Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p112 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "In Spain Falla's lead was followed by Joaquin Turina (1882–1949) and Federico Moreno Torroba (b. 1891), who began to produce works in collaboration with Segovia."
On my guitar, the bridge plate is held on by five screws. Three on the back of the plate, two towards the neck on the front. You may need to remove the intonation block things.One or all. If you decide to take any off, use your calipers and measure from the front of them to the back of the bridge plate, so that you don't lose your intonation. Mark each saddle like in the picture.

I have a Schecter S-1+ (which I believe is close enough) so I'll try my best to answer. There should be 3 knobs and 1 switch. The toggle switch is the pick-up selector. When it is in the middle the sound is coming from both pick-ups. When you flip it left the sound is coming from the neck pick-up. When you flip it right the sound is coming from the bridge pick-up. Next the 3 knobs. The left knob is the volume for the neck pick-up I believe. The middle knob is the tone. And the right knob is the volume of the bridge pick-up. If you are playing a left handed guitar the switch the directions (Ex. Left would now be right; right would now be left; middle stays the same.) So there ya go. Hope that helped!
A very useful way of creating space for guitars in the final mix is to use tunable high-pass and low-pass filters to remove extreme frequencies that do nothing to enhance the guitar tone, but invade the space of other instruments that do perform in those areas. Generally speaking, it’s worth losing everything below 80Hz, although it’s not unusual to set the filter a good degree higher. Shaving off some high end may also be useful to help place the guitar in a specific area of the audio spectrum. Filter at the mixing stage, as the sound of the recording will often determine the optimum filtering points.
The Effect:To this day, there are 3 main delay pedal types coexist, Tape is usually the most expensive and sough-after (especially Vintage releases) type as they provide very natural sound reproduction. Analog were modernized in the 70’s and they worked on electronics, with a minor drawback according to some as they store up to 3 seconds of Delay time. Digital pedals is the type met with most frequency on today’s market, offering longer-than-usual Delay times and pristine sound reproduction, these are usually your best pick. A lot of players know that they want a delay effect but have no idea from where to start, if you are one of them, try the Boss DD-7 Digital Delay Pedal The most basic and often met controls on Delay pedals are Time, Level and Feedback, you’ll sometimes find them labeled differently but with the same function and purpose.
I purchased my Dove in 1989 in a mom and pop kind of music store in North GA , actually Cumming GA. I have played it ever since and I have owned many other guitars in my 52 Years in the music business but it has always been my come back acoustic for the sound and playability of the neck slim D stile ,but the sound quality is very much as good as any lots more expensive guitars,the way it holds the overtone of the note long after you play the note in the body is just unbelievable ,my hat's off to which either company wants to claim they built it I am just glad they did!! Damn fine Guitar.Thanks,Victor
Famous for having created reference electric guitars like the Telecaster and the Stratocaster in the 1950's, the US-based manufacturer has also been offering amps since 1948 to complement its guitar range. The first series was called "tweed" because of the typical cabinet covering. Among Fender's most well-known amps, we have the famous Bassman (1952), which was originally conceived for bass guitar, as its name implies, but turned out to be readily adopted by guitar players. The Twin (1952) and its different variations (especially the Twin Reverb) also influenced rock history with The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton. Fender's amplifier range is quite comprehensive (see the Hot Rod, Champ, Princeton, and Bandmaster series) and its common denominator is a clean sound that is still a reference in its category.
Fender Montara acoustic electric with HSC. Part of the California series made in the early 90's. BEAUTIFUL guitar! See pics. I would describe it as being in excellent condition for its age. Of course there are some minor signs of use upon very close inspection but nothing that jumps out. (2 small dings are shown in pics) All electronics work, could probably use some new strings. If you have any questions please ask!
AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
For more complete control of preamp distortion voicing, an additional EQ pedal can be placed after a distortion pedal; or, equivalently, the guitar amp's tone controls, after the built-in preamp distortion, can be used. An EQ pedal in the amp's effects loop, or the amp's tone controls placed after preamp distortion, constitutes post-distortion EQ, which finishes shaping the preamp distortion and sets up the power-tube distortion voicing.

This truly is a pleasure writing about the best kept secret in the guitar world. The G&L Legacy Tribute. I own a USA Hamer Gold Top Archtop Standard with P-90's and it's stupendous guitar. But like all Les Pauls and high quality Mahoganies, it has a growl suited for certain kinds of Rock N Roll. However, there is another voice in my guitar arsenal and I only have one other. The G&L Legacy Tribute. This guitar can cover the other half. I bought this used for $299 and four years later I still can't put it down. So I have a $2600 guitar and a $299 guitar and love them equally. What does that tell you about the Legacy Tribute?
The Givson Guitar Corporation makes guitars which sell under various brand names and are considered as among the best guitar brands on the planet. The company is famous to have devised the arch top guitar and created a few of the most iconic instruments in guitar history. Some iconic versions are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES 175 as well as the Firebird. The Les Paul Melody Maker is a popular model amongst many guitarists in different countries.
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Launch price: $499 / £279 | Body: Laminated maple, semi-hollow | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Alnico Classic humbucker (neck), Alnico Classic Plus humbucker (bridge) | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, neck tone, bridge tone, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: LockTone Tune-O-Matic stopbar, Grover 18:1 tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Vintage Sunburst, Natural, Cherry, Ebony
Previously, Epiphone guitars were considered to be the biggest competitor of Gibson. However, they were later acquired by Gibson who has retained the name of this brand to distinguish them from their pricey brothers. You can certainly consider it a budget-friendly production from the high-end guitar makers. Epiphone, just like the Gibson’s Les Paul, shares the same design but is available at a much lesser price. When it comes to craftsmanship, then we must say that Gibson is much better than this one. Unfortunately, Epiphone utilizes low-quality products such as mahogany and other electronic components.
• Trapeze: Although the trapeze tailpiece was original equipment on the very first runs ofGibson Les Pauls, they are mostly the province of hollowbody and semi-hollowbody guitars, ranging from the L-5-CES to the Epiphone Regent. Early ES models also came with trapeze tailpieces. These devices attach to the heel of the guitar’s body and have slots for strings to pass through. Once the strings are installed and tightened to proper tension, the tension suspends the tailpiece in air — providing the appellation trapeze. The principle behind trapeze tailpieces is that they dampen the natural resonance of the strings less than stop tailpieces. These tailpieces also transmit the string tension to the guitar’s side, rather than its belly. The downside is they are the hardest tailpieces to string, since strings tend to drop out of their slots until they are at tension. In that respect, they take some getting used to.
After shaping your sound, is important to add some depth to it, and here’s where the ‘ambiance’ pedals find their way into your rig. The chorus effect should be used properly, without overdoing it, but can give great results: the depth and the ‘3 guitarists playing your part’ effect can work amazingly well for your music. Delay and Reverb can be used lightly, in order to enhance your sound and fill up your guitar solos with a little space (by setting up a nice spring or hall reverb settings and a dotted delay) or heavily, to achieve creative sounds where the sky is the only limit.
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In standard Boss fashion, you get a set of four no-nonsense controls and a footswitch that is as durable as the case it’s installed in. However, none of this means anything if the reverb effect isn’t up to the expected level. Fortunately for us, Boss didn’t disappoint with this one. You get a reverb effect that is in that sweet spot when it comes to versatility and quality.
This comment is directed towards the video of the gentleman changing guitar strings. I have an LP Junior, so I don't thread my strings through the guitar body. But I'm curious why he is turning the guitar completely over, flipping the guitar towards himself each time when he could in fact just lean the guitar away from himself, leaving the back of the guitar facing him? I know that seems a bit nit picky, but it would be tremendously more efficient just leaving the guitar on its side with less risk of the string damaging the guitar surface. Any thoughts or am I just missing something?
I would have never finished my project without this, 20 feet sounds like alot, but it can go very fast. I used this to rewire up an Epiphone hollow body,and I needed the length to reach from toggle to jack. The gauge is a perfect feel and doesnt have me worried about accidentally breaking it from movement. Also the cloth is great as it takes much more heat than the standard rubber coverings.
Ah yes, the 808. It's often used and referred to as a kick, but it tends to act more as a very low tom, as it has a pitch. This thing is the Loch Ness Monster – there tends to be more under the water. The best way to deal with a true, clean 808 sample is to work around it. It's usually best to let the 808 do its thing and to get the bottom end around it the hell out of the way. If it's a fuzzy sample or has been driven and squashed, you may need to play with things above 250 Hz, but usually live and let live is the best approach.
Neither player uses any sort of stomp boxes in their rigs. In an effort to emulate his heroes, Bo keeps it straight ahead, using no effects at all, while Frank opts to program his effects via rackmount gear and to make setting changes through a MIDI controller. The advantage is that he can change gain levels, EQs, and effects instantly with one tap, instead of having to do the stomp box break dance in time for the next down beat. Both axemen prefer to get their overdrive the old-fashioned way, by driving the tubes in their amps.

If you have been playing for a year or two and are looking at something to replace your current model, it would be wise to save a little more and go for a mid-range guitar that may cost between $300 and $500. On this kind of guitar you’ll notice a big difference in sound, as well as the feel of the instrument and the overall playability. Use this page as a starting point to find something that may suit you. Until then, you are probably best off sticking with your current guitar.


Later, around 1963, rebadged Guyatone and Teisco guitars appeared, both in the U.S. and a few in the U.K., also as Futuramas. That was the beginning of several years of Guyatone-made Kents. The Teiscos seemed to be part of the 1963-64 freshman-class only. After starting with an initial group of both Guyatone and Teisco guitars, the importer seemed to settle on Guyatone as a main supplier.

The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.


If a love of flamenco and salsa music sung by the Gipsy Kings brought you to the best classical guitar, then you are going to want to read this review. The Cordoba company, as you can now see, has quite the reputation for quality guitars, and their GK Studio Negra left-handed model—a Gipsy Kings signature instrument—could easily be the right one for you (no pun intended).
To repair your guitar’s body, glue in any broken wings. Also, repair strap buttons that have come out and bridge holes that have been stripped by putting glue on a toothpick and applying it to the holes. When the glue is dry, you can re-insert the strap buttons or re-thread the bridge holes. You can use the same technique to repair bolt-on holes if the screw holes are stripped or are larger than the threads. If the holes are too large, just leave enough toothpicks glued into the hole to take up the extra space before you re-thread the screw.
Gruhn Guitars: If you're looking for a convenient appraisal that can be done online--something along the lines of what May Music Studio used to do--Gruhn Guitars offers an appraisal service. You must first send information and pictures of your guitar according to their guidelines. You must also include a payment for the appraisal fee, which varies depending on the instrument.

Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
Altium is known for it’s high end PCB development application called Altium Designer which starts at around $7000 and there’s a yearly subscription fee too. Gulp! Altium Designer is used by many industry professionals for product development. Altium just recently released Circuit Maker, which has many of the features of Designer and is, Gasp!…. Completely free!  The trade off at this point seems to be that it’s designed around a community and apart from a couple of private slots, you have to share your work, so it’s not very useful for completely proprietary projects.
In the world of amplifiers, there are amp stacks and combo amps. For beginners, a combo amp is usually the way to go, since they combine the amp circuitry and the speaker together into one unit. Check out models like the Marshall MG Series MG30CFX 30W 1x10 Guitar Combo Amp and the Fender RUMBLE 25 1x8 25 W Bass Combo Amp for a few examples of this type. For the biggest professional setups, on the other hand, a combo amp may not be quite beefy enough. That's where stacks come in, based on a head (such as the Peavey 6505+ 120W Guitar Amp Head) paired up with a speaker cabinet. You can even find some pre-made amp stacks here, like the Line 6 Spider IV HD150 150W and 4x12 Guitar Half Stack, to save you the legwork of shopping for both parts separately.
That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.
If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.

This is one of the most popular and oldest brands of acoustic guitars available in India. There are various brands and models of guitar available under the umbrella of Gibson Guitar Corporation. ES-335, SG, Flying V, and Firebird are one of the most iconic models of guitars produced by this brand and their classic acoustics include the hummingbird. These are ideal guitars that can be used by beginners made in – the USA. The price of Gibson 6-string guitars starts from 4,000 INR approximately.
"The development of the modern tuning can be traced in stages. One of the tunings from the 16th century is C-F-A-D. This is equivalent to the top four strings of the modern guitar tuned a tone lower. However, the absolute pitch for these notes is not equivalent to modern "concert pitch". The tuning of the four-course guitar was moved up by a tone and toward the end of the 16th century, five-course instruments were in use with an added lower string tuned to A. This produced A-D-G-B-E, one of a wide number of variant tunings of the period. The low E string was added during the 18th century."[48]
In typical pedal effect chains you will most likely be running cable lengths that are much longer than 5.5 meters. The ME-80 allows you to keep your tone pure when running lots of effects. You can run a cable up to 5.5 metres into the input of the ME-80. The multi effects engine processes up to 8 effects in its internal signal chain. Then the ME-80 outputs your guitar signal as a 2,000 Ohm low impedance signal allowing you to run a much longer cable to the amplifier.
Seagull S6 Original Acoustic guitar is one of the best gadgets for the beginners in the list. It comes with the beautiful texture of domestic wild cherry back and sides that give it a unique tone. In addition to that silver leaf maple neck with a rosewood fretboard lets the fingers to have a perfect grip and easy tuning. It’s a power pack guitar to get you the best playing experience and hands on many of the tricks you are looking for.
The first effect in our signal chain is a pedal wah. A wah is an effect known as a filter that alters the basic tone of the guitar. When you push the pedal fully forward, the filter brightens up your guitar tone and you bring back the pedal your guitar tone gets darker. For the most variety of sound, you want all the other effects to have a shot at the sound from the Wah so the ME-80 places it as close to the guitar as possible.
Guitarists love to get loud. I remember when I got my first electric guitar, I took it and my amp out onto my grandmother’s back porch and did my best rendition of The Man Who Sold The World, over and over again — at full blast — for several hours. In suburbia, in the middle of the day, I didn’t receive a lot of complaints. If I tried that today, in my Los Angeles apartment surrounded by grumpy neighbors, I might not be so lucky.
This how-to guide will cover the aforementioned effects, as well as fundamentals like the function of typical delay controls, and where to place your unit in an effects chain. Although there are countless delays on the market—many of which have mind-boggling features—we’re going to use a basic delay pedal setup similar to what you’ll find on a Boss DD-7 as our reference point. We’ve also provided some sample settings so you can get the most out of your delay pedal right away.
One cheaper ampless option mentioned in the article is the Tech 21 Fly Rig used with pedals in front of it – I actually got a $270 Tech 21 RK5 (very close to being the same thing as the Fly Rig 5 mentioned in the article, but the Richie Kotzen signature version with his signature OMG distortion replacing the “Plexi” OD which is on the Fly Rig 5). I’ve used it direct into a cheap PA at practice and it doesn’t sound good to me that way – however, it sounds really pretty good going into an amp, which is what I did for a set-up-quick-and-get-out-after-playing hour-long gig a few weeks ago, plugging into an amp provided at the place we played at. It still didn’t come close sound-wise to my relatively cheap amp setup (hybrid Marshall JMD 50 watt head into Marshall 1960A 4 x 12 cabinet, no additional effects), but a lot more portable of course. So maybe I need to experiment with adding OD pedals to the RK5 for an improvement in sound.
You can trace all things loud and riff-y right back to the Kinks' Dave Davies, starting with the fantastically simple power chords of "You Really Got Me," which he recorded at age 17 – setting off a run of proto-metal singles from "All Day and All of the Night" to "Till the End of the Day." Davies, who created the distortion on "You Really Got Me" by slicing an amp speaker with a razor, has laughed off claims that it was actually played by an uncredited Jimmy Page: "Who'd want to play a solo that crazy, anyway? Only Dave Davies could do that."
Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.

Description: 1997 Non Left Handed Model. Body: Laminated Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Ebony, Natural, Vintage Sunburst


One and a half steps down. Famously used by Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi in the 1970s, as well as Carrie Brownstein, Dimebag Darrell of Pantera, Eyehategod, Architects, Dying Fetus, Anata, Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney, Between the Buried and Me, Machine Head (tuned 40 cents sharp), Down, All That Remains, Bolt Thrower, Pete Loeffler of Chevelle (on Wonder What's Next), Billy Howerdel of A Perfect Circle and Ashes Divide, Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit, Guns N' Roses (on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and "I Don't Care About You"), Slayer (on "Gemini" from Undisputed Attitude, Diabolus In Musica, the majority of God Hates Us All as well as "Cult" and "Black Serenade" from Christ Illusion), and Stone Sour, as well as former guitarist Jim Root's other band Slipknot on the song "Snuff". Also used by Kyuss on the Sons of Kyuss EP and on the songs "Isolation", "Big Bikes" and "Stage III" from Wretch. Used by Metallica on the song "Bad Seed" from the album Reload, by blink-182 in "Obvious". Also used on Considered Dead and The Erosion of Sanity by Canadian technical death metal band Gorguts.
I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
Fuzz: A fuzz pedal or "fuzzbox" is a type of overdrive pedal that clips a sound-wave until it is nearly a squarewave, resulting in a heavily distorted or "fuzzy" sound.[53][56] Fuzzboxes may contain frequency multiplier circuitry to achieve a harsh timbre by adding complex harmonics.[57][58] The Rolling Stones' song "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction", with the main riff played by Keith Richards with fuzz guitar, greatly popularized the use of fuzz effects.[23] Fuzz bass (also called "bass overdrive") is a style of playing the electric bass that produces a buzzy, overdriven sound via a tube or transistor amp or by using a fuzz or overdrive pedal.
I JUST GOT A PALMER P44 EC ACUSTIC/ELECTRIC..BANGED UP BUT FAIR,,I TIGHTEND IT UP,, PUT NEW #12 STRINGS,, WORKS & SOUNDS GOOD,,, I JUST GOT TO LOWER THE STRINGS ,,MY FRIENDS & EVEN THE GUY @ THE REPAIR SHOP KNEW NOTHING ABOUT "PALMER" WHICH GOT ME TO THIS SITE ...AS A FEW OTHER PEOPLE COMMENTED,, I AGREE,, GOOD ENOUGH FOR CAMPFIRES ,,,ITS A FUN INSTRUMENT,,ITS WHAT WE CALL A "BEATER" TO KEEP IN TRUNK & TAKE CAMPING OR HAND TO THE DRUNK GUY W/THE BIG BELT BUCKLE @THE PARTY,,
Doling out everything that an electric guitar newbie could possibly require for less than a hundred bucks, the Davison Guitars Beginner Starter Package with a full-size electric guitar (39”) is super-alluring from the very outset. While many so-called beginners packages reek of inferior quality, this full size black electric guitar plus accessories combo strives to deliver complete bang for your buck. And that’s exactly why this thrifty, but high value electric guitar package has garnered massive popularity, and has been featured in ‘Top 5 Electric Guitar Beginner Packs’ across most reputed websites.
I think for somebody reasonable, the right answer would be that yes, it has an effect on the tone of the guitar and the notes coming off the strings, but not nearly as much as other factors in the design of the guitar. If you think I'm wrong then you should read more about the overtone series, the physics of sound, difference tones, and how sounds interact both as vibrations moving through air, and digitally as numbers in a computer. It's just not as simple as to say wood doesn't have a magnetic field so therefore it can't possibly affect the tone. It's true that much of what we hear is a result of the ear-brain axis, but there are also many fundamentally measurable physical properties of sound as it occurs over time (as all sounds do) that can easily explain why different types or shapes of wood could have a subtle but real effect on the tone.
OK some people will know this already but let’s just be clear about switch terminology. A switch as you see it on the bench in front of you will often be a set of switches, mechanically connected within a single assembly. Wikipedia explains. The important thing to remember is the number of ‘poles’ is the number of switches that you have ganged together off a single lever in the component and the ‘throw’ or ‘way’ part describes how those switches operate.
We don’t know about other early guitars, but Univox probably augmented its offerings with other offerings from the Arai catalog, similar to what Epiphone would do with its first imports slightly later, in around 1970. Evidence this might have been so is seen in the book Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (American Music Publishers, out of print) which shows a Univox 12-string solidbody with a suitably whacky late-’60s Japanese shape, with two equal cutaway stubby/pointy horns. The head was a strange, long thing with a concave scoop on top, and the plastic logo. This is the only example of this shape I’ve encountered, but it had two of the black-and-white plastic-covered pickups used on Aria guitars of the period, and the majority of later Univox guitars were indeed manufactured by Arai and Company, makers of Aria, Aria Diamond, Diamond and Arai guitars. These pickups have white outsides with a black trapezoidal insert and are sometimes called “Art Deco” pickups. Perhaps the coolest feature of this strange guitar is a 12-string version of the square vibrato system employed on Aria guitars of this era. You can pretty much assume that if there was a strange-shaped solidbody 12-string Univox, it was not the only model! These would not have lasted long, probably for only until 1970 at the latest, and are not seen in the ’71 catalog.
The output of the rails is a crunchy, high sustain rock tone that turns your Strat into a much heavier and hard-hitting instrument. The pickguard, pots and five-way volume selector are all included with the wiring taken care of. It’s also really easy to change pickups using a solderless method that allows you to remove and add pickups by simply using screws.
The pickups on this guitar are really cool and not found on any other model that I’ve seen.  They are really loud single coils reading out at 5.58k at the bridge, and 5.90k at the neck.  The pole piece screws even have some “gold foil” surrounding them, which is really cool and not usually seen.  These pickups sound very close to vintage American p90s, and they have this loud, articulate, sparkly clean tone combined with a really grindy dirty tone.  These pups are special, seriously!  Also, those switches were standard fare through the late 60s on most Matsumoku guitars.

In attempting to amplify acoustic guitars, inventors and musicians alike soon discovered an issue that is still problematic for many of today’s acoustic guitarists — feedback. Hence, the evolution of solid body electric guitars, spearheaded by Vivi-Tone in 1934. Rickenbacker followed up by distributing the Electro Spanish in 1935 (Electro Spanish later being shortened to ES by Gibson for their line of hollow body and semi-hollow electric guitars), and the Slingerland Songster 401 was introduced in 1936. But some guitarists — mainly jazz and blues musicians — came to miss the warm, full-bodied tone that can only be generated by the free-space resonance of tops and backs made from quality tonewoods. And so it is that we also have the hybrid design of semi-hollow body electric guitars.
Choosing an electric guitar that addresses these preferences helps guarantee that new players will stay motivated as they learn to play. Musician’s Friend offers a wide selection of ¾-scale, mini, and travel guitars that are ideal for smaller, younger players. Full-sized electric guitar bodies vary considerably in size and weight, and those factors should be considered.
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.
Original plate reverbs were mechanical in nature. There was a literal plate inside the amplifier, which would transform input signal into vibration. Then you would have a pickup located somewhere near the plate, that recorded those vibrations. Today, such a contraption comes across as relatively crude, but many still love the unique mechanical sound it produces. Spring reverb uses a pretty much exact same principle, only this time you have a spring in there instead of a plate. The biggest improvement a spring reverb offers is reduction in both weight and size of the device.
As the name implies, RockJam is a guitar capable of giving you the best of rock sound and deep melody similar to the type you only get from the studio and stage. The RockJam RGEG02-BK ST Style Electric Guitar Super Packstands as the highest quality and most accessible full-size electric guitar kit of the modern era, a quality that still outstands many buyers till date.
Usual general wear. Some noticeable impression marks on face. Piece of decorative trim missing from headstock. Plays but Action is high. Neck truss needs adjusting. There is a slight buzz with action as it is (sounds like it's from bridge area). Frets look good. Not perfect but a classic in good condition in need of a little tune up. SOLD AS IS. Ships wrapped and secured inside a Road Runner hard shell case which itself will be plastic wrapped. Ships Priority from Alaska.
The Ultimate Beginners Series gets aspiring musicians started immediately with classic rock and blues riffs, chord patterns and more. Now, for the first time ever, Basics, Blues, and Rock are combined in one complete book and DVD set. Follow along with 4 hours of DVD instruction and 3 hours of audio tracks, with the help of on-screen graphics and printed diagrams. The Ultimate Beginners Series: Electric Guitar Complete takes you from picking to soloing and power chords. If you're serious about mastering the blues and rock styles, this book and DVD set is a must-have.
The Tone knobs on electric guitars are really just potentiometers. It’s important to know that they do not ADD treble or bass to your sound, they only remove higher frequencies as you turn them down and restore those frequencies to the sound as you turn them up. When they are set at 10, you are getting all the frequencies that your guitar and pickups can produce. In some cases, this may sound too shrill or harsh so if you turn the tone knob down, you are removing some of the higher frequencies or “rolling off “ the treble. Turning the knob back up towards 10 restores those frequencies, but isn’t actively “adding” treble frequencies to what your pickups are capable of producing.
I should also add that I said I expect the Authentics to come in the medium string height range, because they are trying to replicate the kind of vintage Martins coveted by Bluegrass musicians, who are either used to or seek out slightly higher action compared to modern guitars. There are exceptions of course since Tony Rice and Robert Shafer both prefer action so low it is practically resting on the frets.
High-end builders of today have gone back to germanium en masse for their classic fuzz tones, and most of them test their transistors to sort out the few that will do the job correctly. They put them in anything from vintage-style units—like Fulltone’s ’69, Frantone’s The Sweet, and Roger Mayer’s Classic Fuzz—to way-out updates of the breed—such as Z.Vex’s Fuzz Factory.
Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.
Manne guitars - This Italy based guitar manufacturer produces instruments with unique features. The first Manne guitar was built in 1986 and they continue to provide finely crafted instruments based on some very original design concepts. Manne's design philosophy: hand craft the finest stringed instruments then offer them to the public at a reasonable price.
You should have been making all the above adjustments with the preferred gauge of strings, but since you have probably loosened and tightened the strings a number of times over the course of this process, you should now put on a fresh set and do a final check of all the settings Neck adjustments in particular can tend to settle in over the a couple hours after they have been done, so I find it best to then let the guitar sit overnight and do a final check the next day. The bottom line in ending up with a quality set-up is making each of the important adjustments in the correct order: Neck- then Nut- then Bridge saddles.
The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
The Vintage El Dorado Leather Guitar Strap is meticulously hand-tooled in traditional Western motifs by leather artisans with decades of experience. Each strap is an individual and unique work of craftsmanship that you'll be proud to display on your guitar. The designs date back to late 19th century Western leatherwork, used extensively in the decoration of saddles, saddlebags, belts and holsters.

This brand is originally from Japan and  Hoshino Gakki owns it. Ibanez activates in U.S.A, Japan, China and Indonesia, and it is one of the largest, recognized names out there. This manufacturer has developed over 300 models of electric guitars and has collaborated with many musicians that have lent their imagination to the making of customized units.


"I have purchased 15 personalized guitars from the top guitar custom shop. All the guitars have met or exceeded my expectations. Great workmanship and quality work. An exceptional group of people to work with. They are ready to answer your questions or concerns. The one time i had a concern about a guitar they responded immediately and handled the situation more than i expected. I highly recommend this company!" Dr E C Fulcher Jr - Abingdon, Maryland USA.

We love guitars, they are definitely one of the best instruments of all time. What we don’t love is spending crazy amounts of money. We decided to find out what the best electric guitar under 1000 dollars is. Most often when it comes to musical instruments, you can’t expect budget beginners’ instruments to be as good as the best ones that cost ten times as much, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t bargains to be found. For any skill levels looking for new acoustic guitars click here. If you want the best of both worlds, consider looking at our review of the top acoustic electric guitars.
Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
First off, what makes the sound in an acoustic guitar? On both an acoustic and acoustic-electric guitar, you have the strings that create vibrations when plucked or strummed. That vibration reverberates across the span of the soundboard (top tonewood surface) and also travels down the strings to the saddle and bridge of the guitar. Those vibrations “move” air within the air cavity called the soundhole. The resonance created in the soundhole depends on its depth/size and the tonewoods used to make the back and sides of the guitar. Voila, you now have sound exiting through the soundhole of the guitar.
The Super Strat, though modeled after the Stratocaster, is a very different guitar. Basically, the only similarity this guitar really has to its namesake is the body style. The pickups generally used in Super Strats are of a higher output (we’ll get into this in more depth, but for now just remember higher-output=more distortion), which makes them more suited for metal and hard rock. Super Strats also commonly have Floyd Rose tremolos, which allow for a great range of movement than a typical Fender Stratocaster Tremolo while still having a greater tuning integrity (you can use it more without the guitar going out of tune).
The JX44 Air Control™ allows up to four guitars and six amps to be used at once, as well as a built-in Radial DI, an SGI interface for longer cable runs, and an X-Amp to make the reamping process incredibly efficient. No wonder it won the Music Players ‘Wish I Had One’ award! Pair it with a Headbone amp head switcher and the JDX 48 for the ultimate in control and consistent tone night after night.
Flexibility of the BOSS Katana-50 goes way beyond expectations for establishing a different path referencing to its predecessor the Roland type of practice amps. With 50 watts of power and a custom 12-inch speaker, the Katana-50 can deliver a commanding range of sound playing it clean, crunch, lead, and brown for electric and acoustic electric guitars. Moving on to other controls on the panel, it features customizable effects by using BOSS Tone Studio editor software and for adjusting sounds quickly, it has a dedicated gain, EQ, and effects controls. Tone setting memory is also included for storing and recalling all amp and effect settings.
What started as a simple string and pedal sales catalog has grown exponentially over the past thirty years. The early days were a time where catalogs didn't have much of a presence in the industry, but what began as a college dorm room operation grew rapidly. In 1986 we moved to a full product offering and 64-page catalog, which over the years has grown to 162 pages. Join the AMS family and get your free catalog now!

I have a friend with a cool little music store here in St. Louis. I pop in from time to time since he always has a great selection of vintage lap steels, as well as an ever-changing assortment of oddball pieces to check out. As I was on my way out the door after one of my most recent visits, I spotted an early 80s Harmony “Flying V,” and immediately stopped in my tracks.
Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: Medium - Inlay: Acrylic & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Pickups: GB Special - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
In the grand scheme of things, fixed bridges are as simple as it gets. Aside from saddles, which are used to tune in intonation, there are usually no other moving parts involved. The benefit of fixed bridges is their ability to retain intonation and tuning over time. If you're just starting out, sticking with a fixed bridge will make your life much easier. However, it does have its limitations compared to a tremolo bridge.
An expander is the opposite of a compressor. It stretches out the dynamic range of your signal allowing the quietest sounds to be even quieter and the loudest sounds to be louder. This can be useful in situations where you want quieter noises—such as squeaky fingering sounds—to become inaudible in the mix where they don't attract attention, while your intentional tones soar to the top.
Teisco produced guitars that were sold in the U.S. as Teisco del Rey as well as Silvertone, Beltone, Duke, Decca, Heit Deluxe, Jedson, Kimberly, Kingston, Lyle, Norma, Tulio and World Teisco, as well as some of the early Kents. At various times Teisco guitars were made for and sold under the now well-known Ibanez name. They have developed somewhat of a cult following in the U.S. which has resulted in some unrealistic prices for some models.
Here we have a cool vintage piece. Made in USA and is highly Possible this is a Gibson Archtop. Great Original condition make this a great find...this one is a Solid 8.5/10 condition. This one still has the original tuners and pick guard too. The neck is straight and the frets are still OK...and wow what a supprise this one plays great!..nice vintage tone...no repairs or damages just natural play wear and dings etc associated with a true vintage player....EZ on the eyes see the great detailed bindings! and wow this baby sounds very nice...great for Jazz .
So you've decided to purchase a new axe? Well you've definitely come to the right place. Todays line of intermediate electric guitars are so superbly crafted right down to the smallest component, you don't have to worry about sacrificing quality for a reasonably priced instrument. In fact, this catalog is exploding with intermediate electric guitars for every taste and style. Like any expert guitarist will tell you, the learning process speeds up considerably when you have a guitar that's an ideal balance of comfort, playability and tone. Thankfully, popular guitar companies like Ibanez, Epiphone, Jackson and countless others are passionate about giving everyone the opportunity to play an electric guitar that's meticulously constructed. You'll even find intermediate electric guitars that are endorsed by professional artists, including Dave Mustaine, Brian May and John Petrucci. Since its earliest beginnings, the classic sound and feel of a Strat has found its way in the hands of icons, and the Fender Deluxe Player's Stratocaster will be sure to continue that legacy. Consisting of a noiseless pickups, gold hardware and loaded with advanced electronics, this Strat plays effortless, and the push-button pickup switch provides you with seven pickup combinations for a wide range of tones. This section also features plenty of intermediate hollow-body guitar choices, such as the Gretsch Guitars G5420T Electromatic. This eye-catching single-cutaway contains a Bigsby tremolo and Filter'Tron pickups to give you a lethal combination of vintage twang and vigorous punch. Searching for a brand new electric guitar is an exhilarating experience, and with so many stunning options to choose from on today's market, there has never been a better time than now to get your hands on an instrument that perfectly represents your own personality. Whether you're a '60s garage turkey or a technically-skilled metal shredder, you can bet that you'll find what you're looking for.
Super info. thks. Just found your site as I too, had some questions about action. I have a Martin D-28, manufacture date late 2013 and I purchased new in Feb. of 2015. It has always been humidified and kept in the case. I only really noticed the ‘high’ action when I changed to drop D tuning and I noticed amplified ‘string whip’. I estimate the height to be 4mm. I re-tuned and looked again and the action is noticeably higher than my Epiphone EJ 200 and Simon & Patrick Woodland Folk. I think, as you have said, the guitar is just getting acclimatized to it’s ‘new’ home. Play ability is still good, (although the player needs work!) but I think I will take it back to Folkways Music to have the Tech take a look. Thks. Great site, I will bookmark it!

Maple is a very hard type of wood with good tonal qualities and good sustain. Guitar necks are traditionally made from maple, in part because of its strength, and in part because the material can highlight and amplify the wood in the body. Maple is also often used as a top for the guitar body, partly because it is beautiful (think flame, or quilted maple tops), and partly because it can brighten a sound that would otherwise be murky.


“I was trying to help Henry and shoo him away from areas that he was spending a whole lot of money in,” Schon says. “All this electronical, robot crap. I told him, point blank, ‘What you’re doing, Roland and other companies are light-years in front of you, you’ve got this whole building you’ve designated to be working on this synth guitar. I’ve played it. And it just doesn’t work.’ And he refused to believe that.”

Bass effects that condition the sound, rather than changing its character are called "sound conditioners." Gain booster effects pedals and bass preamplifier pedals increase the gain (or volume) of the bass guitar signal. Bass preamplifiers for double basses are designed to match the impedance of piezoelectric pickups with the input impedance of bass amplifiers. Some double bass preamplifiers may also provide phantom power for powering condenser microphones and anti-feedback features such as a notch filter (see "Filter-based effects" section below).

On the back of soundboards is a pattern of struts and braces that provide stability to the soundboard, while allowing it to vibrate as uniformly as possible. The choice of wood used for these struts and braces is much less critical than it is for the soundboard. However, the bracing pattern can have a significant impact on the sound of the instrument. Guitar makers have tried many different bracing patterns in attempts to add distinctive tonal qualities to their instruments. In addition to bracing patterns, hardwood plates designed to add support to the bridge and soundhole areas are also commonly attached to the underside of soundboards. Though the acoustic impact of these plates are minor compared to the bracing patterns, their size, shape and wood type can also affect the tone of the guitar.


Very useful. Today I gave life to a Strat, adding a SD lil´59 in the neck, a noiseless single coil in the middle and a SD hot rails in the bridge. I used a H-S-H diagram from SD website with one volume and one tone pots (500k Alpha pots). I will add a second tone pot later on with a push/pull pot to split the little humbuckers in single coils. The guitar sounds huge now!
With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.
Ostentatious Delays: If you're making very rhythmic music of any kind, it makes sense to use tempo-sync'd delays, to avoid undermining the main pulse. However, simple tempo-sync'ed delays tend to be masked by the main rhythmic stresses, so they sink into the background of the mix unless mixed very high in level, which makes it difficult to create ostentatious delay effects in rhythmic music without swamping your mix. One solution to this problem, very common in trance music, is to set a delay to a three-16th-note duration, which means that although the delay repeats never step outside the 16th-note grid, they'll often miss the main beats and therefore remain clearly audible. Mike Senior

With the die-cast chrome tuners, you get to ensure that your guitar never gets out of tune. The natural finish and large pickguard make this instrument a true classic. You can play this acoustic instrument as it is, or plug it into a PA and let the System 53 piezo pickup amplify its sound. You also get a preamp with 2-band EQ for more control over the tone and volume.
I’m starting at guitar too at sixty years old, my opinion is that it’s not the guitar, but the time put into practicing, you can dup any type of sound with the features from amps, and guitar processors. You can even make an electric guitar sound like an acoustic. I purchased a line 6 150 watt amp, and a processor from line six, and I can dup any type of guitar sound. I built my own guitar
Starfield was a guitar brand owned by Hoshino Gakki. In the 1970s, Hoshino Gakki and Kanda Shokai shared some guitar designs and so some Ibanez and Greco guitars have the same features. The Kanda Shokai Greco guitars were sold in Japan and the Hoshino Gakki Ibanez guitars were sold outside of Japan. From 1982, Ibanez guitars have also been sold in Japan as well as being sold outside of Japan [3].
Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type, still widely regarded as the tone machine. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.
With a typical Strat single coil pickup and assuming an instrument cable capacitance of 500pF, 250K tone pot, 0.022uF cap, guitar plugged in to a 1Meg input, the range of the tone control is roughly from 6.0kHz -3dB (tone fully clockwise – with a resonant peak of +7.4dB at 3.9kHz) to 950Hz (tone fully anti-clockwise – with a resonant peak of +4.5dB at 594Hz). These figures vary from pickup to pickup and depending on the instrument cable capacitance.
The prime advantage of Epiphone is that you get a guitar built to the same specs as the Gibson Les Paul, at a greatly discounted price. With that being said, an Epiphone is not equal to a Gibson simply because it shares the same design. The craftsmanship is where the two brands differ the most, as USA made Gibson’s utilize higher quality materials than the Epiphone line. Epiphone uses a cheaper mahogany in the construction of its guitars, while the electronic components are lower quality as well.
With an entire industry surviving off musicians’ insatiable desire for the ultimate guitar tone, it seems obvious that some company would have cracked the code for the greatness. After all, corporate chain restaurants can quantify that if they use X of fat, Y of salt, and Z of sweet in their latest enormo-burger, then consumers across the country will salivate. Unfortunately, it’s not that simple with music.
By 1970, regular distribution of Japanese-made guitars, including Lyle brand guitars, began in America. In the early 1970s, Arai joined with instrument manufacturing company Matsumoku to produce guitars. It is inconclusive if they continued producing Lyle guitars at this time, but they did launch the Aria Pro II line in 1975, which included set-neck copies of the Gibson Les Paul and SG, and Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars.
I just thought you'd like to know that Takamine produced for other names. I've just bought a 1973 Wayne which has a Takamine label inside stating it was made for Wayne. Its a Takamine 375 thats a Martin D35 copy. Wayne were guitar makers in Melbourne Australia in the 1950s and 60s and began importing under their name briefly in the 70s. It sounds amazing.
Each brand has its own distinctions, benefits, drawbacks, and niche which it appeals to. Most guitar players are loyal to one particular brand for one reason or another. Even the style and image associated with the instrument comes into play heavily, here. For example, consider the image cultivated by Jimi Hendrix and his Fender Stratocaster. Not only did he expand the realm of tones that everyone thought the guitar was capable of, he made this particular model his own. It’s an iconic guitar that will always be associated with Hendrix and the blues.

Most bass combo amps and bass speaker cabinets are "front-firing"; that is, the speakers and horn, if a horn is present, aim forwards. However, because very low-pitched sounds are omnidirectional, some combos and cabinets have woofers that point down or to the rear. The deep bass tone radiates from the cabinet in all directions, even when it is pointed downward or to the rear. The Acoustic Image combo bass amp has a downward-firing woofer for the deepest pitches, and another forwards-firing speaker for higher-pitched sounds. The vintage Acoustic brand 361 cabinet had a rear-firing 18" woofer, an approach used in a number of home cinema subwoofer cabinets. The rare examples of bass cabinets that use a large folding horn can also use woofers that do not face forward.
While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
Why do these genres not require the use of a tone knob, or sometimes, require a tone knob to be fully open? Well, for metal and hard rock, first of all, most of the tone shaping happens on the amp and/or on the pedals, especially for those who use high gain distortion pedals. The pickups on typical hard rock and metal guitars are humbuckers, which are warmer and have less treble. Couple that with high gain and high output pickups which compress the signal and also take some of the treble away, and keeping the tone knob open becomes that much important so that the tone will not be muddy and keep its cut and punch. For country, well, I guess that’s just *the* sound of the genre, and wide open Telecasters and Stratocasters are the weapons of choice.

"My part is just a few notes over and over," Iggy Pop once said about the Stooges song "TV Eye," "but Ron created a whole world around that." In Asheton's hands – on proto-punk anthems like "I Wanna Be Your Dog" and "No Fun" – the classic three-digit barre chord felt more like a superpowered battering ram: droning, relentless and almost mystical. (Asheton, who died in 2009, called it "those magical three fingers.") You can hear Asheton's wild-man approach all over the playing of Kurt Cobain, Thurston Moore and Jack White.
: : I have a Vox Shadow that's sunburst, white pick guard that surrounds 3 solid chrome face pickups and the middle pick up has "VOX" engraved in it. 3 seperate volume controls and a master volume control. Tuning keys are all chrome, and the green decal on the face of the headstock reads Shadow, JMI Dartford, Kent. Neck is attached withthe help of a chrome plate, on the back side of the 'plank' body is an access plate for the jack that states made in England. Guitar also has the original roller/tremelo tail piece with palm lever. The numbers of 64728 are stamped on the back side of the headstock just below the tuning keys. Finish is beginning to crack a bit but it's all original, right down to the volume pots that have to be cleaned from time to time. It must be a rather unknown line that Vox had as I can't find out much on it either. Had this guitar for many years. Was handed to me in pieces in an old 'cardboard' case, (that has since gone away) put it back together and added it to my "music room".
Electric guitars are powered by electromagnetism—and electromagnetic induction to be precise. That might not sound familiar, but you've probably used it if you've ever ridden a bicycle at night with a dynamo-powered light. A dynamo is a simple electricity generator with two basic parts: a rotating coil of wire that spins around inside a hollow, curved magnet. As the coil spins, it cuts through the magnet's field. This makes electricity flow through the coil. Two electrical connections from the coil are wired up to a lamp and the electricity generated makes the lamp light up.
In the ’66 American Teisco Del Rey Catalog, the small, humble EP-9T was left over from before (formerly EP-9), with the quasi-Gibson style head and triangular control plate. The only thing new was the Bigsby (thus the T). In the ’66 Japanese catalog, the small thinlines were represented by the EP-2L and EP-1L. The EP-2L looks for all the world like the EP-9T, with the large rectangular pickups with black inserts, controls on the triangular lower bout plate, and a long-armed trapeze vibrato with a curved handle. The EP-1L was the same except for having a single metal-covered pickup at the neck.

A bit underrated and under the radar, Blackstar makes some superb amplifiers at a fraction of the cost you’ll find from bigger name brands. And while it’s a shame they don’t get more recognition, it’s good news for you, the user. This particular amp might just be the best option for apartment living – due to its small stature and low-level volume paired with the fact that it is still a tube amp. But don’t let the fact that it’s only 1-watt fool you – thanks to the simple truth that it uses tube amplification, it can still get plenty loud. Of course, if you’re overly concerned about noise, this option also comes with a headphone jack, and it’s one of the few tube amps to even offer that convenience.

Hi, I’m John Anthony, Playing and collecting Cool Guitars is my hobby, and all of my friends and relatives know it. For the reason, I receive many queries over the phone, email and social media about Best Guitar Recommendation. Which one they should buy now, which will fit them etc. And finally, I created this GuitarListy.com and started putting my suggestions and reviews here.


Replace or upgrade your guitars volume and tone controls with the best quality pots available from CTS, Bourns, Fender, Alpha, Alps and more. From full size to mini pots, long shaft and short shaft pots, blend pots and stacked concentric pots, push/pull pots and more, we have the pot you need! Not sure which pot is right for your project? Then check out the Guitar Electronics FAQ Page for more info on pot values, pot tapers and more.


The honest truth lies with the listener’s ear and capability to identify a sound with an individual player.  B.B. King was known for his tone and only later revealed his secret mentioned above.  It wasn’t even really a secret; it was more of a physical shortcut that allowed him to express himself.  You should choose what feels and sounds best for your own musical expression.
"Vintage" fretwire is most usually known as "medium" fretwire and that size in today's measurements is usually .080-.040"; what you would see commonly on a Fender RI or Martin acoustic.  I mention this as fretwire does vary and some "vintage" wire back in the day on the guitars was as narrow as .070".  It is commonly referred to in Dunlop numbers as 6230.
Fire Guitar Tuner tunes your guitar in seconds. This tuner tunes makes it easy to play in perfect pitch all the time and eliminates any need to buy those expensive microphone tuners at the music shop. Play a note, and this guitar tuner will display it. And once you''re in-tune, Fire Guitar Tuner will incinerate your mind as it lights ablaze in this Tuner''s fabulous glow animation. Why spend money on a guitar tuner when you can have one for free ?

For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.

The Reaction Many manufacturers reacted by making warranties void if amps were driven at full power, some threatened to cut off retailers who sold their amps to bands that played ‘music of the devil’. The parody of this historical contradiction has been rewritten, to fit mythical beliefs that brilliant designers created these amps for what ‘rock musos’ wanted.

“This is a very complicated mix of economy versus market, demand versus what products are they putting out, versus are their products as good as they used to be, versus what’s going on with the Internet, versus how are the big-box stores dealing with what’s going on,” Smith says. “But I’ll tell you this: You put a magic guitar in a case and ship it to a dealer, it will sell.”

Read Full Review The brand ESP that we all know today started its roots as a shop in Tokyo Japan selling custom replacement parts for guitars that quickly gained a good reputation for its high quality. Soon came after the brand manufactured fully assembled guitars that burst in the trash metal seen of the 80’s signing in big name bands to carry their guitars and basses.


This book teaches you how to visualize the notes, which will lead quickly to remembering them. Once you know where the notes are, forming chords becomes easier, which leads to fluid playing in any position. At the very least, if you can identify your root notes, you can bail yourself out of trouble at any time. That skill for resolution serves you in improvisation and the random jams that will provide much of your growth.
Quartal and quintal harmonies also appear in alternate tunings. It is easier to finger the chords that are based on perfect fifths in new standard tuning than in standard tuning. New standard tuning was invented by Robert Fripp, a guitarist for King Crimson. Preferring to base chords on perfect intervals—especially octaves, fifths, and fourths—Fripp often avoids minor thirds and especially major thirds,[102] which are sharp in equal temperament tuning (in comparison to thirds in just intonation).
The name has a long and involved history that is interwoven with that of the resonator guitar. Originally coined by the Dopyera brothers when they formed the Dobro Manufacturing Company, in time it came to commonly mean a resonator guitar, or specifically one with a single inverted resonator. This particular design was introduced by the Dopyeras’ new company, in competition to the already patented Tricone and biscuit designs owned and produced by the National String Instrument Corporation.
This guitar master is actually a custom guitar builder. He started building guitars in 1993. "I've been doing this a long time," Paul says. "It's just really natural to me. I'm weird. I just look at stuff and know how to fix it." When he younger, Paul was good at woodworking, and besides picking up the guitar at 14, he needed another hobby. But learning the craft of guitar repair didn't require a master, simply a book. "Imagine that, great book." He then converted his garage into a shop, and in two years, his custom guitars became commercially viable. "It's the real deal, all high-end neck set stuff." Today, Brian Paul's Guitars are some of the finest guitars on the market. Some of his clients include Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, Jim Suhler, Warren Haynes and Texas Slim. Even Dallas blues legend Bugs Henderson owned one of his guitars.
I am not a real musician but I feel like one whenever I go in there. I bought my guitar there a few years ago. I have taken it and a travel guitar in there to get re-strung and Pat has always been so helpful and engaging. I follow his FB pages and saw him perform an original song "Will you Take My Name". I was so blown away by the song that I actually proposed to my wife by singing a version of that song. (His version is much better!). He has built a great following in a short time and has a nice selection of guitars and accessories. I really like his frequent FB posts of him showing a guitar he is working on, or a song he sings. Also, he features a lot of customers singing and playing whenever they stop in. This store has a great vibe. If you are in the area, stop in even if you don't anything, you will have fun. And if you need something, well then you've come to the right place!
It’s now time for the most challenging step: fitting everything back into the guitar. Don’t worry: if you did everything correctly up to this point, you shouldn’t have any problems getting it back together. You’ll be using extra wire to pull the electronic parts through the F hole and into their mounting holes on the body. It’s best to start with the component that’s furthest from the F hole, which is usually the jack.
Artists all over the world are enjoying the classic looks and premium features of Vintage Guitars. Professional players and producers working with world renown Artists like Gregg Allman, Amy Grant, Josh Turner, and many  more, rely on the great sound and playability of Vintage Guitars. See what they’re saying about the guitars they’re rocking out on every night!
It’s best to perform pickup adjustments while playing through a clean amp. You can more accurately hear the true tone and volume of each pickup when the signal isn’t being compressed or overdriven by a cranked amp or pedal. Listen to the tone of each pickup position, and try to balance the height of each pickup until the volume remains relatively the same when changing pickup settings.
Anything for which they are wired and/or programmed.  One great example is my first real guitar, a Carvin V220.  It had two humbuckers in a sorta heavy angular gibson explorer body.  Each pickup had volume and tone with a 3 way selector for either or both pickups to be on.  In addition, you could toggle switches to split coils on the humbucker to do a good approximation of a single coil pickup.  Further, you could toggle in/out of phase to get a Peter Green tone or other effects.   Tom anderson guitars have great configurations.  I have gone to lighter strats in recent years and usually replace the pickups with handwounds and customize my 5way switch depending on the guitar.   I love true single coils except that I prefer a humbucker in the bridge. 
The version of the instrument that is best known today is the solid body electric guitar. Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker, did, however, offer a cast aluminum electric steel guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1931. This guitar is reported to have sounded quite modern. Audiovox built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as the mid-1930s.
Some guitars have what is called a push-pull knob where pulling the knob will change a setting, or access a different setting. For example, some guitars have one knob when pulled will turn the bridge humbucker pickup as if into a single-coil pickup, which is known as a coil-split. Some guitars like ones from Fender have what is called the Fender S1 switching system where pushing a knob will alter the behavior of the pickup selector.
Cort, a South Korean manufacturer of musical instruments was founded in 1973. Cort specialises in Electric guitars, Bass guitars and Steel-string acoustic guitars. The hallmark of the company is its elegant series of Electric guitars. The Classic rock series, G, M, CR and X series guitars, Sunset series and Zenox series form part of the list. These guitars not only deliver high performance, but also have a great look and feel. It has established its brand name in Indian market by offering high-class products at affordable prices. The company is amongst the best guitar brands in the country.
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.

It’s curious to note that also tauted in the ’39 Grossman catalog was the National Res-O-Lectric Pick-up Unit, designed to be added to National and Dobro amplifying guitars. This was not sold as an accessory, but had to be factory-installed for $25. On single-cone guitars, the bridge assembly/cover was replaced with the pickup assembly, faced in gloss black Ebonoid. On tricone guitars the pickup would be built in to the silver cover. It’s not clear if these were also mid-’37 developments or if they appeared closer to the ’39 Grossman catalog publication date.
Guitar Neck wood Fingerboard Blanks Electric guitar wood Burl Poplar 1pc Walnut Spalted Apple Burl poplar Spalted Maple Olive Spalted Walnut Burl Elm African Mahogany body wood Red Willow 1pc body blanks Plum Red Willow 2pc body blanks Spalted Birch Pear Mulberry Maple Acoustic / Classic guitar wood Flute and Oud blanks Pool Cue wood blanks & Wood Turning Gallery Sold examples Custom Wood Products Binding wood NEW! Gun Stock Blanks
If you’re a very dynamic player who likes to play soft and loud, a compressor is a must have: by raising the soft parts and lowering / adjusting the loud parts, you will get an even sound that works for most applications and won’t make ears bleed: the simplest way to describe it is as an “automated” volume control. The EQ, on the other hand, is crucial if you have a problematic guitar, an amplifier with limited tone-shaping control or, simply, need a creative way to alter the way your guitar sounds. EQ can be placed in front of the amp for shaping the sound going inside the amp or in the send/return (after the amplifier section) as a volume boost/eq boost.
Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 

Also new in ’66 was the SM series, a variation on the E-100 and ET-100 introduced in the previous year, very similar to the Ks except the cutaway horns were flared outward in the classic Teisco “tulip” shape which would dominate later in the decade. These had fairly flat rectangular chrome-covered pickups, with a rectangular indentation stamped in the center and six flat round poles, plus to long half-slots along both outer edges. The SM-2L (Teisco Del Rey ET-210) had the hooked headstock, small striped metal pickguard along the lower body, two on/off sliders, volume, tone, roller bridge and Bigsby-style vibrato. The SM-2L retained the German carve relief of the K series. A plain-Jane SM-2 (Teisco Del Rey ET-200) followed, sans German carve, and with a bridge/tailpiece assembly. The SM-1 (Teisco Del Rey ET-110) had just a neck pickup with volume and tone controls, bridge/tailpiece assembly, no German carve or striped metal pickguard, and the Strat-style head of the previous ET-100.
Fender’s quality is as widely known as their steep prices. It’s no secret that not everyone can afford one of their guitars. This is why they acquired Squier a long time ago, and tasked the company to build more affordable versions of their guitars. In the beginning the quality was iffy at best, but today the situation is completely different. Squire of today is a trustworthy brand that brings cost effective Fender style guitars to those on a budget.

Fender instruments like the Stratocaster and Telecaster feature bolt-on necks and brighter tonewoods such as alder for the body and maple for the neck. They are easy to work on, and an owner with even a small degree of technical knowledge can fit replacement parts without professional assistance. Fender guitars are built to a 25.5-inch scale length, which lends to their brighter, more percussive tone. You’re more likely to see tremolo systems on this type of guitar, and hot-rodded guitars known as superstrats fall into this category.


Many of the best guitars I saw in my trip to Japan were models made for their own domestic consumption. After World War II, U.S. Armed Forces Radio blanketed Japan with American music. As a direct result, rock and roll, country, bluegrass and American popular music all took strong root in Japan creating a vibrant market for good guitars. Although Japanese players would have preferred to be able to buy genuine American Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, the supply of such instruments in Japan was extremely limited and prices were simply beyond the budget of most of the Japanese population. Japanese manufacturers produced a very wide range of instruments from low-priced student models on up to remarkably sophisticated professional-grade instruments, some of which were better reproductions of vintage American instruments than any of the American manufacturers were doing at the time. These high-end instruments are seldom encountered in the USA because they were priced high enough that wholesalers in the USA did not find them economical to import. Regardless of how good a Japanese guitar of that time might have been, if it cost anywhere near the amount of a new Martin, Fender or Gibson in the USA, there would have been no point in bringing it into this country. For example Tak Inoue, the export director of the Morris Company of Matsumoto, Japan, told me at that time that he had approached Fender to offer them Japanese-made versions of the Telecaster and Stratocaster which he proposed they could import and sell at a lower price that the standard American-made models. He told me that he gave them what he considered to be a very competitive price only to be told that Fender would not be interested since their cost at that time to make a genuine American made Telecaster or Stratocaster in their Fullerton, California, factory was actually lower than the amount quoted by Mr. Inoue. Needless to say, it would appear that CBS, the owner of Fender, had a very good profit margin at the time.
While these sum up the most significant Gibson tone woods, other species do occasionally contribute to the brew. Swamp ash lends the Les Paul Studio Swamp Ash a degree of twangy sweetness and a round, slightly scooped midrange, while the most common Gibson fingerboard woods, rosewood and ebony, even make their mark on the frequency spectrum. Rosewood generally helps to add a certain thickness and creaminess to the tone—warming up the voice of a maple neck, or adding depth and cohesiveness to that of a mahogany neck—while an ebony fingerboard, long considered an upmarket option, contributes tightness, brightness, and a quick attack.
Description: 1997 Non Left Handed Model. Body: Laminated Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - String Instrument Finish: Ebony, Natural, Vintage Sunburst
Note that most (but not all) tabs don't display the rhythm with which you should play the notes in the tab. They may break the tab into measures (usually signified by vertical lines in the tab between measures, but they won't tell you the rhythm of the notes within the measures. In this case, it's best to listen to the song while you read the tab to find the beat.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.
A few years ago I wanted a mini/parlor guitar. I tried a few, did not like what I heard in the Taylor line and I did not want another Larrivee. The irony of it is, I did buy a Taylor and now realize it was because it sounded like a Larrivee, bright and even. This is an anomaly Taylor, I know that now. I bought a Larrivee Parlor which is okay but I also have learned that I am not a parlor, mini fan. They, for the most part, do not deliver an even enough sound for me. I have played Lowden, Martin, Gibson, Guild, Olsen, Huss and Dalton. I recently played an Irvin guitar. Wow, what a beautiful line of guitars. I want one. It is my next guitar with its sustain, consistency, brilliance and ease of ...more
Distortion, overdrive, and fuzz can be produced by effects pedals, rackmounts, pre-amplifiers, power amplifiers (a potentially speaker-blowing approach), speakers and (since the 2000s) by digital amplifier modeling devices and audio software.[1][2] These effects are used with electric guitars, electric basses (fuzz bass), electronic keyboards, and more rarely as a special effect with vocals. While distortion is often created intentionally as a musical effect, musicians and sound engineers sometimes take steps to avoid distortion, particularly when using PA systems to amplify vocals or when playing back prerecorded music.
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.
The Hawaiians are likewise hard to identify. One looks to be similar to the later Teisco EG-7L, with a Gibson sort of shape and a pair of offset rocket shapes on either side of the pickup which house roller wheels for volume and tone. A second appears to have a rounded body similar to a Rickenbacker frying pan, looking perhaps like the later Teisco EG-K. This had the same slotted pickup as the J-1, and a single volume control. Finally, there’s an unidentified eight-string lap with an elongated sort of rectangular body and an elevated fingerboard. This had a volume and tone with white knobs, and the tuners were behind the head, rather than sticking straight up, as on later eight-strings.
First off, what makes the sound in an acoustic guitar? On both an acoustic and acoustic-electric guitar, you have the strings that create vibrations when plucked or strummed. That vibration reverberates across the span of the soundboard (top tonewood surface) and also travels down the strings to the saddle and bridge of the guitar. Those vibrations “move” air within the air cavity called the soundhole. The resonance created in the soundhole depends on its depth/size and the tonewoods used to make the back and sides of the guitar. Voila, you now have sound exiting through the soundhole of the guitar.
Coming from Martin's Travel Series, the LX1E Little Martin has smaller proportions, with a total length of 34", body width of 12", shorter scale length of 23" and 1 11/16" nut width. While it can be a bit too small for some, it is easy to appreciate its impressive workmanship, bearing the same build quality and materials as found on their more expensive models. With the LX1E, you can own an affordable Martin guitar that has been proven to be a true workhorse instrument.

When you first start out playing electric guitar, it goes without saying that it all begins with a guitar and an amplifier. Those are the two most basic parts of your setup, and they’re all you need for learning the fundamentals. Once you have a grasp of your foundation, though, you’re probably wondering how professional guitarists manage to get so many different sounds out of their instruments. Effects pedals are the answer to that question.
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
   I am now building several models which I offer as my signature work. I've always had a special affinity for archtop guitars, but as you'll see in this website, I will go wherever the creative impulse takes me. The instruments I am building now are a distillation of the best design ideas I've found in classic instruments, re-imagined and evolved into higher form and function, as fine tools for discerning artists. 
5. Marshall Code 50 1x12 Digital Combo Amp ($249.99): Marshall is the household name of the amp industry and their inclusion on this list was a definite must. The Code 50 boasts more than 100 presets in an easy-to-transport package. As with most of the amps on this list, the Code 50 also includes a mini USB plug-in for ease of recording, headphone capability for practicing late into the night, and even an aux input for jamming along with music on your smartphone. You can even control it directly via Bluetooth and the mobile app. It also delivers 50 watts through a 12-inch speaker so it’s great for practice or rehearsal.
What type of environment are you playing in? This is an important consideration when determining how many watts your amp should have. If you practice in an apartment surrounded by neighbors, a low wattage combo option is going to minimize potential conflicts. If you play live gigs in small club environments, it is possible to get by with as little as 50 watts. Larger venues require a larger amp that can move more air with its speaker. You should also take in to account how many other musicians you are playing with, and if there is a second guitarist, as you will want a tone cuts through the mix as opposed to getting buried.
@Josh – Changing the order of the effects in your signal chain can drastically change the sound you get from each pedal depending on where it was before and where it is now. Can you please send us an email to support@strymon.net with further details including a video recording of what you are experiencing so we have a better idea of what is happening?

When you’re just getting into the electric guitar, there are a lot of items you’ll need to get going. This includes the guitar itself, tuners, straps, an amp, a bag or protective case, a stand, etc. Buying it all piece by piece can be rather expensive. It’s much more practical in financial terms to opt into one of the many starter packs on the market. If you want to know which ones are worth your time, here are the 8 best guitar starter packs for beginners:
An enduringly popular effect, with all sorts of uses for vocals, drums, guitars and synths, is genuine reverse reverb. This is where a reverb tail appears to increase in volume ahead of the sound that gives rise to it — a completely unnatural sound and something that's impossible to create in real time. It's easy enough to do in a DAW application though. First, find the section of audio you want to treat and reverse it. In the DAW I use, Digital Performer, there's an offline plug-in for this. Now apply conventional reverb to this 'backwards' audio — either by playing it through a reverb plug-in and recording it to another track, or by rendering it using an offline process (if your DAW offers this). In either case make sure you allow enough additional time at the end of the audio to capture the full, final reverb tail. In the screen grab I've done this by allowing 1500 milliseconds of post-roll processing.
One last time we must put aside our expensive tastes and put up with the “economy” version of a guitar that is actually much nicer. The full-scale rendition of Steve Vai’s guitar is, in my opinion, legitimately worth every one of the nearly 300,000 pennies it costs. Per the Ibanez web site, there are a lot of Vai Signature models you can pick from:
Get a ruler (or straightedge if you want to be all fancy) that is at least as long as the neck, but not so long that it reaches all the way from the nut to the saddles (and watch it doesn’t lean on the pickups or pickup surrounds either). If you can’t get one between these lengths, and are willing to sacrifice a ruler, get one that’s too long and cut it to length. Alternatively, you can just cut a little out of one edge so that you can still make full use of the other edge of the ruler. Now lay the edge of the ruler along the frets (don’t rest it on top of the nut, saddles, pickups or pickup surrounds).
1) The tuning keys (machine heads) are as bad as it gets and if you're planning on keeping this guitar for a while and making it really workable plan on changing them ASAP and throwing the others away as far as you can throw them - Shame on you Yamaha, you could have at least used some half decent tuners!! These are an insult to your good name. So I replaced mine with Grover Sta-Tite V97-18NA (with brass colored gear) which are the best tuners "for the money" ($40) for any guitar especially for this one. However, be aware that you will also need to replace the Yamaha bushings because the I.D. is too small for the Grover post and, unfortunately,the Grover bushing O.D. is too small for the holes in the Yamaha headstock. The correct bushing that will allow an easy proper fit of the Grover tuning pegs to the Yamaha APXT2 is Kluson MBG65N or B bushings (Google it). If you elect to do this instead of letting your friendly Luthier do it, be advised that when you knock out the stock Yamaha bushings, since they're press fit it may have a tendency to split the wood on the top of the headstock. This one modification will bring this guitar from the level of a toy trying to be a serious contender to the best little guitar that money can buy.
Power amp clipping is not the same thing as preamp/preamp tube clipping. Sending a power amp signal that is getting power amp clipping to a speaker can blow the speaker. Sending a preamp/preamp tube clipped signal through a speaker is not harmful. In practice, part of the "breaking up" amp sound, of a "cranked" amplifier, which is widely appreciated by hard rock, metal, punk and blues musicians, is a mix of preamp and power amp clipping. One of the benefits of using a separate components head system, in which a separate preamp and power amp are mounted in a rack, is that the bassist or bass tech can watch for the clipping warning LED on the power amp and lower the power amp volume, if necessary.
Tuning machines: Geared mechanisms that raise and lower the tension of the strings, drawing them to different pitches. The strings wrap tightly around posts that sticks out through the top, or face, of the headstock. The posts pass through to the back of the headstock, where gears connect them to tuning keys (also known as tuners, tuning pegs, and tuning gears).
However, if you want a small guitar that will give the quality of sound you might expect from a larger guitar, or if you are considering this style as the first beginner guitar for a child or student, you may want to consider other models that are more typical of a guitar suitable for learning, recording or for growing and developing better skills.
In March 2008, Vox unveiled the semi-hollow Vox Virage DC (double cutaway) and SC (single cutaway) at the NAMM show. Notable characteristics include a 3D contoured ergonomic design which not only had an arch top, but also bent back from the neck toward the base of the guitar hugging the player's body. The guitar body was milled from a single block of wood and had a fitted face in combinations of mahogany and ash. A new triple coil pick-up system designed by DiMarzio called the Three-90 emulates a humbucker, P-90, or single-coil tone.
Whoa whoa wait, what? This pop artist? A guitar player? If all you’ve ever heard from Mayer is Your Body Is Wonderland, or Daughters, then you’ve got to give his album Continuum a listen to. He is no Shakespeare, but his guitar playing speaks to your soul. His songs will make most glorified tough guys miss their old girlfriend, and the rest just go to a corner and cry. If you think that his songs are all too depressing, then watch some videos of him playing. His guitar face is priceless.
Similar to five-string bass guitar tuning, seven-string tuning allows for the extra string a fourth lower than the original sixth string. This allows for the note range of B standard tuning without transposing E standard guitar chords down two and a half steps down. Baritone 7-string guitars are available which features a longer scale-length allowing it to be tuned to a lower range.
The difference extends far past just the look and feel.  Roundwound strings have a shorter life, create more string noise, and wear on your frets more, but feature a brighter tone, longer sustain, and lower tension.  You'll also hear more harmonics and be able to grip them better for bending and finger picking.  Flatwounds last longer and have a warmer sound... pretty much the opposite of what we listed for roundwound's.
One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.

Whether you are a beginner or a professional, you can find the right strings for your level and guitar type. Thinner string gauges are typically better for beginning musicians because they are easier to bend with an uncalloused hand. If you are looking for strings to stand up to heavy shredding and produce more volume, then thicker gauges are what you are after.


The Strat didn’t just sound different, its aesthetics and ergonomics were totally unique and innovative for its time. Instead of a standard slab body, the Stratocaster had double cutaways and was contoured in a way that had never been seen on a solid-body guitar. Originally built for legendary western-swing musician Bill Carson, it was quickly adopted by rock ’n’ roll pioneers like Buddy Holly and Hank Marvin, and has been the tone behind countless Top 40 hits.
Input kewords into the searchbox at the top of each page, then click the WHAT'S IT WORTH button. The search engine will find matching pages based on keywords you type into the Search Box. The engine searches all categories of objects, not just this particular category, so you may get some irrelevant items in your search results. Too many results? Be more specific. Not enough results? Be less specific.
This body and headstock shape are identical to my Nivico Balladeer, and both guitars are real keepers.  This truss rod cover would become the standard curved plastic type seen on many Matsumoku-made guitars for the next 10 years.  Of course the Palmer badge is missing, but the Palmer name (as it pertains to Japanese imports) was being used as early as 1964.  I’ve seen Kawai S80s badged with the Palmer name.  If you do a search for vintage Palmer guitars, you’ll come up with all sorts of hits but you probably won’t see too many guitars like this one.  These were probably made for one or two years, and I’d bet the pickups were sourced from local Matsumoto.

I have a Hohner DC. It is either a MIC or MIK. It does not have body, or neck bindings, but in every other respect is very nice. It was one of the first guitars I got when I started paly about 5 years ago. As a matter of fact, I had not played it for over a year - I recently got it out of the case, re-strung it and played it regularly for a couple weeks. I have been going over my colection looking for things I could sell off, but I decided to keep this one.
To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its
The process of building our kit guitars and basses is straight forward and requires little experience in woodworking or in instrument building. The entire instrument can be assembled with a few simple tools. Setting the instrument up for your playing style is also straightforward. We will guide you though the basic process in our instruction manual. For more complex or particular setup requirements, we suggest that you work with a professional for setup - just as you would with any instrument that you purchase.

The GRX70 showcases how good Ibanez is at producing great value guitars, they sure know how to keeps other guitar manufacturers on their toes. It has all the makings of a mid-tier instrument, complete with dive bomb capable bridge and great looking aesthetics, but packed inside a super affordable entry-level instrument. The basswood body with quilted art grain top is gorgeous, and a trio of pickups gives you tons of tones. A standard tremolo handles divebombing and other whammy acrobatics. This axe is perfect for burgeoning rockers who want a versatile guitar for all occasions. All in all, the Ibanez GRX70 gives you a whole lotta guitar for the money!.
Also called a “wah-wah pedal”, the wah was one of the earliest effects designed for guitar players and has remained popular ever since. Basically, a wah uses a pedal and filter to sweep the tonal range from bass to treble, creating a vocal like “wah” sound. Some players also use them as a tone control leaving the pedal set at different settings to get different tones.

Once The Beatles became tied to Vox amplifiers (a deal was struck early in their recording career whereby they would be provided Vox equipment for exclusive stage use), the quest for more power began. John Lennon's first Vox was a fawn-coloured twin-speaker AC15, while George Harrison's was a fawn AC30 with a top boost unit installed in the rear panel. They were later provided with twin black-covered AC30s with the rear panel top boost units. Paul McCartney was provided with one of the first transistorised amplifiers, the infamous T60, which featured an unusual separate cabinet outfitted with a 12" and a 15" speaker. The T60 head had a tendency to overheat, and McCartney's was no exception, so he was then provided with an AC30 head which powered the T60's separate speaker cabinet.
The same no-compromise attitude that gives the Redondo Player its uniquely killer vibe extends to every aspect of its construction. It features optimized bracing for reduced mass and superior resonance, a Graph Tech NuBone nut and saddle for greater sustain, and a Fishman preamp system (with bass, treble, volume control and tuner) that makes it easy to plug in without sacrificing the guitar’s natural sound. The lightweight mahogany neck features a comfortable, easy-to-play, slim-taper "C"-shaped profile suitable for any playing style and its laurel fingerboard and bridge further augment its vibrant tone.
Thanks to the built-in pickup system, you can amplify your acoustic guitar by simply plugging it in, without having to perform any installation or tweaking beforehand. This bundle gives you a reliable 10-watt amplifier for electric performances, a digital clip-on tuner to keep your guitar in tune, a gig bag for safe transportation, a truss rod, extra picks and strings, and a strap.

This is easily the best multi effects pedal for metal, especially if you need an easy to use option with just the essentials packed in. Within the Valeton Dapper Dark Effect Strip, you have a built-in tuner, Higain effect designed for brutal distortion sounds, a lush Chorus to bring out those riffs and add more weight to your sound as well as a Delay effect with tap tempo to allow you to add everything from slap-back delay to long, drawn out echoes. Best of all you have a Boost pedal which throws in +12 dB of gain so you can stand out from the mix when you kick in to a solo or need a certain riff to really jump out.


Epiphone is to Gibson what Squier is to Fender. Meanwhile, the Les Paul is Gibson’s Stratocaster. Probably one of the most famous guitars on the planet, the Les Paul has been played by the likes of Slash, Jimmy Page, and Bob Marley. Epiphone, luckily, has made it available to the world with a price that won’t break the bank. And it’s an excellent guitar for those starting to play rock music.

Fred’s wife Lynn Shipley Sokolow served as our adult student tester. She plays double bass and banjo in the Americana quartet Sugar in the Gourd but is just starting to learn her way around the electric guitar. To evaluate the short-scale/travel guitars, I also consulted a couple of teenagers who are currently learning how to play: 15-year-old Alana Wood, who helped us on our Best Acoustic Guitar for Beginners and Best Ukulele for Beginners reviews, and 13-year-old Charles Lesser.
Yeah, I wasn't meaning to disparage either brand. While not necessarily "cool", they both offer solid stuff and a really good value that really competes with luxury brands. I'm not a car guy, so I'll stay on the guitar side for an example - Schecter can offer a mahogany body with a flame maple top and binding, set neck, ebony fretboard with abalone inlays, 25.5" scale, compound radius, original Floyd, and name brand pickups for $1000, give or take. Seems like you have to get up into Ibanez's Prestige line or the Jackson USA line to get all that, and then you're paying around $2k.

Combo amplifiers are the most popular type of guitar amplification these days. While amp heads are the source of incredible power, it is the versatility, convenience and simplicity of combos that makes them the go-to choice for so many – from beginner to seasoned pro. Combos come in a variety of flavors in all price ranges. While the practice amp and budget markets are awash with combos, there are also some epic premium models such as the Fender ’65 Princeton Reverb, which is a revamp of one of the most epic tube combo amps ever made. .
It’s provided as-is with no support, but it’s still well worth checking out if you’re on a PC. According to the developers, it was born inside an academic research project about the modelling of electric devices, and then applied to the musical instrument field as an evolution of the techniques available in commercial units. Its most important feature is the high precision of the simulation.
Whether you use it to move on to fingerstyle guitar or integrate it into a hybrid technique, mastering the right hand in this finite way will make you a better player. In addition to the progressive book, you can download the song samples, which are enriched with the ability to slow them down, change keys, and set looping points to help you master parts one at at time.
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.
Russell is not only one of the hardest working technicians in Dallas but also a classically trained guitarist with a degree in classical guitar performance from SMU. To supplement his income playing classical guitar, he joined the Brook Mays team before finding a home at Charley's Guitar Shop. "Having a background as a player helps with cutting through the issue," he says. "I think the real part of guitar repair is being able to observe what's going on with the guitar but also understanding what the player is going through."

I have relied on the Sonic Port as a backup rig in case I do have an amp failure. At one point, I kept a Tech 21 PowerEngine 60 on hand to plug my Sonic Port into. Works great for studio and stage work. Again, so much cheaper than AXE-FX which unfortunately, this article plays heavy into spending over $2,000 for the rack mount unit. Don’t forget a decent PA, Monitors, and a Rack to mount it in (another $1000 if not more?). Yea, AXE-FX is sounding worse and worse than bringing a small combo amp..
Anonymous, that's tough one. Usually, breaking the D string would be down to two things - a sharp edge on the saddle (unlikely if you're using a roller bridge) or your technique. The only other thing I can think of right now is the break angle (how sharply the strings pass over the saddle on the way to the tailpiece). Perhaps raising the tailpiece (or feeding the strings through from the front and then passing them over the tailpiece - you could do this second one with the D string only) might help.
Vacuum tubes (called "valves" in British English) were by far the dominant active electronic components in most instrument amplifier applications until the 1970s, when solid-state semiconductors (transistors) started taking over. Transistor amplifiers are less expensive to build and maintain, reduce the weight and heat of an amplifier, and tend to be more reliable and more shock-resistant. Tubes are fragile and they must be replaced and maintained periodically. As well, serious problems with the tubes can render an amplifier inoperable until the issue is resolved. In the 2000s, high-end tube instrument amplifiers (along with a small number of hi-fi power amplifiers used by audiophiles and high-end studio microphone preamplifiers) survive as the few exceptions, because of their perceived sound quality.
Lyndon Laney established his brand in 1967 in Birmingham (England). In those days, he was also playing in a band with a couple of guys you might've heard of: John Bonham and Robert Plant. You might also know Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath) who happened to be one of his first clients. The LA100BL is a must among heavy-metal guitarists, while the KLIPP aims to be more versatile. The AOR (Advanced Overdrive Response) series provides more gain every time, contributing, in part, to the brand's constantly growing reputation. Among Laney addicts, we could mention Ace Frehley of Kiss and Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits.
if you wish to use your computer as an "effects pedal", I recommend IK Multimedia's Amplitube 3 - it has an extensive array of effects and amplifiers with all kinds of crazy and fun tones to mess around with. Theres a ton of effects, so I recommend you check it out. It is a bit pricey though ($199 for the standard edition). If I were you, I would download the Amplitube CustomShop, which is basically a free demo version of the full software.
Compressor pedals add a softening effect too, by reducing the front edge of notes and amplifying their tails. This increases sustain by bumping up the signal as the note fades out. Most compressors allow you to control both the thresholds (upper and lower limits) and the knee (the speed with which the signal is raised or lowered). The big appeal for guitarists is the compressor's ability to simulate the natural compression that tube amps generate when driven at medium to high levels. A good compressor can help thicken up the sound of your guitar and add extra punch to your performance.

Rule 4 - The technology further defines the order. Let's give a couple examples here. If you don't use your noise gate before your compressor, you'll increase the volume of your noise which renders your noise gate useless. If you send an impure signal like heavy distortion to a harmonizer, the harmonizer will be very inaccurate, thus you want to apply distortion to the harmonized signal and not the other way around. If you compress before using equalization, the compressor may act on frequencies you don't intend to keep in the signal, thus you should EQ first.

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Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
Go ahead – visit a music store and spend a few minutes on different guitars. If you see the same models listed here, that’s great. If not, then look for a model that has roughly the same size and shape as the one you’re eyeing. If you’re keen on buying an acoustic guitar online, take note of the model or size that feels the most natural to you, then go for that.
A younger, but very high-quality brand that's also a favorite among country artists, Taylor manufactures some truly investment-worthy acoustic guitars—with a sound that only improves over time. Its creator, Bob Taylor, tested the use of exotic tonewoods in excellent guitars, so he used oak recovered from pallet wood to craft the back, sides, and neck of the Pallet Guitar, an important model originally made in 1995. Taylor's roster of tonewoods also includes Indian Rosewood, African Ebony, Blackheart Sassafras, Blackwood, Cocobolo, Figured Walnut, Granadillo, Hawaiian Koa, Maple, Ovangkol, Sapele, Tropical Mahogany, and several others.

AMAZING. Awesome place. Will NEVER go anywhere else for guitar work again. I am sitting in the parking lot of this place writing this on my phone, THAT'S how good of an experience I had. I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL. What a wonderful person, awesome shop, honest, quality people. And for a steal. Cannot recommend enough!

SOLD OUT : A real find this one is... not your average vintage Takamine you will soon see its also in amazing original superior condition .. this premium example was hand built by the finest Japanese Luthiers at Takamine Gakki. This prime example is the finest Exotic Brazilian Rosewood we have had in yet and we have had some duzies for sure this true Law Suit era Takamine F375S acoustic guitars we have ever had! wow.. and exact copy of the Genius original Martin design of the D-28 exotic....WoW.. the frets look almost new, Martin bone nut and saddle the "s" stands for solid construction and the Solid Sitka Spruce top is super nice amber with age now over the past 37 years and taken care of this California native guitar exhibits its premium exotic woods very proudly just have a look all round everywhere you look...from the amazing Brazilian rosewood sides & the back is A Gorgeous 3-piece back with intricate inlay work to the premium solid mahogany neck..fit & finish is simply put gorgeous. The neck is nice & straight with a perfect Martin like medium V profile 1-11/16ths @ the nut - the action is very good 3-16th @ 12th fret you can adjust either way to taiste no problem and with the bone nut and saddle this guitar has wonderful tone right up there with the Martin or Yairi this guitar is AAA professional grade vintage and is in 100% condition it is not new or mint with minimal dings its condition is JVG Rated as 9.5 / 10 - excellent vintage = beautiful and exotic... please see the pictures for the cosmetics..these Takamine are built as good or better than the Martin it copies the back is quad braced and the reinforced crossbracing of the top should make this finely built instrument last several lifetimes.. Your looking at the best of the best in Japanese vintage exotic & solid construction in astoundingly nice condition...you simply must play and hear this guitar we love it and so will you.. I can't amagain a cleaner example of this vintage you will not be sorry... exotic Brazilian Rosewood tone woods are the best of the best. No need to spend $3000 or even $5000 or more for such an exotic vintage 40 + year old Martin d28....Find it here Email: gr8bids@comcast.net ..
The best advice any guitar player can give when it comes to figuring out which guitar to get is to buy the best model your money can afford. In most cases, this advice is rock solid. Even if you are a beginner who isn't sure whether or not you want to commit to playing guitar long term, you can always sell the guitar with a minimal loss, like a decent car versus a junker.  Think of it as an investment as long as you maintain and take care of it.
The Destroyer is an Ibanez brand electric guitar model (originally) manufactured at the FujiGen-Gakki musical instrument factory for the Hoshino-Gakki Company. The Destroyer model was first introduced by Hoshino-Gakki in 1975 and was based on the Gibson Musical Instruments' Explorer design. The Destroyer has since undergone several design and line changes and has been available in both 6-string and bass versions.

Guitar Center Twin Cities provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Roseville area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Twin Cities can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
DRILLING THE HOLES Now is a good time to drill the holes for the neck, pick up rings, bridge, string furreles, the control plate and cavity. Here is where I wish I had a drill press but I don't, so I just use a hand held drill. It doesn't matter wher you start drilling you holes, just make sure you use the right size bit for the screws that you will put in them later. To figure this out I compare the thickness of the screw minus the threading. A good rule of thumb is to start off with a bit that will produce a hole that is smaller than the screw. If the hole is too small when you try to screw in the screw then you can move up to the next size bit an re-drill. Be careful of the depth that you drill you hole to as well. A good way to do this is to size up the screw with the bit and mark the bit with a peice of tape. This will help you to keep from going to deep.
Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
A comparable alternative at a fraction of the price to the Axe-Fx (which also made the list), the Line 6 Pod HD Pro offers a ton of amp models and effects within it’s 2U rack interface. With over 100+ premium effects, 16 different cabinet models, and even eight microphone models, the Pod HD Pro gives you complete control over every aspect of your tone. All of this is complimented by an intricate display that lets you know exactly what your virtual signal path is. Add the ability to use a mic, bass, or your Line 6 Variax guitar for recording or live scenarios, and you’ve got the best of every realm of music-making at your fingertips. Oh, and to answer the most important question: Does it djent? Yes.
Michael Bloomfield is credited with Eric Clapton for helping seed the renewed interest which compelled Gibson to return the original Les Paul to full production; both musicians began using Les Pauls at about the same time. Bloomfield first played a 1954 Les Paul goldtop (with the strings wrapped around the tailpiece rather than suspended and intonated over a bridge) while with the Butterfield Blues Band in 1966, but he swapped the guitar (plus $100) to guitar technician Dan Erlewine in exchange for a 1959 Les Paul Standard. This guitar was characterised by mismatched volume and tone control knobs (a reflector-topped “tone” knob for the bridge pickup volume, two top-hatted knobs for neck pickup volume and bridge pickup tone, and a cylindrical “speed knob” for the neck pickup tone), a missing cover on the rhythm/treble toggle switch, a truss rod cover with “Les Paul” engraved in script (this feature had originated with the early Les Paul SG models, not the original Les Paul single cutaways), and a crack in the wood behind the tailpiece. Because the guitar was lost in the 1970s (Bloomfield biographers Jan Mark Wolkin and Bill Keenom, in Michael Bloomfield: If You Love These Blues, disclosed that a Canadian venue owner claimed it as compensation after Bloomfield missed a scheduled performance and never reclaimed the instrument), Gibson used hundreds of photographs of the late blues guitarist’s instrument (and consulted with Bloomfield’s family) to produce the limited-edition Bloomfield signature. The company produced one hundred Bloomfield models with custom-aged finishes and two hundred more with the company’s Vintage Original Specifications finishing in 2009. They reproduced the tailpiece crack on the aged version, plus the mismatched volume and tone control knobs and the “Les Paul”-engraved truss rod cover on both versions, while including a toggle switch cover. The headstock was characterised by the kidney-shaped Grover tuning keys installed on the guitar before Bloomfield traded for it, and the pickups were Gibson Burstbucker 1 (at the neck) and Burstbucker 2 (at the bridge).
alright i think we all need to stop hating on john mayer. I don't think that he really would even call himself one of the best guitarists of all time, he's obviously not far enough into his career to be criticized about this stuff. But i love him, and he eventually will make it on this list. Oh, and for all you who say he sucks and whatever, if he is so bad then why has he played with so many of the people who actually should deserve to be on this list?
If ever there were a forensic investigation to identify the true biological father of punk rock guitar, all DNA evidence would point clearly to Johnny Ramone. The guitar style that people most associate with punk—briskly downpicked barre chords executed with blinding precision at breakneck tempos and marshaled in service of concise catchy song structures—is the invention, progeny and proud legacy of the man born John Cummings on Long Island, New York.
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