The solution is pretty simple actually. When setting your intonation it should look like two sets of steps. You should never need to move the saddles all the way forward or turn them around. If you want to adjust something do it in a way that allows you to keep this configuration. You do that and you'll never have to worry about tuning issues period, let alone a g-string.
"We strive to offer our clients the highest level of service in guitar sales, repair and consulting. We will, as keys to attaining this objective, conduct our business according to a high standard of excellence. We are dedicated to earning our clients' trust through our professional conduct, our many years of experience, and our extensive preparation for their needs."
WARTUNG Herzlichen Glückwunsch und vielen Dank dafür, dass Sie sich für ein Produkt von Ibanez entschieden haben. Ibanez legt bei seinen Produkten die höchsten Standards an. Alle Ibanez- Instrumente werden vor der Auslieferung unserer strengen Qualitätskontrolle unterzogen. In dieser Anleitung wollen wir beschreiben, wie Sie das Äußere Ihres Instruments pflegen und Ihre Gitarre in dem Zustand halten, wie sie bei Auslieferung ab Werk war.
Fun !...Top 5...Such a good game I love it I would defiantly reccomend this game to all console users the graphic las the entertainment is just great you can play either online or offline so that's good so many different missions to play all at different difficulty so they ain't too easy but they also ain't too hard I ate this 5 stars for everything of people like shooting games car games then go get this game coz it is all of those things it is just excellent....The graphics are amazing though but I'm going to trade it in for something I enjoy more if this is your type of game I would recommend it but I mostly play games like Diablo and wolfenstein thought I might like it but don't and I don't have anything negative to say about it because it looks and plays great just not my cup of tea

The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.
Made famous by Dream Theater guitarist and loyal Mesa Boogie endorsee John Petrucci, the Tri-Axis presents the absolute best of modern rock and metal tone with a touch of that signature Mesa Boogie character. If you scoured the Petrucci forums in the 90’s and early 2000’s, you’d be the first to know John had quite a few of these, both live and in the studio. It was the Tri-Axis that contributed to the now legendary sweet singing tone he achieved on countless DT albums. The first thing you’ll probably notice about the Tri-Axis is it’s unusual interface, which features digital numbers and arrow buttons instead of knobs.  The Tri-Axis also boasts five 12AX7’s into one rack space. Furthermore, you can achieve tones from Mesa amps like the Mark I, Mark IIC+, Mark IV™ and much more.
Today, Van Halen is one of rock’s most influential and imitated innovators. As unpredictable and flamboyant as Hendrix, Van Halen has had an unmeasurable impact on the guitar community. By the mid Eighties, his self-described “brown” sound, over-the-top techniques (including two-handed tapping), and revolutionary trem-bar effects inspired a generation of aspiring guitarists who bought the one-pickup, one-volume-knob, Floyd Rose–equipped Strat-style guitars that Van Halen made famous.
It is possible to perform a setup at home, but it can easily become a laborious and time-consuming process. You can instead bring your instrument to a local store or other professional. Guitar setup cost is usually a large value in comparison to the work it would take to do the job at home. You should consider that the cost of a guitar setup includes the addition of new strings but may not cover the actual cost of them. Whether or not strings are included in the price is something that should be investigated prior to having an instrument professionally setup. Guitar setup cost may also increase if the tuning keys need adjustment, or if you have a complicated bridge system (like a Floyd Rose) that requires extra knowledge and skill to be properly fine-tuned.

Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .

• Similarly, insert the Soft Clipper into the third insert slot and click on its Edit button. For settings, try putting the Input at ‑0.0, Mix at 55, 0.0, Second at 100, and Third at 57. As with the Compressor, set the output to a high level, again stopping short of distortion. These settings are intended to get you started; you may want to tweak them depending on your guitar, pickup, playing style, and so on.
What Fender might lack in heavy, modernized features, it makes up for in affordability, novelty and being some of the best all-around guitars in existence. They would also have to be considered some of the most stylistically versatile guitars, covering all kinds of musical genres and songs. We’ll focus primarily on the Standard (non-American) models, since they’re priced below our $700 cut off. If you want to go with something nicer, target the American series Strats and Teles.
I always recommend the Cordoba C5 for beginners who are looking for their first classical or nylon string guitar. It’s comes at a very wallet-friendly price, but it sounds and plays exceptionally well for a guitar in its price range. More experienced players can look to other C-Series Cordoba guitars like the C12, which is built for advanced guitarists.
Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.
FuzzPlus2 is an update of our popular free download Fuzz+. The basis of the plug-in is a transform model of a famous vintage fuzz pedal. There are four controls: Fuzz knob: This controls, as you might imagine, exactly how much fuzz is applied to the signal. Tone knob: This controls the brightness of the distorted signal. Output knob: This is the output volume of the device, when it is active. Bypass button: This works just like the switch on a stomp box. When the blue light is lit, you're money. When it's not, the input is passed directly to the output. This can be automated for a slightly different vibe than automating the effect bypass of your host. free vst plugin.
Now, you may be wondering if there are things to love about Guitarist and there certainly are. The GUI is incredible and simply one of my favorites around. And if you need funk or jazz rhythms fast, then this is your guy — the auto-wah feature saves this plugin. The more you put realism out of your head and strive for interesting tones, the more you’ll like Guitarist.
There are many varieties of speaker combinations used in guitar speaker cabinets, including one 12" speaker, one 15" speaker (this is more common for bass amplifiers than for electric guitar cabinets), two 10" speakers, four 10" speakers, four 12" speakers, or eight 10" speakers. Less commonly, guitar cabinets may contain different sizes of speaker in the same cabinet. Cabinets with eight 10" speakers are large and heavy, and they are often equipped with wheels and a "towel bar"-style handle for transport. Some cabinets use mixed speaker types, such as one 15" speaker and two 10" speakers.
Other notable effects include the tube-driven Leslie speaker series, which originally modified the sound of electric organs (such as the Hammond B3) until guitarists like George Harrison (and the Beatles more generally) began to use it for spacey chorus, tremolo, and phaser tones. The classic 60s model, the Leslie 122, was housed in a huge 41-inch wooden laminate casing and comprised of two motors (essentially two electromechanical horns) that had been rotated to create a Doppler-effect-based vibrato. These horns were, in turn, picked up by the dual speaker units. The Leslie 122 wasn’t even built to connect to a guitar, but bull-headed technicians fudged the electronics and made it work anyway. The laminate wood wasn’t just for aesthetics, either: It functioned as a partial enclosure, ensuring mellower tones, and different woods created different vibratos.
The Blue Midnight was released in 2011 with a limit to the key of C, also on the less expensive side of the market. It features stainless steel cover plates with a wider back gap for enhanced volume while playing. The unique feature of this harp is the comb, which is made out of translucent blue plastic. The comb allows for brighter tone than the black combed models. It also has a special just intonation (JI) "Chicago tuning". It is also now available in other keys.[23]
That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).
My interests are in the Kents with the script logo on the headstock, body, and pickups. The headstock is Gibson-ish with tuners on both sides. The pickup nearest the neck is tilted, regardless of how many pickups are on the guitar. One model, the 742 has four pickups with switches, volume and tone knobs for each. Overkill, to say the least, and I have read somewhere that they don’t sound very good. However, I have seen some youtube video where a 742 sounds pretty good in live performance. A lot of the sound comes from a proper setup and the hands of a skilled player. Hopefully I’ll be able to find out for myself someday. Regardless, the 742 is one funky-looking guitar.
Hook, who covered the economics of running a nightclub in his 2009 book, “The Hacienda: How Not To Run a Club”, predicted: “The guitar companies are going to restructure and get smaller. The true artist in the company — the guy who builds a guitar by carving it out of a piece of wood hopefully will be the one that will be celebrated, not the middle management.”
1) Mic your guitar cabinet, running the mic signal into a simple mixer with your effect units patched in on effects sends and returns. Run the mixer into a power amp and full-range speakers, or powered full range monitor speakers (the “wet” cabinets), placed on either side of your dry cabinet. Set the effects units 100 percent wet and blend in the amount of effect you want into the wet cabs. Use a MIDI foot controller to change presets on the effects units, and add an expression pedal to control things like the output volume of the effect signal, or the feedback of a delay. For live applications, the soundman can mic your dry cabinet separately and take a stereo line-out signal from your mixer for the effects, panning the effected signal hard left and right in the PA. Guitarists such as Eric Johnson and Larry Carlton have used this approach.
It looks like a Gibson. but it’s another Epiphone — the Epiphone Les Paul Special II. This is the other iconic shape in electric guitars, the Gibson Les Paul, and Epiphone make the budget-priced version with this one listed at $170. In another blog we’ll explain the primary differences between Gibson and Fender guitars. For now, just know it’s like an Apple versus Windows kind of debate. Really.
SOLD OUT ! We are VERY pleased to present a very special example Alvarez Yairi Classical guitar . The condition of this high end instrument is excellent plus and this guitar is simply wonderful. This is hand built example by The Kazou Yairi himself, Japanese Master Luthier. For those of you not familiar with the Premier Japanese Master Luthier Kazou Yairi and his masterfuly built instruments you may enjoy this vidio introduction to YAIRI GUITARS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPRyLPouYZM The model is CY116 and is a very high-end professional guitar and is in excellent Plus condition. Only the highest grade woods used as you can see ...choice AAA Flamed-Quilted and is 3-dimensional depth is a work of art as you can see by the pictures. This guitar plays and sound AMAZING and is truly inspirational. This guitar shows very little fret wear. There are just a few minor nicks or scratches which is normal wear for a guitar of this vintage that has been lovingly played. This one is a one owner adult owned guitar and comes with its high quality custom hard shell case too. General Specs: Alvarez Yairi CY116 Classical Acoustic Guitar The CY116's Solid Cedar Top is adorned by an elaborate wooden mosaic rosette. Burled Maple Back/Sides give this classical amazing clarity and warmth like the fiery Andalusian plains that inspired the music that this guitar was born to perform. With room-filling projection, the CY116 is a guaranteed conversation starter. You hear it in the elegant pacing of a classical air. You see it in the vivid charm of a folk dance. Specs: Burled Mahogany Back/Sides Solid Cedar Top Mahogany Neck Ebony Fingerboard Scale: 25 1/2" (650mm) Width at Nut: 2" (51mm) Rosewood Bridge Ivory Body Binding Wooden Mosaic Rosette Gold Vintage Open-Style Tuning Machines .
The first rule of making repairs to any instrument is to decide if the value of the instrument, financial and otherwise, is worth the price of the desired repairs. If the repair is small enough to be comparable to guitar setup cost (about $50) then it is almost always worth having done. However, for large and expensive jobs like painting and neck replacement, the cost can easily outweigh the need of repair.

Two-handed tapping was the hoariest of heavy-metal clichés until Marnie Stern reclaimed the concept on behalf of indie-prog bedroom shredders everywhere. No one would ever confuse Stern’s chops with Eddie Van Halen’s, but that’s kind of the point: If Stern’s shredding exudes the agreeably skewed internal logic of the self-taught, it also allows her to utilize the two-handed technique far more creatively than the pseudo-classical chest-puffing that usually comes with Dokken territory.
In 1945, Richard D. Bourgerie made an electric guitar pickup and amplifier for professional guitar player George Barnes. Bourgerie worked through World War II at Howard Radio Company making electronic equipment for the American military. Barnes showed the result to Les Paul, who then arranged for Bourgerie to have one made for him. (info from Wikipedia, photo of Jimi Hnedrix from bassmiddletreble.files.wordpress.com)

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Effects can be connected via insert points, or the effect send and return loop that is included in most consoles and DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). When effects are used in the send/return loop, their Mix control should be set to 100 percent wet, so you add back only effected sound to the dry sound, which comes directly through the mixer channel.
You can run up to six of the 112 built-in internal effects within the Boss MS-3 Multi Effects Switcher at the same time and integrate three of your existing stompboxes into that sound too. So, to say there’s a world of options at your feet is an understatement. You can use it with your hybrid MIDI gear and utilise it to channel switch between amps too.

Strandberg: Extremely unique and of great quality, the guitars made by Strandberg belong to a league of their own. They have extremely unique neck profile called EndurNeck to facilitate comfortable playing, the EGS tremolo is way more stable and easy to tune than other double locking trems. The guitars made by them are ergonomically designed to minimise fatigue among players. Their custom-shop specialises in making made-to measure guitars which are built specifically for each consumer so as to perfectly match his or her playing style. Their custom shop also provides option for Cycfi XR pickups whose sound can be programmed by editing their frequency curve.
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.
Just start out small, when i first started playing guitar I wanted to learn every metallica song there is, and sure enough I did, it took me about 5 years to get there and a bunch of different gauges eventually with time you start to develop the feel for what gauge satisfies you the best. Now I mostly use hybrids ranging from 10-13's, but just like everyone I started out with softest strings that are out there in existence but I used to break them alot so there were many beers out there that I didn't get to drink because the will to play guitar was stronger hahaha. But in the end it was worth it cause now I get to have all the fun on the guitar, and all the chicks are digging it hahaha, no they're not. And one more thing never obey the rules it's just something that stuck up guitarist make up because they don't want to be outdone find out what pleases you the most and keep on doin that.

Here we have a real vintage Rare IBANEZ CONCORD beauty from the Golden Era of the Best Japanese Martin D41 style guitars period... This example is Ibanez Model #679 and is the Top of the Line and is an exact Martin copy and is a great " Law Suit " model from the era where Ibanez set out to make the best guitars worldwide period...Fit and finish even after 30 years it is simply superior it appears to be thin old school Nitrocellulose Lacquer finish, this guitar was constructed using the best woods very ornate intricate triple bindings with lots of beautiful inlaid abalone on the Brazilian Rosewood fretboard and the spruce top body WoW...please do have a very good look ...This example has employed the best exotic woods in its construction, The top looks to be solid no seam edge showing at sound hole some pick wear and looks solid, the sides & back also look the same on the inside and outside grain matches so again it looks to be solid?.... A high grade mahogany neck, Sitka spruce top, Choice Indian Rosewood sides & back, and what seems to be a beautiful Rich Chocolate brown Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood fretboard with gorgeous abalone, frets show some wear lower several yet plays excellently all the way up with very good action and fast & plays easily...Neck width is a nice slim-med super comfortable 1-3/4" at the nut with no buzzing all the way up action is good set at 5/32nds @ 12th fret. This guitar has been well played and well taken care of and is a good professional grade instrument ready to record tonight. Cosmetically this is a 8.5 out of 10, A real vintage player that has not been abused at all yet has been lovingly well played its tone has richly mellowed with the years and only improved with its age and now after 30 years it shows this wonderful patina that can not be replicated that only comes with age, vintage is not for everyone some like it new we understand that this vintage Martin Copy Japanese Guitar however is not new or is it in mint condition yet it is very beautiful in vintage terms of mellowing with age and patina Wow this is for the TRUE VINTAGE LOVER... also you Ibanez Collectors of Japanese vintage. Its Sound is second to none it has nicely articulate lows with nicely contrasting bright highs and the mid-range has a good punch and ring when finger picked, full on sweet big tone when strumming open cords. This one is a real pleasure to play and is EZ on the eyes too. These are really great old classic guitars and are getting very difficult to find now in anywhere near this kind of vintage condition...its all original and the original tuners work very well with no need to change them out they are keeping the guitar tuned well...no cracks or repairs non needed , excellent original neck set and angle, intonation is good. This Rare beauty is conservatively JVG condition rated at very good - excellent in a 30 year old Vintage guitar...amazing looks and tone & playability in a real vintage collectible that your not going to want to put down.. Every bit as good as the much more expensive Martin for a fraction of that. Any questions ask? gr8bids@comcast.net .
More information on Ovation can be obtained from Walter Carter’s book, The History of the Ovation Guitar (Hal Leonard, ’96), although solidbody electrics are not the primary focus, and some inconsistencies exist between the text and the model tables (when in doubt, the text seems to be more reliable). Except for using Carter’s book to confirm some dates and a few details, most of the information presented here was gathered independently prior to publication of that book.

Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!
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A Squier strat is a killer starter instrument (it has the looks, playability, and classic style beginners are looking for). But the guitar itself is only part of the journey when learning an instrument. Especially with electric guitar, you’ll need things such as a small practice amp, a strap, a case, some picks and more. Thankfully, companies such as Fender now cater to the first-time buyers with all-inclusive packs that house a pretty solid guitar along with some great beginner gear to get you jamming. The Strat in this pack gives you three single coil pickups for that crisp, bright, clear sound, a five-way selector switch for all the classic Strat options, as well as a fulcrum-based tremolo to add nice depth to your playing. But the pack includes a lot more than just the guitar.
Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland

The explanation for this "asymmetrical" tuning (in the sense that the maj 3rd is not between the two middle strings as say in the tuning of the viola da gamba) is probably that the guitar originated as a 4-string instrument (actually an instrument with 4 double courses of strings, see above) with a maj 3rd between the 2nd and 3rd strings and that it only became a 6-string instrument by gradual addition of a 5th string and then a 6th string tuned a 4th apart:
A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.
Featuring a tremolo tailpiece, the player is guitarist is guarantee weeks of sustain. In terms of playability, the Jackson JS22 features a rosewood fingerboard that is ultra fast with breathtaking jumbo frets, giving the player a comfortable chording experience and high speed runs with little or no effort. The basswood body features an arched top armed with dangerous looks to compliment its incredible sound, an ideal choice for you.
Unfortunately, not many reference materials are available to document in complete detail, but we can hit some of the highlights, and illuminate a number of relationships along the way. If you have catalogs, ads or pictures of guitars that can help fill in some of the blanks, please let me know (Michael Wright, PO Box 60207, Philadelphia, PA 19102).
All of the complex air-coupling interactions, along with the resonant properties of the tonewoods themselves, are a key reason that different acoustic guitars will have different tonal qualities. The sound is a complex mixture of harmonics that give this type of guitar its distinctive sound. Some of the most important varieties are the classical guitar (nylon-stringed) and steel-string acoustic guitar.
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Amplesound's AGM Lite is a freebie guitar VST that can run as a plugin or as a standalone. (Standalone == no digital audio workstation required, just open the program, turn on your speakers and play). In either version, one can write strum patterns with the point-and-click cursor, and use the on-screen keyboard to make things happen without ever touching a keyboard.
The first successful guitar pickup was developed in the early 1930s by Rickenbacker® to help amplify Hawaiian lap steel guitars which were popular at the time. The first pickups were single-coils and while they do a good job of picking up the guitar signal they are also susceptible to picking up interference from nearby electrical devices. The Gibson® humbucker (US Patent 2896491) was developed in the 1950s to eliminate the "hum noises" resulting from electromagnetic interference. The humbucker uses two coils and a pair of pole pieces (having opposite magnetic polarities of each other) for each string. The coils are wound and connected to each other in such a way that the current produced by the moving guitar string in the two coils adds up (in-phase), while the current produced by electromagnetic interference in the two coils cancels (out-of-phase). Not only does the humbucker drastically reduce noise from interference, but it also has a different characteristic sound. The single-coil pick up is commonly considered to have a thin, clear and bright (more treble) sound, while the humbucker is known to have a full, but dark (less treble) sound with more overall signal output.

This is another best budget electric guitar from Epiphone. It is also a great choice for a beginner and it is quite lightweight to carry. For an inexpensive guitar, this one has a pretty good sound and tone. Despite being low priced, the manufacturer has not compromised in its quality. The cherry red color is really attractive and appealing and can help you to boost up your smart personality as a guitarist. This is closer in look to the iconic rock guitars.
Thanks to its small size and slim neck, you get to play this guitar and improve your skills with ease. The cutaway design also gives you easier access to the higher frets for tapping or other more advanced techniques. This guitar has a spruce top that improves the sound quality as it ages, meranti back and sides, and rosewood bridge and fingerboard.
In some modern valve effects, the "dirty" or "gritty" tone is actually achieved not by high voltage, but by running the circuit at voltages that are too low for the circuit components, resulting in greater non-linearity and distortion. These designs are referred to as "starved plate" configurations, and result in an "amp death" sound.[citation needed]
Although there’s no clear delineation for when Phase Two officially began, the Hi-Flier began to develop new features. While it maintained the P90-style pickups, other aspects of the guitar were changed. The fret markers shrunk and were made uniform in size, the rocker switches were replaced by three-way toggles and a plain white pickguard was made standard.
Kay was founded in 1931 by Henry “Kay” Kuhrmeyer. They supplied guitars to Montgomery Wards and others. During the 1950s their electric guitars were competitors for the Silvertone and Danelectro guitars. The company dissolved in 1968. Kay guitars are not currently in production. However, Kay also produced cellos and basses. Engelhardt-Link purchased the acoustic line of instruments from Kay. These are still being produced in Elk Grove Village, IL.
Here we ( SOLD ) are very proud to offer a USA built Martin Acoustic electric the model # JC-16RGTe.... More info soon to come and more pics as well... near mint condition like new! Everyone from Eric Clapton to Sting to Johnny Lang has played a Martin guitar, and professionals and amateurs alike know the bright sparkle and deep, resonant tone that Martin guitars have become famous for, from the most high end acoustics to the Backpacker. Carefully hand-selected tonewoods, master craftsmanship and beautiful finishes and styles make Martin acoustics a class all their own, and must be played to be believed. Martin sets the standard for acoustic guitars, and since 1833 has been a leader in guitar innovation and craftsmanship. The following info is from Martin. Martin JC16RGTE Features: * CONSTRUCTION: 1 Style; Ply Blocks; Mortise/Tenon Neck Joint * BODY SIZE: D-14 Fret CUTAWAY * TOP: Solid Sitka Spruce * ROSETTE: Bold Herringbone * TOP BRACING PATTERN: D1 Hybrid * TOP BRACES: 1 Style/Scalloped * BACK MATERIAL: Solid East Indian Rosewood * SIDE MATERIAL: Solid East Indian Rosewood * ENDPIECE: White Boltaron® * ENDPIECE INLAY: Black/White Boltaron® * BINDING: White Boltaron® * TOP INLAY STYLE: Multiple Black/White * NECK MATERIAL: Solid Spanish Cedar * NECK SHAPE: Modified Low Oval * NUT MATERIAL: White Corian® * HEADSTOCK: Solid/6 String No Diamond/Standard Taper * HEADPLATE: Solid East Indian Rosewood/ Raised Gold Foil Logo * HEELCAP: Solid East Indian Rosewood * FINGERBOARD MATERIAL: Black Micarta® * SCALE LENGTH: 25.4" * # OF FRETS CLEAR: 14 * # OF FRETS TOTAL: 20 * FINGERBOARD WIDTH AT NUT: 1 11/16" * FINGERBOARD WIDTH AT 12TH FRET: 2 1/8" * FINGERBOARD POSITION INLAYS: 28 Style * FINGERBOARD BINDING: White Boltaron® * FINISH BACK & SIDES: Semi Gloss/ Dark Filler * FINISH TOP: Polished Gloss * FINISH NECK: Semi Gloss/ Dark Mahogany Stain/ Dark Filler * BRIDGE MATERIAL: Black Micarta * BRIDGE STYLE: 1 Style Belly * BRIDGE STRING SPACING: 2 1/8" * SADDLE: 16" Radius/Compensated/White Micarta® * TUNING MACHINES: Chrome w/ Small Knobs * RECOMMENDED STRINGS: Martin MSP 4100 Light Phosphor Bronze * BRIDGE & END PINS: White w/ Black Dots * PICKGUARD: I-02 Tortoise Color * ELECTRONICS: Fishman® Prefix Premium Stereo Onboard Blender .
On the whole, Decca sold a lot of these guitars but the timing was awful.  By 1968 the demand for electric guitars had decreased dramatically.  MCA was about to bankrupt Danelectro, and CBS was cutting all sorts of corners on Fender instruments.  Darker times were coming folks, but for a moment, let’s rejoice in the mid 60s era of records and guitars!
Today, Van Halen is one of rock’s most influential and imitated innovators. As unpredictable and flamboyant as Hendrix, Van Halen has had an unmeasurable impact on the guitar community. By the mid Eighties, his self-described “brown” sound, over-the-top techniques (including two-handed tapping), and revolutionary trem-bar effects inspired a generation of aspiring guitarists who bought the one-pickup, one-volume-knob, Floyd Rose–equipped Strat-style guitars that Van Halen made famous.
When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
While it is possible to practice on a huge stack, it’s more convenient (and probably more sensible) to practice on a compact, low-powered, versatile practice amp. These little combo amps are one of the most important tools in a guitarist’s tool box, especially for beginners who should avoid ‘dry practice’ (i.e. without an amp) as it encourages bad habits. Many amps can be considered a practice amp, but one of our favorites is the Fender Frontman 10G – a very affordable practice amp that offers 10 watts of power, solid Fender tone and a headphone jack for quiet practice sessions.
When the Fender company was bought from CBS by a group of investors and employees headed by Bill Schultz in 1985, manufacturing resumed its former high quality and Fender was able to regain market share and brand reputation. This sparked a rise in mainstream popularity for vintage (and vintage-style) instruments. Dan Smith, with the help of John Page, proceeded to work on a reissue of the most popular guitars of Leo Fender’s era. They decided to manufacture two Vintage reissue Stratocaster models, a maple-fretboard 1957 and a rosewood-fretboard 1962 along with the maple-fretboard 1952 Telecaster, the maple-fretboard 1957 and rosewood-fretboard 1962 Precision Basses, as well as the rosewood-fretboard “stacked knob” 1962 Jazz Bass. This project was very important and critical to the company’s survival. These first few years (1982–1984) of reissues, known as American Vintage Reissues, are now high-priced collector’s items and considered as some of the finest to ever leave Fender’s Fullerton plant, which closed its doors in late 1984.
Mastering guitars isn’t a piece of cake, mainly if you are a greenhorn. You get lost in the labyrinth of types of guitars, each having different size, shapes, and price values. Most of these especially hunt your wallet, burdening down your pockets with hefty price tags. As an amateur, you find no other option but to pay the said amount hoping to get something useful. Indeed, the best electric guitar brands are usually inclined towards the more pricey side. If you have background knowledge about the best brands, who knows you may get your desired guitar in an affordable range. Through this article, you will learn what different types of guitar brands are available in the market.
New from Stewart-MacDonald are guitar wiring kits with the premium brand pots, switches, jacks, capacitors and cloth wiring used in original Gibson Les Paul and SG guitars. The kits make it easy to order top-quality components for wiring or re-wiring a 4-control / 2-pickup guitar with a 3-way switch. The kit components include Switchcraft toggle […]
We considered more than 40 guitars for this guide, and we tested the 13 most promising models. A couple of models aside, our testing panel thought, as Lynn Shipley Sokolow put it, “These are all of good quality and are all adequate.” In fact, certain models we didn’t pick may be a better choice for beginning guitarists who are into a specific style—most notably metal, which is clearly the primary market for brands such as Ibanez and Jackson.
Not something you have to think about with an acoustic guitar, the electrics in an electro acoustic are quite important, though not as critical as with an electric guitar. You’ll want to make sure that you’re getting a good quality pickup and preamp, and then the next thing to consider will be features. Preamps often come with EQ adjustment to alter the tone slightly, and some will even come with certain effects that you can add on. Builtin tuners are a common addition too which mean you don’t need a separate tuning box.
On round hole martin guitars, the serial and model numbers are stamped on the neck block inside the instrument. The number can be seen by looking inside the sound hole. Look at an angle towards the neck. All f-hole Martin archtops have their serial and model numbers stamped on the inside center of the backstripe, roughly under the shadow of the bridge (and best seen from the bass side "f" hole).

i have an old Dorado solid-body electric serial # 0726454 on the neck plate it says STEEL ADJUSTABLE NECK, then the serial number, then made in japan. it has abalone fret markers, and dorado is in abalone in the headstock, blonde finish white-black-white-black pickguard, and a funky trem. i was told once that maybe guild had made this guitar... seems pretty unlikely... and that it retains it's original value, it all seems pretty unlikely... but i don't know... please help!!!
When this guitar came in the headstock was completely broken off.  Being a 12 string I knew that it would need some extra reinforcement to stay structuraly sound.  I glued the headstock in place and then started to cut away wood from the truss rod to the edge of the neck running from the 5th fret to the A string tuner.  It took hours of cleaning up gluing surfaces and precisely fitting the graft before I could glue it in place.  I then repeated that step on the other side of the neck.  With this repair the only original wood remaing around the break is directly over the truss rods making the finished product basically as strong as a new neck.  Once the neck was refinished you cant even see the original break and only if you look very closely can you see the edges of the grafts.  When the owners of the guitar came to pick it up they thought I had made a whole new neck.  Needless to say they were very excited.  -Evan

Another important factor to consider is speaker size, which impacts overall loudness and tonality. Bigger speakers can push more air and have more low end, while smaller speakers have limited pushing power, while emphasizing the mids. In addition to size, different speaker models and cabinet types also introduce subtle differences to the overall sound.
I’ve played Martin D35 and O18 for decades and fooled around with Maton and Cole Clarke’s for a bit, but switched to James Goodall’s ( 6 and 12) which are simply stunning instruments. Why they’re not mentioned here is a mystery to me – especially if it’s quality of woods and craft and tone you’re chasing. I love the Martin’s but Goodall stole my soul.
According to Harmony’s 1963 price list, the H1213 Archtone sold for $37.75. If we take inflation into account, this same guitar would actually sell for around $270 today. This is roughly the same price for most entry-level acoustic guitars these days, but the two main differences are that the H1213 is an archtop and it was made in the US (most modern entry-level acoustics are flattops produced in Asia).
I've only been playing guitar for 3 years but it seems like no matter what I do no matter what pedal I use I just can't get that real band sound like the heavy rock bands do on recording but when I tried a marshall that all went away. Marshall has the perfect distorted sound (overdrive) and for the price ha you just can't beat it. I'm getting a mg100fx half stack and it all totals out to only $400 plus this amp can get so loud you can play in a bar or club with only half volume
I don't have enough good things to say about this shop.  Are you used your music shop being being run by snotty musicians who judge you based on the skinniness of your jeans or number of piercings?  Well, this ain't that shop.  James, the owner,  is super helpful and knowledgeable, and stocks his shop with really top quality gear.  I'd recommend this place primarily for pedals and amps, as well as for checking out some small batch electric guitar manufacturers (like their gorgeous Asher collection).  That being said, they have a really nice selection of Breedloves, Rain Songs, Guilds, Martins, Gibsons in the acoustic section as well.  

Many consider the D-28 to be ultimate expression of the dreadnought form. ‘Reimagining’ such a guitar could be a poisoned chalice. Fortunately, you can still feel the gravity of that 184 years of history in its high-end guitars. The latest D-28 features forward-shifted bracing, a wider nut and vintage-style aesthetic changes, but it’s the new neck design that really makes this the most comfortable and accessible dreadnought playing experience we can remember for some time. The sound is balanced and maintains the very definition of an ‘all-rounder’. Notes ring out with sustain - that clear piano-like definition we love from Nazareth’s craftsmen. Harmonics come easy and, with strumming, the high mids and treble have choral qualities that don’t overshadow the lower mids. Despite the tweaks, our test model still largely feels like the acoustic equivalent of Leo Fender’s Stratocaster design. Just as that outline is most synonymous with ‘electric guitar’, so to the D-28 continues to embody the dreadnought in look and sound.
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I can't have them above Guild. Their usa made stuff and vintage acoustics are gems no doubt, but they set 7 or 8th for me. I just wish they still made American made acoustics. Like guild they are a hallmark name in the acoustic guitar world. Unlike guild they aren't being made in america. Guild and their supporters really lucked out with the Cordoba purchase. They're bringing Guild back where they belong. On top. Now if someone would do the same for Washburn. I really thought the usa made stuff would get back to greatness with that solo deluxe warren haynes model, but they stopped American made guitars all together which is a shame.
Hello. If any of you who have a dorado guitar would like to sell it, please email me (swiver84@hotmail.com). I am always looking for cool vintage guitars. I am a big fan of the Gretsch name and have found the Dorados to be very nice guitars. I don't check follow ups much, so you'll have to email to get in touch with me. Put "Dorado" in the subject because I get a lot of spam and tend to get crazy with the delete button. Thanks :)
I've had a Sunburst pattern Ventura when I was a teenager.. it was a nice guitar and played well. recently i saw a really well made Oscar Schmidt gs-1 . not expensive at all. My main guitar for many years was a Gibson howard roberts "artist" dove style. wine red and mother of pearl inlay and gold plated. I eventually sold it to a lady in alaska that plays a lot of blue grass and pop. I got full money out of it. I had it 25 years, so it was vintage by now.
After the Beatles 1965 summer tour, Paul McCartney frequently used a left-handed 1964 4001S FG Rickenbacker bass, as its tone was better suited to recording than the lightweight Höfner basses he had used previously. The instrument became popular with other bassists influenced by his highly melodic style, as it produces a clear tone even when played high up the neck, its deep cutaways allowing easy access to the higher frets.
The Chapman ML2's classic, single-cut body, two chrome-plated humbuckers and a black pennant headstock that’s not a million miles away from Gibson’s Les Paul. But appearances can be deceptive: this instrument is a very different beast. Chapman pegs its weight at a relatively svelte 3.5kg, so it’s unlikely to see you turning over your salary to the chiropractor. It’s also heavily contoured with its cutaway and heel carved for easy access to the upper frets. It has a modern, satin-smooth C-profile neck, hewn from maple (another deviation from the LP blueprint) and glued neatly to the body. The 25" scale lends it a unique feel - and with 24 jumbo nickel frets, the ML2 Modern is hugely shreddable. Both pickups feature an Alnico V magnet at the heart (think tight low-end, brightness, a little less on the mids), but with a coil-split, accessed by pulling up on the master tone pot, you can split the signal of these humbuckers for some single-coil snap and sizzle. The ML2 Modern makes a good claim on being all things to all guitarists. With coils split or not, we love its tone. That bridge ’bucker really sings with some gain. While the neck pickup is a great ‘rhythm’ humbucker - articulate and dynamic. Whether you find the modernity in its versatility, or in a feel that’s more Jackson than Gibson, the ML2 Modern sure lives up to its name.
If you’re a guitar lover, you might be out for a unique look as well as your own sound. You might also be interested to learn more about how guitars are put together and function. If you have moderate woodworking skills, you can build your own solid-body electric guitar. To make things easier, you can even purchase some parts pre-made. Use your creativity for the finishing touches, and you’ll have a unique guitar and a story to tell.

Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.
This budget price range is home to compact, low-powered combo amps, which are mainly designed for beginners and home practice. Despite their low volume and limited features, you can find some exceptional sounds and versatility that will make practice sessions good fun. This category can throw up some poorly made cheap amps, so stick to bigger brand names, such as the Blackstar ID:Core 10 V2, which is a great example of what a $100 guitar amp should offer, including low power, decent tone, good EQ and a variety of amp voices. While you may outgrow one of these affordable amps after a year or so, they are a great way to begin.
“Spectrum ‘5’ has an unusually thin neck. To achieve the proper rigidity in this fast action neck Teisco had to select the hardest (and the costliest) material available…Ebony. The adjustable neck is fashioned out of 5 plys [sic] of laminated Ebony to insure maximum strength. The fingerboard of the Spectrum ‘5’ is likewise fashioned out of Ebony. Note the unique position markers and the extra wide, easy to finger frets.
The Orange Rocker 32 2x10" Valve Combo Amp is a great amp for those who want a serious amount of power on stage. This all valve stereo amplifier allows you to channel into that signature Orange crunch and utilise the stereo effects loop to really make use of any stereo pedals you may have (Strymon Timeline etc.)  Enjoy massive panning delays, previously only possible by using two amps at once and knock the power down using the "Half Power Mode” for home playing.
I agree that you should spend more on the guitar than the amp, but if you have a nice guitar and a cheap amp, you aren't giving the guitar enough width and breadth of tone capabilities to warrant spending $1500 or more on a guitar. So, if you're going to spend over $1200 on a guitar, don't buy a lousy amp. A Peavy 30 is a decent amp, but is short on breadth of tone as compared to a Fender Deluxe Reverb 22 watt. Marrying the guitar and amp is an important part of the process, they are symbiotic. My advice, as a player for over 40 years is to buy as good a guitar as you can. For beginners, a bad guitar will not get you playing, in fact, the most common reason young novices stop taking lessons is that the cheap junker they got is unplayable, even by professionals. It's hard, not fun, seems like a world of work and they quit. That's not how it's supposed to be. It's a fun thing, so get out there, get a good playable instrument and you are on your way to a lifetime of good times.

Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!

I’ve been keeping track of completed Ebay sales since I started looking at Kents, and have come up with a few average sale prices. The way I figure an average is by first tossing out the highest and lowest sales. If I am left with fewer than three sales I don’t bother. That’s too small a sampling to be worthwhile, otherwise I take the average of the rest. The table below will only be updated when there is a sale that results in a change, so if the table looks like it might be dated, it’s probably because there haven’t been any sales that affected the numbers. Availability of Kent guitars on Ebay seems to ebb and flow.


Fujigen Gakki is a musical instrument maker located in Matsumoto, Japan. They began making violins and classical guitars in 1960 and electric guitars in 1962. Their real heyday of guitar production began in the 1970’s when they began producing guitars for major American manufacturers like Fender and Gibson as well as some Japanese manufacturers. In fact, after CBS acquired Fender Electronic Instruments Company they decided to move to larger manufacturing facilities. Between the closing of the old factory and the opening of the new one, the only Fender guitars being made came from the Fujigen Gakki factory. Other factories have been used to manufacture Fender guitars, some for the Japanese market only. Regardless, Fenders made in Japan are considered top-quality.
In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.

With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.
Overdrive and distortion are effects that introduce harmonics to your guitar tone by pushing more volume into a circuit until it can’t handle it anymore and starts to break up. The types of sounds you can get from an overdrive or distortion range from a light boost to a full on metal crunch. Overdrive and distortion effects are great when placed after a compressor but before any of your other effects.
While it is possible to practice on a huge stack, it’s more convenient (and probably more sensible) to practice on a compact, low-powered, versatile practice amp. These little combo amps are one of the most important tools in a guitarist’s tool box, especially for beginners who should avoid ‘dry practice’ (i.e. without an amp) as it encourages bad habits. Many amps can be considered a practice amp, but one of our favorites is the Fender Frontman 10G – a very affordable practice amp that offers 10 watts of power, solid Fender tone and a headphone jack for quiet practice sessions.
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
If you're in a small, unsigned band, it's very important to choose an amp that's loud enough - as not every venue will mic your amp. Ironically, bigger artists don't need to worry about this, since they are safe in the knowledge they'll always have a good sound and their amps will always be mic'ed. That's why Seasick Steve plays a small Roland Cube amp, but it's not necessarily a great choice if you're in a band who plays live.
You may not have considered Orange Amplifiers before, but they’re a company with a history that dates back to the early days of hard rock. If you watch footage of rock bands from the 1960s you’ll see Orange amplifiers onstage almost as much as Marshalls. The British amp builder has had its ups and downs since those glory days, but today Orange is as strong as ever.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
The road toward becoming a better guitarist is paved in… books? It certainly can be, although there are plenty of routes that both beginners and professionals take to improve upon — and bone up on — their craft. The books on this list are about history and technique. They’re books that you’ll pull off the shelf for years to come to look up a vintage guitar you’re curious about or a chord progression or song you’ve been meaning to master. You may find additional inspiration reading the autobiographies of your favorite guitarists, but we decided to leave those off this particular list. If you’re in the market for a good guitar book, read on.

Distortion is usually generated by three distinct sources: the power amp, the preamp and the speakers. Many players overlook power amp distortion when trying an amp, but the power amp section is the source of what guitarists describe as low-end chunk and balls. Audition the power amp by turning the master volume way up and turning down the gain. The sound should be lively, with a crisp attack that jiggles your trousers.


“The tone thing is amazing because you can have one rig, have three different guitar players, and each guy can play the same exact thing and it’s going to sound different,” says L.A. Guns guitarist Stacey Blades. “It’s all in the hands.” Waara from Line 6 agrees. “Any guitar player will tell you, at the end of the day, it’s in your hands and you will sound like you will sound,” he says. The percentage of influence the hands wield is shockingly high.
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.
You should try the compressor after the overdrive stage. Providing an already compressed signal to a drive/distortion pedal doesn’t allow the full dynamic range of the pedal to be applied to the raw guitar signal, losing something of the capability or unique nature of these pedals. You can also lose the touch sensitivity of the drive pedal when the input signal has its louds softened and it’s quites upped. Placing the compressor after drive pedals allows the full driven tone to then be leveled dynamically with the compressor. Note that may drive and distortion pedals will include their own natural compression so addition of compressor after the drive pedals allows for fine tuning of the overall compression. It’s worth experimenting with.
The PRS SE range has offered solid, well-built, great-sounding guitars for years now, and the PRS SE Custom 24 2018 is a perfect example. This Korean-built mass of maple, mahogany and rosewood is a classy-looking guitar. It’s a wonderful instrument to play too - PRS's expertise making eye-wateringly expensive guitars is evident from the moment you pick it up. The bridge, for example, has a noticeably low profile. This makes palm-muting a much more pleasant experience, especially if you’re used to chugging away on a Floyd Rose-style bridge. A lot has been made of the SE Custom’s pickups; 2017 models added Korean-made versions of the 85/15 pups used on the more expensive American Core line, dubbed “the perfect pickup” by Paul Reed Smith himself. Largely, they live up to that promise; the bridge pickup is capable of some serious chunky metal tones, which retain definition and clarity even at absurd levels of gain. Spend some time with the SE Custom 24 and you’ll come to realise that there is no stereotype that fits. And therein lies its beauty. It’s not a guitar or a brand that concerns itself with cultivating a popular image; PRS has always favoured more obvious metrics like quality manufacturing, great sounds and classic looks.
Vox entered the "lunchbox" amp market in 2009 when it introduced the Night Train (NT15H) head. This compact, all valve amp is a 15W head with two 12AX7 preamp tubes, a pair of push-pull EL-84 valves in its power section, and a solid state rectifier. It uses a cathodyne splitter, and its power section is cathode biased. The amp is solidly constructed on a black steel chassis with a bright mirror chrome finish, diamond-perforated steel tube cage, giving it a physical appearance reminiscent of a lunchbox (some comparisons to a toaster have been made as well). The NT15H also set the cosmetic and operational template for two additional releases, also all valve heads, that book-ended its output power: the 2W Lil Night Train (NT2H) in 2010, which uses two 12AX7 preamp tubes and a 12AU7 dual triode as its power section, and the 50W Night Train 50 (NT50H) in 2011, a two channel head with four 12AX7 preamp tubes and a pair of EL-34 valves in its power section. All models feature the ability to choose between the familiar "chimey" Vox voice and a high gain voice that bypasses the EQ section, via the Bright/Thick switch. Note though that each Night Train model's feature set also provides some unique capability apart from its siblings. For example, the NT15H output power can be switched between 15W pentode and 7.5W triode modes. The NT2H provides a headphone/line out jack with on-board speaker emulation (for practice or direct recording use). Lastly, the NT50H offers two channels by adding a second,optionally foot-switchable, higher gain "Girth" channel, a "Tone Cut" control and a "Tight" switch in its master section, plus a bypassable, JFET-driven effects loop. All models were designed for use with most any 8 ohm or 16 ohm cabinet, although Vox also offers a matching cabinet (NT15H/V112NT, NT2H/V110NT, NT50H/V212NT) for each model.

The roots of effects pedal usage can be traced back to early into the history of the electric guitar, but two people immediately come to mind who really pushed its usage out there:  Roger Mayer and Jimi Hendrix.  We’ve come a long way since those early days and it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the insane amount of options out there.  From good old standbys to newer boutique options, it can be a chore to know what effects pedals could be right for you.

5. Marshall Code 50 1x12 Digital Combo Amp ($249.99): Marshall is the household name of the amp industry and their inclusion on this list was a definite must. The Code 50 boasts more than 100 presets in an easy-to-transport package. As with most of the amps on this list, the Code 50 also includes a mini USB plug-in for ease of recording, headphone capability for practicing late into the night, and even an aux input for jamming along with music on your smartphone. You can even control it directly via Bluetooth and the mobile app. It also delivers 50 watts through a 12-inch speaker so it’s great for practice or rehearsal.
Electric guitars are versatile instruments. If you’re not entirely sure where your playing career is headed, pick a Strat-style solid-bodied guitar in a ‘sensible’ colour, and you’ll have an instrument that can do pretty much anything – and one which you won’t be embarrassed to get out of its case when (and if) you get through the ‘death metal’ phase!

Two ways. The most important is: practice. But the other way is technique. Proper fingering. Some chords have multiple ways they can be fingered, and you always want to pick the easiest. Now, some fingerings may not *seem* the easiest, just because they aren't the ones you already know, but in the long run, they are worth learning because they really do make things easier. In particular, most people play an open A chord the wrong way, but the proper fingering makes it easier.. The essense of fingering is laziness: you want to move your hand and fingers as little as possible. So in particular, if you have a finger down in one chord that's already in the right place for the next chord, you want to just *leave* it there. Don't pick it up, only to place it back down in the same place. And if you can use a fingering that *let's* you just leave it there, then that's clearly the choice!. So let's look at the open A chord. Most people play it with their 1st finger on the 4th string, 2nd finger on the 3rd string, and 3rd finger on the 2nd string, three-in-a-row. But that's a weak fingering (however popular it is). The better fingering is like this: 1st finger on the *3rd* string, 2nd finger on the 4th string, 3rd finger on the 2nd string. It may *look* a little awkward, and feel awkward until you learn it. But it really is the better fingering.. Why? Because consider the context of an A chord. What chords are you most likely to want to go to from an A? The biggest answer would probably be D. Well, notice, if you finger the A chord as I recommend, your first finger is now already in the right place for the D chord, and can just be left there! You only have to move two fingers, instead of all three, to switch between the two. This lets you do it faster and smoother. The other chord you'd be likely to want to go to from an A would be an E, and, while we don't have any fingers exactly in the right place, we at least already have the 1st finger on the 3rd string, like we want it for an E; we just have to slide it back one fret. This is still easier than entirely re-arranging all three fingers. Finally, more rarely, you might want to go between A and Amaj7. For instance, the old Beatles song "Mother Nature's Son" uses the sequence A Amaj7 A7. This is perfect for this fingering! You just slide your first finger back one fret to make the Amaj7, then take it off entirely to do the A7.. Similarly, a G chord normally be fingered using your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th fingers, instead of your 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. This makes it much easier to go to C, the most likely chord for you to be going to.. But no fingering rule is absolute, it's always contextual. If you have a song which requires you to move to something more unusual, and a different fingering would make that particular move easier, then use the different fingering. For instance, if I had something which required that I add an A note to the top of my G chord, then I might well use the common 1-2-3 fingering for the G chord, so that I'd leave my pinkie free to reach the A note.


This fuzz sounds great! Different from a standard fuzzface or tonebender sound, and much more musical in my opinion. Not buzzy at all, very smooth. It is not one of those over-the-top fuzz sounds. It's more of a fuzzy overdrive. But really the amount and quality of the fuzz is highly dependent on the transistors. Q1 seems to effect the amount of output, and Q2 changes the character of the fuzz. I tried many combinations and ended up using 2N2222's for both (BC109's also sounded great!). One other ... full review
Once again we traverse the extremities of guitar body sizes; from the sleek parlour shapes to the rather obviously named jumbo sized acoustics. If dreadnoughts are the poster-boys, and parlours the waif-like supermodels, then jumbo acoustics are the plus-size, brash, loud ones who just want to have fun. You’ll probably have seen jumbo-sized acoustics in the hands of Noel Gallagher or Bob Dylan, and the benefits here are measured in sheer volume. With all that extra wood, there’s more room for the sound to reverberate around the body, resulting in a big, bold sound which simply can’t be recreated from a smaller bodied guitar.

Fender’s legendary tone is enough to win just about anyone over, and they cater to a wide range of customers by offering the more cost friendly Squier series. While their classic electric guitars are favored by plenty of players, their acoustic selection and Jazzmaster offerings have their fair share of supporters as well. No matter what you’re looking for in a guitar or what price range you’re shopping in, you’re likely to find a good fit with Fender.


GNUitar is a basic free guitar effects software that allows you to turn your PC into a guitar effects processor without having to spend a single dime. Nothing much needs to be said aside from it is working as intended. Although you don't have too many options, it has all the essential effect types including distortion, reverb, echo, delay, chorus, flanger, equalizer, wah, phaser, tremolo, vibrato and noise reduction. The package comes with 2 different types of distortion and has various flavors of echo, reverb and delay. This free software works for both Windows and Linux.
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Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.

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Ok I know Hondo? .... But this is a good one folks its got a lot going for it really have a closer look, its actually built well it is a beautiful vintage guitar in its own right its condition and patina good looks good sound and easy playability make it an excellent entry or back up choice into vintage guitars, The Top appears to be solid 2 piece center seam spruce top you see grain going from top to bottom with really beautiful straight grain with flame type figuring that is surprising on a Hondo it's unique in that feature and it has that patina I love it caught my eye big time as I got close I couldn't believe it was a Hondo, it's logo has that same font as old Martin & Takamine used this one has the look and feel, but it's action was a little off spec , so I fixed all that it has great action now it's neck set and angle was excellent and I ended up changing its nut & saddle out for Martin born nut & saddle set and a new set of 80/20 strings, this guitar has good volume and sweet tone it rings clear and true with good intonation. It's in very good to excellent vintage condition, it's body & neck has no cracks , no finish checking and still shines like glass it's beautiful just have a look, it's not new or mint it has a couple drinks on its top and a couple on its back too but besides those it's exceptional vintage and plays easy with good low action with plenty of saddle left to lower more down the line of ever needed it's set up to meet or exceed Martin specs for playability. This is a lot of vintage guitar for this kind of price WOW! .
The third technique I would like to talk about today consists in, once again, doubling a distorted, or not, guitar sound with a...folk guitar. This will give you much more definition and sustain on arpeggios, while on rhythm guitars it will allow you to highlight the sound's percussive aspect, and on power chords it will make your sound more powerful. This production technique has been around for ages (Led Zeppelin was pretty fond of it, for instance). But this doesn't mean that it's an outdated trick and it can't be used on modern productions: lots of contemporary metal bands still use it nowadays.
The Tele is often called a workingman’s instrument for its simplicity.  It also happens to offer tons of tone variants, just like the Strat.  The neck pickup, with its distinctive “lipstick” look, can go from perfect blues tones to jazz, just by rolling back the tone knob.  Danny Gatton was known to take full advantage of the many sounds the Tele could produce, even in one song, by rolling the tone knob to produce the “wah wah” effect that most players achieve through a foot pedal.
Several years after his last adventure, retired fortune hunter, Nathan Drake, is forced back into the world of thieves. With the stakes much more personal, Drake embarks on a globe-trotting journey in pursuit of a historical conspiracy behind a fabled pirate treasure. His greatest adventure will test his physical limits, his resolve, and ultimately what he's willing to sacrifice to save the ones he loves.
CostHelper Electric Guitar Guide - [New Window] - Find out how much an electric guitar should cost. Get price guidelines and shopping tips for an electric guitar. A basic electric guitar with amplifier and cord starts around $200 to $400 for a beginner's outfit; a better quality kit can run $500 to $2,000, and high-end electric guitars are $2,000 to $5,000 or more for the instrument alone.
I have a yamaha sg 1000 like Carlos Santana's. It rocks! I tried it with a Gibson sg of the same price and it didn't match the quality. Then I tried a Les Paul Gibson about one and a half grand more, even that wasn't as good as the sg 1000. Lets face it, the Japanese (this does include Ibanez for they are awesome too) kick ass when it comes to quality and price!
Guitar Tricks is a step-by-step learning system that’s designed to make learning guitar easy. The Guitar Fundamentals level 1 training curriculum has been totally reworked, improved and only recently re-released. Nothing else is as beginner-friendly as Guitar Tricks. In addition to working your way through the fundamental lessons of the Core Learning system you can explore great songs arranged with beginners in mind.
Granite, when quarried in its natural state, also has a crystalline atomic structure which is ideal for sonic transference and has a compression strength of 19,000 psi, and a tension strength of 700 psi—the material these blocks are made of is the fourth densest on earth next to Diamond, Carbon and Quartz that has ideal resonant qualities which will decrease signal loss from your guitar to your amplifier by at least 30%. Utilizing this optimum material allows you to achieve maximum attack, clarity, sustain, note articulation, note separation, harmonics and punch. While the lows get tight and articulate, the harmonics scream effortlessly! Palm mutes, tapping, sweeps, you name it, all sounds so much better.
In a market filled with increasingly good Japanese copies of Les Pauls, the Ovation offerings fell, well, flat, despite obvious high quality. In ’75 both the Breadwinner and Deacon switched to Ovation humbucking pickups, metal covered with twin rows of six pole pieces. A very short-run Deacon 12-string debuted as well in ’75. In ’76 the blue finish on the Breadwinner was ditched and the Deacon acquired red, black and natural finish options. As synthesizer technology caught on in the late ’70s, some of these guitars became popular for adapting to synth playing, primarily because of their “high-tech” image.
Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.
What I am saying that we should look at the first three or four on each persons list and discard the rest. Then we’ll have a better estimate. Of course we always forget some fabulous guitarists and often some that deserve number two even number one on the list. Thats what statistics is good for. HOwever that said statistics is often a pillow for people. Faith and loyalty to true values is what brings success and fucks statistics. THings untoched statistics works but its the respect of god that changes things.
FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.

These guitars also appeal to adults who played in their youth and would like to pick up the instrument again. Fortunately, they’ll find that high-efficiency, low-cost overseas manufacturing has created a new generation of inexpensive guitars that play and sound very much like more expensive models—something that wasn’t true 20 years ago, when few cheap guitars were worth playing. We also discovered in our Best Electric Guitar Amp for Beginners article that there are several very nice amps available for less than $100, so an adult can get back into the game for well under $300.


While styles and models may vary, electric guitars operate on the same general principles. The pickup mounted on the electric guitar’s body functions as a magnetic field. When a metal string is plucked and vibrates, it generates a current. That current is transmitted by the pickup through a preamp circuit with tone controls to the guitar cable, and in turn to the amplifier. The amplifier boosts the signal and modifies it with various tone controls and effects, depending on the amplifier's design and capabilities. The signal is then output to a speaker, which converts it to sound waves. The type of pickup(s), tone controls, strings, playing techniques, and other factors built into the guitar's design all influence the signal that is sent to the amplifier. In short, each component of the guitar affects how the guitar sounds.
In this article you will learn the basics of guitar effects pedals so you will be better prepared to choose the right analog stomp boxes and digital effects to complement your sound. I’m not going to spend too much time on the science of how effects boxes do what they do. But I will do my best to explain, in plain English, the basics of each effect.
Lower-priced amps may have a preamp out. While this signal can be plugged into a mixing board, it is preferable to use a DI output for this purpose because a preamp out is a 1/4" unbalanced signal. Unbalanced signals are more prone to unwanted hum and noise. Bass amps intended for use by professional players may have an XLR DI output so that the amp can be connected directly to a mixing board of a PA system or recording set-up. Some bass amps have a 1/4" headphone out jack, so that the bass amp can be used for silent practice. When the headphone is plugged in, the amplifier to the speaker is normally automatically turned off. Higher-priced amps designed for professionals often have "preamp out" and "power amp in" jacks, which can be used to make an effects loop. The power amp in jack can also be used to plug in an external preamplifier pedal, which would then bypass the amp's onboard preamp and EQ section.
i've got a a Ricky Tom Petty model (same as the 660-12) that I've had for almost 20 years. Plays great and the sound difference compared to a 360 is minimal, and I like it better because it has the old toaster pickups. The only thing I had to do it was pull off some of the windings on the pickups. They were up to 12K ohms, which is very high and makes the guitar sound too thick. Unwound to about 8K and they sound much better. I had a different Ricky with the narrow neck and it was painful to play at best with my fat fingers. The wider neck is a dream to play.
Most bass speaker cabinets employ a vented bass-reflex design, which uses a port or vent cut into the cabinet and a length of carefully measured tubing or pipe to increase the low-frequency response and improve the speaker system's efficiency. To give an example, if one compares two bass cabinets, each with the same type and power of power amplifier, one cabinet being a sealed box and the other being a vented or ported cabinet, most listeners will perceive that the ported cabinet produces more bass tone and deeper bass tone. Less commonly, some bass speaker cabinets use one or more passive radiator speakers, a voice coil-less "drone cone" which is used in addition to a regular woofer to improve the low frequency response of a cabinet. Passive radiator speakers help to reduce the risk of overextension. Acoustic suspension designs with sealed cabinets are relatively uncommon because they are less efficient. Some cabinets use a transmission-line design similar to bass-reflex, and in rare cases, some large cabinets use horn-loading of the woofers (e.g., the Acoustic 361 18" speaker cabinet from the late 1960s).
This is an echo effect – every time you play a note it is repeated quieter and quieter, just like an echo. You can get a variety of different delay effects, from old-school “tape” echoes which are said to sound more natural, to analogue delay pedals and more modern digital ones. Digital pedals tend to sound clearer and a little harsher than their analogue cousins, making them more suited to modern styles such as modern metal.
Hook isn’t worried the current challenging economic pressures will jeopardize the guitarist’s iconic status. “The guitar hero will never go away,” he said. “People adore this image of the guitarist almost being like a cowboy. You will always see the odd-looking kid walking down the street holding a guitar — there just might not be as many of them.”
Ostentatious Delays: If you're making very rhythmic music of any kind, it makes sense to use tempo-sync'd delays, to avoid undermining the main pulse. However, simple tempo-sync'ed delays tend to be masked by the main rhythmic stresses, so they sink into the background of the mix unless mixed very high in level, which makes it difficult to create ostentatious delay effects in rhythmic music without swamping your mix. One solution to this problem, very common in trance music, is to set a delay to a three-16th-note duration, which means that although the delay repeats never step outside the 16th-note grid, they'll often miss the main beats and therefore remain clearly audible. Mike Senior
Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.
Epiphone does a great job of making instruments for all levels of guitar players, especially those looking for affordable acoustic and electric instruments. Epiphone is owned by Gibson, and therefore can make official copies of Gibson guitars like the Les Paul, SG and Hummingbird. Many are good enough for pro players to use in the studio or onstage.
Since there is little difference outside of the individual guitars featured in this series, I will nitpick a bit and say that RealLPC has the worst GUI of the four.  Where there was never any difficult-to-read text on RealStrat, there is some here, and the weird navy green parameter boxes along with a black Les Paul with gold trim doesn’t sit well for me.  

In the following essay I will outline the steps involved in the set up of an electric guitar. These guidelines will not address the nuances of Floyd Rose style bridge assemblies. I am presuming here that the frets on the guitar in question are level and properly seated, but it should be noted that the process of leveling and dressing/crowning guitar frets is indeed sometimes necessary before a set-up can be performed. I am also presenting this outline without an in-depth itemization and discussion of the specialized tools that are necessary for some of the adjustments.
I want to talk about a session that I got hired for this week. On this particular session, I was asked to recreate a very early-to-mid 70’s guitar tone. Something in the vein of George Harrison. Maybe “All Things Must Pass” era.

So I want to talk about my method, and the process to get this sound. The first key element is guitar and amp. I always start here. I feel like this is the most important relationship in getting any era of sound.
Control knobs and buttons are typically on the front of the cabinet or chassis, though in some cases, the knobs are on a recessed panel at the back of the top of the amplifier. The most basic amps only have a few knobs, which typically control volume, bass and treble. More expensive amps may have a number of knobs that control pre-amp volume (or "gain"), distortion or overdrive, volume, bass, mid and treble, and reverb. Some older amps (and their re-issued versions) have a knob that controls a vibrato or tremolo effect. The 1/4" input jack is typically mounted on the front of the amplifier. In the simplest, least expensive amplifiers, this 1/4" jack is the only jack on the amplifier.
Its simple yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in electric guitar manufacturing and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the autumn of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as March 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. The Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another since its first incarnation.[1] The Fender Telecaster has been mostly used in music genres such as country and rock, but is also sometimes used in blues and jazz.
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Using, or not using, some piece of gear doesn’t make a player more genuine, harder, tougher, more real, more natural, or better than players who do. What does make people those things is the honest pursuit of their art, the skills and experience earned from practice and performing, their genuine expression, feeling, and the ability to play something that has an effect on the listener. All of this is MUCH more difficult and real than simply choosing not to use a piece of gear.


GuitarFella reviewed the Bullet Strat, and despite a few minor complaints concluded, “It was supposed to be the ultimate beginner guitar. Seeing what kind of impact it has now, it’s fair to say that Squier succeeded.” AudioRumble said it “pretty much sets the standard for all other budget guitars.” The last time we checked, its Amazon average rating was only 4.0 out of 5 stars in 14 reviews, but the only specific complaints were about apparent damage in shipping.

And again. the no-brainer: your guitar just plain sucks.  If your bought your guitar at Wall-Mart for $19.99, PLEASE don't put my pickups in it!!!  Here is EXACTLY what you should do with it: keep it around until you are playing your first big club gig and you need to do something extraordinary to get the crowds attention.  As you thrash away on the final chord of the last song pick up THIS guitar, douse it heavily with lighter-fluid and light that puppy up!  Now that's getting more that 20-bucks worth of wow-factor out of that pile of Chinese dog-dung!
*When the item leaves our warehouse, they are generally shipped to EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service and it would usually take 7 – 10 days to United States. We ship our products from Mainland China where our manufacturing factory is located. We will inform you once your order has been shipped and we will be providing you with the tracking number so you can conveniently monitor the shipments progress on EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service website or SF Express and USPS and Parcel Force website.

Seagull guitars were first manufactured in Quebec in 1982. Their goal was to introduce a high-quality guitar with all the essentials for a reasonable price. It goes without saying that they completed that goal, as Seagull guitars are still here today.Seagulls are great for both beginners and pros. They are durable and high-quality. They have incredible sound-quality and they have something for everyone. They make both acoustic and electric guitars at reasonable prices. Seagulls are easy to play even for beginners. Additionally, they strive to reduce the impact guitar manufacturers have on the environment. They use sustainable wood sourcing so that they can avoid deforestation. Reclaimed wood is often used in the production of Seagull guitars. 
I built me my own custom guitar in high school shop class and it was simple i made an Ibanez RG styled body and a Randy Rhodes/Alexi Laiho styled body just so i can swap the 2 when ever i want and i can say the cons are waaaaaaay over exaggerated cause it was VERY cheap to do it i spent a total of $350 to do it and thats even with the the EMG 81's i have in them. I mean yes its only a 1 pickup guitar on each but its how i want the wood was only $60 for an Ash body (thats for both of them not each) and i have a hook up to get free mahogany that i used on the neck for it and mine noooo one could tell the difference between an actual Ibanez RG or ESP Alexi Laiho's signature guitars the only thing that they were able to know it was custom was the head stock being my signature and the parts that were on it and color option i used is NOT used by ether of them but the time is spot on it took 3 months for me to do them but this was of course all during the course of 45 mins for 3 months so it would of been much faster without it being in school but then again i also sort of cheated with mine cause i have been doing carpentry work since i was 8 so i already knew how to do everything professionally
“Top shelf” simply refers to any product that is sufficiently uncommon and/or of significantly high enough quality to place it “above” the rest of the “regular” crowd of products. In a shopkeepers parlance, the top shelf was where you placed things that you wished to be visible, but were, in actuality, were rarely sold. The best stuff was kept up and just out of reach of the daily rabble and only brought down when someone who truly appreciates the quality (and is willing to pay the commensurate price) came into the shop.
You've come to the right place.  We offer a wide range of vintage and used guitars and basses including a great selection of Fender instruments.   We're guitar players who recognize and appreciate how important Fender has been to the evolution of Rock and Roll.  Please browse our web site, give us a call or visit our Chicago show room.  We're constantly searching for Fender guitars, new gear is arriving daily and they often sells before we have a chance to list them on our web site.  
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.
Rickenbacker continued to specialize in steel guitars well into the 1950s, but with the rock and roll boom they shifted towards producing standard guitars, both acoustic and electric. In 1956, Rickenbacker introduced two instruments with the “neck through body” construction that was to become a standard feature of many of the company’s products, including the Combo 400 guitar, the model 4000 bass, and, later, the 600 series.

The Boss Katana Head is a full featured amplifier head that can handle stage, recording and practice duties. It does this with its built-in power attenuator, which lets you choose between 100W, 50W and a super quiet setting of 0.5W. To complement the 0.5W setting, Boss even added a built-in 5" speaker into the amp head - making the Katana head to be technically a combo amp in head form factor. Complementing its versatile power rating is its built in amp modeling, which gives you five voicings from acoustic, to clean to high-gain. As expected, this amp comes with essential effects from Boss, with over 50 of them to choose from, 15 of which can be loaded to the amp for quick use, albeit limited to just 3 effects running simultaneously. Finally, all these features are packed in sleek looking profile that feels really solid, as expected from Boss.
The #1 cause of fret wear is the fretting hand pressure exerted by the player.  I have some clients that grip very tightly and wear frets quickly (Rob Fahey), and some that grip very lightly and take forever to exhibit significant wear (Jasan Stepp, Dog Fashion Disco/PolkaDot Cadaver).  Fret material hardness, string hardness and frequency of use all contribute to wear as well, but hand pressure is still the leading cause since frets do not wear themselves out.  Technique is different for every player, unique and personal and habits can be hard to change.  Just like brakes in a car, how hard and how much something is driven directly impacts wear and longevity.  Please see the refrets page for further thoughts on this topic.
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Your first step should be to think about what you’d really like to add to your sound. If you like the clean tones you get from your amp but can do without the buzzy onboard distortion, consider adding an overdrive or distortion pedal to your rig. If you’d prefer to experiment with chorus, a phaser or a pitch shifter, start there. There are no wrong answers when it comes to effects, and the units you choose and how you decide to use them are part of the creativity of playing guitar.

Although I’ve spent most of my life focusing on audio journalism, I’ve been active as a musician since taking up guitar seriously in the 1970s, and I have played lots of gigs with jazz, rock, and folk groups in New York and Los Angeles. I now play mostly double bass and ukulele; I currently play in three jazz groups in Los Angeles, and I sub regularly in a couple more groups. I also conduct more-or-less weekly jazz jam sessions at my home, where I accompany numerous guitarists of widely varying skill levels, toting all sorts of axes. Having conducted innumerable multi-listener comparisons of audio products over some 25 years, I have a good idea of how to make product tests fair.


Are you running it through a cab simulator? That or proper eqing. Turn up the mids and drop a high pass filter on that sucker. If you're finding it still lacking check out the KeFir cab simulator and then just use the preamp you have now. I've had wonderful results with that. If you're not liking your preamp try out The Anvil by Ignite amps. Best clean tone I've had out of freeware.
the top five in no certain order are…….. JIMI HENDRIX .NIO EXPLANATION NEEDED……..RICHIE BLACKMORE he broght the strat into metal and he led his leads perfectly back into the song ……… .EDWARD VAN HALEN he was the next innovater after hendrix…………DIME BAG DARRELL….he was just plain the baddast ass of them all…………..AND ENGWIE MALMSTIEN he did everything else……..there are lots of great guitar players . but .these five guys set the bar for everyone else

If you have your heart set on a Stratocaster, but can’t justify shelling-out $600 or more for the USA-made Standard Strats, the Squier Standard Stratocaster is a great place to start. Unlike the even cheaper Strats that are included with Fender’s “starter packs,” this guitar is a definite step-up in quality and features a more modern take on their traditional bridge. I personally prefer this bridge style over Fender’s traditional/vintage 6-screw bridges.
The L-00 carries over the airy nasal tone and midrange emphasis of the original, making it great for tasty slide and classic rock riffs. Your favorite blues licks will also have more oomph when played through this blues box. For something so small, this parlor guitar can compete with standard size acoustics in terms of volume. Its solid sitka spruce top and solid mahogany back and sides work together well to give this seemingly diminutive instrument great clarity and good low end.
In late 1966, Peter Green had the job of replacing Eric Clapton in John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Mayall told his producer, "He might not be better [than Clapton] now. But you wait… he's going to be the best." Soon, with the original Fleetwood Mac, he was Britain's most progressive blues guitarist, with a Chicago-informed aggression heightened by the melodic adventure on albums like 1969's Then Play On. Green soon entered a dark age of mental and health problems, returning in the Nineties with more subdued but recognizable gifts.
Starfield was a guitar brand owned by Hoshino Gakki. In the 1970s, Hoshino Gakki and Kanda Shokai shared some guitar designs and so some Ibanez and Greco guitars have the same features. The Kanda Shokai Greco guitars were sold in Japan and the Hoshino Gakki Ibanez guitars were sold outside of Japan. From 1982, Ibanez guitars have also been sold in Japan as well as being sold outside of Japan [3].

Buy a Kay online at our main web site, call our store or visit our Chicago guitar shop in person and check out the new Kay Vintage Reissues. We're not one of those guitar super stores, you will find we're friendly, knowledgeable and easy to work with.  We sell guitars world wide and we want to earn your business so please don't hesitate to contact us for our best Kay prices.  We ship Kay Basses and Guitars to Canada, Australia, UK, Europe, Japan and other locations.
Meaning of electronic: (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. or (of a device) having or operating with the aid of many small components, especially microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current. Example is “electronic calculator”.
This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo’s PTB™ (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What’s more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy’s hard-rock maple neck features an easy-playing satin finish, while its 12” radius lets you bend notes deeply and its Plek-dressed medium-jumbo nickel frets deliver silky playability. The moment you open the luxurious deluxe Tolex hardshell case, you’ll be greeted with a stunning instrument and delicious aroma that’ll have your pulse racing.
The lotus had a plywood body and was pretty cheap, I wouldn't pay a 100 bucks for one today, if anything. But, back then, it was as good as any, we worked with what we could get. I know we played some excrutiating unison leads (ala Blackfoot, Molly Hatchet,etc) he with his souped up Lotus, me with my Memphis Strat copy, both plugged into my bitchin solid state Crate (looked like a real wooden crate!) amp.
A marvelous acoustic guitar with 6 strings and natural color. it has its body made from mahogany and a spruce top. The fret board is also made from mahogany. It one of the most beautiful guitar producing incredible sound. It is designed to suit the needs of the beginner in guitar playing. The price ranges from around INR 14,760 depending on available offers. To find more product information relating to Epiphone DR-212, click on the link below:

Open tunings improve the intonation of major chords by reducing the error of third intervals in equal temperaments. For example, in the open-G overtones tuning G-G-D-G-B-D, the (G,B) interval is a major third, and of course each successive pair of notes on the G- and B-strings is also a major third; similarly, the open-string minor-third (B,D) induces minor thirds among all the frets of the B-D strings. The thirds of equal temperament have audible deviations from the thirds of just intonation: Equal temperaments is used in modern music because it facilitates music in all keys, while (on a piano and other instruments) just intonation provided better-sounding major-third intervals for only a subset of keys.[65] "Sonny Landreth, Keith Richards and other open-G masters often lower the second string slightly so the major third is in tune with the overtone series. This adjustment dials out the dissonance, and makes those big one-finger major-chords come alive."[66]

We would recommend that you, for your first guitar, spend between $500-$1000. This price range is good, because you know that you will be getting a guitar that is made for some serious music making (which the cheapest ones out there just aren’t). Of course you don’t want to spend this much money on something you’re not even sure you will be using a year from now, so if you aren’t that serious about learning to play the guitar it might be a good idea to go for an even cheaper option.
Above all, enjoy playing guitar and enjoy the journey! Look forward to 3, 4, 5 years down the line when, if you've been persistent with your practice time (and allowed plenty of time for noodling), you'll have accomplished so much. This is all about freeing up your creativity, bit by bit, so you can express yourself on guitar as naturally as you can with speech. Doors will open all throughout your progress. Each new door that opens is like a new outlet for your creativity.
A volume pedal does the same thing a volume knob on a guitar, but it allows you to control the volume with your foot. It is not a boost, it just allows you to sweep between zero output and the full output capacity of your instrument. Many guitarists use a volume pedal, also sometimes referred to as an expression pedal, to create pedal steel-like swells, where a note or chord is played, then the volume is slowly and smoothly raised. Volume pedals can also be used as a boost effect, by simply playing at less than full volume, then stepping on the pedal to go to full volume momentarily when you need the extra boost. Volume pedals can make a standard electric guitar sound like a pedal steel when used with a well-practiced foot technique.They can also be an important pedal to have in your toolbox when playing in a band with multiple guitars.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
G & L Guitars - Leo Fender founded this US Based guitar company with then-partner George Fullerton (hence the name G & L. They offer guitars similar to classic Fenders, but with some modern innovations. It is said that if Leo Fender stayed with Fender, their instruments will be upgraded to the G&L designs, which he considers as an upgrade to his classic guitar creations.
OK, when the list started it was hard to tell if the author was knowledgeable on the subject because of the automatic “Go To” names. Unfortunately, by the time I got to the end I realized this was the author’s favorites list versus the Top 10 Greatest Guitar Players. Kirk Hammett, Slash, Jack White, Chuck Berry??? You can’t put them on any list and not mention the guy who influenced so many, and who Eric Clapton called the best guitarist in the world, SRV. Richards biggest claim to fame it the amount of drugs he’s done that haven’t killed him,… Read more »
The most common alloy (mixture of metals) used in pickups is alnico; this is a combination of aluminium, nickel, and cobalt. Alnico magnets were once the strongest known, but they have since been eclipsed by the rise of the rare earth magnets, which can also be used in pickups. Samarium cobalt magnets and neodymium boron iron magnets can also be used, although are perhaps less common. Additionally, ceramic magnets, based on iron oxide with strontium or barium carbonate, can be utilised.
Today, if you shop around, you can pick up the Martin D-200 Deluxe for a mere $119,999, but if that doesn't suit your style you can always go for the Martin D-15M which we announced as the highest rated acoustic guitar between $1000 and $2000 in October 2016, or the Martin DCPA4 Rosewood which we announced as the highest rated acoustic-electric guitar in the same price range at the same time.
The fact is, the qualities of different strings can have an effect on your guitar’s resonance and tone, on the quality and responsiveness of your attack as a plectrist or finger picker, and impact your speed and other important factors. And think about your budget. Some coated strings list at nearly $20, while a good basic set of electric guitar strings can be scored for $3 to $4 on sale.
Some Korean Ibanez serial numbers are purely numeric with no alphabetic characters. According to Jim Donahue these guitars were manufactured in the Cort factory, in which he had the supervision. Because they had no date stamps available when they started, the serials numbers of Artstar models in this factory were written by hand. These handwritten serial numbers are hard to decipher. The production of these Artstar models at the Cort factory was discontinued in 2003.
Hook isn’t worried the current challenging economic pressures will jeopardize the guitarist’s iconic status. “The guitar hero will never go away,” he said. “People adore this image of the guitarist almost being like a cowboy. You will always see the odd-looking kid walking down the street holding a guitar — there just might not be as many of them.”
Many guitarists have chosen this iconic axe for its versatility and capability to sound great in any genre of music, but the Les Paul is most widely known for its heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll vibe.  A great example of this would be Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin fame.  Once Page began using Les Pauls, he never looked back and helped to give the instrument its indelible place in the history books of music.
Engl has to be the most underrated amplifiers on the market. I have an engl gigmaster 15 and it is pure awesomeness. No fender cleans but if you want fender cleans buy a fender. The gain section is where this thing shines. I haven't used any kind of distortion pedal since getting this amp. More gain on tap than any Marshall I've ever owned or played. Getting ready to upgrade to the ironball and can't wait. If you like metal, hardcore, punk, grunge, sludge, doom you should look at an engl. This thing will even do blues extremely well without a ts9. It will take pedals very well as this is a 15 watt amp with an effects loop. Wow, right. Won't get that with a tiny terror. Plus these are German designed and built unlike the terror series built in China.

I'm trying to determine the worth of a korean made fender telecaster. Solid ash,butterscotch blonde,maple neck,abalone inlays,seymour duncan pick-up(the other 1 is silver?)classic bridge.It's probably about 5 or 6 years old,it seems nicer than any mexican I've seen. Serial # 04041144 I paid $500 and I want to sell but don't want to be unfair to self or buyer.Help please-QUICK.

Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
If you are a beginner, you may have heard of electro-acoustic models. In the future you may want to consider one of these, as they will allow you to plug into an amplifier and project your sound across a room, concert hall or stadium (well, you have to dream big!). However, for now it’s wise to stick with a solely acoustic model, which will be cheaper and less complicated to use.

custom made guitars luthier services alvarez ampeg benedetto boss breedlove collings danelectro ,dean,digitech eastman electro-harmonix ,grinning elk, electro-harmonix epiphone fender- fender-custom-shop fender-usa fulltone g&l gibson godin gretsch guild hagstrom hal-leonard hamer harmony heritage hofner ibanez jackson kay line-6 marshall martin mxr national orange ovation paul-reed-smith peavey prs prs-paul-reed-smith rickenbacker roland silvertone suhr takamine taylor vox washburn yamaha 000-18 00-18 4001 asat-classic catalog champ classic custom-22 custom-24 d-18 d-28 d-35 deluxe es-125 es-175 es-335 flying-v j-45 j-50 jaguar jazz-bass jazzmaster l-00 lap-steel legacy les-paul- les-paul-classic les-paul-custom les-paul-deluxe les-paul-jr les-paul-junior les-paul-special les-paul-standard les-paul-studio lg-1 lg-2 melody-maker mustang precision- precision-bass sg sg-special sg-standard strat,bass guitar,speakers,parts,effects pedals stratocaster- telecaster telecaster-custom telecaster-deluxe telecaster-thinline..Greg's Guitars is the only author of "The Vintage Guitar News and Views.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar. I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best. You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment. You get treated like a valued customer. Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars. They have a great variety of quality instruments. Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars. A place like this is so rare nowadays.
When connecting more than one pickup, it’s important to follow the manufacturer’s color codes and wiring diagrams so that the phase relationship is correct. The phase relationship of a pickup is determined by the winding direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnets. The two coils of the traditional humbucker are connected in series with the phase relationship shown in Fig. 1. Most modern Stratocaster® style guitars with three single-coil pickups are supplied with a reverse wound/reverse polarity middle pickup for a parallel hum canceling effect when the guitar is switched to a two pickup position (e.g. neck & middle pickup together) as shown in Fig. 2.
The vibration of the wood isn't in question at all. It does indeed vibrate and if you put a microphone up to the wood of the guitar as it's being played (and if you can manage the feedback) you'll no doubt hear the tonal qualities of the wood. You can knock on it to hear that. It's like knocking on a door. ANY wooden door or any processed wood for that matter.

Ibanez are a Japanese musical instrument company. Although Yamaha is a better known Japanese musical instrument company, Ibanez exceeds expectations for electric guitars. This brand of guitars stands out in the world of rock guitars. They gained popularity in the 1980s when they introduced their original designs for guitars based on Steve Vai’s JEM Universal. Their designs have since become some of the biggest selling metal guitars. The Ibanez guitars are used by guitarists such as Steve Vai, Paul Gilbert, and Joe Satriani. In addition, Ibanez guitars tend to be very affordable, giving you a great guitar for a cheaper price.
Launch price: $599 / £500 | Body: Basswood | Neck: Hard maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Manson Design bridge humbucker, Manson Design neck single coil | Controls: Volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Two-piece bridge and tailpiece, staggered height locking machineheads | Left-handed: Yes: MBC-1LH | Finish: Matt Black
There are many varieties of speaker combinations used in guitar speaker cabinets, including one 12" speaker, one 15" speaker (this is more common for bass amplifiers than for electric guitar cabinets), two 10" speakers, four 10" speakers, four 12" speakers, or eight 10" speakers. Less commonly, guitar cabinets may contain different sizes of speaker in the same cabinet. Cabinets with eight 10" speakers are large and heavy, and they are often equipped with wheels and a "towel bar"-style handle for transport. Some cabinets use mixed speaker types, such as one 15" speaker and two 10" speakers.
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This body and headstock shape are identical to my Nivico Balladeer, and both guitars are real keepers.  This truss rod cover would become the standard curved plastic type seen on many Matsumoku-made guitars for the next 10 years.  Of course the Palmer badge is missing, but the Palmer name (as it pertains to Japanese imports) was being used as early as 1964.  I’ve seen Kawai S80s badged with the Palmer name.  If you do a search for vintage Palmer guitars, you’ll come up with all sorts of hits but you probably won’t see too many guitars like this one.  These were probably made for one or two years, and I’d bet the pickups were sourced from local Matsumoto.
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In 1979, there was a benefit for Amnesty International called “The Secret Policeman’s Ball”. Pete Townshend played acoustic versions of “Pinball Wizard”, “Drowned”, and (in a duet with classical guitarist John Williams) an astonishing version of “Won’t Get Fooled Again”. Unfortunately the soundtrack for that show has never been available in the CD and digital download era, but you can often spot these performances on YouTube. Highly recommended.


Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavlly, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation with single-coil pickups, and sometimes with a Bigsby tremolo, has long been popular in country and rockabilly; it has a distinctly more twangy, biting tone than the classic jazzbox. The term archtop refers to a method of construction subtly different from the typical acoustic (or "folk" or "western" or "steel-string" guitar): the top is formed from a moderately thick (1 inch (2.5 cm)) piece of wood, which is then carved into a thin (0.1 inches (0.25 cm)) domed shape, whereas conventional acoustic guitars have a thin, flat top.
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