Sawtooth ST-ES Carc is another affordable electric guitar that both beginners and intermediate players can use for practising their skills. It comes with a sycamore body with a black finish and has a pickguard or vanilla cream color. It comes with almost all the accessories needed - tuner, amp, picks, cables and basic online lessons too. You also get a gig bag with it which very few guitars give you and normally you have to buy it separately.
There are a couple of important things to look out for when buying an acoustic guitar for the first time, one of which being plastic hardware – especially if it’s used on the bridge or the tuning pegs. Unless you are paying less than a hundred dollars for the instrument, there’s no reason why a good beginner guitar should have a plastic bridge or saddles, which aren’t particularly durable and do nothing for the instrument’s tone or sustain.
Filters can also be sweeping filters controlled by a wah-wah pedal. Wah-wah pedals are a foot controlled pedal that kind of looks like a car’s gas pedal. As you press the pedal forward, the filter moves to the lower end of the the sound spectrum, leaving the mid- and high-end sounding more pronounced. As you bring the pedal back, the high end is filtered, leaving a muffled sounding guitar tone.
Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.

For more balanced tone and increased sound quality, the Agile AL-3010 comes with two tone and two volume controls, plus three-way pickup switch.The guitar comes with professionally installed strings sitting tight on an ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and solid abalone trapezoid inlays. This gorgeous guitar is highly recommended for the beginner and even the professional alike.

The simplest tone control is the one inside practically every guitar. That knob is a single potentiometer set up as in Figure 1. The signal from the pickup coil goes through the internal impedance of the pickup itself, then to the output jack. The capacitor C and resistor R are in series to ground from the guitar signal. C shunts signals above some cutoff frequency to ground. R prevents this by resisting the signal flow to ground. As R is made smaller, more and more treble is lost. However, the bass level remains at the same volume as it was before the treble cut.
This is another really nice 12" 16 ohm guitar speaker from 1973, and is a matched pair with the one listed earlier, it has its original Pulsonic H1777 cone, and is in excellent condition, there it also has a tiny repair on the edge of the cone but this doesn't affect the sound in any way.Cash on collection preferred but carriage can be arrange if required.
While it may not look like a classic amplifier, if you're into classic rock style tones for home use, the Yamaha THR10C is probably the amp that you really need. Ideally, we would all be rocking with big amps, but not all of us have the space or acoustically tuned rooms to let loose. And since we are using low volume amps more often, Yamaha designed their THR line to be the best in providing you with just that - low volume performance for jamming, practice or recording. The THR10C is part of this line, featuring the same 10W setup and stereo 3" speakers, but with tones that replicate the sound of classic amps. It also houses some essential effects which include reverb, delay, chorus and more. In addition to the usual clean to overdriven tones, Yamaha also equipped this unit with acoustic guitar amp and bass amp models, so you can directly play or record with those instruments. All these features are packed in a distinct and portable profile, and is powered either by the supplied AC adapter or via 8 x AA batteries.
Tone wise, flamenco players appreciate the snappy and bright tone that this guitar reproduces, while acoustic guitarists find the playability and feel to be easy to transition to. Whether you want to focus on classical flamenco style, or you are merely looking to the sound of nylon string guitars into your collection, the GK Studio will not disappoint. The combination of its solid European spruce top and Cypress back and sides is a treat to look at and great to listen to. You can visit Cordoba Guitars for the complete specifications. You can also see two more Cordobas in our nylon string guitar roundup.

Best brand in price/quality relation. I have 4 guitars, an epiphone explorer goth made on korea, and Jackson KV2 made on usa and 2 ibanez. RG320PG P2 and a RGT6EX, both made on indonesia. The first one is the cheaper, but the sustaine, action a comfort is very nice for a bugget guitar. I've played bugget guitars of other brands, and ibanez is far superior. In fact, my RG320 P2 is nice as some others guitars that cost twice of it price. Mi RGT6EX is excellent, to me must worth $1000 USD but the real price is close $800 USD or less.


So far so obvious, right? But what's easy to miss is that this same scale shape also gives you A major and D major - they are the same chord shape, just starting on different strings. Now it's true that they're not quite the same physical shape, but that's just because of the funny little tuning 'kink' between the G and B strings (See Why is the guitar tuned like it is?). Once you iron that out, E, A and D are the same shape, as are the barre F and B chords.
"The Choice of Professional and Student Musicians Everywhere" This eight page catalogue was included as an insert in the 1963 annual "school music" issue of Downbeat magazine (September 1963). As well as keyboards and pedal steels, this catalog contains seven guitars, three basses and ten amplifiers - from student guitars such as the Musicmaster and Duotone to professional models like the new Jaguar.
There are a couple of tips that can help you out, however. First – as a new learner – you don’t need a stage-ready amplifier or even a high-end boutique amp, as they are both far too powerful and pricey for someone just picking up the hobby. Second, you should look into amplifier versatility. As a new player, it’s likely that you’re still figuring out your own style – and being able to change up your sound without the need for a bunch of extra peripherals is incredibly valuable in figuring that out.

We think this is one of the best multi-effects pedals as it’s packed to the brim with a range of classic and modern Boss effects. In fact, there’s eight simultaneous effects categories that can work in unison, and each of those categories has multiple effects types within. This means you have access to a vast array of Boss effects as well as COSM amps derived from the Boss GT-100.
Note that the information presented in this article is for reference purposes only. Antique Electronic Supply makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this article, and expressly disclaims liability for errors or omissions on the part of the author. No warranty of any kind, implied, expressed, or statutory, including but not limited to the warranties of non-infringement of third party rights, title, merchantability, or fitness for a particular purpose, is given with respect to the contents of this article or its links to other resources.

Make sure that only the notes you deliberately play actually sound. Guitar strings aren't isolated systems like the tone generators of a synthesizer; if you simply leave them open they may ring even though you've never actually played them. Always watch out carefully for such “rogue sympathetic vibrations” and make sure you properly stop strings that sound in unintended ways.
Every generation there's one guitar master whose touch can make a guitar purr; whose grasp of his skill is so complete that just by looking at the guitar, he knows her problem; and whose ears can pinpoint what your tone is lacking. They are legends. And the mystique that surrounds these guys is hard to penetrate. Swank is one of those guitar masters. "I think part of my mystique now is that I'm just flaky and don't return phone calls," he says. "It's not that I'm some kind of badass." Swank was first introduced to the business of guitar repairing when he saw another master's work. "I just thought it was a pretty noble pursuit."

Determining the phase of pickups: attach pickup leads to an ohm meter, and then tap on the pickup with something metal, note direction the meter reading moves. Also note which wire is attached to the red test lead. Attach the nect pickup to the ohm meter, and tap on it. If ohm meter reading moves opposite of the direction it did for the first pickup, reverse the leads. When the meter reading moves the same direction, not which wire is attached to the red lead. it is the same as it was for the first regardless of it's color (i.e."hot" or "ground")
Simple mistake that the beginners do is not selecting the right pickup on the right time. For example Normally they put the switch for the bridge pickup for soloing or do the powerchords. But then, to do some plucking, clean strumming or ryhthm, they still using the bridge pickup. So the sound is so dry, They should change it to toggle number 2(or for 5 way switch, toggle number 2 or 4)

I use the boss me-8 for 15 years, now with the boss me-25 i have the same kick ass sound plus some more effects and customisations, also it comes with a beutifull surprise that i don't even expect, this guiar pedal is also an audio interfase that suport digital audio via USB, is really amazing you will not regret, it doesn't come whit a power supply only batteries, buy one separatly.


When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.
“Top shelf” simply refers to any product that is sufficiently uncommon and/or of significantly high enough quality to place it “above” the rest of the “regular” crowd of products. In a shopkeepers parlance, the top shelf was where you placed things that you wished to be visible, but were, in actuality, were rarely sold. The best stuff was kept up and just out of reach of the daily rabble and only brought down when someone who truly appreciates the quality (and is willing to pay the commensurate price) came into the shop.
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Air Norton
DP193
The Air Norton started out simply to be the Airbucker version of the Norton. DiMarzio thought it would make a distinctive-sounding bridge pickup with high-gain amps, but they soon discovered that it's a radically neat neck pickup, too. The tone is deep and warm, but not muddy. It's hot, but not distorted. It's even got cool harmonics, which are really unusual for a neck humbucker. The patented Air Norton magnetic structure reduces string-pull, so sustain is improved; and pick attack and dynamics are tremendously controllable and expressive. Combine the Air Norton with The Tone Zone in the bridge position for a perfect blend of power and tone.

The Tone Zone
DP155
Have you ever heard a bridge pickup that made a guitar sound like a giant mosquito attack? If you've run into this problem, The Tone Zone is the solution. The Tone Zone is hot enough to qualify as a high-output pickup, but it has a wider dynamic range - hard picking will produce a lot of power, and softer picking will be much cleaner and quieter. It's got tremendous bass and low-mid response to reinforce the bottom end and make the overall sound bigger. The highest single notes have depth, and chords sound huge. Patented dual-resonance coils reproduce more overtones than you'd expect from such a fat-sounding pickup. It makes a great match with an Air Norton.

Case sold separately.
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Pete Townshend turned his guitar into a machine gun. That was the actual sound he went after, slamming his guitars into speaker cabinets and toggling the pickup-selector switch violently. “To me the guitar was a symbol,” explained the Who’s lead guitarist. “It was a metaphor for a machine gun. And the only thing you could do with a machine gun in the 60s was break it across your legs. That’s what I did.” You can hear these specific sonic strategies on songs like My Generation and Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere.
Reverb sits at the other end of the tonal kaleidoscope, serving usually to add warmth and depth to a clean tone. Practically speaking, reverb simulates the sound of your guitar being played in a larger physical space. Imagine shouting at the top of your voice in a cloakroom. Then imagine doing the same thing in a church and you’re somewhere near there. Ok, that’s an extreme example, but approximating the sound as it reverberates around is quite a seductive thing when applied to a guitar. There are plenty of good examples of it being used to add a bit of life to an otherwise sterile clean tone.
Finally, vintage gear tends to display more variation from unit to unit relative to modern gear. Fifty years ago the technician winding pickups might have been distracted and left the pickup on the winding machine a little longer then normal, resulting in a coil with extra windings of wire and a hotter output. Modern standardization is usually a good thing-you’re less likely to encounter unwanted surprises. On the other hand, the relatively casual standards of the past sometimes resulted in happy accidents.
In addition to building world-class custom basses and guitars, our luthiers also perform a wide variety of guitar repairs, restorations, modifications and upgrades. Whether you have an electric guitar, acoustic guitar or a bass, new or old, feel free to bring it by the shop for a free assessment. We have the experience, skill and equipment to provide maximum playability.
Very nice. I'd love to hear it. 12 strings seem to emphasize the difference among guitars, the 335-12, the Firebird 12, etc. I like the sound of the Rick, but playability is an issue, you might go through three or four before one feels right, then they are so easy to pull out of tune. But you've got a totally unique variety one of a kind variety there.
A middle ground between solid and hollow-body guitars, semi-hollows are hollowed out but have a solid block of wood running through the center of their bodies. This achieves the increased sustain and reduced feedback of a solid-body guitar while retaining the mellow tones of hollow bodies. For this reason, semi-hollow guitars became exceedingly popular with blues players like Chuck Berry and Freddie King. Their duality — sweet and mellow but also some awesome, crunchy sounds — makes them great all-purpose guitars with classic sound.
Back in the mid-60s, a desire for independence in business led to John Skewes forming a small musical instrument agency and wholesale business based at his home near Leeds, England. Over time, his new business steadily began to take off, and soon included throughput of some self-branded lines of musical merchandise. That effective early decision to carry self-branded merchandise continues to this day, with their signature Vintage® acoustic and electric guitars and basses which were first produced and sold in 1985. Today, Skewes is the largest family-owned independent musical merchandise distributor in the U.K. and the Vintage ‘family’ includes Fret King® electric guitars, Pilgrim® Banjo’s and Mandolins, Laka® Ukuleles, Encore® electric and acoustic guitars, and Kinsman® cases.
Yes, he wears a KFC bucket on his head and a Michael Myers mask on his face, but he's a genius. Buckethead (real name Brian Carroll) plays every style, from country to death metal. Albums like 'Monsters and Robots' and 'Population Override' are must-haves for any aspiring guitarists, and instrumentals like 'Nottingham Lace' and 'Too Many Humans' take some beating. - Floods
A tung oil-finished rock maple neck, and a slightly more curved fretboard radius of 13.75 inches are the other small modifications to the ‘speed’ features on the MD200. However, it has a thinner bolt-on neck as compared to the MD400’s wider mahogany set neck. That said, both neck profiles remain a shallow “C” shape, and the guitars’ dramatically beveled cutaways give you ample room to reach the high notes.
Then, there are the venues where all you get is a vocal mic or two, where you're left to curate your sound all by yourselves. This category accounts for the vast majority of places a young band will play, and if you can hone your tone here you can hone it anywhere. What's most important is that you keep your amps low enough to allow the drummer to play at about 80% intensity. That way, the audience can actually hear all those important vocals, and when your drummer kicks it up to 100%, and you stomp on your distortion pedal, the audience will actually feel a shift.
Our basic no frills guitar Denny designed to go head to head with $1000+ guitars. Magazine reviews and customer testimonials say it actually outperforms many well known $1500 models. If you want the look, feel and sound of a high dollar acoustic with 50% easier playability this is the best guitar we offer. Shipped wholesale direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
If you’re new to the world of guitar pedals, it can be a little daunting if you’re thinking to yourself “which guitar effects pedals do I need?”. Maybe you’ve bought your son or daughter a new guitar for Christmas or their birthday, or you’ve decided to really get serious when it comes to changing your sound up and you want to know where to start, what guitar effects pedals do and what sounds different guitar pedals make. Either way, we’re here to help with our handy guide to guitar effects pedals, complete with sound examples.
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1]
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.
By panning the distant mics to the opposite side of the mix from the close mic, you can create interesting panning effects for solos. "If it's a rhythm part, you get this huge sound because the whole thing is spread across the stereo spectrum." When double-tracking lead or rhythm parts, a useful trick is to reverse the panning of the direct and distant mics. "If there were two guitarists in a band, I would record them like that, so you got a wall of sound that had a transparency that would allow the drums and bass to come through."
Dude I totally agree with you,Eddie Hazel was awsome.And Add Ernie Isley (he learned from Jimi Hendrix when he played with the Isley Brothers),And Carlos Santana(his oloder stuff,check out the Borboletta album from 1975),and if you like Hendrix and stevie Ray why isn't Robin Trower (Robin Trower Live) on this list ?Also the guitarist from the band Slave(he was17 when they cut the album with "Slide"on it).Most of these are Metal guitarists,I prefer a guitarist that can make the hair on the back of my neck stand up when they play.Someone that makes you feel different emotions when they play.Just because you can play super fast doesn't make you great.
When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
The National String Instrument Corporation for manufacturing these louder guitars was founded probably in 1927, in Los Angeles, by John Dopyera, George Beauchamp, Ted Kleinmeyer and Paul Barth, when production and advertising began. The company was officially certified as a California corporation in 1928. For a detailed accounting of those early years, I recommend Brozman’s book, The History and Artistry of National Resonator Instruments (Centerstream Publishing, Fullerton, California, 1993). This is a horribly confusing relationship, so stick with me; we’ll try to put it right.
Even with the myriad finish options, this latest model looks very much like the original Strats from Fender's original production line. As a testament to how effective the original design is, most of the specs and even the hardware design are followed even to this day. Speaking of specs, the current iteration features the same double cutaway alder body and bolt-on maple neck with a scale length of 25.5", narrower nut-width of 1.685" and SSS (Three Single Coil) pickup configuration. Giving this guitar its authentic quack and chime are three V-Mode Strat Single-coils.

In recent years, convolution reverbs have become both affordable and commonplace. These differ from synthetic reverbs insomuch as they work from impulse responses (or IRs), recorded in real spaces to faithfully recreate the ambience at the microphone's position when the IR was made. Sometimes these are referred to as sampling reverbs but there's no sampling involved as such, even though the process seems akin to sampling the sonic signature of a room, hall or other space.
The AEG10II combines laminated spruce top with mahogany back and sides, and packs both in a thin profile body. Thin bodied guitars, while more resistant to feedback than their larger counterparts, don’t have the breadth of tone or the volume of a full sized acoustic guitar. The cool thing about this guitar is that, it’s one of the cheapest ways for beginning musicians to get a solid gigging instrument.
An excerpt: “The Dobro brand name has been identified with resonator guitars since 1929 and is currently owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Despite its registered trademark status, the Dobro name has at times been used generically to refer to woodbodied instruments with 1) an aluminum cone or “resonator” mounted so that the cone opens toward the top of the instrument and 2) an 8-armed spider assembly supporting the bridge.”
Maybe a more modern, streamlined strap is better suited to your personality. No problem: the best-selling El Dorado Durango Suave Leather Strap uses the same top quality material but in a smoother style that's ideal for acoustic or electric rock guitarists. It comes in a variety of colors so you can seamlessly customize to your favorite looks. Comfortable, adjustable and lightweight, this thick edge-stitched leather strap travels easily wherever you go.
The Salamander Grand made by Alexander Holm (details above) who sampled his Yamaha C5 Grand and is quite well known for having a great sound. Most sf2/sfz versions seem to be lacking the proper dynamics, have latency problems or have been oversimplified. This sf2 version has addressed these issues yet retains its essential character including optional resonance but removes other non-essential sounds such as pedal noises.
The basic function of the volume knob is to change the level of your guitar’s volume output in a smooth and even way. But there’s more to it than that. Some players use the volume knob as a means of boosting their signal to make solos pop out. For example, if you keep your volume dialed in at seven or eight and perhaps lean on your amp a little more for output, you’ve got two or three more notches to ride your loudness up via the knob when it’s really time to burn. No need to spend money on a volume pedal, and unlike distortion or overdrive pedals this doesn’t change your sound much.
A rackmount effects unit may contain an electronic circuit nearly identical to a stompbox-based effect, but it is mounted in a standard 19" equipment rack, which is usually mounted in a road case that is designed to protect the equipment during transport. More recently, as signal-processing technology continuously becomes more feature-dense, rack-mount effects units frequently contain several types of effects. They are typically controlled by knobs or switches on the front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface.
*We build all of our Custom Shop and Semi-Custom instruments from scratch and on demand - therefore, Custom Shop and Semi-Custom orders are fulfilled in the order in which they were received. These times can vary due to demand and the custom options you choose. Our production/assemble time frame: 20 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
As a total beginner, my wife and i visited a local music shop and spent about two hours talking to several of the employees about string instruments (acoustic guitars, ukuleles, and electric guitars). They answered our questions, taught us enough to play a few chords and let us sample their guitars and amps, stopping in every few minutes to answer our questions as they came up.
The Epiphone Company is a musical instrument company which was founded in the year 1873. Epiphone is specialized in making Guitars and are one of the largest producers of guitars in the world. Epiphone has several ranges to choose from, as they brand them in different groups. Few of the Epiphone ranges of guitars are, Epiphone Sheraton, Epiphone Casino, Epiphone Texan and The Dot etc. Besides guitars Epiphone also manufactured upright basses, banjos and other forms of stringed instruments.
While SG Guitars kits are sold in a number of different timber varieties, if you are looking to match the original as closely as possible you will be best selecting a model constructed with a Mahogany body and Maple neck with Rosewood or Ebony fretboard. * Gibson has recently transitioned from Rosewood to Richlite due to New CITES Regulations For All Rosewood Species.
Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.
The questions I get asked in response to people reading my stuff on guitar wiring often relate to the 5-way pickup selector switch so I thought I’d write a brief explanation of how it works. Understanding how the 5-way switch on your guitar works is key to successful guitar wiring. Knowing what goes on inside the switch may sound like a simple, maybe trivial, detail but it’s something we all need to understand and it’s not as easy as it first seems.
By the late 1950s, the Les Paul was considered “staid and old-fashioned” as well as too heavy and expensive, no longer competitive with the Stratocaster, and by 1961 Gibson stopped producing the traditional Les Paul in favor of a lighter redesign called the SG. The mid-1960s, however, brought a resurgence of interest in the Les Paul, a development credited to one man and one album: Eric Clapton, using a Les Paul plugged into a Marshall Bluesbreaker amplifier as recorded on Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton (the “Beano” album, 1966),[13] set the standard for tone for a new generation of guitar players in blues and rock and roll (see Keith Richards’ contribution to the Les Paul legend below in the section ‘Renewed interest in the Les Paul models’ below). [14][15] Clapton was initially followed by American guitarist Michael Bloomfield and British guitarist Peter Green, and the subsequent rise in the instrument’s popularity was such that by the late 1960s Gibson reintroduced an updated Les Paul and a variety of other instruments “in its mold”, including a bass guitar.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar brand, which is established in the year 1957. They provide Acoustic, Bass Guitars and Semi-Acoustic Guitars at different price segments. The company is owned by Hoshino Gakki. Their headquarters located in Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. They also manufacture amplifiers, mandolins and effect units. They become one of the top ten best guitar brands in India. The price range starts from Rs. 13,299/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit Ibanez.com.
Some of the most impressive pieces of equipment come in small packages and in the shape of an item you would not expect to be as good as it is. The proof of this is the deceptively simple looking Mugig Portable Amplifier for Electric guitar, with 10W of power. This piece of equipment is on the big side of small, but is perfect in every single aspect of it, other than the size. The design is simple and understanded, the ease of transport is guaranteed, while the sound takes over the mind and heart of the musician and the crowd instantly. It is possibly the best electric guitar amp that I have gotten to mention on this list.
So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.
We specialize in the repair and restoration of stringed instruments and Guitar repair in Nashville, and the surrounding area. Our services provide for stringed instrument repair and maintenance  of all makes and models.  We also sell stringed instrument related accessories. Contact us for all of your repair and restoration needs. We love rescuing injured instruments, and helping them make music again.
It’s apparent right away that Acousticsamples knows how to sample a guitar, regardless if it’s acoustic or electric. All frets on all the string have, of course, been meticulously sampled and taken through a round of guitar techniques: slides, mutes, hammer-ons, pull-offs, staccatos, fret noises, and a plethora of other articulations — 53 different samples per fret/string.

Maintaining these items does help though, perhaps every year or so remove the cover plate or pickguard and clean out any dust building up on the switch and contacts, it'll make them last for years to come so it's worth the minimal effort. You'd perhaps clean the fretboard and frets, so it's worth thinking about the other, hidden, functional parts too. 
This style of volume effect rhythmically reduces and swells the volume of the signal in a regular cyclic fashion.  Often heard in Country and Western type guitar tracks, tremolo was commonly built into older amplifiers and is one of the earliest recorded effects.  The speed and depth of the effect is controlled on the pedal by way of one or two potentiometers.  When set to the tempo of a song, the player can produce an extra layer of rhythm on top of what is being played.
TAB uses a series of hyphens to represent the strings. Each string is identified on the far left by the name of the note produced when played open. The high-e (string 1) is at the top; low-E (string 6) is at the bottom. There is no restriction for how long a line of TAB can be, but for readability it should be kept short enough to prevent wrapping on a web-site or printed page.

Except I wasn’t. Because, really, I could only make two types of sounds. There was the clean, flat, boring, plugged-in-acoustic one. Or I could push the little red button on my starter amp and get a muddy, cloudy, mess of a distortion. However, I was, at this point, somewhat blissfully unaware of what I was missing. I made do with what I had and spent my evenings rocking my house (sorry family).


Complex though some of these techniques are, probably the most powerful use of multi-miking I've encountered during my investigations comes courtesy of Jack Douglas, who makes creative use of phase cancellation between microphones. "For guitar overdubs, the best EQ in the world is the phase EQ, which you get by using multiple mics on a speaker. For example, take a Shure SM57, a Sennheiser MD421 and your favourite condenser, and set them up in a triangle with the two dynamics at an angle up against the grille, but off axis. Then take your favourite condenser mic, put a 10dB pad on it, and place it about a foot away, facing the speaker, on axis.
I have owned Fender amps and Line 6 amps and while they have been "ok" amps, none of them come close to my newly acquired Mesa Mark V 90watt and 4� - 12 rectifier cab. Amp is super versitile and the time is out of this world. I knew I'd hit the jackpot the first time I plugged up to one. Mark V pairs nicely with my variety of guitars including PRS Holcomb sig, Fender Tele and Strat, Schecter Hellraiser, and Epiphone Les Paul. There's a tone in there for everyone, every guitar and every style of music... you just have to be willing to sit down and get to know the amp. Mesa Boogie is definitely the brand for me so I cast my vote in with them. Great company with quality amps and super friendly/helpful custom service.

The list of musicians who are (or who have been) in love with their vintage Fender Bassman amps—especially the 4x10 tweed variety made between 1957 and 1960—is pretty much endless. Just for starters (past and present), there's Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Mike Campbell, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmie Vaughan, John Fogerty, Josh Homme, Brian Setzer, the guy up the street from me... . Again, this is just the tip of the iceberg, people. After all, many professional music industry analysts have heralded Fifties 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest amps—ever.


If you’re into guitar and its majestic world, we strongly advise you to get your hands among the best options. That way, the musical enigma will reach its pinnacle. We here would help you around with the list of best and famous guitar brands available in the nation at present. To be fair, even the best guitarist in India uses these ones for their musical rendering.
Guitar amp modeling devices and software can reproduce various guitar-specific distortion qualities that are associated with a range of popular "stomp box" pedals and amplifiers. Amp modeling devices typically use digital signal processing to recreate the sound of plugging into analogue pedals and overdriven valve amplifiers. The most sophisticated devices allow the user to customize the simulated results of using different preamp, power-tube, speaker distortion, speaker cabinet, and microphone placement combinations. For example, a guitarist using a small amp modeling pedal could simulate the sound of plugging their electric guitar into a heavy vintage valve amplifier and a stack of 8 X 10" speaker cabinets.

I bought a Yamaha EC-10 classical at a garage sale for $5.00. It was still in the cardboard box and never played according to the seller. The guitar is full size and looks cool and has real good volume and good bass, but I'd still like to get more bass out of it. I'm thinking of making some modifications to my guitar so that I can fit it with actual bass guitar strings, nylon ones. A friend of mine said I'd wreck up my guitar if I did this. Would I wreck the guitar putting bass strings on it or could I make a bass out of it?

If you’re a very dynamic player who likes to play soft and loud, a compressor is a must have: by raising the soft parts and lowering / adjusting the loud parts, you will get an even sound that works for most applications and won’t make ears bleed: the simplest way to describe it is as an “automated” volume control. The EQ, on the other hand, is crucial if you have a problematic guitar, an amplifier with limited tone-shaping control or, simply, need a creative way to alter the way your guitar sounds. EQ can be placed in front of the amp for shaping the sound going inside the amp or in the send/return (after the amplifier section) as a volume boost/eq boost.
The HOF is one of the single best examples of a convergence of price and quality features that we've ever been able to find. While we can't mention pricing in this article, we'd recommend clicking through and checking the retail price on the HOF, then comparing it to the other reverb pedals in this list. As far as value, the HOF is nearly a perfect 10.
Ibanez' strategy to have virtuoso guitarists as endorsers have paid off big time, allowing them to not only produce signature instruments, but to also improve on their production line guitars using the ideas they compiled from various artists. Among their many signature instruments, the Ibanez JEM series is easily one of the most easily identifiable, thanks to its affiliation with guitar wizard Steve Vai and its unique monkey grip handle, which is carved into the body.
He revolutionized music by combining two different guitar styles who were begging to be played together, blues and country. It was through this courage and confidence that Berry was able to convey his slick attitude that made everyone stop and listen. Sadly, however, even though his lyrics and performances were positively received, the artist himself did not have as positive a reception. He was said to be quite hard to get along with… but that didn’t stop his band swinging along. A sign of complete trust in what they were achieving together.

Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.


I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.
The Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co., Ltd. was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902 in Kalamazoo, Michigan when he brought in a consortium of investors to finance expansion to keep up with demand. Orville had been selling his hand made instruments since 1894 and was awarded a patent for his one-piece designed mandolin in 1898. He also invented Archtop Guitars around that same time by applying similar lutherie techniques to those used on violins.
These acrobatic guitarists used humbucking pickups and the more aggressive Floyd Rose style tremolo bridge to create the hard rock edge that began to be defined in the late 70’s and 80’s more technical playing styles.  These instruments now include much higher output and even active electronic pickups, and their recessed cavities to allow the tremolo bridges to make the distinctive “dive bomb” effects that Van Halen made famous in his solo “Eruption.”  Other distinct features include thinner necks and larger frets with flatter fret boards that many technical players prefer for their flashier techniques.
A Delay or Echo pedal creates a copy of an incoming sound and slightly time-delays it, creating either a "slap" (single repetition) or an echo (multiple repetitions) effect. Delay pedals may use either analog or digital technology. Analog delays often are less flexible and not as "perfect" sounding as digital delays, but some guitarists argue that analog effects produce "warmer" tones. Early delay devices actually used magnetic tape to produce the time delay effect. U2's guitarist, The Edge, is known for his extensive use of delay effects. Some common Delay pedals are:
If you are looking for a guitar that is not only surpassing quality levels but also looks classy, Gretsch is the one you require. The company certainly makes some genuinely beautiful instruments that appeal your eyes. Although, some Gretsch guitars come with a considerable price tag, yet they certainly worth the money. Likewise, you can also find several hollow and semi-hollow body guitars at Gretsch that are quite affordable. It means every player from all levels will surely find something of their interest over here.
If you are interested in a more a price friendly model, it is recommendable that you give this model produced by Davison Guitars a good look. According to its manufacturer, the unit comes shipped with a handful of useful accessories such as a practice amp, a case, a strap cord and a very practical DVD that is said to help beginners play the instrument in no time.
The F Series Martin electrics were before my awareness of the diversity of the guitar universe, but I recall the appearance of the GTs, which got to stores in Wisconsin in the summer of ’67. I recall admiring the cool shapes and burgundy finish, although I’ve never been a fan of DeArmond pickups and, rightly or wrongly, always considered them a weakness. As already indicated, the GT Series was hardly a winner and fell victim to the general guitar malaise that swept the world guitar markets in around 1968. The same guitar bust that did in Valco/Kay and a host of Japanese guitarmakers did in Martin’s archtop electrics.
Your first step should be to think about what you’d really like to add to your sound. If you like the clean tones you get from your amp but can do without the buzzy onboard distortion, consider adding an overdrive or distortion pedal to your rig. If you’d prefer to experiment with chorus, a phaser or a pitch shifter, start there. There are no wrong answers when it comes to effects, and the units you choose and how you decide to use them are part of the creativity of playing guitar.
16-Series: Style 16 guitars were first introduced in 1961. Later, they were the first production Martins to utilize sustainable, native woods such as ash and walnut, as well as the first to implement hybrid A-frame “X” bracing. Today, these models use solid woods such as mahogany, East Indian rosewood, koa, sapele and maple. Models include DC-16RE Aura, OMC-16E Koa, D-16 GT, 000C-16RGTE Aura and the J12-16GT, a 12-string jumbo-size guitar with the series 16 appointments. Most -16 series instruments use the Martin long scale, 25.4″.
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Thanks to the built-in pickup system, you can amplify your acoustic guitar by simply plugging it in, without having to perform any installation or tweaking beforehand. This bundle gives you a reliable 10-watt amplifier for electric performances, a digital clip-on tuner to keep your guitar in tune, a gig bag for safe transportation, a truss rod, extra picks and strings, and a strap.
I purchased one online a little over a year ago. looks great and sounds even better. I had a serious problem with it staying in tune, changed the tuners and nut, it helped but not to the point where it needed to be. Too ban because this guitar plays and sounds great. I sold it for half the purchase price to someone not so concerned about sounding so in tune.
if you wish to use your computer as an "effects pedal", I recommend IK Multimedia's Amplitube 3 - it has an extensive array of effects and amplifiers with all kinds of crazy and fun tones to mess around with. Theres a ton of effects, so I recommend you check it out. It is a bit pricey though ($199 for the standard edition). If I were you, I would download the Amplitube CustomShop, which is basically a free demo version of the full software.
While there are some obvious quality gaps, they do appear to be closing as time passes on. The hardware used on Epiphone is getting better, and the presence of the new ProBucker Pickups helps to elevate the brand to new heights. The fact of the matter is, while Epiphone is viewed as just being a cost friendly alternative to Gibson, guitar players gravitate to the brand anyways for its own special sound. While it may use the same Specs as a Gibson, they are far from equal guitars, including in the sound department (4).

Vox's first electric guitars, the Apache, Stroller and Clubman were modelled after solid-body, bolt-neck Fenders, which at the time were not available in the UK. A four-string Clubman Bass followed shortly after. These first guitars were low-priced, had unusual TV connector output jacks and were produced by a cabinet maker in Shoeburyness, Essex. Vox president Tom Jennings commissioned the London Design Centre to create a unique new electric guitar, and in 1962 Vox introduced the pentagonal Phantom, originally made in England but soon after made by EKO of Italy. The first Phantom guitars were given to The Echoes to trial and were used by them until 1970. They were used on many of the recordings by The Echoes and records they did with other artists such as Dusty Springfield. Aside from the unusual body and headstock shapes, Phantoms featured copies of the Fender Stratocaster neck and its attachment, the Strat's three single-coil pick-ups and standard vibrato bridge that in this case copied a Bigsby unit. Aside from being a bit awkward to hold for seated playing, the Phantom guitars now approached professional quality, performance and price. Phil "Fang" Volk of Paul Revere & the Raiders played a Phantom IV bass (which was eventually retrofitted with a Fender neck). It was followed a year later by the teardrop-shaped Mark VI, the prototype of which had only two pick-ups (rather than three) and was made specifically for Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones, again using a Bigsby-like "Hank Marvin" bridge. By the end of the decade, Stones bassist Bill Wyman was shown in Vox advertisements playing a teardrop hollow-bodied bass made for him by the company, subsequently marketed as the Wyman Bass. Many guitar gear authorities dispute that he ever actually used the instrument for recording or live performance. See also Vox Bass Guitar. Vox experimented with built-in effects and electronics, with guitars such as the Cheetah, Ultrasonic, and Invader offering numerous built-in effects. Ian Curtis of Joy Division is known to have owned two white Vox Phantom VI Special effects guitars which had push button effects switches on the scratch plate. Amongst many innovations were the Guitar Organ, which featured miniaturised VOX organ circuitry activated by the contact of strings with fret contacts, producing organ tones in key with guitar chords. This instrument was heavy and cumbersome with its steel neck and external circuit boxes, and rarely worked correctly, but was a hallmark of the ingenuity of this company.

: : I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.

In 1977, Gibson sued Hoshino Gakki/Elger Guitars for copying the Les Paul.[21] In 2000, Gibson sued Fernandes Guitars in a Tokyo court for allegedly copying Gibson designs. Gibson did not prevail.[22] Gibson also sued PRS Guitars in 2005, to stop them from making their Singlecut model. The lawsuit against PRS was initially successful.[23] However, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the lower court decision and ordered the dismissal of Gibson's suit against PRS.[24]


Here we have a sweetie from the late 1970s folks they just don' make them like this anymore this is the RARE High End Lawsuit 5053 model this model was discontinued decades ago. This guitar was made nearing 40 years ago of woods said to have been aged 20-30 years at time of its being built.... food for thought. Fresh release from the JVGuitars Vintage Vault is a beauty seldom seen in this configuration and in this condition we have collected many 5053 Alvarez lawsuit era guitars not all are like this one is SPECIAL this is a must see and hear beauty! Based on the Martin top of the line D-45 this Japanese crafted D-45 copy was crafted with top workmanship only the top luthiers were allowed to use this precious expensive aged Brazilian Jacaranda rosewood on this guitar its back - sides - fingerboard - bridge and headstock are ALL made of this exotic tone wood, the neck looks to be a high grade Honduran Mahogany and proudly still displays it's original imported by Saint Lewis Music gold Medallion and fancy SLM truss rod cover see pics The top is Solid Sitka spruce this guitar is detailed and adorned with much perfling and inlay top to bottom including its fingerboard and headstock, this example is in top playing condition and cosmetically excellent as well and is VERY RARE in deed to find one so excellent. The neck is a nice handful like the old Martin a medium slim profile, its beautiful fingerboard is excellent as are its frets.... Headstock is striking with its A over A inlay in mother of pearl, tuners are original and still doing an excellent job, This guitar has the tone only the Exotic wood series guitars can produce unique rich and dynamic with excellent volume and clarity a fingerpickers delight. Just freshly received a JVG setup with a new Martin Bone & compensated sadle along with a fret dress and a new set of Martin 80/20 Phosphorius Bronze strings 12's x 54 for a substantial tonal upgrade from its old plastic. Overall rated 9.0 +++/10 well preserved it is over 40++ years old and has been lovingly played and well taken care of all these years is not new or mint of course it clearly is well above average used / vintage This comes with a good hard shell case ... and will protect it for the next 4-5 decades. Wonderful players guitar in excellent vintage condition when will I ever see another like this??? its here as of today ask if serious about owning this gem Thank you for your interest in our vintage guitar contact Joe to buy this guitar at: JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come.

Made famous by George Harrison in the ‘60s, the jangly Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string electric guitar has become perhaps one of the most iconic 12-string electrics. With a semi-hollow body and thru-body neck, the 360/12 is able to create a unique tone that is difficult to create with other 12-string guitars. Though this model has undergone many changes and seen many iterations through the years, the newer Rick 360/12 models have a slimmer neck and are still highly-sought instruments.
SOLD OUT: ASK we may have another in stock Here we have a wonderful example of the Alvarez answer to the classic Martin 000-18 now famously linked to the Eric Clapton version from Martin om guitar today. Imported to the US by Saint Lewis Music 36 years ago. This fine example of the Alvarez 5014 is in excellent vintage condition you will not believe that she is over 36 years old when you see this in person you will realize it has been amazingly well cared for these past 3.6 decades. Its fit and finish is excellent as is its play action / neck angle ... this guitar is a pleasure to play and is truly EASY on the eyes... The neck is 1-11/16" at the nut and very comfortable to play with very little visible play wear to fingerboard or frets one will notice that this example is WELL above average condition for this age of guitar its really rare to see. Its beautiful SITKA SPRUCE top is solid and the back and sides are excellent grade Mahogany as is the neck please refer to the pics ... with nice details like its herringbone rosette, celluloid tortis pick guard, exotic Brazilian Coral Rosewood headstock overlay this guitar is more fancy than the other 5014's we have had and is in near mint vintage condition. The woods are well aged and the tone and volume has nicely opened up and aged like fine wine it takes time... a lot of guitar for this kind of price. Crafted in Japan over 36 years ago and kept in Amazing condition all these years just for you... Nicely set up with a NEW Martin Bone Nut & compensated bone saddle here at JVGUITARS. get this gem before she's gone! questions let me know... jvguitars@gmail.com .

It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.
A friend lent me this banjo and I got it working and sampled it. Its a 5 string closed back banjo. The fifth string being tuned to a high "g" note (half the length of the neck). Its this string and the closed back that helps give you the bluegrass sound (the high string ringing the "g" note throughout each of the chords with syncopated fingerpicking patterns). This has a standard mapping with variations of long release (to hear the whole sample) and reverb.
Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
Here we have a VERY WELL MADE 1978 Vintage Japanese Quality Replica of G!b$@n Dove Acoustic guitar. This is a "SUPERB" top of the line model its Premium woods used in its construction along with very good workmanship see the bindings and the detail wow...and has now over the past 28 years has wonderfully aged into a very nice vintage guitar in its own right. The Vintage aged spruce top is of a high quality on often seen today with a woderful aged finish, also see the sides back & neck all made of premium grade mahogany WoW! The finish is SUNBURST and was done by a master no doubt I compair this very favorably with any G!b$@n for its fit & finish and sound! Believed to be from the same factory as the Aria and a few others exported to St. Lousi music in the 70's...this example is in very good - excellent original condition rated 8.5++/10 Quite a clean example. The frets are in good condition the neck is straight and tuners work well all and all a very enjoyable player with a wonderful rich tone. A Gig bag or case is optional and is available. Dont be fooled by the low price under $400 this guitar would cost over $1200 today out of Japan! Thie is a Bargain find get her before shes gone. .
The 2555X Silver Jubilee reissue has the same silver vinyl covering used on the originals, and looks just as handsome. The controls are pleasingly familiar, with a simple front panel layout featuring controls for bass, mid, treble, presence, together with a preamp gain and two master volume controls - one for lead and one for rhythm. A push/pull switch on the output master volume changes channels, while another on the gain knob flips the 2555X into rhythm clip mode, changing the clean channel into something a lot more aggressive. The third rocker switch changes the output stage mode from pentode to triode, dropping the power from 100 down to around 50 watts, and softening the attack a little. The sparse rear panel also features a series effects loop, a fixed-level frequency-compensated DI output, and a jack socket for a single-button footswitch, used to change channels. Overall, the 2555X is built to last and look good for a long time, with Marshall's typically high build quality and attention to detail. Apart from its association with Slash, Joe Bonamassa, and various other high-profile users, the main reason why 2555s are so sought after is their sound. We're pleased to report that the reissue amp is tonally as accurate as it possibly could be, with perhaps a touch more gain and low-end punch than the original. The 2555X accurately reproduces the original tone - and with a few minor exceptions, the look - of the original, at a price that's very reasonable compared with the competition, especially for a UK-made product.

The Kent 800-series hollow bodied guitars all had asymmetrical bodies and the pickup closest to the neck was tilted. There are several Kents that had symmetrical hollow bodies and no tilted pickups. The pickups are either humbuckers or wide single coils with covers. They resemble Gibson ES-style guitars. The necks and headstocks are very similar to the Kent 800s. They're probably newer than the 700s and 800s. I won’t be covering those here.
Dick Dale is a prominent Stratocaster player, who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 1960s, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin–guitarist for the Shadows, a band that originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was Hank Marvin’s sound that many musicians, including the Beatles, initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster.[citation needed] However, in 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon acquired Stratocasters and used them for Help!, Rubber Soul and later recording sessions; the double unison guitar solo on “Nowhere Man” is played by Harrison and Lennon on their new Stratocasters.[10][11][12][13]

I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.
While there are cheaper Strats under the Squier sub brand, the Standard Stratocaster is the way to go if you want a budget friendly one with with the Fender logo. This guitar is fondly called an MIM (Made in Mexico) Strat to differentiate it from the American made version. While some elitists will tell you that the difference is noticeable, many others attest that it's hard to spot the difference in an actual blind test - making this a true to form Standard Stratocaster, only this one is not made in the USA.
Accompanying the Supro frying pan in the ’36 Peate catalog was the Supro amplifier. This had a small, rectangular cabinet with a round grillplate with the screws attaching the speaker showing around the edges. The grille cover was still similar to a resonator cover, with large diamond cutouts, backed with cloth, and finished with black wrinkle paint. A leather handle sat on top, and metal bumper guards graced the lower corners. No information is available regarding specs.
The entry point for guitar pedal self-assembly is the effects pedal kit. A lot of the work such as designing and manufacturing the circuit board, drilling the enclosure, and selecting suitable parts has already been done for you. With a little care and careful following of the instructions, there’s no reason not to have a first time success with a pedal kit.
A thermally engineered centre block and bracing make this 335 acoustically louder, open and with more clarity. The 'burst top and back also look more modern than vintage, while the translucent dark brown/ almost-black sides and neck-back finish add contrast that creates a classy appearance, along with the nickel hardware. We also get a lightweight aluminium stop tailpiece with locking studs, but this is all-very-classic ES-335 fare, such as the small block inlays and the small fleur head logo. Again, Gibson's build specs tell us we have MHS 'buckers and here the 'Memphis Tone Circuit' includes matched pots with a tight five per cent tolerance, with the same 'orange drop' tone caps as the ES-275.  Plugged in, it's like all our Christmases have come at once. There's a more solidbody response here, as you'd expect, and it really pushes out the sound. It's expensive, but as an investment, this is one of the best electric guitars on the market.
You can do this using a fairly slow tracking time in Auto-Tune so that the bend dynamics aren't changed in any obvious way — it's just that when you finish bending, the note will come to rest on a precise value. Not that I'm suggesting you need to do this, of course, but the day will come when a client plays a never to be repeated take that is perfect apart from a few bend intonation problems...
GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is the free, modular and expandable effects processor from Native Instruments, combining creative effects routing possibilities with ease-of-use and pristine sound quality. The included FACTORY SELECTION library provides one stunning amp with 17 cabinet emulations, plus 13 effects and sound modifiers to shape and enhance any audio signal.
Time controls the length of time between any two repetitions of your signal. It is most often measured in milliseconds (ms). Most delay pedals don’t have a delay-time readout that would enable you to determine exact delay times in milliseconds, so you typically just adjust the Time knob to get an approximate time based on the unit’s available range. For instance, the Boss DD-7 (street $179) has a Mode knob that selects between four time ranges—up to 50 ms, 51–200 ms, 201–800 ms, and 801–3200 ms—and the Time knob then adjusts the setting within the selected range.
The advantage of this specific package is that you’ve got everything you need to get started right away: guitar (duh), amp, strings, tuner, guitar cable, picks, gig bag, strap, and instructional DVD. Those of you who just wanna get a guitar and start, this is your choice. Squier also makes similar package, but I recommend this over the Squier because the parts (electronics) are higher quality, although the Yamaha costs a little bit extra.
The way you connect your amp, speaker and DI box depends on whether the DI box has a built-in dummy load.If miking isn't practical, or you don't want to find space for a soundproof speaker/mic box, then perhaps one of the available DI options will give you the result you need. I was once reviewing an analogue guitar preamp that provided several programs, both clean and overdriven, and I noted that one of the clean settings sounded really superb. When I checked the manual, I found this was the bypass position! The reason it still sounded good was that the unit was matching the high impedance of the guitar to the medium impedance of the recording system and, for clean sounds, you can get this same effect by using any good-quality active DI box that offers a high-impedance (500kΩ or more) input. A little compression will add density and 'spring' to the sound (experiment with the attack time to get the best 'pluck' sound, as too fast an attack can squeeze all the life out), while reverb will put back the missing sense of space.

Regardless of your age, gender or musical preference, you deserve to hone your skills on a guitar that's built by dedicated craftsmen who are just as passionate about music as you are. Thankfully, you don't need to look any further for a beginner guitar that perfectly suits your skill level and influences. Before purchasing your first guitar, there's definitely a few things to consider. For one, you should think about your own music tastes. Is there a sound that you're hoping to achieve? Maybe you have a certain band in mind whose style you'd like to replicate. If so, it helps to do a little research on what that musical artist uses in terms of gear. The good news is that this catalog has plenty of acoustic and electric guitars to choose from. In fact, many of the most well-known and trusted guitar brands specialize in their own affordable yet high-quality beginner models, including Epiphone, Fender, Yamaha, Martin and countless others. For an ideal electric guitar that's specifically designed for enthusiastic novice players, the Squier Bullet HH Stratocaster has everything a beginner needs to take their talents to the next level. This special version consists of pitch-black hardware throughout, right down to the black-taped humbuckers. Other features include three-way switching, synchronous tremolo and a rosewood 21-fret fingerboard with maple neck. Overall, the Squier Bullet HH Stratocaster is a remarkable axe for any budding shredder. This category also contains a wide range of starter bundles, such as the Ibanez JamPack IJV50 Quickstart dreadnought acoustic guitar pack. Combining all of the essential ingredients that a beginner guitarist needs to begin their musical journey, this package includes a beautiful V50 natural-finish acoustic, an accurate electronic tuner, a gig bag, strap and an accessory pouch. With so many beginner options available in the world today, there has never been a better time in history to learn the guitar. Whether you have ambitions of fame or just want to strum along to your favorite songs, the sheer joy and satisfaction you can get from learning the guitar is unlike anything else, and whatever you're looking for, you could bet that this section has it.
Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.

Swan7 offers the best quality guitars for most musicians. Based in Brooklyn, New York, Swan7 provides superior quality musical instruments for the music lovers. They are specially recognized due to their durability, reliability, and affordability. Hence, no matter if you are looking for a budget-friendly choice, or are yearning to buy an expensive model, Swan7 will satisfy your thirst for the best guitar.

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Now, none of this should take away from the actual tones, which are beautiful, even when not fully convincing.  I haven’t commented on Instant Guitar’s GUI yet and that should tell all you really need to know. It gets the job done well, but looks unfortunately ugly — or at the very least bland and not matching the high-quality of the sounds found in this line of guitar VSTs.
Fuzz was originally intended to recreate the classic 1960's tone of an overdriven tube amp combined with torn speaker cones. Oldschool guitar players (like Link Wray) (citation needed) would use a screwdriver to poke several holes through the paperboard part of the guitar amp speaker to achieve a similar sound. Since the original designs, more extreme fuzz pedals have been designed and produced, incorporating octave-up effects, oscillation, gating, and greater amounts of distortion.
Beginner amps aren’t going to be packed with features, but they should include good clean and distortion sounds, plus a decent EQ layout to shape your tone. Part of your journey as a newbie guitarist will include discovering what tones you like and don’t like, and that’s hard to do with a cheap amp that only produces one generic sound. If your first amp has some reverb or onboard effects, that’s a bonus.
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Now I know the image above will give some people fits. Just the idea of doing a gig without your favorite amp roaring behind you is enough to send people to their sheds, grabbing pitchforks and lighting torches. This article is about why some guitarists choose to go direct at gigs. Going direct doesn’t replace the traditional guitar/pedals/amp formula that has powered popular music for over 60 years. Bass players and acoustic guitarists have gone direct for years, and technology is catching up to the ears of electric guitarists. Of course, no one is trying to tell every guitarist to do this, but it does seem to have merit in certain situations. Those situations are exactly what we will be talking about here. 
The amps have a simple control set on the front panel: all versions have Gain, Tone and Volume controls except for MV50 Clean, which has Treble, Bass, and Volume. Also on the front panel is a small "VU" meter, and a 1/4" input jack. On the rear panel are a 1/4" speaker output jack, and a 1/4" headphones/line out jack. The amp includes cabinet simulation at the line out jack, and can thus be used as a DI to go straight into a mixer or recorder. There is also an EQ switch to select between "Deep" and "Flat." The Deep setting is intended for use with smaller cabinets where mids and highs tend to overwhelm the low frequencies, and Flat is designed to allow the amp to work with larger cabinets where the lower frequencies are more naturally present. Also present on the rear panel is the DC19V in jack, and the ECO on-off, standby-on, and Impedance switches with the following two exceptions: MV50 Clean has no Impedance Switch but instead has an Attenuator switch allowing the choice of either full power out, 1/10th power out, or 1/100th power out, and MV50 High Gain, which has no Impedance Switch but instead has a Mid Ctrl "minus/Norm/plus" switch allowing boost or cut of the amp's mid range.
James Williamson was the man who facilitated Iggy Pop’s transition from self-lacerating Stooges frontman to solo artist, icon and all-around elder statesman of punk. In a way, Williamson was the only man for the job. He shared Iggy and the Stooges’ Detroit garage rock roots and was a friend of Stooges founding guitarist Ron Asheton during the mid Sixties.
Collectors grade 1964 Harmony H-59 Rocket near mint condition. These guitars are so hard to find in this excellent condition. This one is a 9 out of 10. Great action, straight neck, Gold Foil Pickups, and that rocket look too. She has a few very small edge nicks on rear of headstock, a few slight tiny cracks on center of back in grain, and one small edge ding. Also some very slight age checking but this guitar looks great! All are nothing to be alarmed about and not obvious when looking at guitar. This is the finest example of an H-59 we ever came across. Guitar is completely original with great color and grain. Comes with chipboard period case. Just reduced to $1,299.99 complete.
The primary difference in tone between the solid body and hollow body guitar is the high end bite one associates with the solid body guitar. From the biting rhythm of guitarist Nile Rodgers to the supersonic leads of Eric Clapton and David Gilmour, Stratocasters have found favor with so many guitarists because of their versatility and their timeless tone.
In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).
Certain features make Vintage® guitars a “bigger bang for the buck.” Subtle changes to traditional guitar designs have been made so they perform much better. For instance, on the spring block, the holes are staggered in a way that allows the strings to leave the block and pass over the saddles at a consistent angle that helps keep those strings in tune. Trev also developed tuning keys called EZ-LOK™ that work like a locking tuner, but actually don’t require any mechanical manufacturing. There’s nothing to unwind when you’re slacking the strings using the vibrato, and they always come back to pitch. The same goes for our pickups. Trev doesn’t have a high-dollar pickup range to protect, so he can produce pickups that will sound as good as any company can wind anywhere in the world.
Certain guitar brands are renowned and respected worldwide, and you don't have to be a player to be aware of them. Companies like Fender, Gibson, Epiphone, Ibanez, Yamaha and many others have built a solid reputation for providing exceptionally crafted guitars. In fact, these names are consistently endorsed by the greatest players of all time. However, you'll find more than enough guitar brands from lesser known manufacturers as well; these smaller companies take enormous pride in offering models of equally extraordinary playability, tone and construction.
Wah pedals can sound eerily similar to a human voice, and they were actually a favorite of Jimi Hendrix, who many have said possessed the most expressive guitar playing amongst all the great guitarists. Wah pedals are great to activate right when you’re about to take a solo and when you really want to make it sound like you’re speaking with the guitar.
Slicer – A dynamic effect that sounds like your guitar tone is chopping in and out. This percussive effect is akin to sequencer-type effects used by synthesizers. The effect turns the volume of the signal on and off, and sounds like the signal is being “chopped up” or “sliced” in a specified pattern. The BOSS SL-20 Slicer features 50 patterns to turn your guitar into a groove machine!
What people may not know is that they have a very affordable line of entry-level guitars.  This line continues the legacy of craftsmanship and prestige that comes with owning a Taylor. Whether you look into their line of Baby Taylors – 3/4 sized guitars that play better than many full-sized budget guitars, or you look into their entry full-sized acoustics, Taylor will not disappoint you.
Want to switch from pristine cleans, to vintage crunch, to face-melting distortion within seconds? You’ll probably want a modeling amplifier. Based on digital sound processing, modeling amps will combine many (sometimes hundreds) of iconic, vintage and modern amp sounds into a single unit, easily selectable at the twist of a dial or press of a button. Of course, the downside to modeling amps can be their recognizable digital tone, but when this means you have a whole guitar store worth of amps at your disposal it doesn’t tend to put many guitarists off.
The ADA MP-1 was a legend for it’s superior versatility at the time of it’s release. Since first becoming available during the 80’s, players vied after it for it’s midi switching capability via footswitch. Paul Gilbert is most famous for his loyalty to the amp during the spawn of his career.  It runs on two 12AX7 preamp tubes and has three main voicings — Solid State, Clean and Distortion. One downfall of this amp stems from it’s lack of an input volume control, but thanks to a host of mods available nowadays for this thing, one can look really look past this minor flaw. On top of that, you can find them used for around $250! A steal for 80’s tone-in-a-box.
When you start to look for that great beginner's electric guitar, focus on an instrument with good-quality wood and reasonable workmanship. That's the most commonly accepted method of choosing a low-cost electric guitar for a beginner. Guitar manufacturers tend to cut corners with cheaper guitars by using, for instance, cheaper pickups and hardware. But for the guitarist who gets more serious about playing, these are all upgradeable parts that can be swapped out for higher-quality parts. So begin with a good-quality wooden frame and upgrade as time and money allow.

• We'll add EQ to give some polish and let the guitar cut through a little better in a mix. Enable a stage in the standard channel EQ (which comes after the inserts in the signal chain), and choose the Parametric II response. Add a boost of around 4‑5dB at 3.5kHz, with a Q of 0.2.This screen shows the VST Audio Channel Settings and the roster of effects used to create our basic guitar rack.
• Why fret ends get sharp: Sometimes the end of the fret wire can become sharp or, more accurately, protrusive at the sides of a guitar’s neck. Besides being rough on the hands, this is an indicator of a trickier problem: that the fingerboard has become dry and shrunk. This means that the guitar has been kept in an environment that lacks the proper humidity. More careful storage is the ultimate answer, but using lemon oil on the fretboard also helps prevent this from happening by moisturizing the wood.

Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.
yea, i’ve looked on a lot of websites. The way the 5-way switch is explained here helps a lot. Actually, the Dimarzio site has the closest wiring schematic that I’ve seen. I tried it and I got 2 out of the 5 positions to work. The problem is that all 3 pickups are running on both the working settings, just the bridge is more defined on the one setting and the neck is more defined on the other.
In general, the typical situation is that HSH gives me options of cleaner/thinner/clearer tones which aren't as achievable with HH (even with volume and tone pots in use!). These are options I use very frequently, and I'd feel pretty restricted with HH! Though of course, this isn't the case for everyone. Indeed, I'm quite fascinated at the variety of tones Ron Thal and Andy Timmons get from the overly-simple SH set up they prefer!
Early electrics weren’t built for distortion. The idea was to create a loud, clean sound and, with a few notable exceptions, that’s what players who utilize this type of guitar are looking for today. But even without overdrive this design has one inherent problem: As the volume goes up, hollow-body guitars become highly susceptible to feedback. The next level of electric guitar evolution, the semi-hollow body, made a few strides in dealing with this issue.

Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.
Guitar Center Repairs is your go-to spot for expert stringed instrument repairs, upgrades and servicing. Located inside every Guitar Center store, our staff of experienced, certified technicians will keep your guitar or other stringed instrument in peak playing condition and help you get the most out of your investment. We also repair and modify other equipment like effects pedals, amps and more at select locations. Set up an appointment or stop by any Guitar Center today.
When gluing a set neck guitar it’s important that you don’t use an excessive amount of glue. The glue should be applied to the base of the neck and base of the neck cavity. Try to limit the amount of glue so that it doesn’t come into contact with the edges of the neck or pickup cavity as this can impact on the tonal quality of the guitar and sustain.

Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black
There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.
If you are looking into a list of the best guitar practice amps chances are you plan on practicing… a lot. The chances are also high that you are a beginner and the idea of getting yourself into this unknown yet fascinating world is somewhat confusing. While figuring out which guitar you want is a big step forward the next step is not that much easier. You got to find a good amplifier. The market is full of all kinds of amplifiers. Starting from tube amps over $2000 for pre-level players and going down to amplifiers under $100. And yes, maybe $100 amps are not the highest in quality but they do the job, especially if you have done your research.
From the 1920s to the 1940s, upright bass players who wanted to strengthen the acoustic sound of their instrument had to use small portable PA systems or guitar amp combos designed for acoustic guitar or archtop guitars. Since these systems were not specifically designed to amplify bass instruments, it is unlikely they provided good low-frequency sound reproduction (particularly guitar amps, which are not designed to go down as low in pitch as the low E (41 Hz) and A (55 Hz) strings). In the early 1920s, it was very hard for an upright bass player (indeed for any musician) to find any amplifier and speaker system to make their instrument louder. The only speakers that could be bought during the early 1920s were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output", and the cone speaker (which is widely used in modern-era amp cabinets), was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers were PA speaker setups; while an upright bassist could potentially have used one of these early PA systems, they could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
“Volume pedals work well just before any delay or echo effects, as you can fade in and out of delays smoothly. A volume pedal at the very end of the chain just before the amp input will control master volume, and can also be used as a mute. Reducing the signal at this point will also reduce any noise. I put clean boosts right at the end—also just before the amp input—to ensure that any effects earlier in the chain would not be overloaded.”

Epiphone Broadway Electric Guitar Make way for the Broadway, Epiphone’s big, bold and blindingly beautiful hollow body archtop guitar. The Epiphone Broadway has been a jazz club staple since the 1930s and it continues its soulful career with new appointments. The big-bodied Broadway features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, a hard maple neck, a rosewood fretboard and Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups.
Upgrade your guitar or bass and get the full sonic potential from your pickups with a complete electronics parts kit. Our Guitar & Bass Super Kits include the best quality parts from CTS, Switchcraft, CRL, Orange Drop and Alpha. Kits available for most popular types of guitars and bases. We also have the PMT Passive Sonic Expansion Control kits to take your instrument to the next level of tone perfection!
Placing a texture-based effect such as chorus before distortion basically means that the chorus effect will be distorted rather than the distorted tone getting some chorus. That may sound kind or original and appealing to some but trust me – you do not want to waste your distortion pedal effect by distorting an already subtle effect. This very concept is extremely important in determining the correct placement of your effects.
1963 D-28e. This model is a paradox. Martin took a great guitar with great flattop tone, and then added DeArmond pickups and knobs to the top. This ruined the tone (a flattop develops most of its tone from the vibrating top). And the DeArmond pickups don't amplify the acoustic properties of the guitar. So you end up with a electric guitar sound, while playing a flattop. Because of this, the value for D-28e's is really low. Some people go to the extreme of re-topping this model. This essentially gives you a vintage Brazilian rosewood D-28, but with a new top. A double edge sword of originality versus usability. Martin made only 284 D-28e's from 1959 to 1964, before giving up on the model. Rare, but for very good reason (no one wanted them, then or today!).
Most players dream of having comfortable, smooth action on a guitar. With the PLEK, the most optimal string action possible for any instrument can be realized. This gives the individual musician an instrument that plays exactly the way he has dreamed of. Optimal playability on a guitar makes it sounds better with notes that ring true and clean. There is no fret buzz under normal playing conditions and the intonation problems that occur because of high string action, are eliminated. You can hear and feel the difference.
There are of course, other buttons and positions featured on guitars. BB king’s Lucille had a switch to toggle different values for R11 (thus going from moody chords to punchy ‘Lead’ with a finger and no need for extra gear). Advanced guitars may have phase and antiphase switches for humbuckers or dual pickups. The jackson 5 Telecaster I think is an example as it has both a phase and anti-phase wiring on their pickup selector.
Thanks for the list. Michael Gurian was a luthier in NYC who began as a classical guitar maker then began making steel string instuments in the 1960’s , I remember seeing his instruments shortly after i bought My first Martin in the dog years of the 70’s along wi Don Gallaghers instruments. Recently acquired one of his jumbos in Brazilian rosewood made in 1971 still in remarkable condition. He was among the first to compete as luthier with the big boys at Martin and gibson , even before Bob taylor jumped in.
In August ’68, Ovation added three more models – the Hurricane 12-string and the Typhoon I and II basses, all with chrome hardware. The K-1120 Hurricane was a Tornado with the extra strings, advertised as offering a “harpsichordian” effect. This lasted only a year and was gone by ’69. The initial Typhoon basses had slightly smaller bodies than the guitars, with stubbier, more flared horns. These lasted only a year until ’69, when the body styling changed to that of the Gibson-style guitars. The K-1140 Typhoon I bass had one Schaller pickup and a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The K-1240 Typhoon II was a two-pickup model with a three-way select. This was also called the Williwaw (“mountain wind”) in some Ovation literature, but it was never really called that. The Typhoon I was only available in the stubby body and was discontinued in ’69. The Typhoon II changed model number in March ’70, becoming the K-1222. This model made it until June ’72.
Martin is a famous America-based company known for is a variety of impressive electric and acoustic guitars. Their guitars are predominantly manufactured in Pennsylvania and Nazareth. The history of Martin guitars dates back to 1833. From then on, Martin has managed to maintain classiness and quality in their guitars to satiate the thirst of pro players in America.
Simple and great idea! Ordered it from StewMac and received it in the mail two days later. Mounted it on my Taylor acoustic instantly and played for hours! Haven't put it on an electric yet but have every bit of confidence that it'll work like a charm there as well! Very handy piece to have in your studio....quickly turn any guitar into a slide-playing machine!
There’s an old joke in the technology industry: If a product has a problem, simply sell it as a feature. The electric-guitar-effects industry is no different. Music has often thrived on transforming faults into influential sound effects. Before professional studio production enabled granular tweaks in sound, standalone guitar effects emerged from deliberately converting hardware faults—often caused by the limitations of amplifiers—into positive features. By the end of the 1970s, it had become impossible to imagine how R&B, blues, and rock could have existed without these fortuitous mistakes.
Another popular value pack comes courtesy of one of the greatest rock'n'roll guitarists of all time. For those who have an appetite for destruction, look no further than the Slash AFD Les Paul Guitar Outfit. Endorsed by the Guns N' Roses shredder himself, this pack comes with the killer AFD Special-II guitar that's equipped with new Ceramic Plus humbucking pickups, and a built-in Shadow pickup ring E-tuner. Additionally, this pack also contains a custom gig bag with the Slash "Snakepit" logo, Slash signature Dunlop Tortex picks, and much more.
It worked like all amps: the guitar in my hands translated the vibrations from its strings through magnetic pickups into a voltage that traveled through the guitar's wiring and out the main 1/4" cable, then the amp picked up the signal and sent it through a coil of wire around a much larger magnet than those in the pickups, and the vibrations of that magnet shook the cone of the speaker, producing sound. The specific vibrations corresponding to those voltages created specific frequencies of vibration through the air, and my 10-year-old ears were hooked.

Getting the right amp for your acoustic electric guitar is definitely something you want to think about. You can have a guitar that sounds stunning when plugged in, but not so much when playing acoustically. Reversely, you can also have a guitar that sounds absolutely beautiful acoustically, but sounds like a tin can when plugged in. Sometimes, this is just due to plugging into the wrong amp.
Tuning machines: Geared mechanisms that raise and lower the tension of the strings, drawing them to different pitches. The strings wrap tightly around posts that sticks out through the top, or face, of the headstock. The posts pass through to the back of the headstock, where gears connect them to tuning keys (also known as tuners, tuning pegs, and tuning gears).
The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
• Trapeze: Although the trapeze tailpiece was original equipment on the very first runs ofGibson Les Pauls, they are mostly the province of hollowbody and semi-hollowbody guitars, ranging from the L-5-CES to the Epiphone Regent. Early ES models also came with trapeze tailpieces. These devices attach to the heel of the guitar’s body and have slots for strings to pass through. Once the strings are installed and tightened to proper tension, the tension suspends the tailpiece in air — providing the appellation trapeze. The principle behind trapeze tailpieces is that they dampen the natural resonance of the strings less than stop tailpieces. These tailpieces also transmit the string tension to the guitar’s side, rather than its belly. The downside is they are the hardest tailpieces to string, since strings tend to drop out of their slots until they are at tension. In that respect, they take some getting used to.
This how-to guide will cover the aforementioned effects, as well as fundamentals like the function of typical delay controls, and where to place your unit in an effects chain. Although there are countless delays on the market—many of which have mind-boggling features—we’re going to use a basic delay pedal setup similar to what you’ll find on a Boss DD-7 as our reference point. We’ve also provided some sample settings so you can get the most out of your delay pedal right away.
Guitar pedal multi-effects units comprise several effects in just one package. Multi-effects units utilize digital processing to bring out different sound effects when playing guitar. These digital multi-effects pedals come with internal memory in order to save your individual settings. Among the top-rated multi-effects brands you might want to check out are the DigiTech RP and GNX series, the Boss ME-20 and ME-50 models, the Boss GT-6 and GT-8, the Zoom G2, G3, and G5, various Behringer models, and the Line 6 POD.
The Effect: Even though acoustic electric guitars are generally not associated with various guitar effects, using some can be very beneficial to your tone. Naturally, the types of effects you are going to use will differ from those used with electric guitars quite a bit. The most common accessory in an average acoustic electric signal chain is a preamp pedal. Something like LR Baggs Venue DI is a perfect example. This preamp allows you to boost the signal being fed into the amp or PA, but more importantly, shape it in a way that enhances your tone. Aside from preamps, many guitar players like to use various modulation effects, delays, reverbs and similar. General consensus is that overdrives and distortions are not something you would want to hook up to your signal chain. If you are frequently performing on stage, having even a simple effects chain can be a real game changer.
Music is an art, which can create pleasure in our mind. We can do it with the help of a good musical instruments like guitar, flute, harmonium etc. This art has the power to change our mood. Here we are introducing top ten best guitar brands with price in India. These brands are providing high quality guitar. Most of the musicians choose these brands. All are ensuring high performance. Some of the companies provide quality guitar at affordable prices. Our list covers ten well known company. They offer wide range of guitars. If you are looking for a good guitar brand, check out our list.
I've got a vox white shadow too though its a crimson/red colour with 2 chrome plated humbuckers, it has one volume pot, two tone pots, 1 toggle switch aswell as 2 further switches to change between pick-ups. It has stamped on the back neck plate "made in japan" I can't seem to locate the serial number though. Would love to know more about this guitar.
The best electric guitar isn’t one that just sounds good (however you may define good as) — it’s how it feels in your hands. We remember when we could barely start forming memories, going to our dad’s shows and him using his telecaster on stage. He had been playing since he was 5 years old (which we actually used his opinion for in this guide as well) and continues to play today 50 years later. As we grew up and learned guitar ourselves, it was more about what was comfortable and felt as natural as possible. Paired up with the sound and feel, there are a few more factors to take into consideration when you’re looking for the best electric guitar.
Vintage Gibson Les Paul Special model, introduced in 1955 This 1957 model is killer.Utilizing the Junior’s solid Mahogany body with single cutaway shape but  finished in what Gibson called Limed Mahogany which appeared white on black and white television sets which gives it the nickname of "TV Special"A neck pickup with accompanying volume and tone circuitry was also added making the Special an affordable but still professionally playable instrument. The Special was sold in this configuration until 1958 . Gibson’s surviving shipping records indicate approx. 1,452 Les Paul Specials were shipped in 1957. MORE HERE.
You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
Ovation Instruments is a Division of Kaman Corporation, a major supplier to the United States government of military helicopters, rescue equipment, electronic components and other aerospace products. There are eight divisions of Kaman, participating in such diverse industries as commercial transportation, nuclear sciences, space medicine, education and social sciences, oceanography and, most recently, recreation.
Our basic no frills guitar Denny designed to go head to head with $1000+ guitars. Magazine reviews and customer testimonials say it actually outperforms many well known $1500 models. If you want the look, feel and sound of a high dollar acoustic with 50% easier playability this is the best guitar we offer. Shipped wholesale direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
By the way, I’d like to also take this opportunity to thank collector and one of VG’s earliest subscribers Jim Dulfer for invaluable help in an ongoing research effort, providing access to his truly impressive paper collection and photographs of some of his instruments. These catalogs are filling in many, many holes in information. You will be reaping the benefits in upcoming “Different Strummer” columns in both information and illustrations, as well as in upcoming book project. Thanks to Jim from guitar fans everywhere!
Finally, there were some twelve Hawaiian lap steels in ’55, the EG-NT, EG-K, EG-Z, EG-A, EG-S, EG-R, EG-L, EG-7L, EG-P, EG-8L, EG-M and EG-NW. Again, since I have no reference materials, there’s no point in attempting any description. However, many of these guitars continued on into the ’60s where we’ll discuss them in detail, and you can probably extrapolate backwards to these mid-’50s models, allowing for pickup changes, etc.
As a beginner, it is best to avoid making a pawn shop, flea market, or yard sale purchase unless you are shopping with somebody who has experience in purchasing a guitar. Having never purchased a guitar, you may not know what to look for in terms of damage or guitar quality. With that being said, a local music retail shop is your best bet. You may also shop online with a reputable company, although be sure to review the business’ return policy.

This mod is a little different—and definitely not as affordable as the ones we’ve been talking about up to this point. When players think about modifications that involve tuning machines, the subject revolves around tuning stability. That’s all well and good, but I’ve rarely encountered a quality machine that slips—because the mechanical torque required to turn the tuner’s capstan is pretty stout. Problems of pitch are usually more related to capstan wobble or a bad nut-slotting job.


Great info. I found an interesting connection when researching a recently-acquired Intermark Cipher, as it's said here to be a Teisco, yet it bears a close resemblance to a model of Pleasant, which was credited to the obscure Shinko Musical Company. I wish i could post pics, but essentially, both have the Teisco-like headstock, identical pickups with off-white covers and square pegs, body shape is virtually identical except for the upper cutaway having a slightly different contour, the Pleasant having one more pickup and larger pickguard, both having switches above the pickups. I came upon a drowinginguitars video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-vhvYBy6os) describing in the video description how Kawai (-Teisco?) bought the "Pleasant Guitar Co." (Shinko?). This video isn't the model I have, my Cipher resembles the Pleasant sel-220.
Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.

For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.


I have an old 1964 60watt Australian Goldentone which I love and will keep. Had a Marshall 800 Lead at one time (head and quad box) when I was in a band but let that go when I stopped gigging. I tried a 50W ENGL combo as I was looking for an amp that was easier to cart around than my old Goldentone and I was blown away with the sound and the build quality. The ENGL should be in the top ten.

You have to take into account that these are low budget guitars, so there will be compromises in terms of materials, pickups and hardware. The experienced guitar player might require a higher standard. That being said, if you have between a 100 and 300 dollars to spend and you do want to learn to play guitar than these guitars are really worth the investment.

For notation and composition work, some of the common choices are Avid Sibelius 7, Makemusic Finale and PG Music Band-in-a-Box. Or, for DJ-ing and remixing, check out the Native Instruments Traktor series, Avid Torq or the software packages from Venue Magic. There truly are dozens of options available for you to take advantage of the benefits digital editing has to offer. Whether you're an independent artist mixing tracks on your own laptop or a professional sound editor working on a major TV series or indie film, the right music software is here to handle your needs.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Ash - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 42.5mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Medium - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome - Pickups: CAP Double Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Black

Upgrading the components in your guitar’s control cavity should give you significant improvements in tone and component life. If your guitar has single-coil pickups, buy 250K pots. If it’s packing ’buckers, go for the 500K jobs. If your ax has humbuckers and single-coils, I recommend 500K pots. This could make your single-coils sound a bit brighter than normal, but it will unlock your humbuckers’ full potential. For this job you’ll also need a soldering iron, solder, safety goggles, wire cutters, and a camera, to help you keep track of your original wiring connections (your cellphone will work just fine for this).

The Dobro All-Electric featured a pickup purchased from the fellow who’d invented it in ’32, Arthur J. Stimson of Seattle, Washington (it was not invented by Dobro’s Vic Smith, as has been reported elsewhere). This was, as far as we know, the first modern electric guitar pickup, with the magnet under the pickup, rather than over the strings, as on Electro/Rickenbacker instruments (or the presumed “transducer” on the ’28 Stromberg-Voisinet). Stimson’s pickup had a large horseshoe pickup in the body with two coils, one for bass and one for treble strings, each with its own bar polepiece. A 1/4″ jack outlet sat on the top down near the standard stamped National trapeze tailpiece, next to a single volume control.
Route the body. You’ll need to make a cavity (a hole that goes partly through the body of the guitar) in the back of the guitar to fit the electronics for the volume, tone, pickup selection controls. You will cover it later with a bit of material (usually hard plastic). You’ll also need one cavity in the front of the guitar for each of its pickups. Rout the pickup cavity (or cavities) to the depth recommended by the manufacturer.[9]
The legendary ES-335 is a widely used element in practically every genre imaginable. Often equipped with double humbuckers, the ES-335’s semi-hollow body delivers a warm, woody sound. And when players like Larry Carlton or B.B. King get their hands on one, the sound can be likened closer to silk or butter. Despite being closely associated with blues artists like King, the ES-335 isn’t just a blues guitar. You can find them in the hands of just about anyone in any genre—from rocker Dave Grohl to Latino sensation Trini Lopez.
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In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.
In contrast, wiring two pickups in series produces a longer path with increased resistance, adding volume while preventing the highest frequencies from getting through. With series wiring, the output of one pickup goes into the input of another pickup, while with standard parallel wiring, each pickup takes its own path to the output. Besides being noticeably louder, series wiring emphasizes low and midrange tones, and this is a perfect combination to drive any tube amp into saturation without the help of a booster.
While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.

One half step down from standard Drop A. Used by bands such as Trivium on some songs from Silence in the Snow and The Sin and the Sentence, Destrophy, TesseracT, Brian "Head" Welch, After The Burial on some songs from their Rareform, In Dreams and Dig Deep albums, Within the Ruins, In Hearts Wake and Periphery. Jim Johnston used this tuning for the song "I Bring the Darkness (End of Days)".

You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!

Practice amps often have an auxiliary line-in jack, so that the bassist can plug in a recorded music signal (often via an 1/8" jack), to practice along with a recording. The line-in jack can also be used to plug a drum machine into the amp, also for practice purposes. Some practice amps have a level control knob for the line-in input. Practice amps often have a headphone jack, with a feature that turns off the power amplifier when headphones are connected. This feature enables bassists to practice silently at night, to avoid disturbing others in adjoining rooms or apartments. Higher-priced practice amps aimed at pro bassists may have a DI out jack, so that the amp's preamplifier signal can be connected directly to a mixing board for a live show's sound reinforcement system or for a sound recording session. DI out-equipped units effectively turn the practice amp into a preamplifier unit.
Ultimately, you want to make the best purchase for the person who will be playing the guitar while staying within your budget. As we recommended in the beginning, it’s good to get an idea of what the player is looking for. Find out what styles they like, and his or her favorite music. Looks are important too! The right guitar in the right color could make all the difference.
PONTE NON TREMOLO Per cambiare le corde, infilare le corde nuove negli occhielli di guida sul retro della chitarra e posizionarle in seguito sopra la selletta. È possibile regolare l'intonazione spostando la selletta in avanti o indietro utilizzando un cacciavite a testa Phillips (+) sulla vite di regolazione dell'intonazione nella parte posteriore del ponte.

First, let’s start with the switch. Like the Gibson-style switch, the Stratocaster’s is used to select between different pickups and combinations thereof. In this picture of Jimi Hendrix and his Stratocaster, the switch is just above the knobs. It’s a little hard to see because of the white pickguard, but if you have this type of guitar, you’ll have no trouble finding it on your own instrument.
Best Answer:  Half of playability is how your hands interact with the neck. Me, for instance, I've found that BC Rich necks are just too big... I can play it, but it's uncomfortable enough to make it a little akward. On the other hand, ultrathin necks like those you find on many Jacksons (Dinky's, etc) are a little too thin, over time my hands actually hurt from playing them. I discovered that I was playing them too hard, but even beyond that they're just too thin. For me, LTD necks are where its at for me. Rather inexpensive ones, EC-50 and EC-100QM, but once I upgraded the electronics, got a setup, and replaced the pickups, I was happy with them.
RACING STRIPES Once you have checked out the color coat and are satisfied with the results and have let it dry completely, you can move straight to clear coats or add some racing stripes... or any other design you feel comfortable painting on. I did a paint splatter on the guitar I'm currently working on and it looks awsome. Plus it was realy easy. I just sparyed some black laquer paint in a pan, dipped a brush in it and splattered it on to my liking. For racing stripes make sure you get auto masking tape so you don't get any bleed through when you paint. Decide where you want you lines to go and tape them off. Use a garbage bag to cover the rest of the guitar and make sure all the other areas of the body are covered and taped off to prevent any unwanted spray from getting on the guitar. Spray just enough coats of paint to cover up the base color. You don't want it to be too thick because you will lay daown a clear coat on top and wet sand to level out the finish. If it is too thick it will take much more coats of clear and more sanding than you will want to do just to level it out.
I personally use Vegas, Sonar, and REAPER. I would not recommend Vegas or Sonar for live playing, if for no other reason than both have crashed on me during recording sessions, and I do not easily forgive that. REAPER (Audio Production Without Limits) never, ever crashes. It’s not as full featured as some DAWs, but what it does, it does well. I use it for all my recording.

Processing audio before it passes through an amp simulator is a creative alternative to adding effects to its output. As described elsewhere in this article, pitch-shifting can work well in conjunction with amp simulation, but other ways of editing and processing the raw guitar file before it goes through the amp modeller also yield interesting results. Reverse reverb, resonation, vocoding and Auto-Tune can all produce distinctive effects. Try chopping small sections of guitar out, for an interesting stuttering effect that's nothing like tremolo. A piece of guitar that's been reversed before being fed through an amp modeller sounds quite different to what you get by reversing a guitar part that's already been through an amp, and this technique can be very effective. Likewise, recording three or four separate tracks of single guitar notes and routing them simultaneously through the same guitar amp simulator sounds very different from playing chords. Sam Inglis


Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb is one of the most comprehensive ways to learn music theory from a book that we can recommend. This book, and the combination of online audio that accompanies it, has helped many aspiring guitarists learn theory after being frustrated with trying to learn how to play the guitar. One reason that might be is because Tom uses very plain language to explain theoretical concepts that are often confusing and can come off as complex. Further, the book includes diagrams frequently, which really helps visual learners.
Parts made for the Kay Vintage Reissues may not fit or lineup with the original and we do not guarantee that our part will fit your guitar. We do sell SELECTED parts and hard shell cases for the following: K161V Thin Twin, K775V Jazz II, K162V Pro Bass, K5970V Jazz Special Bass, K1700V Barney Kessel Pro, K6700V Barney Kessel Artist and K8700V Barney Kessel Jazz Special.
And when you shop with Guitar Center, you can search through our entire chainwide inventory and have any item shipped to your local store for free, or directly to your home. Whether you’re a devoted collector, a player looking to get back that one instrument that got away, or an audiophile trying to capture the true vintage sound you’ve always wanted, the Guitar Center Vintage Collection has everything you need. Start searching today.
Ibanez is a Japanese music instruments manufacturer that has produced some of the most iconic guitars of the 20th century. Established in 1908, the company started to design the first guitars in 1957. Ibanez was one of the first companies to gain popularity in the US and Europe markets. It also was the first to mass-produce 7- and 8-string guitars.
The Fender Bassbreaker 15 Amplifier Head presents a budget friendly option for those in need of great tone. You have 15 watts of pure power to channel here as well as a studio friendly Power Amp Mute so you can record straight into a desk - a great feature for those in need of a powerful stage and studio amplifier. This is a professional grade amplifier head that features 3 very unique tonal options and overdrive levels to provide you with a whole host of lush fender tones that range from glass like cleans to vintage overdrive. Perfectly paired with the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab.
You don’t have a single Guild in your list, but you have Washburns that totally lack any sort of bass response. In fact, I’ve never understood how Washburn could take perfectly good materials like sitka spruce and mahogany, and produce such inferior guitars. You list the Fender fa-100 and stratacoustic, both firewood as far as I’m concerned, but don’t list the outstanding Alvarez AD60 and AD70, two amazing sounding guitars for the money. The Hohner and Oscar Schmidt OG2 are beginner guitars, but I know a lot of people with Yamaha FG800 and FG830 guitars who would be very offended by you saying one of their favorite guitars is for beginners. They are serious instruments, even if they only carry a sub-$300 price tag. They are certainly better sounding than that Taylor Big Baby thing, which I was shocked to hear at GC. Talk about over-rated. But you did get many things right. You gave the Blueridge d160 high marks, though I think the D140 should have been up there, too. Good to see that you gave the FG800 such high marks, but I actually like the FS800 a little better. It’s easier to play and better for fingerpicking. The Ami, Jim Dandy, and Recording King are all over-rated and over-priced. You need to take the Washburns down and put up the Guild M-120, D-120, and D-150. The D-150 may be the best guitar you can buy for under a grand.

I'll be honest .. my Washburn N4 is hands down the best I've ever known. To me, Les Pauls sound amazing but are heavy and play like a log cabin. A buddy of mine's Suhr Strat felt/sounded clinical and small. An old Gibson SG felt like a cigar box jobbie. I remember in the early 90s looking at the Vai Ibanezes and the body was great despite the zany colors but the neck was too thin and whispy. I had the frets leveled and crowned and the action on mine 10 years ago and it just plays and feels like butter .. maybe 2 - 2.5mm at the 12th fret. The neck I sanded with 2000 grit now slighty reflects light so it glides beautifully feeling like 'satin wooden glass'. My aftermarket pickups puts the tone squarely into a modern fusion rock camp of sorts .. Oh yea and I think it's the neck shape of these Davies N4s that might make them so cool. The nut is a wider, more comfortable 1 11/16 inches with a flat fingerboard radius .. so may of the others seem like 1 9/16 with a cramped, rounder fringerboard. I did try a JP6 I didn't care for the feel of .. tl;dr ymmv :)

An acoustic guitar is a guitar that uses only an acoustic soundboard (the top of an acoustic guitar) to help transmit the strings energy into the air in order to produce its sound. The soundboard will add various tonal qualities due to its own mix of tonewoods and bracing, and the soundboard also has a strong effect on the loudness of the guitar. Without a soundboard, the string would just cut through the air without actually moving it much because it is large, the soundboard can push the air, creating a much louder sound. In addition, the acoustic guitar has a hollow body that resonates, increasing the efficiency of its lower frequencies.
You’ve decided to pick up an axe and learn to shred like one of the pros. While mastering the guitar is no easy feat itself, before you even start jamming you’ll probably find yourself looking through site after site trying to find the right instrument. It’s hard. There’s an expansive list of components to be taken into account: body styles, wood types, pickups, bridges, necks — and that’s just scratching at the surface.
Seeing one in the hands of Ed Sheeran was a huge shot in the arm for the small-body acoustic market, and now players are picking these up as good-quality, usable guitars which are equally at home in the living room as they are on the stage. The Martin LX1E is perhaps the best known and best respected small body acoustic, and can hold its own tonally against many of its regular-sized peers.
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body: Mahogany - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Engelmann Spruce - Back: Bubinga (African Rosewood) - Figured - Sides: Bubinga (African Rosewood) - Figured - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Ivory - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Mother Of Pearl - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, Grover Tuners - String Instrument Finish: Natural

If you think not using any pedals makes you more “real” or “natural” of a player, you’ve got to be kidding me. Let’s think about what is physically happening when we play electric guitar. The sound is created when a guitar string is plucked by a pick, likely made from some polymer (oh wait, the “real” guys use their thumb, okay) causing it to vibrate. This vibration also creates a corresponding vibration through a magnetic field above your pickups. The pickup converts this into electric current, which passes through a simple low-pass filter tone circuit and a passive volume attenuator (we presume you’re not using an active pickup, being that you’re keeping it “real”) that does some equalization before it even gets to the cable. The standard cable consists of stranded, >99% oxygen free copper wire usually measuring between 18-24 gauge thickness, creating another filter in conjunction with the guitar circuitry based on cable capacitance.
The difference between laminate and solid wood is that laminate is several thin sheets of wood glued together, while solid wood is a solid piece of wood. The glue that binds the pieces of laminate together reduces the amount that your guitar vibrates, which in turn lessens your volume and frequency production (tone). Solid wood resonates more efficiently, so instruments that use it are louder and sound better. On the flipside, laminated woods are cost effective, reliable and resilient to weather changes.

Myself, were my budget less than a thousand then I'm dropping a big name like Martin of my list entirely, and probably I'm dropping Taylor too. Seagull makes some solid wood instruments for around $700...no idea how much the electronics tack onto the price, but I'm betting a Seagull SWS guitar with electronics could be had at $900 or so with ...just the slightest of scratches or blemishes.

A touring pro friend of my was given one of these years ago by the McPherson company as a promotional endorsement for him to play on stage. After playing his I have wanted one for years. They are indeed expensive, but recently I was able to purchase one. In my 45 years of playing I have always gone through multiple examples of each guitar I've owned before purchasing, and have (and do) own Martins, Taylors, Gibsons, Tacomas, Fenders, Seagulls, Alvarez, Yamaha, etc. which were all really good in their own right. However, nothing I've played has been as good as the McPherson in terms of tone, volume, sustain, note clarity, playability, workmanship; it's useful whether played solo or in an ensemble setting, and for chords or single line playing. It is indeed the last acoustic guitar that I will ever buy.
Nickel ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.

Included here after the filters are shifters like your standard pitch shifters, harmonizers, or octave pedals. You want to take care of any pitch changing (I'd argue even vibrato should happen here) before you add other effects into your signal, since they will react to the audio signal itself. You don't want to add reverb and then try to pitch shift, because the signal you send becomes too complex and inaccurate for such a precise effect.
He embodies the stylish sideman identity forged by guitar greats like George Harrison and Keith Richards: a neatly trimmed pudding-basin haircut, and a stage presence that never upstages the frontman. Yet, he is intriguing in his own right. Marr’s post-Smiths career has been stellar. He’s worked with everyone from New Order’s Bernard Sumner (in Electronic) to Oasis to John Frusciante, and has been quite active recently with both Modest Mouse and the Cribs. He has an uncanny knack for being around whenever cool music is happening.
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