Like most affordable super strat guitars, the Omen-6 has a basswood body, carved into the elegant looking shape that Schecter is known for. The neck is crafted from mahogany and joins the body via a bolt-on joint. It is topped by a 14" radius rosewood fingerboard that has 24 jumbo frets. It comes setup for fast and comfortable playability, with its 25.5" scale length, 1.65" nut width and stylized fretboard markers. Giving this guitar its voice are two Schecter Diamond Plus pickups, which are passive pickups but are still hot enough for driving high-gain pedals and amps.

Ease of Use: Multi-effects pedals are inherently more complicated to use than individual stompboxes. As such, we value multi-fx units that are not overly complicated, and require hours with the user manual to understand. Look for pedals with intuitive layouts and interfaces. Technology has come a long way, and most multi-effects pedals have good quality sound. To us, ease of use is a huge selling point (probably the most important behind price), and can differentiate the good from the great.
Chords are an essential component of playing the guitar. When you first start out, it’s best to make a habit of learning one or two new chords a week, and with each chord you learn, practice playing it with the previous chords you’ve learned. Not only does this help you commit the chords to memory, it helps you learn how to move from chord to chord smoothly, so you can start applying your new chord vocabulary to playing actual songs. After all, isn’t that why we all start playing in the first place?
However, even for recording experts who can discern if something was done at Columbia Records Studio A or Olympic or wherever, it’s challenging to define a percentage of influence that the studio provides. “I don’t know that you can measure it in any way. It’s really more an ineffable quality of sound and aesthetics,” Horning Schmidt says. “You can measure frequency response and you can measure decibels but in my research I’ve found that back in the thirties and forties, you had engineers saying ‘you can’t just go by the meters. You have to use your ears.’”
So, many engineers add a second mic at the other end of the room, to capture that room ambiance. Put it on a separate track and you can dial it into your overall sound at will. But remember, if you have an acoustically dead room covered with foam tiles, you do not really have a room sound to capture. Stick the amp into a tiled bathroom, that’s a whole different story.
Hidesato Shiino (1947–). Music-Trade.co.jp. Dai-Show Corporation. — The person who involved with a lot of remarkable Japanese guitars including: Yamaha FG, Fernandes & Greco models, Morris & H.S. Anderson (named after his son; well known as Prince's Hohner Telecaster), early ESP, Vesta Graham & Vestax (now known as DJ brand), Akai Guitar 1997 series, D'Angelico, etc.
In nature, reverb is an extremely fast series of echoes that reduce in volume over time.  Depending on the size of the environment, the number of repeats and the timing at which they occur will change.  Digital reverb pedals are very good at replicating the differing types.  Basically, you can take small tiled bathroom and the Grand Canyon (and everything in between) with you to your gigs.

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Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber
There is something special about musical instruments of a certain age. Guitars built from the mid 1950s until the late 1970s are generally held in high esteem; techniques and materials, particularly pre-1970 were vastly superior to today's 'mass-produced' standards. But is a vintage guitar really much different to a modern day equivalent? People often say wood is wood, but this is simply not the case. Centuries old trees that were regularly harvested for guitar manufacture in the 1950s are now protected, and it is these old trees with close grains and unbeatable tonal qualities that make the very best guitars. With rainforests rapidly diminishing their protection can only be a good thing. But it does mean that good quality older guitars, perhaps with a few modern upgrades can make some of the very best instruments available. What's more, much of the painstaking attention to detail lavished upon fine old jazz guitars by special order/custom departments and aimed at serious guitarists has been replaced by the continual churning out of 'limited editions', aimed at serious collectors. Whether these rare, but ultimately not-so-special guitars will be quite so desirable in 30 years time remains to be seen.
Fuzz Box World – We are dedicated to bringing the highest quality components to builders of guitar and bass effects. We want to be the number one source of parts for electronics diyers. Whether you are a professional boutique pedal builder or a weekend hobbyist, your business is very important to us. We will do everything we can to make sure you are happy with your experience at Fuzz Box World.

In the late 1950s, various guitars in the Kay line were assigned new model numbers; according to the 1959 catalog, the Thin Twin became K5910 and the Electronic Bass became K5965.[18] Both instruments remained in Kay's catalog offerings with only minor cosmetic variations until 1966, when Kay revamped its entire guitar line to only feature budget instruments. Kay also manufactured versions of the Thin Twin guitar under the Silvertone (Sears) and Old Kraftsman (Spiegel) brands.
But where do you start? What do all these different pedals do? In this guide we will give you a brief overview of what each different type of effect does so you can make sure you are looking for the right gear. If you're new to the pedal world, you might wanna check out our selection of best guitar pedals for beginners while you're here. And if you already have some pedals but want advice on which pedalboard to get, click here!
This page is a work in progress and as new information is revealed it will be added to the list. But I can't do this alone, folks. See a guitar not listed? Tell me! Listed below are the major manufacturers, known badges and suspected badges to the best of my knowledge in written and list form to make it easy to find out WHO MADE YOUR GUITAR! In some cases I won't know because the badge you have may be extremely rare and virtually unknown to even seasoned collectors.
@Josh – Changing the order of the effects in your signal chain can drastically change the sound you get from each pedal depending on where it was before and where it is now. Can you please send us an email to support@strymon.net with further details including a video recording of what you are experiencing so we have a better idea of what is happening?
As one user put it, this is one of “Amazon’s hidden little gems”, with a good set of tube electronics that gives out a natural sounding overdrive and some crystal-clear rhythmic sounds. If you want to make your guitar sound clear enough to accompany Porcupine Tree while also having the option for a natural grainy sound that might work well for jazz and blues, then this item is definitely something to look into.  
The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
If you do want to use single pedals then BOSS compact pedals come with a buffer circuit that converts your high impedance input into a low impedance output. For a more detailed discussion on the topic of single pedal buffers check out Steve Henderson’s excellent article here: https://www.rolandcorp.com.au/blog/buffered-effects-true-bypass-and-boss-pedals-by-steve-henderson
In 1970, B.B. crossed over to the white rock audience with “The Thrill Is Gone.” In 1988, he virtually repeated the trick when he recorded “When Love Comes to Town” with U2. Always the humble student of the instrument, B.B. King became jazzier and better than ever as his life and career continued well into the new century. His loss earlier this year was deeply felt by the music community and, particularly, by the guitarist he influenced.

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Since National had applied for a patent on the single cone (US patent #1,808,756), Dopyera had to develop an alternative design. He did this by inverting the cone so that, rather than having the strings rest on the apex of the cone as the National method did, they rested on a cast aluminum spider that had eight legs sitting on the perimeter of the downward-pointing cone (US patent #1,896,484).
Thanks for posting the cool video. I have a Decca like that one. Its pickups migrated to my #1 guitar, which is a relative from roughly the same era (early 1970’s), a Daimaru (sunburst, jazzmaster / jaguar copy surf guitar body, tremolo, etc.). The Decca now has one Daimaru pickup (I wrecked the other one when I was a teenager — thinking I was going to ‘improve’ it), but otherwise, my Decca looks basically identical to yours — except for it has the original tuners, and I angled the bridge in the 1990’s. The neat sound you can get from one of these particular Deccas is the placement of the bridge pickup, it’s a bit further from the bridge than a lot of other electrics, which gives it a neat, plunky sound to it — as is apparent from your video.

Guitars by José Romanillos, Robert Bouchet, Daniel Friederich, Hermann Hauser I, Hermann Hauser II, David José Rubio, Dominique Field, Francisco Simplicio, Enrique Garcia, Pascual Viudes, Enrique Coll, Santos Hernandez, Domingo Esteso, Ignacio Fleta, Marcelo Barbero, Arcangel Fernandez, Hernandez y Aguado, Manuel Reyes, Enrico Bottelli and 1950's Ramirez.


Luthier Steve Lamb has been providing quality instrument repair in Fort Worth for over 30 years. Steve’s years of experience has provided musicians, collectors, students and friends the information and service necessary to keep their instruments in shape. Lamb’s Music is an authorized service/warranty center for most guitar manufacturers including – Fender, Gibson, Martin, Taylor and more.
“The California Series captures the true meaning of a Fender acoustic guitar,” said Billy Martinez, VP Category Manager – Acoustics and Squier Divisions. “From the iconic 6-inline Stratocaster headstock to the original Fender body shapes and organic styling, everything about these guitars is uniquely Fender making them the ultimate tools for artistic creative expression. Whether you’re at the beach or rocking out with a band on stage, we’re offering players of all levels a chance to express their own creative style, standing out in the crowd with the bright colors and energy these guitars give off.
These guitars work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Semi-hollowbodies are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, ’60s pop and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes, though these can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B.B. King's famous Lucille.
With a neck made of mahogany and a body of maple, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is one of the best hollow body electric guitars included on this list. Due to its hollow body design, this guitar has the ability to play well in all genres, ranging from country to hard rock, and is known for its high-quality tone and ability to maintain tune through long periods of playing. This is possible in part due to the pickups at the neck and bridge, reducing excess humming for clarity in tone and pitch.  The knobs at the base of the body have a super-grip design, making it easy to change the volume and tone between the neck and the bridge and utilize the three pickup selector. A pearl block inlay is included on the rosewood fretboard, making this 20 fret electric guitar a strong option to conclude this list.
The Japanese copy juggernaut got off to a fast start, and the second major Univox guitar was the Lucy, a lucite copy of the Ampeg Dan Armstrong, again produced by Arai, introduced in 1970. This guitar had a surprisingly thin bolt-on neck (especially compared to the Ampeg original) and a slightly smaller body. The fingerboard was rosewood with 24 frets and dot inlays. This had a fake rosewood masonite pickguard with volume, tone and three-way select. Like the Ampeg, the Lucy had a Danelectro-style bridge/tailpiece with little rosewood saddle. Unlike the Ampeg – which had Armstrong’s groovy slide-in epoxy-potted pickups – this version had a pair of the chrome/black insert pickups jammed together at the bridge. Other Japanese manufacturers also made copies of the Ampeg lucite guitar, notably carrying the Electra (St. Louis Music) and Ibanez (Elger/Hoshino) brand names, with versions of the slide-in pickups. In ’71, the Univox Lucy (UHS-1) was $275 including case. Just how long the Lucy remained available is unknown, but it probably did not outlive the original and was gone by ’73 or ’74.
To cut to the chase, we can say that a changing magnetic field generates or "induces" electricity. It's also true that a changing electric field generates magnetism. If you feed electricity through a coil of wire, you generate a magnetic field around it. That's how you can make a magnet controlled by electricity—better known as an electromagnet. Electricity and magnetism are really two different aspects of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism.
Mentioned below are some of the tabs for guitar, that a beginner could practice. Take the guitar and let us first learn the 4 x 4 rhythm. Strum the guitar with a plectrum in downward and upward direction in the form of - four beats in each measure and the quarter note gets one beat. That is, strum the guitar strings (chord) 'Up-Down' 4 times a then just end it coming up after the 4th downward strum. Yes! You got it right. 'Up-Down' is 1 note (that needs to be played 4 times) and 'Up' is the half note (that needs to be played once). Practice this rhythm till you get your hands on it and then practice it, changing the guitar chords.

I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring
It is a great budget guitar but not very much useful if you want to play this at an advanced level. Actually, this is an ideal and the most popular electric guitar for intermediate players; also it's suitable for the beginners. So make sure you upgrade your guitar once you master the basics of using this guitar. Find out the latest price of this guitar using the button below which takes you to the Amazon product page of this model and tells you all the information about it.

Until the 1950s, the acoustic, nylon-stringed classical guitar was the only type of guitar favored by classical, or art music composers. In the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Luciano Berio's Nones (1954) Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gruppen (1955–57); Donald Erb's String Trio (1966), Morton Feldman's The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb's Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze's Versuch über Schweine (1968); Francis Thorne's Sonar Plexus (1968) and Liebesrock (1968–69), Michael Tippett's The Knot Garden (1965–70); Leonard Bernstein's MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen's De Staat (1972–76); Helmut Lachenmann's Fassade, für grosses Orchester (1973, rev. 1987), Valery Gavrilin Anyuta (1982), Steve Reich's Electric Counterpoint (1987), Arvo Pärt's Miserere (1989/92), György Kurtág's Grabstein für Stephan (1989), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Alfred Schnittke also used electric guitar in several works, like the "Requiem", "Concerto Grosso N°2" and "Symphony N°1".
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!

The EB-18 was a bass version with a 33.825″ scale. According to Longworth, early versions had a single DiMarzio “One” pickup and Grover Titan tuners, while later basses had a DiMarzio “G” pickup and Schaller pickups. Expect to find various combinations of those. Longworth also mentions the possibility that some might have Mighty Mite pickups, but this is uncertain. EB-18 production began in ’79 and about 5,226 (about 1,300 a year) were made until the guitar ended in early 1982.
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Of course, any item is only worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller. iGuide?is "just a guide." Please be aware that PRICES VARY WIDELY from region to region. Current estimated values are the result of much research. And we invite anyone to help add and update data. Read the "What's A Wiki" section below for more info on how to help.
The prime advantage of Epiphone is that you get a guitar built to the same specs as the Gibson Les Paul, at a greatly discounted price. With that being said, an Epiphone is not equal to a Gibson simply because it shares the same design. The craftsmanship is where the two brands differ the most, as USA made Gibson’s utilize higher quality materials than the Epiphone line. Epiphone uses a cheaper mahogany in the construction of its guitars, while the electronic components are lower quality as well.
Paint chips and cracked binding: Common on older instruments. Over time these openings will collect sweat, polish, and dirt, causing discoloration, lifting of the edges, and further deterioration. It is best to clean these spots w/ naptha (lighter fluid)or alchohol, remove any loose edges around the chips before cleaning (they will be holding polish and grime preventing the glue from working), then seal the chips and cracks with thin superglue. Super glue can be heated in the microwave for a few seconds (plastic bottles) to make it flow better. Drop Filling is a technique for filling chips with paint. This is covered at the ReRanch site.
There’s 12 footswitches for you to control all your sounds and effects as well as a smooth expression pedal that can control swells, wah and even make parameter changes. A looper with 20 mins of record time is ideal for songwriters, buskers and those who need to be able to write music anywhere. It especially shines when coupled with the HeadRush FRFR-112 2000 Watt Powered Speaker.
Now that you have made it through, if you chose to build a guitar, you are probably going to want to make more. Hopefully some of the info as well as links I have provided has helped to get you started in the right direction. Guitar building is fun and chalenging at the same time, and if your like me you will always want to improve your skills and find something else to try out on your next project. I have added some pictures of some of the guitars that I have made down at the bottom so you can see my progression. So here's to having fun and building a piece of art that you don't just have to look at. Though they do look good hung on a wall!
Nickelback singer/guitarist Chad Kroeger collaborated with Gibson to create a signature Les Paul. The guitar, called the Blackwater Les Paul, features a mahogany body and neck, a Trans Black finish on a AAA flamed maple top, Gibson 490R/498T pickups, a GraphTech Ghost piezo bridge, Grover kidney tuners, acrylic trapezoid inlays, and painted white stars corresponding with the fingerboard inlays.[46]
Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
I've had my Dorado, model #5986, serial #41 since 1972 and have used it for classical guitar study off and on since getting it as a gift. For what it is, the sound quality and playability are quite good. I'm donating it to a church rummage sale tomorrow (6/3/07) and will remember it fondly. I have an Alvarez Regency, similar to the Dorado, which lacks the sound character.
The type of potentiometer you should use will depend on the type of circuit you are designing for. Typically, for audio circuits the audio taper potentiometer is used. This is because the audio taper potentiometer functions on a logarithmic scale, which is the scale in which the human ear percieves sound. Even though the taper chart appears to have a sudden increase in volume as the rotation increases, in fact the perception of the sound increase will occur on a gradual scale. The linear scale will actually (counterintuitively) have a more significant sudden volume swell effect because of how the human ear perceives the scale. However, linear potentiometers are often used for other functions in audio circuits which do not directly affect audio output. In the end, both types of potentiometers will give you the same range of output (from 0 to full), but the rate at which that range changes varies between the two.

Most bass speaker cabinets employ a vented bass-reflex design, which uses a port or vent cut into the cabinet and a length of carefully measured tubing or pipe to increase the low-frequency response and improve the speaker system's efficiency. To give an example, if one compares two bass cabinets, each with the same type and power of power amplifier, one cabinet being a sealed box and the other being a vented or ported cabinet, most listeners will perceive that the ported cabinet produces more bass tone and deeper bass tone. Less commonly, some bass speaker cabinets use one or more passive radiator speakers, a voice coil-less "drone cone" which is used in addition to a regular woofer to improve the low frequency response of a cabinet. Passive radiator speakers help to reduce the risk of overextension. Acoustic suspension designs with sealed cabinets are relatively uncommon because they are less efficient. Some cabinets use a transmission-line design similar to bass-reflex, and in rare cases, some large cabinets use horn-loading of the woofers (e.g., the Acoustic 361 18" speaker cabinet from the late 1960s).
Gut strings were the original strings for the classical stylist.  They were literally made from the guts of farm animals, mostly sheep.  The intestines and the process used to make these strings became more expensive than nylon and thus have fallen out of favor.  Even though you may hear the term “cat gut” strings, this style of string was never made from the innards of our cute, cuddly, feline friends… just the beasts we like tend to use as a food source.
Everyone from Jazz guitarists to lovers of Queens of the Stone Age style heavy rock have fallen in love with the Artcore series since it was first introduced in 2002. Fusing expert workmanship with affordability, the Ibanez 2017 Artcore AS53 Semi-Acoustic Guitar, Transparent Black Flat is one of the best cheap electric guitars you’ll find on the market today. It’s budget friendly price tag makes it a fantastic choice for beginners whilst the high-quality pickups and superb tonewoods are the reason why so many pro level players will choose it for the stage and studio.
The 2nd basic beginner guitar chord you should learn is C, or C major. You don’t have to say “major” in the name of the chord. If you just say C chord it’s assumed that it’s a major chord. You only want to strum the top 5 strings (that means the highest sounding 5 strings, not their relationship to the floor) The X in the guitar chord chart means not to play that string, or to mute it.
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Hopefully, that explains the basic components and tools. As mentioned guitar electronics can be a little daunting and my best advice if new to guitar electronics is to avoid seeking out information on guitar related forums as you may leave your head spinning, feeling more daunted than you did in the first place. We will cover the basics here and in most cases that will be more than enough to help you put together a great guitar.
While styles and models may vary, electric guitars operate on the same general principles. The pickup mounted on the electric guitar’s body functions as a magnetic field. When a metal string is plucked and vibrates, it generates a current. That current is transmitted by the pickup through a preamp circuit with tone controls to the guitar cable, and in turn to the amplifier. The amplifier boosts the signal and modifies it with various tone controls and effects, depending on the amplifier's design and capabilities. The signal is then output to a speaker, which converts it to sound waves. The type of pickup(s), tone controls, strings, playing techniques, and other factors built into the guitar's design all influence the signal that is sent to the amplifier. In short, each component of the guitar affects how the guitar sounds.
If you decide to choose a guitar, amplifier and accessories separately, consider spending more on the guitar than the amplifier. A better guitar will often suit a player’s needs longer, and a less expensive amp will be fine for early practicing sessions. If the player decides to upgrade down the road, often they may only need to upgrade the amplifier and not their entire setup.
The best acoustic electric guitars solve the inconveniences of playing a traditional acoustic in a very preferable way. No longer do we need to play a guitar size and shape we don't enjoy in order to project more volume. We don't have to strum and pick harder. We don't need the nuisance of setting up and staying positioned behind a mic to be heard through the loud speakers. Today we look at how this is achieved and share our top recommendations for every budget...
If you can afford to go to a store and drop $3000 on the latest, greatest Les Paul Gibson or vintage Fender Stratocaster, this is a very different question. But let’s assume your budget isn’t quite that big. Many affordable guitars are very similar, but come in a variety of packages that include lots of extras and even an amplifier. In case you are looking to buy the amp separately, here is an amazing list of 10 Best and Affordable Guitar Amps for Beginners: 2016 and while you are it, check out: Top 5 Guitar Plug-Ins You Need to Know: AmpliTube, Guitar Rig & Others.
The beauty of an affordable small amp is that it can be high quality without the sacrifice of anything. I mean yeah some people say that the low tones disappear a little when the amplifier gets small, but don’t listen to them too much. Unless your low tones are being drowned out by some loud person screaming into the microphone so hard that the system starts screeching, even the smallest of amps can produce a respectable low tone. The small amplifiers are there to be portable and easy to have, so that you never have to deal with a back hurting (unless your instrument is heavy) or your arms being tired from anything other than playing the guitar too much. Which is why the Blackstar Fly 3 Battery Powered Guitar Amplifier is a great piece of equipment to have in your artillery. Portable, small and powerful in sound, what else could anyone ever want?
There are two types of acoustic guitar namely the steel-string acoustic guitar and the classical guitar. Steel-string acoustic guitars produce a metallic sound that is a distinctive component of a wide range of popular genres. Steel-string acoustic guitars are sometimes referred to as flat tops. The word top refers to the face or front of the guitar which is called the table. Classical guitars have a wider neck than steel-string guitars and are strung with nylon strings. They are primarily associated with the playing of the solo classical guitar repertoire. Classical guitars are sometimes referred to as Spanish guitars in recognition of their country of origin.
As auto wahs, envelope followers, and other dynamically controlled filter effects respond to your attack, you don’t want to limit dynamics with compressors and/or distortion pedals that reduce dynamic range. Most players also put wah pedals first in the signal chain—mostly to come before distortion effects—however Tom Morello is a notable exception.
The single keys at the beginning of the keyboard (C2-C3 white notes only) contain a variety of percussion instruments (2 wood blocks, an Irish bongo, a mini rain stick, a mini swinging drum, a tambourine, a mini hollow wood log and a mini wooden scraper). Then the black keys further up are groups of instruments that cut each other off. For instance the first group of black notes (F#3,G#3,A#3) are all samples from the big conga but with different hit types. The next 2 black notes are a dear skin bongo. The next 3 black notes are the little conga. The next 2 black notes are a little metal bongo. The next 3 black notes are the medium conga and the next 2 black notes are a home made plastic shaker. This makes it easy to know the grouped instruments. It is also easy to whack a way at the congas (like real congas) as they are all the black keys in groups of 3 and each conga cuts its own keys off if another is played. I mainly recorded this for the 3 congas and then added the other bits as I had them laying around (some are even from my childrens musical instruments bag, i.e. wood blocks from the early learning centre and a home made plastic shaker). The congas are boomy when played hard but with a lot more delicate hand sound when played softly. It is possible to get a variety of sounds and styles with these conga samples.
And you should still be able to take it to a certified Martin repair person. There may be some issue given how long you have had the instrument, however, if there is no evidence of the problem existing when the guitar was new. But it is worth checking out. Martin has changed policy in recent years regarding what voids the warranty and what does not. But if things are as you say, they should have taken care of the issue a long time ago. And they may still be willing to under your warranty. If not, you may be able to find someone who really knows what they are doing to fix the issue – which may require a neck reset, but would be worth it in my opinion. Good luck!
The way you fix this is by finding a book that makes you reconsider an aspect of your playing, regardless of what that is. If you’re into metal go ahead and pick up a book on Gypsy jazz. If you’re a dedicated Bluegrass flatpicker try your hand at learning some jazz. If you learn one thing from a different genre that you can routinely apply to your genre of choice you can break yourself out of just about any rut imaginable.
So, we’re just over £100 here with the Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo, but we had to include the new version of the world's best-selling amplifier series. At just over £100 you get 18 amp models, 37 effects, and 24 onboard factory and user presets – which is a lot of features for such a small price tag, definitely making it one of the best cheap amps money can buy. With 20 watts of power at your disposal pumping out through an 8" Fender Special Design speaker, it won’t blow the windows out, but it will certainly stand up on its own on stage and when used in a rehearsal or practice situation.
Since there is little difference outside of the individual guitars featured in this series, I will nitpick a bit and say that RealLPC has the worst GUI of the four.  Where there was never any difficult-to-read text on RealStrat, there is some here, and the weird navy green parameter boxes along with a black Les Paul with gold trim doesn’t sit well for me.  

Made of mahogany, the Destroyer's iconic body style has been attracting artists for years. It features a mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offers ultra-smooth playablity. Electronics include DiMarzio Air Norton and The Tone Zone pickups for a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters.


Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.
Bassists who want a more powerful low end may use a subwoofer cabinet. Subwoofers are specialized for very low frequency reproduction, with typical maximum useful high frequencies of about 150 or 200 Hz, so a subwoofer cabinet must be paired with a full range speaker cabinet to obtain the full tonal range of an electric bass or upright bass. In addition, subwoofers intended for PA system use have much higher power handling requirements than do subwoofer designs for high fidelity home use. Bass guitar players who use subwoofer cabinets include performers who play with extended range basses with include notes between B0 (about 31 Hz); and C#0 (17 Hz) and bassists whose style requires a very powerful sub-bass response is an important part of the sound (e.g., funk, Latin, gospel, R & B, etc.).

The fact that there are a lot of us belies a truth about learning guitar: It’s kind of frustrating. Unless you’re moving to guitar from some other kind of musical training, there’s a lot to adjust to right out of the gate. While a piano can sound reasonably good if you simply press a key, playing that same note on a guitar requires you to hold both hands the right way, situate the guitar properly, and make sense out of holding a pick.
Though because of this flexibility, it can be hard to figure which of the many types of electric guitar is going to be a good fit for your needs. Thankfully, if you’ve arrived at this article you’re going to get all of the information that you need to make an informed decision on which body styles are going to be worth considering for your genre of choice.
Here at Dave’s Guitar Shop we are proud to have a staff of world class Guitar and Amp technicians. Be it simple guitar setups, restrings, grafting on broken headstocks or restoring timeless classics our techs work at the highest quality. With a shared experience of over 50 years and access to one of the largest collections of historic guitars for reference you can rest assured that your repair or restoration will be completed accurately and with great care and precision.
2. Orange Micro Dark w/1x8 Cabinet ($288): Who doesn’t love tiny yet mighty lunchbox amps and the speakers they rest upon? The Micro Dark head uses a tube front end to push 20-watts of power and coupled with a 1x8” speaker, you’ll be able to get awesome tube tone for a fraction of the price and size of a bigger rig. This little duo is well-equipped to handle clean and overdriven tones whether you are cracking the volume on the speaker or playing through your headphones.
Much of this is probably thanks to an outdated a pedal with a two-function switch that is labeled “Chorus” and “Vibrato.” These words will trigger a sigh of awe and wonder from many a guitarist because, of course, they are the labels on the mode switch of the famous Univox Uni-Vibe. This pedal is a good place to start because it was one of the first of the transistorized effects of this type to become widely available, and it occupies a patch of ground all its own in the world of things that go “swoosh”. That said, and despite the name and switch labeling, the Uni-Vibe is more akin to a four-stage phaser than what we today consider to be a chorus pedal, even if that’s the label on its most-loved setting. The deception is forgivable when you remember that the Uni-Vibe’s intention was to reproduce the chorus-type sound—or “chorale” sound, as it was often labeled—produced by a Leslie rotating speaker cabinet used with a Hammond organ. Also, the unit existed before there was much categorization of such things: it was a guitar effects footpedal, it had its own sound… and that was all anyone needed to know. The Uni-Vibe—and the better clones that have followed it down the years—is based around a discrete transistorized circuit with four sets of light bulbs and light cells and a low frequency oscillator (LFO) which does the shifting work to move the peaks and notches. Unlike the drawing-board phaser discussed above, however, the frequencies of each stage of the Uni-Vibe are set differently, so it could be argued that there is indeed more of a chorusing of the sound.
So you want to learn how to play guitar but don’t know where to start? No worries. This how to play guitar for beginners guide will cover all the basic requirements to get you started with playing guitar. The guide is split into 2 sections: The Basics – where you’ll learn about the various parts of the guitar, how to hold the guitar and how to tune your guitar. Playing – where you’ll learn popular chords, strumming techniques, and how to read guitar tabs. This guitar for beginners guide is meant for guitarists just starting out, however there are also tips and
While there's nothing necessarily wrong with plonking your mic right at the centre of the speaker cone if it gets what you're after, a lot of producers take the time to experiment with different positionings off axis, where the sound is typically warmer. Mike Hedges: "Depending on where you have [the mic] — outer speaker or inner speaker — you get the difference in tone from the edge of the speaker and the centre of the cone." In fact, Mike Clink also tries small changes in position even when working with basically on-axis sounds. "I'll point [the SM57] exactly dead on, though I might move it an inch or two to get the right sound."
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Large-diaphragm condenser microphones set to cardioid or omni mode work better for ambient purposes at distances of 2-3' or farther, introducing more room sound and coloration. Ribbon microphones, which are also (usually) dynamic, have become a popular alternative for guitar-cabinet recording in either close or distant miking situations. They combine good, detailed sonic reproduction with the capacity to withstand intense levels of sound pressure (a characteristic of their dynamic brethren, as well).

If you're looking for a one-stop music shop with an amazing selection of guitars, drums, keyboards, recording, live sound, DJ equipment and more, Guitar Center Twin Cities is it. Whether you're a beginner or a gigging pro, our team members have the expertise and musical talent to get on your level and help you make great choices. Located adjacent to the Rosedale Shopping Center by the Best Buy in Roseville.First and foremost at Guitar Center Kansas City, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales and repairs to lessons and rentals, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Midwest music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
The first question you should ask yourself is: What type of music genre do I like that uses guitars? If you’re into metal, hard rock, or even alternative rock, selecting either one of those options is going to have an impact on the type of electric guitar you’ll buy in addition to the amp. Remember that one type of electric guitar and amp is going to work better or worse than another depending on the type of sound you want.
I like the difference in character of some of the amp distortions, then you get the tome knobs of the amp, different speaker emulations with tone controls and the graphic eq. So there is a lot you can do to get the right tone. My complaint on that is that the "mixer" mode cuts the highs (since there is no amp to do so) cuts thee highs too much. If you go flat with the graphic EQ the amp emulations are always a little too dark.
Yamaha is the most revered and leading manufacturer of full-line musical instruments. With its wide range of guitars, the company has become a best seller and is easily one of the best guitar brands in India. The C Series are the popular and affordable nylon string guitars by Yamaha suitable for beginners and young learners. The electric guitars of Yamaha available in India are of the Pacifica and RGX series. The Pacifica series offers the most value for money combining affordability with performance.
This is another best budget electric guitar from Epiphone. It is also a great choice for a beginner and it is quite lightweight to carry. For an inexpensive guitar, this one has a pretty good sound and tone. Despite being low priced, the manufacturer has not compromised in its quality. The cherry red color is really attractive and appealing and can help you to boost up your smart personality as a guitarist. This is closer in look to the iconic rock guitars.

Had a seven string Ibanez with loose/worn frets worked on. Steve knew right away that the frets had to be tacked and it could use a fret re-crowning and gave me a quote for 125$. I thought it was a bit high but trusted him because of the good reviews. Came back a couple weeks later and he had re-crowned the frets, tacked all the loose frets, tightened down some more loose hardware and did a set-up for only 100$. I am overall quite satisfied with the quality of the work and the pricing. I will be going back to have my acoustic worked on.
I have a Hohner DC. It is either a MIC or MIK. It does not have body, or neck bindings, but in every other respect is very nice. It was one of the first guitars I got when I started paly about 5 years ago. As a matter of fact, I had not played it for over a year - I recently got it out of the case, re-strung it and played it regularly for a couple weeks. I have been going over my colection looking for things I could sell off, but I decided to keep this one.
I'm no musician, know very little about guitars, but I think I stumbled on to a great deal. The predicament we faced last Christmas was that my two nieces, ages just 7 and 5, both fell in love with a toy "music" setup consisting of a plastic "guitar" and a fake microphone. I won't say the famous girl-toy-brand name it was marketed under but it was pretty much a collection of junk. The "guitar" had a few buttons on it to make noise... it would have been broken and tossed away inside of a week. And here in Costa Rica - a price of 34,000 colones or roughly $70!

Am I missing something? Few MIDI artists can document the finest details of legato expressed by some human performers, but such nuance is within the scope of current notational languages. If no human can or will produce such detailed documentation of existing performances, computational machines can, if not now, soon -- unless the inexorable march toward AI that can pass the Turing test is more exorable that it might appear.
There are two basic tremolo circuits found in classic amps; power tube tremolo and photocell tremolo. They produce basically the same effect, a fluctuation in volume. For the best definitions I have come across I’ll borrow from the Strymon website: “Power Tube Tremolo utilized the LFO signal to directly influence the power tube bias of the amplifier’s push-pull output stage. The power tubes are biased into lower and higher idle currents, creating the fluctuating gain that produces the tremolo effect. The effects of crossover distortion at low tremolo volumes, increased power tube harmonic distortion at maximum tremolo volumes, as well as the influence of power-supply sag, all add up to the boggy and dirty nature of this tremolo circuit.”
Keyboard players who use subwoofers for on-stage monitoring include electric organ players who use bass pedal keyboards (which go down to a low "C" which is about 33 Hz) and synth bass players who play rumbling sub-bass parts that go as low as 18 Hz. Of all of the keyboard instruments that are amplified onstage, synthesizers produce some of the lowest pitches because, unlike a traditional electric piano or electric organ which have as their lowest notes a low "A" and a low "C", respectively, a synth does not have a fixed lowest octave. A synth player can add lower octaves to a patch by pressing an "octave down" button, which can produce pitches that are at the limits of human hearing.
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.

Even cheaper (abour $40) is the Behringer Guitar Link (review: Behringer Guitar Link UCG102 USB Interface Review). One nice thing is the long cord.. you can sit a ways away from your PC without needing an extender, and like the line 6, it’s also got a headphone output. They offer some guitar effects software as well, via download, and a basic DAW program. Worth checking out, as this does check every basic box for forty bucks. I have not used this, but I have used other Behringer audio interfaces. Cheap, basic, but they do include ASIO drivers (read ahead).


I bought a Palmer acoustic-electric about 10 years ago, for 185.00, used, it's white, with black trim, and still plays very well. I also can't find out where it's made, the neck is still straight, and the tone is good. It says hand crafted inside, and model p-38-12 and a letter I don't recognise, or is a misprint. the pick-ups are near the last frets, small screws, almost hidden. The neck is kinda wide, but you get used to it. Thats all for now, I'll bet all their guitars are pretty good.
Potentiometers are used in all types of electronic products so it is a good idea to look for potentiometers specifically designed to be used in electric guitars. If you do a lot of volume swells, you will want to make sure the rotational torque of the shaft feels good to you and most pots designed specifically for guitar will have taken this into account. When you start looking for guitar specific pots, you will also find specialty pots like push-pull pots, no-load pots and blend pots which are all great for getting creative and customizing your guitar once you understand how basic electric guitar circuits work.
The war over an electric guitar's tonewood, like the Princess Bride sword fight, has ranged all over leaving a wake of havoc whenever it's brought into a conversation. It's brought a few too many guitarists to the brink of insanity certainly. Regardless, everyone has an opinion about it and when the Internet comes into play, the world weighs in too.

The $300-$500 price range of acoustic guitars is perfect for all levels of players. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate or advanced player, this price point gets you a good guitar that will sound great while not breaking the bank. While you won’t find any American made acoustics under $500, you will find some by popular American brands offering cheaper versions of their high end guitars that are made in Mexico or China.


Clock maker Matthias Hohner began crafting harmonicas in 1857, assisted by his wife and a single employee. 650 were made in the first year.[1] Hohner harmonicas quickly became popular, and in his lifetime Matthias built the largest harmonica factory in the world.[2] During the American Civil War, Matthias Hohner distributed harmonicas to family members in the United States who in turn gave them to the soldiers.[3]

Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)


Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.
Fuzz boxes and other heavy distortions can produce unwanted dissonances when playing chords. To get around this, guitar players (and keyboard players) using these effects may restrict their playing to single notes and simple "power chords" (root, fifth, and octave). Indeed, with the most extreme fuzz pedals, players may choose to play mostly single notes, because the fuzz can make even single notes sound very thick and heavy. Heavy distortion also tends to limit the player's control of dynamics (loudness and softness) - similar to the limitations imposed on a Hammond organ player (Hammond organ does not produce louder or softer sounds depending on how hard or soft the performer plays the keys; however, the performer can still control the volume with drawbars and the expression pedal). Heavy metal music has evolved around these restrictions, using complex rhythms and timing for expression and excitement. Lighter distortions and overdrives can be used with triadic chords and seventh chords; as well, lighter overdrive allows more control of dynamics.[citation needed]
Hugh Padgham adopted a similar tactic for recording Andy Summers' Roland JC120 when working with the Police: "The chorus [was] always switched on in order to produce the slightly out-of-tune guitar sound that was all the rage during the early '80s. The amp's two 12-inch speakers would each be close-miked with a Sennheiser MD421, panned left and right — one speaker would produce a straight signal while the other would be chorused, and these would sometimes be double-tracked the other way around in order to produce an especially wide stereo picture."
All electric guitar strings are made using steel, nickel, or other magnetically conductive metal alloys since they’re essential for transmitting string vibrations to the magnetic pickups. The type of plating or coating applied to the steel alloy has a significant impact on the strings’ sound. Here are some general tonal characteristics of the most common types of strings:
Gibbons has also twisted more than a few towering tall tales in his time, but his life is so surreal that it’s hard to tell where the truth ends and the trip takes over. His colorful manner of speech, known as “Gibbonics,” has made him one of Guitar World’s favorite interview subjects, especially since his poetic ponderings are loaded with insight, wisdom and a unique sense of humor.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
A while back I bought a GuitarPort, a product from Line6 that was one of the earliest guitar-to-PC interfaces. It cost me $99. It connects through USB and I could plug the guitar into it. I could play amp models and effects through my PC and the sound would come out of the computer speakers. (Headphones are of course an option through the PC speakers)
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
Some of the earliest electric guitars, amps-in-cases, pickups under the bridge, fiberglass guitars, built-in electronic vibratos. Sound curious enough for you? The subject of Supro guitars and amplifiers represents a profitable avenue for exploration by collectors and enthusiasts interested in the many curious and significant byways off the guitar superhighway, which can be enjoyed without having an oil sheik’s bankroll. While National resonator guitars have received superb attention by Bob Brozman, little has been written about this mysterious corner of the Valco universe. Well, with a little help from our friends (in particular, catalogs and invaluable information supplied by Mike Newton, Jim Dulfer, and Michael Lee Allen), let’s set the record straight.
There is competition for Guitar Tricks and this is a good thing, as this makes sure that they have to keep improving. Prior to starting with Guitar Tricks I bought some lessons from True Fire. While the lessons were good and very well presented they needed to be downloaded onto a PC and could only be played in a special player program. TrueFire also offer an online service that includes group and one-on-one lessons.  Another alternative worth checking out is JamPlay. JamPlay has been continually gaining ground on Guitar Tricks and is worth while checking out. They do not have a free trial period, but you can get started with a very low amount for the first month and they also have some free lessons. Another option is a fairly new program called Infinite Guitar. They seem to be doing a rather good job too and also offer some free lessons.
This category of effects pedals does what the name implies.  It tweaks the volume of your guitar signal in some fashion.  These typically come in this spot in the pedal chain (after everything but the time-based effects) so that any change to your volume is already receiving the effects of all the pedals before it.  You’ll be altering your entire signal minus delays and reverbs.
Until his death in August 2009, Les Paul himself played his personal Les Paul Guitar onstage, weekly, in New York City. Paul preferred his 1971 Gibson “Recording” model guitar, with different electronics and a one-piece mahogany body, and which, as an inveterate tinkerer and bona fide inventor, he had modified heavily to his liking over the years. A Bigsby-style vibrato was of late the most visible change although his guitars were formerly fitted with his “Les Paulverizer” effects.
Nickelback singer/guitarist Chad Kroeger collaborated with Gibson to create a signature Les Paul. The guitar, called the Blackwater Les Paul, features a mahogany body and neck, a Trans Black finish on a AAA flamed maple top, Gibson 490R/498T pickups, a GraphTech Ghost piezo bridge, Grover kidney tuners, acrylic trapezoid inlays, and painted white stars corresponding with the fingerboard inlays.[46]
The USA-made variants of Jackson guitars are somewhat pricey, yet they are also custom-made. However, you can also find the same options bearing affordable price tags too. These inexpensive models come with slightly downgraded specs as they aim at the beginners and intermediate level guitarists. It means Jackson guitars provide an excellent opportunity to the metal players to choose any of the guitars that fit in their budget and meet their requirements.
When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.
The AEG10II combines laminated spruce top with mahogany back and sides, and packs both in a thin profile body. Thin bodied guitars, while more resistant to feedback than their larger counterparts, don’t have the breadth of tone or the volume of a full sized acoustic guitar. The cool thing about this guitar is that, it’s one of the cheapest ways for beginning musicians to get a solid gigging instrument.
This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.

Lots of people tend to research for months about which is the best electric guitar when what they really need is to get started playing and practicing. Becoming an elite player requires time behind a solid axe picking and strumming. What a beginner needs is an electric that is generally great so they can learn over time what specific nuances they care about, and that's what we discuss and share today...
Hi everyone! I have a quick question regarding string action. I have just gotten my 2003 Standard set up a few months ago, but I am having trouble with how low the action is; strings slip off of my fingers during bending now. If I just turn the screws on the Tune-O-Matic bridge to heighten the action a little bit, without touching or adjusting the truss rod, individual saddles, or tailpiece, will that screw up my intonation?
I inherited a guitar and am looking for any information I can about it. It is a Kent model 533 Videocaster. I have no idea when they were made or what this one might be worth. It is a solid body, but I know next to nothing about guitars so I am not sure what other info might be needed. It needs to be tuned/serviced and possibly needs a little restoration, but otherwise it works and is not in horrible shape. Any info would be appreciated.
And its not just all about the looks, because this guitar comes with impressive specs for its price point. It has a solid spruce top, mahogany back & sides, rosewood fretboard and built-in electronics, all of which meet Epiphone's quality standards. It would have been nicer if an all-solid body version was available, but I guess it would be a problem for the premium Gibson version. Playability is also one of this acoustics strong points, following traditional specs that include 25.5" scale length and 1.68" nut width. If you're looking for an affordable workhorse guitar that will give you "satisfaction", then check out the Hummingbird Pro.

Around the same time as the 700-800 series of guitars there was also a line of acoustics. The steel-stringed "Folk Guitars" featured necks and headstocks very similar, if not the same as, the electric models. The nylon-stringed "Classical Guitars" featured slotted headstocks with the curly logo squeezed into the middle. The acoustics seem to be pretty well-made and often fetch pretty good prices on Ebay. One reader of this site even found a Kent banjo made in Germany. The lettering of the name is the same as on the 700-800 series instruments without the curly thingie.
The guitar features hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top supported by Martin's incredibly reliable mahogany HPL (high pressure laminate) back and sides, essentially similar to the configuration found on many of Martin's mid-priced acoustics. If you're looking for an affordable starting instrument that has big-brand backing, or you are looking to get into the parlor-style guitar trend, check out the LX1E Little Martin.
The simplest way to explain modulation effects is that they make a copy of the original signal, modify the copy in some way, and then mix the original and the copy back together. The result is sort of like a pitch-shift taken to the next level, where instead of simply adding new notes or varying the fundamental, they can create entirely new sounds altogether. Here are the usual suspects of modulation effects:
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Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).

i think i have the exact same guitar as you do daniel. it's the same red into black faded with one pickup and no serial number tho. i'm looking everywhere for the exact model info etc. but i can't seem to find it either. i got it free froma guy i know and i had to replace the tuning heads, the strings and some of the ground wiring but now it's doing great. i love it. it has a really good sound for being so old!


Regarding truss rods, all vintage Martin instruments post-1934 have *non-adustable* truss rods (T rod). This means the neck better be straight, otherwise an expensive repair will be in order. To check neck straightness on a guitar, first tune the guitar to pitch. Then hold the low-E string down at the 1st and 14th frets. Note the distance between the bottom of the low-E string, and the 7th fret. You should be able to put a medium guitar pick in this space. Any more, and the neck is "bowed". Any less, and the neck is "back bowed". Repeat this with the high-E string (the same results should be seen; if not, the neck has a "twist" to it).
One look at its distinct bowl-back body, and you already know that the Ovation Applause Elite AE44II is not your average wooden guitar. This distinct back is crafted from Lyrachord, the same material which is said to be used in helicopter blades and more. This results in a lightweight instrument that's not as fragile as wood. Still it does come with a solid spruce top and other wooden components, so it doesn't sound or look too out of the ordinary. Finally, the guitar comes equipped with an undersaddle piezo and preamp system, which features a 3-band EQ and built-in tuner.

: But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.

Since Jackson is currently owned by Fender, they have the facilities, resources and more importantly, the legal right to use Strat bodies in their designs. The result are legitimate super strats from the brand that helped jumpstart the entire hot-rodded guitar market. The Adrian Smith SDX is a great example, co-designed by renowned Iron Maiden guitarist to be a road and gig-worthy metal guitar while retaining an accessible price point.
ASIO drivers do a bunch of things. For one, your DAW talks directly to an ASIO driver, no going through the Windows Mixer and actually bypassing a bunch of other Windows stuff you can’t see. The ASIO driver itself is very efficient. And native ASIO drivers allow you to adjust the buffering on that interface. If you’re working a DAW with 64 tracks of audio going to and from hard drive, you may need to add some “buffer’ memory to keep everything working, because computers are way better at doing a fewer big things than lots of little things. But if it’s just your guitar playing live, you can dial down to minimum buffering to make the delay through the PC as small as possible.
Working with Dimebag Darrell Abbot, Rex Brown, Mike Scaccia, Scott Shelby and others, this guitar master has had to work overtime to keep up with these guitarslingers' abuse. These guys make their guitars scream on stage, and it's King's job to make them sing again. "Everbody knows -- other than Scott -- that they're at my mercy when it comes to working on their guitar," he says. "That's why I'm not out on the circuit. I'm pretty picky about which guitar players I work with." (Although Darrel and Mike are no longer with us - may they ignite heaven with their notes - Scott is still tearing it up with Warbeast.) Rabid Flesh Eater, Warbeast, Rigor Mortis, Pantera, this guy has worked on some brutal guitars. "If you're going to buy a Cadillac, put the right parts on it" is one of his mottoes.
Read Full Review The brand ESP that we all know today started its roots as a shop in Tokyo Japan selling custom replacement parts for guitars that quickly gained a good reputation for its high quality. Soon came after the brand manufactured fully assembled guitars that burst in the trash metal seen of the 80’s signing in big name bands to carry their guitars and basses.
The structure of the lessons are good, it varies between guitar technical stuff and theory as you progress, meaning that you won't get bored of any single topic, and you'll have a chance to try out the theoretical bits one step at a time. It's a shame they never made newer editions of this book with more graphics and supplemental audio-video tools.
Hello. This is a great article. Does strymon have a user fourm group anywhere. I own the g system, i love it for its effects, but it cant do everything i want. I found strymon, and instantly bought a timeline. I have also ordered big sky and mobius. Is there a way to connect the strymon up to the gsystem, and haveva patch on the g pull up a bank on the strymon, and also be able to choose one or multiple strymons.
Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.

Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.


Price guides can be used by both sellers and buyers. Sellers can generally use websites to get a ballpark figure on the value of their model of guitar or bass. They can then deduct for dings, scratches, and other injuries the guitar may have sustained in its lifetime. After-market modifications, such as new pickups or repair work, can increase the value of the guitar.
Nitrocellulose lacquer is prized as a coating by some guitarists as it is thinner than some other coatings, which some claim leads to a better sound (though we’re not going to wade into that argument here). It’s also easy to blend with paints, and easier to repair. It does have its downsides, however. The solvents used in the lacquer can be potentially damaging to the respiratory systems of workers applying the coating during the guitar’s manufacture, and for this reason other options were sought.
The assets of Kay/Valco were auctioned off in 1969. The upright bass and cello lines were sold to Engelhardt-Link, a new company formed by a previous Valco member, which has continued production (see #Kay basses for details). The Kay name (and some of its trademarks, such as Knox[citation needed]) were acquired by Teisco importer, Weiss Musical Instruments[2] (W.M.I., Sol Weindling and Barry Hornstein), who put the Kay name on the Teisco products beginning in 1973, and continued on through the 1970s.[11][12]
Though comfortable playing many styles, Atkins was most often associated with country music and the acoustic guitar. By using a combination of his fingers and a thumb pick, he created his signature “fingerpicking” sound—a style somewhat inspired by fellow guitarist Merle Travis. Atkins even recorded a duo album with Travis, as well as with other respected guitarist like Doc Watson, Les Paul, Jerry Reed and Mark Knopfler.
The key difference between an electric guitar and an acoustic is how they make a sound. Electrics use pickups and acoustics rely on a ‘soundboard’ a hollowed out body, and a sound hole to amplify the vibration of the strings. The most important difference though is what you want to sound like and what you prefer. A guitar that you want to pick up and play will always be one that makes you practice more – which is the only way to get better at guitar!
Here we have a great D-28 clone from the finest Matsumoto Japanese guitar factory with a lot of history of making premium guitars Aria this is a AD-35 model these high quality D-28 copy’s were made in Japan for a short time frame of about a decade or so I believe discontinued in early to mid 1990’s for the Japanese domestic market not seen in the US until recently. Aria Dreadnought / Aria Auditorium SERIES The pursuit of perfection - This was Aria’s theme pursuing continuously ever since they started to manufacture guitars in 1956. This Aria Dreadnought / Aria Auditorium series lent brilliance to the early and middle days in the history of Aria acoustic guitar they know how to make great guitars this is model is no exception. The high standard for workmanship and materials are simply second to none. This instrument produces a Rich sound and offers the intermediate - pro grade playability from the determined beginner to the accomplished player. With its premium Solid Sitka Spruce top, will increase the volume and dynamic complexity of sound as you play it more and more. Noted Japan’s advanced finishing skills learned over decades this gloss vintage thin poly finish allows tone to jump of its sound box. AD-35 features Solid sitka spruce top and beautiful rosewood back and sides -bridge and fingerboard, the body binding, the center line of the body back and so on. I believe the original brochures specs were all solid woods on this run from Aria I look and can not tell you be the judge for yourself. This is recommendable model to guitar players who want to own a high end Martin D-28 but on a realistic budget you wouldn’t compromise much here surprisingly. This example has been upgrades here at JVGuitars with a Martin bone nut and compensated saddle - solid ebony decorotive with Abalone detail bridge pins and new set of Martin Marquis strings .... she has been fully cleaned and polished from headstock to bridge pin and natural rosewood re-hydrated with lemon oil We also leveled -dressed -recrowned-polished refined frets .... she plays and sound like a MUCH more expensive guitar now... sure to please for decades to come She’s a beauty and easily in 8.7/10 condition with a few insignificant blemish nicks - scratched we have addressed by lacquer tip color matched touch up and repolished Specifications: Top : Solid Sitka Spruce Back & Sides : Rosewood ... said to possibly be solid woods ... little is difinitivly known of this series just looking it looks to be solid you judge for yourself Neck : Mahogany Fingerboard : Rosewood Bridge : Rosewood Hardware : Chrome Finish : vintage gloss Hand crafted in Japan Vintage very good used condition Sound is really good!!! Contact Joe to buy it at jvguitars@gmail.com .
Choosing an electric guitar can be a difficult feat, especially if you have never played electric guitar before. There are so many brands of electric guitars and so many things you need to consider while making your choice. Among the things you need to consider are shape, musical preference, and price. In addition, you need to take a look at the best electric guitar brands to help you choose the highest quality guitars out there that will fit your preference and give you the best playing experience. This is why we have put together a list to give you a look at said brands.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.
One of the first successful methods was to record a track as you would any other. Then you would take the recording and play it through a speaker that is placed in a very large room. The magic happens when you put a microphone somewhere in that room to essentially record the sound of a recording. However, by placing that speaker in a large room, they have added a layer of natural reverb.
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good working condition Blackstar Amplification HT Studio 20H guitar amp head. This auction is for the amp and power cable you see pictured. No footswitch is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. This unit has some scuffs and dings from being moved around. It has been tested and is in good working condition.

Get a ruler (or straightedge if you want to be all fancy) that is at least as long as the neck, but not so long that it reaches all the way from the nut to the saddles (and watch it doesn’t lean on the pickups or pickup surrounds either). If you can’t get one between these lengths, and are willing to sacrifice a ruler, get one that’s too long and cut it to length. Alternatively, you can just cut a little out of one edge so that you can still make full use of the other edge of the ruler. Now lay the edge of the ruler along the frets (don’t rest it on top of the nut, saddles, pickups or pickup surrounds).
Before we wade in, please note that National Dobro and subsequently Valco, more than most other manufacturers, were notorious for putting together guitars with parts left around. This, combined with the fact that they routinely used components (especially bodies) provided by other manufacturers, means that you are likely to find instruments with details inconsistent with catalog descriptions, and they may just be Kosher.

Much like the FG series model we have talked about above, this guitar is made solid and has passed Yamaha's unforgiving quality control. You know precisely what you're getting and how it'll perform because each guitar in this line-up is exactly the same as the next, with no discernible variation. They went with a nice solid Sitka spruce top in combination with a rosewood back and sides. This should tell you right away that the guitar is going to be very responsive aurally.
So, you want a guitar that's absolutely packed with tone? One that has the vibe that it's been pulled straight out of the 1950s, but has all the playability, comfort, and stability of a brand-new instrument? Then get your hands on the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. This stylish archtop smolders with personality. And with the P90 pickup onboard at neck position, you have an unbelievable vintage/atittude tonal combination working in your favor. You'll notice right away that the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin has plenty of projection and volume, and moreso in the low/mids than traditional archtop guitars. You'll love it for that. Why does the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin sound so good? Sure, it's that P90 working with the hollowbody design that gets things going. But the primary tonewoods here are pure North American perfection, including a Canadian Wild Cherry archtop, back, and sides. The finish here is a custom polish that gives each and every Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin a satin sheen that recalls French 19th century craftsmanship. Whatever your musical style, you'll have a friend on your side in the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It is, plain and simple, a great guitar. Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin Archtop Guitar Features at a Glance: Finish: Cognac Burst Archtop hollowbody electric guitar Canadian Wild Cherry archtop Canadian Wild cherry back and sides Silver Leaf maple neck Contoured high-gloss black headstock Custom Polished finish Rosewood Fingerboard Adjustable Tusq Bridge by Graphtech Cream Binding 1 x Godin Kingpin P90 single-coil pickup 1 x Volume, 1 x Tone 16" fingerboard radius 24.84" scale 1.72" nut width
Our very first impression of the American Special Telecaster was that it’s such a good guitar. There is just something about it that feels remarkable. It’s hard to point to one particular thing, what does it is the combination of design, sound and feeling. We love the alder body and the maple neck that makes your music sound great, and the Texas Special pickups make everything we play on this guitar sound amazing.
The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.
Some delay pedals also come with full looping abilities, allowing you to play detailed multi-part melodies completely by yourself. A few artists to look to for great examples of delay pedal use are Angels and Airwaves, U2 and Muse. Reverb pedals are an entirely different animal. It brings its own unique type of sustain to a note, infusing the sound with strong texture and character through its distinctive echo. Creating a sound not quite like any other effect, reverb calls to mind the energetic surfer rock of the 1960s, such as Dick Dale's version of "Misirlou." You can stay true to those vintage roots or take the effect in a new, modern direction—it's up to you. With the added dimension they bring to your tone, you'll want to use your delay and reverb effects pedals at every performance. They make a unique contribution to the sound individually and even more so when you use them as a team.

This gives you a wonderful bass line, and will dramatically improve your sound, as well as helping you to develop a good rhythmic strumming style right from the first. Singing the song is a matter of timing. Listen to the song a few times and you’ll get it. It’s easier than trying to explain time signatures, and timing. You’ll know when you get it right. Just keep listening.
OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.
That is not always the case with acoustic electric ones, especially with piezoelectric pickups since they pump out a relatively high amplitude signal. All you really need is a small DI box that will attenuate the signal a little, and you plug the guitar straight into a mixer. Naturally, how good this is going to sound will depend on your guitar's preamp.
For a relatively new band, Dream State have - in industry parlance - gained some serious frigging traction, playing Reading/Leeds last year, gobbling up streams in the millions and signing to hardcore label par excellence UNFD. Lead guitarist Aled does a deft line in a tapped arpeggio, while breakthrough single White Lies covers a hell of a lot of ground in its four minute runtime - combining Marmozets’ urgency in its opening and Deftones’ dynamics at the close. 

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There is something special about musical instruments of a certain age. Guitars built from the mid 1950s until the late 1970s are generally held in high esteem; techniques and materials, particularly pre-1970 were vastly superior to today's 'mass-produced' standards. But is a vintage guitar really much different to a modern day equivalent? People often say wood is wood, but this is simply not the case. Centuries old trees that were regularly harvested for guitar manufacture in the 1950s are now protected, and it is these old trees with close grains and unbeatable tonal qualities that make the very best guitars. With rainforests rapidly diminishing their protection can only be a good thing. But it does mean that good quality older guitars, perhaps with a few modern upgrades can make some of the very best instruments available. What's more, much of the painstaking attention to detail lavished upon fine old jazz guitars by special order/custom departments and aimed at serious guitarists has been replaced by the continual churning out of 'limited editions', aimed at serious collectors. Whether these rare, but ultimately not-so-special guitars will be quite so desirable in 30 years time remains to be seen.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the "stereo" effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
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