That "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" stigma comes from people who can't use effects. I mean, you can't just auto-set your delay to syncopate with your playing and make you sound like the Edge with every not you hit. You have to figure out the delay's rate, and what notes you can "delay" together so it doesn't sound like a jumble of notes.
For punchy tones and a clear, high tone, you might want to consider the EMG JH James Hetfield Humbucker Set. Designed specifically for Metallica's front man, this set features both a neck and bridge pickup that can be used together or separately. If screaming highs and bluesy lows are what you're after, the Seymour Duncan SH-1 1959 Model Electric Guitar Pickup is a solid choice. Its enameled wire, nickel plated studs and balanced coil windings produce great sustain, making this neck pickup a great addition to your Gibson or Les Paul. For an electric guitar pickup that offers great range for different genres, a Gibson '57 Classic Plus Pickup can help you make your musical mark. This bridge pickup delivers a slightly higher output without sacrificing the rich, vintage tone of your instrument. The Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 Pearly Gates Pickup is another great choice if you want some kick combined with a well-rounded sound. Your choice for an electric guitar pickup really comes down to personal preference and what kind of sound you're looking for. Whether you're jamming in the garage, recording live in the studio or taking centre stage every night, you're sure to find the electric guitar pickup that best suits your needs.
You can think of this article as a directory of sorts. There’s a lot of information presented here, but then again there are a lot of guitars out there in the world. I started this project a few years ago with the idea of creating a page where new and veteran players alike can find information about different guitar brands. I’ve got over thirty years of experience behind me, so maybe my opinions can help you make a better decision if you are looking for a new instrument.
When looking to buy a guitar, you want to make sure that you’re picking a model that is right for your skill level, playing style, and needs, all that while ensuring that you don’t overspend. If you’re just starting out, there’s probably no need to spend a couple grand on a flashy model when one of the quality cheap acoustic electric guitars will do.
Even working on the assumption that you're only using one mic, the professionals have an awful lot to say about where you might put it. For a start, it seems to be fairly common practice to audition the different speaker cones of your guitar amp. "They're supposed to sound the same," says Roy Thomas Baker, "but if you're using a 4x12 cabinet, each of these four speakers may sound different."

I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho.  I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States.  I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar.  Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour.  These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order.  Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss.  Consultations are always free.

The Fender Stratocaster, or Strat® (as it's been referred to affectionately for decades), has become a favorite for players of all genres. Introduced in 1954, the Stratocaster ushered in a new era of guitar design and has been instrumental in the development of modern music as we know it. Like its older cousin, the Telecaster, it features single-coil pickups. But rather than just pickups at the neck and bridge, it has a middle pickup and five-way selector that allows for even further in-between tonal variations. Along with being the first solid-body electric to have three pickups, it was also the first to have a self-contained vibrato system.


For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.

Many guitars (even new guitars) need the frets leveled in order to play buzz-free with low action. Most electric guitars with bolt-on necks come from the factory with high tongue frets. Doing great fret work is a learned art, and I guarantee that you will be happy with mine. All my fret work jobs are performed with the guitar mounted in a neck jig that simulates string tension. This allows very accurate work. Re-fret jobs include leveling the fretboard if needed.
I am an SG player through and through. I own a bunch of them- mostly from the initial run of SG Special Faded with the moon inlays, because that particular run felt right to me. I am looking to have a custom SG style guitar made, but I don't know of any builders who make SGs. Can anyone tell me a boutique or custom shop builder who does SGs? Thanks!
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory

Whether you're recording or just plain playing for the fun of it, a headphone guitar amp is a great thing to have. You can even choose headphone amps that will work with pedals, mixing consoles and other connections, giving you a ton of versatility in how you use them. If there's one thing that's universally true about these amplifiers, it's that no guitarist should be without at least one.
Gibson and Fender have been ripping the public off for years, they're not even close to being worth what they charge especially Fender with such a mass produced bolt on neck and lame finishes design. Carvin is a superior guitar in every way and what people fail to mention is that you can choose what wood and finish you would like as well as bolt on neck, set neck or neck through designs and their pick up's are impeccable. A truly great guitar co. With excellent customer relations and real musicians will all show respect for Carvin when mentioned if not already owning one.
A final tip: not a lot of people know this, but Antares Auto-Tune works rather well with electric guitar. Of course Auto-Tune is monophonic, so it will dutifully ignore chords and double notes, but it will come into play when it detects a single note. You might reasonably ask whether a guitar tuner might not be a wise investment, but the reason I suggest Auto-Tune is not to compensate for a badly tuned guitar, but rather to pull imprecisely bent guitar stings into pitch.
Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.
16-Series: Style 16 guitars were first introduced in 1961. Later, they were the first production Martins to utilize sustainable, native woods such as ash and walnut, as well as the first to implement hybrid A-frame “X” bracing. Today, these models use solid woods such as mahogany, East Indian rosewood, koa, sapele and maple. Models include DC-16RE Aura, OMC-16E Koa, D-16 GT, 000C-16RGTE Aura and the J12-16GT, a 12-string jumbo-size guitar with the series 16 appointments. Most -16 series instruments use the Martin long scale, 25.4″.
Some Korean Ibanez serial numbers are purely numeric with no alphabetic characters. According to Jim Donahue these guitars were manufactured in the Cort factory, in which he had the supervision. Because they had no date stamps available when they started, the serials numbers of Artstar models in this factory were written by hand. These handwritten serial numbers are hard to decipher. The production of these Artstar models at the Cort factory was discontinued in 2003.
Very good working condition, this guitar is completely playable and in great condition. All electronics function properly without any issue. This guitar contains very minor cosmetic scuffs throughout, typical wear from a used guitar, nothing at all significant, please see pictures. The body, neck and headstock are all straight and contain zero cracks, bends, or bows. This guitar will come exactly as shown with soft gig bag.
Once you've mastered a few songs on the guitar, you may want to record what you can do so others can hear you shred a wicked solo. Or you may want to use your recording to help improve your skills. In either case, recording your electric guitar outside of a studio can result in poor sound quality that is less than desirable or noise complaints. Depending on your situation and equipment, there are many factors you'll likely have to tweak on your way to getting the best recording, but with a little effort, you'll soon be able to listen to an awesome recording of your musical ability.
Fantastic article. I pretty much do all of my recording nowadays through my AxeFX II. Paired with a good set of studio monitors, it’s perfect for the at-home musician who does not want to sacrifice quality. I have a nice Tone King amp and pedalboard with nice boutique pedals like the Strymon Timeline, but when recording it’s so much easier to plug the AxeFX into my laptop. I don’t have to fuss about with mics or room treatment. Also, having three big dogs, it’s great to not worry that they’ll start barking in unison at the mailman when I’m almost finished with a “perfect” take.
Known for their distinctive jangle and chime, Rickenbacker guitars tended to be favoured by Jangle Pop, Power pop and British Invasion-style groups – bands such as The Who, The Byrds and The Beatles. The early Rickenbackers that made this sound famous were equipped with lower-output “Toaster” pickups. These pickups were phased out circa 1969-70 for newer “Hi-Gain” pickups, which had twice the output of their illustrious predecessors. This change was almost certainly due to the trend toward the louder “Rock” sounds of the 1970s, despite the earlier models being credited by Pete Townshend as being key to the development of “the Marshall sound” and his refinement of electric guitar feedback techniques[8]
The musical theory of chords is reviewed, to provide terminology for a discussion of guitar chords. Three kinds of chords, which are emphasized in introductions to guitar-playing,[10][11] are discussed. These basic chords arise in chord-triples that are conventional in Western music, triples that are called three-chord progressions. After each type of chord is introduced, its role in three-chord progressions is noted.
Although we encountered Japanese guitars from the early 1960s onward, the few Teisco brand and other Japanese instruments of that time did not capture nearly as large a market share in the USA as Harmony, Kay and Danelectro. Japanese guitars of the 1960s were generally very crudely made and did not at that time present any great threat to the market dominance of American-made student models.
Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.
Located on the corner of Menaul Boulevard and San Pedro Drive NE, Guitar Center Albuquerque is just a short drive from the Lousiana Blvd. exit off the I-40. Since opening our doors in March of 2004, we've been making the dreams of musicians become realities. We take pride in our dedication to customer service and our in-depth knowledge of the latest and greatest musical trends. We invite you to come check out all we have to offer at Guitar Center Albuquerque. First and foremost in Guitar Center Albuquerque, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales to repairs, our staff in each department is well-trained to cater to music-lovers from all over Albuquerque. Our store is open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.
Is there a correct guitar pedal order? Every guitarist will move into using effects pedals in their signal chain, which is when the chaos starts. What the heck is an effects loop? Why is there more than one output on a pedal? This is the same plight mix engineers and keyboardists deal with. But thankfully, with a decent explanation, you'll find there is a logical sequence your effects should be in. Today we explain what that order is and why...
Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)
Look at the action. Action is the distance between the fingerboard and the string at any given time. Make sure you hear no buzzing from the guitar when playing a note at a normal weight. Try it at the 5, 10, 12, fret, etc. and listen for the 'buzz' of strings banging on the frets below it. If any guitar is like this, ask the music store (any good one will do this for you) to adjust the neck if you can try it out in playable condition. If they can adjust it for you, then there is no problem, it just needed adjustment.
Guitar Center Twin Cities provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Roseville area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Twin Cities can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Judging by the tag in the sound hole, headstock logo, and general construction of the guitar I would think it's definite made earler than '86. Mine has a tag identical to this one but the date 16 5 78 is stamped onto it and it also has the name of the person who inspected it stamed on it. Interestingly I did notice your guitar has a different truss rod construction than mine. looks like yours adjusts from the head stock under the cover and mine is an allen adjustment through the sound hole. Don't know if they switched over to your style at a later date... food for thought. I have heard of some poeple reffering to these as Yairi built guitars even though they don't carry the Yairi headstock logo.
There are several string configurations available with electric guitars, including 4-string, 6-string, 7-string, and 12-string configurations. Although each configuration can make a slightly different sound, the differences are mostly down to personal preference. Nontraditional configurations include 5-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 18-string versions.
I play a Breedlove and it compares very favorably with Martin, Taylor, and Gibson while I prefer it to Fender acoustic guitars (I think Fender electrics are much better). Beautiful tone, and in one place where I play I'm not allowed to plug in. At that place, my Breedlove is the only one of my guitars I can get sufficient volume from. My other guitars are a Martin, an Ibanez, and a Schechter. Breedlove should be in the top ten.
The style of music you prefer will greatly dictate the type of guitar you want, so it is safest to stick to the guns (or axes) of your heroes. This way you can get a good and inspiring instrument even when you don't have thorough knowledge of guitar types. For experienced players, you owe it to yourself to understand the pros and cons of different guitar types better, before making big investments. But even then, your preferred style, and the recommendations of experts and professional guitar players that play them will be invaluable. 

An octave generator is a simplified form of pitch shifting. This effect will allow you to add an octave—usually below—the fundamental note. Units that add a lower octave exclusively are referred to as sub-octave generators. They can add a lot of depth to the guitarist’s sound. Many bass players also use sub-octave generators to significantly fatten up their sound.
One of the first successful methods was to record a track as you would any other. Then you would take the recording and play it through a speaker that is placed in a very large room. The magic happens when you put a microphone somewhere in that room to essentially record the sound of a recording. However, by placing that speaker in a large room, they have added a layer of natural reverb.

"I have purchased 15 personalized guitars from the top guitar custom shop. All the guitars have met or exceeded my expectations. Great workmanship and quality work. An exceptional group of people to work with. They are ready to answer your questions or concerns. The one time i had a concern about a guitar they responded immediately and handled the situation more than i expected. I highly recommend this company!" Dr E C Fulcher Jr - Abingdon, Maryland USA.


Three full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by Dead by April (on some songs), Metallica in the song "Invisible Kid" from St. Anger, Asking Alexandria (G#) on their self-titled album, Damien Deadson, Love and Death, Architects and The Acacia Strain. Staind also uses this tuning (but with the 2nd string tuned up 1/2 step to emulate a 7-string guitar), as well as several other modified variations of this, such as one in which the 5th string is also dropped from D# to C#.
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Lou Reed has been blowing traditional guitar styles to bits since his Velvet Underground days. A fan of Ike Turner's R&B and Ornette Coleman's free jazz, he created epic bad-trip psychedelia on songs like "Sister Ray." "He was rightfully quite proud of his own soloing," wrote fellow New York guitar luminary Robert Quine, "but resigned to the fact that most people weren't ready for it." As a solo artist, Reed kept on ripping up the rulebook: See 1975's Metal Machine Music, a noise opus that took feedback further than Hendrix could have imagined.
Most new electric guitars tend to ship pre-strung with "super light" guitar strings. Depending on your technique, and the style of music you play, that string gauge may or may not be too light for you. The following is a list of the standard string gauges included with each set of electric guitar strings. Note though that different manufacturers include slightly different string gauges in their sets of strings.
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.

Single coil pickups utilize a single magnet. They also typically have a lower output than humbucking pickups, which means they aren’t capable of producing as much distortion as a humbucker equipped guitar. However, because they’re not intended to be used with extreme levels of distortion they have a very rich and musical voice when played with lower amounts of gain.
Joe Perry is the American distillation of the good-old Keith Richards/Jimmy Page recipe for sideman/lead guitarist cool. He’s got the look and the licks, and he’s maintained both over the course of three or four decades—despite all odds. Jagger and Richards are the Glimmer Twins, but Perry and Aerosmith singer Steven Tyler went down in history as the Toxic Twins.
We are very proud to present to you a pleasant surprise I must say from way back when folks this is prime Time beginning of that Golden Era of some of the GREATEST QUALITY Acoustic guitar that FENDER ever had the smarts to Import… that’s right these are Japanese crafted beauty’s . Built back in the day when Japan had the economy riding high while US guitar builders were getting bought out by business folks not guitar builders and US economy was in the tanker just a little brief history reminder… Fender & Gibson were under the gun to cut costs and re-structure if they wanted to stay alive and that they did…. CBS , Norlin…. And others cut back on the high quality woods they once enjoyed and relied upon the reputation the US had for making great guitars basically reputation from the late 50’s – early 60’s To about 68-69 or so…. Then quality went down no doubt…. Right then it was prime time for Japan Luthiers to strike and they did…they stepped up the quality from the funny toy grade guitars we saw here in the states back when I was a kid you could get a decent cute player electric guitar at the Pawn shop in about 1965 for about $69.00 in fact my dad bought my 1st electric guitar there for $69.00 … I loved it—it was a “ KENT” and it sounded very good threw my Silvertone amp….. ..Kent is a offspring of Greco which is a factory behind making many brands buildby Fujigen Gekki…. Ok what this Fender beauty traces back to the great FujiGen Gakki in 1974 according to its serial number… making this beautifully preserved SOLID TOP Vintage Japanese guitars 40 years old a true vintage guitar in its own right. It was during the time when this guitar was built that the Japanese Luthiers set out to make some of the most righteous guitars period… fit – finish - workmanship & materials used are the good stuff folks….. This full size Dreadnought Acoustic guitar is a replica of the Martin designed D-28 known to be one of the finest most prolific designs the US Martin & co ever produced. This Fender F310 is of a High Quality example, The top is Solid Spruce straight grained with some nice figure and wow it has 40 years of patina to its color and finish and overall vintage appeal is Very strong… I was drawn to this example it sounds deep and rich and complex with an excellent volume And its highs ring threw when cording and finger picking , This guitars Back & sides are true to the masterful D-28 desigh …. High quality ROSEWOOD just beautifully grained see the pics for more detail Its absolutely beautiful back – sides are all east Indian Rosewood the fingerboard may be Brazilian Rosewood by its looksa very high grade non theless, the bridge appears to be Ebony wood….. the Bridge is nice and flat to its top which is also nice and straight, action is very good medium low and adjustable. The top has a couple of minor doinks see the pics not bad at all and certainly nothing remotely enough to detour from its vintage Gorgeous looks , no cracks anywhere found , bindings are very food, overall this guitar is an EXTREMLY CLEAN example aside from the afore mentioned . This guitar is in top Vintage used condition and is easily a 9//10 Fit and finish I suggest this was built but a high level Journeyman and can compete or compare with A nice vintage Yairi or Morris or Gibson or Martin for that matter…. .

Traditional sets can sometimes feature vastly different tensions between strings, causing players to compensate with altered techniques. New York string icon D’Addario set out to even the playing field with its Balanced Tension XL sets, which boast mathematically equalised resistance for a similar feel from string to string. That means even effort when bending, strumming, plucking and slapping, and even improved dynamic control.

Tonality is an important consideration for many musical instruments, and that’s especially true when it comes to acoustic guitars. The strings, fretboard, sound holes, and body of a guitar all play a role in how the guitar will sound to an audience. The distance between the strings and the fretboard (called the “action”) can also affect sound quality.
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Heritage Guitars, founded in 1985 by four long-time Gibson employees when Gibson relocated to Nashville, continues to build guitars in the original factory at 225 Parsons Street inKalamazoo, Michigan. Many of their models evoke memories of Gibson’s late-1950s/early-1960s “golden years.” The H-150 and H-157 are reminiscent of the original Les Paul and Les Paul Custom, while the H-535 is a modern version of the Gibson ES-335.


When buying your first guitar, the cost is always a matter of consideration. Be careful not to let this become the focus of the search otherwise you run the risk of compromising on quality. Think about it, you don't want to learn on the shoddy piece of equipment. You can usually get a good value with proper research. If you have a friend who plays the guitar; find out if they are willing to give you the benefit of their experience.


Player-friendly features like a slim "C"-shaped maple neck give this guitar a slick, smooth feel, while the 12" fingerboard radius and jumbo frets are ideal for speed and effortless bends. The dual ceramic humbucking pickups boast hot output for powerful tones perfect for crunchy rhythms and soaring solos. Premium styling cues include chrome pickup covers and an eye-catching matching painted headstock to make this guitar stand out from any crowd.
The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:
Hugh Padgham adopted a similar tactic for recording Andy Summers' Roland JC120 when working with the Police: "The chorus [was] always switched on in order to produce the slightly out-of-tune guitar sound that was all the rage during the early '80s. The amp's two 12-inch speakers would each be close-miked with a Sennheiser MD421, panned left and right — one speaker would produce a straight signal while the other would be chorused, and these would sometimes be double-tracked the other way around in order to produce an especially wide stereo picture."
Famous for having created reference electric guitars like the Telecaster and the Stratocaster in the 1950's, the US-based manufacturer has also been offering amps since 1948 to complement its guitar range. The first series was called "tweed" because of the typical cabinet covering. Among Fender's most well-known amps, we have the famous Bassman (1952), which was originally conceived for bass guitar, as its name implies, but turned out to be readily adopted by guitar players. The Twin (1952) and its different variations (especially the Twin Reverb) also influenced rock history with The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton. Fender's amplifier range is quite comprehensive (see the Hot Rod, Champ, Princeton, and Bandmaster series) and its common denominator is a clean sound that is still a reference in its category.
Pictures, description and soundclips from a 1973 Fender Musicmaster bass. The Musicmaster bass changed very little between it's introduction in 1970, and it's deletion in the early 1980s. Although often regarded as a student bass, the Musicmaster was of high enough quality, both in terms of components and build, to sell to student guitarists and more advanced players looking for an affordable shortscale bass.
Taylors are okay as guitars go, but... I've owned three, sold them all in mint condition and lost considerable coin in doing so. I think they belong on this list because they charge hand made prices for MASS PRODUCED guitars. Don't believe me? Take the Taylor that you own and do a search for it on eBay. That's right, at this very moment there are hundreds of guitars just like yours for sale on eBay. And that's only checking this one sales venue! These guitars are worth half of what you paid because the market is saturated with them. Taylor cranks out hundreds of them per day and 100's of thousands per year. If you're shopping and seriously considering a Taylor, you can get comparable quality and far better value elsewhere. Choose carefully and you'll see your investment go up in value. Aside from some special, collectable models of Taylor, you will loose money on this brand.
THE BODY This is where your guitar starts to take shape. After you have finnished your design you will need to trace it onto the wood that you are going to use for the template or body. A solid blank of tonewood that you can get from online retailers like Catalina Guitars can run anywhere in the price range of $70 to $250 depending on what wood you use. Some people will tell you that different wood will produce a different tone. While this is true in some cases like the crisper higher pitch tone of Mapel and the warmer fuller tones of Mahogany, you probably won't be able to tell the differnce between using a lower grade wood versus a higher grade more expensive wood. The only time that I would splurge and buy expinsive wood is if I was going to use a clear finish on the body and all the other parts of the guitar were going to be high end quality parts. For my project I didn't have a lot of money, much less the expensive tools to work with to produce a result that I would want to break the bank on.
I found one at a local shop, 60's Norma, resembles a Strat LIKE guitar, but with a sweet design... It has two switch where you would fidn hte pickup selector on a gibson les paul. Its got a few nicks and such, but it sounds REALLY good and the guy only wants 60 bucks, I plan on buying it, re-fretting, and doing some custom fix up on the body. And He said pretty much everything is original... A pretty sweet guitar if you ask me... If and when I buy it I'll get a picture, email if interested!

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A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Chord inversion is especially simple in M3 tuning. Chords are inverted simply by raising one or two notes by three strings; each raised note is played with the same finger as the original note. Inverted major and minor chords can be played on two frets in M3 tuning.[56][74] In standard tuning, the shape of inversions depends on the involvement of the irregular major-third, and can involve four frets.[75]
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Even if your favourite musician is predominantly driven by music and is committed to releasing material for their fans, they cannot possibly deny that are a number of incentives for them to do so. A journalist writing for The Economist online explains that songs are ‘complex mixtures of features’, so composers are always trying to find the right mix of ingredients to increase their chances of success. And everyone loves a success story!
If you are familiar with - a special kind of - programming, you can use something like Pure Data or Max MSP. Pure Data (PD), for example, is an open source, visual programming environment for manipulating streams of data like audio (or video). With PD you are able to build your own individual FX chains or use community contributed patches (In PD speech "programs" are called patches). But I think it's not as trivial to use as out of the box products.
There was a time when Yamaha were thought of as just a guitar maker for students and beginners - but those days are long gone and Yamaha now produce quality acoustics that compete favorably with the best in this category. The LL16 is a great example, with it's all-solid wood body and built in pickups with preamp, this is a true workhorse instrument. Having premium level specs at mid-tier pricing is like a dream come true, the main reason why we consider the LL16 as the best value for money acoustic in this section.

Fender’s step-down Squier brand has offered unbelievably full-featured guitars, and the Bullet Stratocaster has classic American looks, a great sound and a price tag that will feel plenty comfortable for a beginner. It has a 21-fret neck (not the full two octaves of a pro guitar, but still pretty expansive) and a soft C-shaped neck that will make it easier for a player to get a feel for it. There’s a vintage hardtail bridge, so Fender has foregone the addition of a floating tremolo system, but that is probably better for a beginner as it will increase responsiveness and tuning stability.
This Charvel is the signature model for Guthrie Govan, widely regarded as one of the finest guitarists around. Its caramelized ash body model is also up there with the finest bolt-ons we’ve ever played. The neck is extremely tight-fitting and held in place with four screws, each recessed into the contoured heel. Like any HSH set up you have huge choice on exactly how you wire it - this is no different. While the outer positions select the full humbuckers, position two voices bridge (slug single coil only) and the middle single coil; position three gives us bridge and neck (both slug single coils); position four offers the screw single coil of the neck pickup with the middle pickup. A ‘secret’ two-way mini toggle that simulates a coil-split via an old-school passive filter (a 0.1 microfarad capacitor). In many ways this feels more like high performance rifle, not a guitar. It gives off a tuned-to-perfection vibe that’s like an instrument you’ve owned for a while, gigged, modified and tweaked. Which in reality is exactly what it is only Charvel and Guthrie Govan have done it for us. But don’t dismiss this as a virtuoso rock shredder axe. Yes, if your technique is up to it, you won’t have a problem there and using just the bridge pickup you’ll probably have all you need: big and ballsy, a hint of a cocked wah-like high end it’s certainly in the JB area. But it’s offset by a pokey PAF-like neck voice, tube-y and soupy but far from one dimensional. If that was it, we’d be smiling. But there’s plenty more... Guthrie Govan’s vision for an all round workhouse that’ll stand up to the rigours of professional touring is superbly realised in this signature. Every detail is wonderfully considered. It’s not a cheap date, but it’s an astonishing guitar: a player’s tool of the highest calibre.

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Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.

This includes guitar tutors and coaching software, guitar & amplifier emulators, reference tools and more. You will find tablature software in the Tablature category and software to slow down guitar solos in the Slow Down Music category. Software to tune your guitar can be found in the Instrument Tuners category and specialized chord software in the Chords category. Software designed specifically for bass guitar players can be found in the Bass Guitar category.


Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
The woods used on the body and neck are worth considering too, although are unlikely to be a defining factor when you consider your purchase. Basswood features heavily as the body wood of many guitars in this price range because it’s affordable and has decent tonal properties. You will also find cheaper to produce woods like poplar and alder, although the traditionally more premium mahogany is also found on affordable guitars these days.
Great guitar this is my 2nd one fist one i purchesd in 2010. Had to pown it I was realy upset about it but nothing i could do. I was so happy to find another one here on Amzon!!! Only thing it did not come with A pick card as addvertized. Thats why iam giveing it 4 in stead of 5 stars. Case that comes with it is realy cheep you would think the money invested the would at least give you a padded soft case.I have orderd a hard shell Gator case for it it will be here in 2 days. This is why it gets 3 stars. Iam a pro. Guritist and song writer,singer. Guitar it self gets 5 stars

The list is leaving off some HUGE names. You absolutely cannot leave out Clapton and Van Halen. However, you apparent uninformed people saying that John Mayer shouldn't be on the list should wake up and get in your music. He is on track to waxing this whole list by the end of his career. Clapton is practically handing him the torch. But then again, I guess that Tiger Woods will never be as good as Jack to some.

Effects pedals, or stompboxes, are effects units designed to sit on the floor or a pedal board and be turned on and off with the user's feet. Typically, effects pedals house a single effect. The simplest stompbox pedals have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers (knobs) for controlling the effect, gain or tone, and a single LED display to indicate whether the effect is on or not. More complex stompbox pedals have multiple footswitches, numerous knobs, additional switches and an alphanumeric display screen that indicates the status of which effect is activated. An effects chain, or signal chain, may be formed by connecting two or more effects pedals together.
Previously, Epiphone guitars were considered to be the biggest competitor of Gibson. However, they were later acquired by Gibson who has retained the name of this brand to distinguish them from their pricey brothers. You can certainly consider it a budget-friendly production from the high-end guitar makers. Epiphone, just like the Gibson’s Les Paul, shares the same design but is available at a much lesser price. When it comes to craftsmanship, then we must say that Gibson is much better than this one. Unfortunately, Epiphone utilizes low-quality products such as mahogany and other electronic components.
This is like an echo where the sound you play repeats either once or multiple times depending on how you set the pedal. At low repeat settings this fills up the sound which is useful if there aren’t many other musicians. With lots of repeats it sounds rhythmic and huge. This effect relies heavily on the speed of the repeats keeping time with the song tempo. With practice it’s easy to set correctly but get it wrong and it can sound like your chords are running away from you.

The Orange Crush is all about style and portability. It’s distictive look is due to the Orange basket weave Tolex, woven speaker grille, beading and legendary hieroglyphs (PiX) and of course the Orange signature ‘picture frame’ edging. It’s not as feature rich as other models, but that’s the point. It’s simple, portable and just a good basic combo amp. It’s also available in black (why?) and retails for around $99.
the les pauls are way out of my ballpark...but i played a few to kind of get the feel so I could compare the cheaper guitars. All the cheaper guitars (including epiphones) sucked when compared to a gibson les paul....with the exception of one... a samick copy of a les paul. It was solid, played as good as the les pauls i was trying, had nice fretboard and headstock inlays, has a set neck, keys held the tuning well, tone was better than any of the other cheap guitars i played (very close to the les paul tone), and had a drop dead georgous birdseye maple top.

Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.

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