7) Yamaha quality can't be beat. I just returned from my friend's house and noticed his $1,000 Martin box splitting because of the dry Las Vegas climate. And, no I'm not a believer in guitar humidifiers because I believe a guitar should be made for the real world and not so delicate that it needs a humidifier. My friend and fellow old-time musician who has been working at Guitar Center here in Vegas for many years has seen them all come back over time because of splitting or warping except one brand that is... You guessed it, Yamaha! The reason you find them back ordered from time to time is because Yamaha actually gives their wood time to cure properly unlike other manufacturers who tend to rush their products out the door. And, this guitar is for my kid and for travel which means it needs to be exceptionally tough and well-made:)
Guitar Tricks has a special Discount Coupon Code that will make it even cheaper for the first month. You can get 60% discount if you choose the monthly subscription. To take advantage of this offer follow the link below and key in your email address. You should wait for an email with your username and password for Guitar Tricks. Use this information to logon.  Once you are inside Guitar Tricks select the Upgrade button and choose the Monthly Membership option. In the Coupon Code section on the same page enter the Coupon Code ‘60OFF’ to get the 60% discount on your full access membership for the first month.

The tonal variations produced by an electric guitar, an amplifier, and a chain of stomp-box or rackmount effects processors are endless, and with the advent of the DAW and its many software-amp, speaker-cabinet and effects-modeling accoutrements, so are the options available for recording it. Since most commercial studio engineering techniques and tricks for recording the electric guitar apply to the project and home studio recording environment, let's turn on the gear, fire up the amp and get going.
The top is made from spruce and features X-bracing, while the back and sides are made from basswood. The FA-100 also sports a very playable maple neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets. It would work very well for beginners, as it provides a defined, crisp sound that’s well suited to plucking or strumming, and good for everything from rock to country.
Predating many of the newer brands on this list is another Californian company – B.C. Rich, who has been producing heavy rock guitars since arriving on the scene in 1969. Since the seventies, B.C. Rich has been a name synonymous with high-quality electric guitars featuring weird and wonderful shapes, including the Warlock, the KKV and the Mockingbird.
Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
Aaron Staniulis is not only a freelance live sound and recording engineer, but also an accomplished musician, singer, and songwriter. He has spent equal time on both sides of the microphone working for and playing alongside everyone from local bar cover bands to major label recording artists, in venues stretching from tens to tens of thousands of people. Having seen both sides at all levels gives him the perfect perspective for shedding light on the "Angry Sound Guy." You can find out more about what he’s up to at aaronstaniulis.com.
The volume pedal is about as simple as a pedal can get. It is basically an external volume knob that you work with your foot. They are an excellent way to control the volume of your rig and can be placed at different places in your guitar chain. When placed first for example it can be great for volume swells (as we will see), reducing your amp gain by acting like your guitar’s volume knob. If placed after your gain section it will bring down your overall volume without reducing changing your tone or gain. You can really experiment with the placement of a volume pedal to see what matches your needs.
The volume knob can act as a boost which can take your guitar from clean sounds for rhythm playing to dirty overdrive tones for soloing. When playing a song keep your volume knob at 6 or 7 when playing chords or verse parts and when it’s time to deliver a rockin’ solo roll up the volume to 10 and you will not only hear a boost of gain (overdrive) but also a volume lift over any other instruments in the song.
Check out a set of Elixir strings for yourself to hear and feel the difference.  The coating actually reduces string squeaks as well, providing a consistent sound for close miking and recording acoustic players.  The squeak of the finger over the round wound strings of an acoustic has always been an intrinsic part of the instrument, but hearing the guitar performed without such extra squeaking may change your mind.

Jump up ^ "Now the Gibson Guitar Raids Make Sense". www.investors.com. Investors' Business Daily. May 23, 2013. Retrieved July 14, 2018. According to C.F. Martin's catalog, several of their guitars contain 'East Indian Rosewood,' which is the exact same wood in at least 10 of Gibson's guitars. So why were they not raided and their inventory of foreign wood seized? Grossly underreported at the time was the fact that Gibson's chief executive, Henry Juszkiewicz, contributed to Republican politicians...By contrast, Chris Martin IV, the Martin & Co. CEO, is a long-time Democratic supporter.


Taylors have a "happier" sound and I like the feel of them. I am a novice but from what I have seen for a beginner with an acoustic guitar, they felt and sounded warmer and less tinny than the laminated wood ones. A good rosewood taylor isn't on the cheap side of things but it feels like you can play better than you can. And the model I looked at had strings that were nice and close to the frets so you didn't feel like you were pushing in deep like the keys of an old typerwriter. Go into a Guitar Center or somewhere you can actually feel what you are getting before you buy anything. I got a cheap Gibson online less than a month ago and got what I paid for when it came with the bridge completely missing and a brassy sound when it was played. Buy your stuff in person. I think that Gibson is probably still a good brand, but the quality control of the cheaper models they put their name on is something I might question from my first experience with them...
Ask yourself this question right at the beginning. Before buying a guitar you have to make sure of the kind of style you are comfortable in- be it the jazz and blues or be it country, soul or pop. Only once you are sure of the kind of style you are in for, you should move forward to buying your new guitar. Make the wrong choice, and you will have to regret for it later on.
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
Even with a H-H configuration, you could utilize coil splitting to achieve single coil-ish sounds. While arguably this does not give a "true" single coil sound, if humbucker sounds are mainly used, this can be enough. My impression is that most people aren't using the middle position that much, I think the way forward is to try different pickup configurations to find out what you need.
Got one, a V-???? Gold Top w/ P-90's. Way hotter than my PRS or my Gibson. Plays about as well. If I were a LP kinda guy I'd probably rant and rave, it has a special place in my herd but not in the top five. If you want an LP style and sound but don't want to spend $3K plus, it's more worthy than any of the Epi's I looked at including the '56 reissue.
I'm having a few buddies over to jam this coming Sunday. I don't have a full drum kit setup at my house, so our drummer will be using djembes, bongos, etc. To make things a little more manageable I'm telling folks to bring their electric guitars and NO effects. I have a small arsenal of 15-watt tube amps, so the idea is that we'll all just play into low-wattage tube amps at low volume and see what we come up with.
Started in 1997 by Steve Suhr and Steve Smith, this Lake Elsinore, California-based guitar-building brand is the finest in a relatively new wave of manufacturers. They do not have a line of guitars, per se. Instead, they make every single guitar to order. This high-end boutique style manufacturing in a large-scale format was all but unheard of until the internet changed the world. Now, this brand can offer dozens of shapes, pickup combinations, finishes, etc. reasonably. But don’t let the fact that their guitar shapes seem like knock-offs of other long-standing brands fool you. Any Suhr guitar you’ll encounter is going to be of the utmost in quality of construction and sound. There simply is not a better custom brand out there with the same vast catalog of offerings. There are literally thousands of possible combinations, so if you are looking for a unique and superb instrument and are willing to pay for it, it’s hard to say there’s anything better.

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Great Gretsch "pumpkin orange color", and a great sounding, and playing import reissue. Knobs replaced with dice, and a couple of decals added. Has factory installed Epiphone labeled Bigsby trem-tail piece, no longer available on this model. Chrome p-90 pick-ups. Guitar, and original hard-shell case in like new cond. New list on these is $1195.00 with original hard shell  case.
I taught myself how to play on a beat-up old acoustic decca my mom let me have. I couldnt begin to guess how old it is, but it must be just that; its serial number is 129! It has a pretty decent sound, but i really should replace the strings. it has 18 frets and marks at 5 7 9 and 11. Theres no pickgaurd, the body is orangish wood with thick finish and the neck is some sort of dark wood. The damn thing gave me headaches when i was learning because the strings were so far from the fretboard and all incredibly thick too. It came with extra strings and medium and heavy picks. I dont think it would be worth too much now, especially in its condition.

I have relied on the Sonic Port as a backup rig in case I do have an amp failure. At one point, I kept a Tech 21 PowerEngine 60 on hand to plug my Sonic Port into. Works great for studio and stage work. Again, so much cheaper than AXE-FX which unfortunately, this article plays heavy into spending over $2,000 for the rack mount unit. Don’t forget a decent PA, Monitors, and a Rack to mount it in (another $1000 if not more?). Yea, AXE-FX is sounding worse and worse than bringing a small combo amp..

Zappa – would have liked to hear him play with Hendrix – as a compliment not competition. Zappa, a classically trained musician, playing in a rock and roll world,had such depth of experience from without – as much as Hendrix had from within – too bad the intensity killed him; Zappa tamed it and had fun with it. Hendrix was driven by it. Great guitarist? Who cares! My picks are artists, something a machine, human or otherwise can not approach let alone touch, and that is what it is all about, touching the soul through music. One trick ponies are a dime a dozen – some of them are at the right place at the right time and their ego does the rest. Who will be remembered a hundred years from now – it will not be the "best".
While tone and volume should be your foremost considerations, you should also determine what extra features you really need. Built-in effects are great if you want a no-hassle, all-in-one package, but they may not be as flexible as external effects pedals and processors. An effect loop is useful for effects like digital reverb and delay, but it’s not essential if your effects consists of a few stomp boxes. Line outputs with speaker emulation are helpful for home recording, and external speaker outputs are great for expanding your live rig.
The dynamic mic’s strengths for close-miking constitute some of its weaknesses in distant-miking, and you’ll more likely want to use a ribbon or condenser mic for this job, if you have one. Distant miking really begins at 10″ to 12″ out, where many condenser and ribbon mics start to bloom. As a rough guide, start 12″ to 18″ from the speaker in order to record an electric guitar sound that is still pretty solid and direct, but captures some sense of air and space and natural room reverberation. You can aim the mic straight at the center of the speaker for a bright and detailed tone, as described in our close-miking techniques above, or move it around in the field, trying different direct and off-axis placements. Any position that achieves a desirable tone is valid, and you don’t have to remain on the same plane as the speaker itself. Moving the mic out adds more space to the sound (while potentially compounding phasing issues – see below). Raising the mic above the speaker and aiming it down slightly to fire toward the upper edge of the cone can let the sound bloom as it reaches the mic. In a room with a carpeted floor, you can position the mic lower to the ground (even below the speaker itself) to cut out some of the reflected sound. Positioned as such, an end-fire mic can be shooting either toward the amp on a plane that hovers above the floor or at an angle toward the speaker, while a side-fire mic can be aimed either way or fire straight at the ceiling with the amp sound washing over its capsule.

the les pauls are way out of my ballpark...but i played a few to kind of get the feel so I could compare the cheaper guitars. All the cheaper guitars (including epiphones) sucked when compared to a gibson les paul....with the exception of one... a samick copy of a les paul. It was solid, played as good as the les pauls i was trying, had nice fretboard and headstock inlays, has a set neck, keys held the tuning well, tone was better than any of the other cheap guitars i played (very close to the les paul tone), and had a drop dead georgous birdseye maple top.


Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.

Twelve-string electric guitars feature six pairs of strings, usually with each pair tuned to the same note. The extra E, A, D, and G strings add a note one octave above, and the extra B and E strings are in unison. The pairs of strings are played together as one, so the technique and tuning are the same as a conventional guitar, but they create a much fuller tone, with the additional strings adding a natural chorus effect. They are used almost solely to play harmony and rhythm parts, rather than for guitar solos. They are relatively common in folk rock music. Lead Belly is the folk artist most identified with the twelve-string guitar, usually acoustic with a pickup.
"I'm the famous guitar player," the late Duane Allman said, "but Dickey is the good one." The two spent less than three years together in the Allman Brothers Band, but they established an epic rapport – jamming at length, trading solos and playing their famous twin-guitar leads. After Allman's death in 1971, the group continued with Betts, scoring with "Ramblin' Man" and "Jessica." For all his blues and slide chops, his roots are in jazz, and you can hear the influence of his clean-toned modal soloing in every Southern rock group that's followed.

For something like the application you suggest, getting a used prior generation Line 6 pedalboard like, say, an HD500, might be more cost-effective than trying to patch your laptop into the effects loop of an amp. You can fine tune the Line 6 and add downloaded patches to it with your laptop via a USB cable, but still be able to hook the Line 6 up to your amp with standard 1/4″ TRS plug instrument and patch cables like you use with stomp boxes. Your total outlay would be maybe $250, possibly even less, and that particular model is giggable, versatile, includes a looper, and sounds about 99.5% as good as Line 6’s current stuff. Even the POD X3 Live I have lying sounds pretty darned convincing on many of its models, and it’s like three generations long in the tooth.
The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!

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The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
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They are based out of Nashville, TN, and all of their products are made in the United States. The Gibson Les Paul is possibly the most iconic model of guitar ever made. It’s been used by many players throughout the years, and it’s suitable for everything from jazz to rock to metal. Famous wielders of the instrument include: Jeff Beck, Duane Allman, Chuck Berry, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Dave Grohl, George Harrison, Tony Iommi, B. B. King, Jimmy Page, and many, many more.
The phaser is an interesting pedal that has a surprising mix of uses across genres. What a phaser does is add an out of phase version of your signal with your original signal. This gives your sound a swirling effect that has many sonic possibilities. Eddie Van Halen famously used a phaser set a a low rate to add some “movement” to his solos. In funk, phasers are fundamental in creating the bright and terse rhythm sounds.

The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
Taylor T5. Even the friend who bought it doesn't play it and it goes for around $2300. I was always looking for an acoustic that plays like an electric, so the T5 seemed optimal. It didn't play very well and I thought it sounded awful. Since it's got the Taylor bridge pickup in it, it sounds like a tinny can with a string until you EQ the fuck out of it. But for that kind of money, it should play and sound awesome (in my opinion), or come with indoor plumbing.

No guitar recommendation list is ever complete without a Fender product in the mix. Squier is Fender’s more affordable instrument range, and this set is a great place to start. The affinity series Stratocaster is available in sunburst, classic black, or candy apple red. A 10 watt Fender amp and corresponding cable are also included alongside a strap, 3 picks, snap on the tuner, tremolo bar, replacement parts and tools, strings, gig bag, and an instructional DVD to help you get off on the right foot with your playing.
This is a great opportunity to start working with a digital multimeter (DMM). Track down an inexpensive DMM and make sure it has a continuity function, preferably with an audible connection indicator. You can then trace how switches work by connecting the individual lugs to your DMM and seeing which are connected, and then switching to the other position and taking the same measurement again. The beep that sounds when you’ve made a connection is a great help when you’re taking these measurements.
While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
Although I’ve spent most of my life focusing on audio journalism, I’ve been active as a musician since taking up guitar seriously in the 1970s, and I have played lots of gigs with jazz, rock, and folk groups in New York and Los Angeles. I now play mostly double bass and ukulele; I currently play in three jazz groups in Los Angeles, and I sub regularly in a couple more groups. I also conduct more-or-less weekly jazz jam sessions at my home, where I accompany numerous guitarists of widely varying skill levels, toting all sorts of axes. Having conducted innumerable multi-listener comparisons of audio products over some 25 years, I have a good idea of how to make product tests fair.
Wow, to work with Johnny Mac! But he makes anything sound better, right? I am not a Stick player (love the instrument though), but I would think with a well-tuned setup, it might actually be easier? I think Tony Levin is running a Kemper now for his Stick. The whole idea isn’t an either/or thing, or which one is better. The idea is “running direct is a thing now, and here’s why.” But no one is taking our amps away. BTW, Bootsy is cray cray.
The x99 is as Soldano as an amp can get; its purple! The X99 (a step above the 3-channel X88) is a unique MIDI-controlled preamp, featuring Tim Caswell’s innovative system of real-time-controllable motorized knobs. Modeled after the SLO, the X99 has got the Soldano character that everyone’s grown to love. If you find one, let us know! Like most discontinued Soldano’s, the X99 is virtually impossible to track down.
As the crowds at Beatles shows got louder, they needed louder amps. Jennings provided Lennon and Harrison with the first AC50 piggyback units, and McCartney's AC30/T60 rig was replaced with an AC100 head and an AC100 2×15" cabinet. Lennon and Harrison eventually got their own AC100 rigs, with 4×12"/2-horn configurations. In 1966 and 1967, The Beatles had several prototype or specially-built Vox amplifiers, including hybrid tube/solid-state units from the short-lived 4- and 7-series. Harrison in particular became fond of the 730 amp and 2×12 cabinet, using them to create many the guitar sounds found on Revolver and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Lennon favoured the larger 7120 amplifier, while Harrison preferred the 730 and McCartney had its sister 430 bass amplifier.
Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.
First off, I would like to say I had a lot of fun building this. Also, my hat goes off to the person that hand wrote all the tiny labels on the parts. With that being said, I couldn't get it to work. No sound at all, and only the light came on when I hit the switch. Now the fact that it didn't work could totally be an error on my part, but who knows. Now what I didn't like about this product is this: the casing is pretty small, so everything is pretty cramped (which may also contribute to why I wasn't able to get this to work, although, if you read other reviews, which I recommend for further useful information, some managed just fine), some pieces were mislabeled (There is a review that sorts this out), and the directions aren't very clear...well I thought they were clear enough, but look where that got me, so be ready for that. So 3 stars for fun, good price, and faster than expected delivery.
Gain is the strength of the electronic signal carrying your sound. A standalone gain booster is essentially just a preamp, and can be an effective way to overdrive the preamp section of your amp, creating easier musical-sounding breakup and increasing the amp's power. A gain booster in a stomp box lets you instantly boost your sound level for solos without altering your fundamental tone.

A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.

@Carl – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble. I am not clear on why this would be happening from the info you have provided. Can you please shoot us an email with details on the input and output connections and how each pedal is being powered when you experience this problem? Also, please also include a video that clearly shows this behavior, your connections, and how each pedal is being powered so that we have a better understanding of what you are experiencing. support@strymon.net


B.C. Rich specializes in guitars for the heavy metal and hard rock crowd. They’ve produced some of the most legendary designs in the history of metal, including the Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. Their instruments helped to mold the hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s and B.C. Rich is still a great choice for any guitarist looking for an instrument that looks and sounds as edgy as possible.
An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.
Fast forward a few hundred years to the world of guitar pedals. The first registered portable effect pedal for guitarists built in 1941, called the DeArmond 601 Tremolo Control, was a clumsy toaster oven-shaped unit with a heavy granite-like exterior. The tremolo effect worked by reducing the signal from the guitar several times a second through an electrolytic hydro-fluid located in a glass canister inside the unit. When activated, the main voltage motor rapidly shook the canister, causing the fluid (water, windex, and even mercury) to stir and splash against the pin and the guitar signal to ground, creating a “watery” tremolo sound.

The benefits of owning a combo amp and one or more powered speakers is that a bassist can bring just the combo amp to recording sessions or small venue gigs, but bring the combo amp and the additional powered speaker(s) to large venue shows to add more stage volume. Another benefit of having a combo amp and additional powered speakers is that the bassist could leave the additional powered speakers in the rehearsal space (or, if playing as a house band for a club, on the venue's stage), and only carry the combo amp back and forth from her home to rehearsals or shows, saving time and energy.


Want to know more about how to distinguish all these guitars? Until a few years ago there wasn’t a good (or any!) English language reference book for Japanese guitars of the 1960s. But my co-author on this piece, the esteemed Frank Meyers of Drowning In Guitars, has written an excellent primer on this subject which can help demystify the confusion around a lot of these guitars. You can pick up your own copy here.
Another advantage of an Apple Macintosh computer is that they come with a much better built-in sound card than those of almost any brand of Windows PC. You can actually use the headphone audio output of any model of Apple Macintosh without needing a professional audio internal or external audio interface and get acceptable results. Of course, if you do in fact want the highest-quality audio output, especially for multiple channels, you would want to purchase a third-party external audio interface.

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In this example I used the "Sub Engineer Bass" patch included in the Kontakt 5 bass collection. But there are no rules in this regard: a simple sine oscillator can do the trick just fine. Back in the '60s and '70s it was not unusual to use a Rhodes to achieve the same effect, and Roland's famous JUNO-106 was also used on countless occasions with the same goal in the '80s. Just give it a go with whatever you have at hand!
If you feel you’re ready for a new and better axe or are keen on starting your musical journey with an awesome electric guitar, check out the models we’ve reviewed below. All of these electric guitars have become fast favorites since they were released to the music-loving public. We’re sure you’ll find one or two that would meet all of your requirements and fit your budget.
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
You think those guys are good? They are, but you should hear my uncle- Chris Lambert- and my cousin -Brent Lambert-. My uncle works at the Shadow Box in Columbus (or is it Cincinnati?) Ohio. He plays in a whole bunch of the music shows as a guitarist, and he rocks. Sometimes my cousin works there, too. Brent is just as good as my uncle, and they're both as good as the people you put on here.
Ibanez has always been a company that breaks new ground. For starters, they led the way for Japanese guitar makers to become a force to be reckoned with in music stores and stages all over the world. But, even more significant than that, they pioneered seven and eight-string guitars, laying the groundwork for others to follow in their footsteps and bringing these extended-range axes into the mainstream for the first time.  There's an Ibanez axe to cater to any player's sound. Rockers Steve Vai and Joe Satriani use Ibanez electric guitars, for example, and they can be heard in alternative metal with Mick Thompson of Slipknot as well as power metal from Dragonforce's Herman Li and Sam Totman. On the other end of the musical spectrum, there are the smooth jazz performances of George Benson and Pat Metheny. While their styles are as different as they come, the one thing that all of these artists have in common is that they each have their own signature model Ibanez guitar.
3,000 to 8,000 Hz - Brilliance and Presence: This is the range that can add shimmer or allow a guitar to cut through a mix when boosted. It can also be where you make cuts to keep a guitar from conflicting with a vocal. If making boosts in this range, keep an eye (ear?) out for noise, as any noise present from distortion/effects pedals will very quickly be accentuated as well
One oil finish that many luthiers use and recommend is Tru-Oil, which was originally formulated for finishing gun stocks. It is the oil finish that Luthier's Mercantile carries, and if you Google for Tru-Oil you will find plentry of information about using it on guitars including some very good instructions. And those instructions will help you with Danish Oil as well.
The Omen line is made for everyone, but perhaps leans just slightly toward the shredding crowd. This guitar features a maple bolt-on neck which features a rosewood fretboard with pearloid inlays. The inlays are a nice touch at this price, if you’re into that sort of thing. The pickups are Schecter Diamond Plus humbuckers and offer a well-balanced tone that can also be aggressive when needed. Twenty-four jumbo frets means this is good for speed.

Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
We are looking at plenty of audio boom here, secured by the mahogany hollow body. The rest of the mix also includes a strong mahogany neck with an attached rosewood fingerboard, a pack of 22 frets and classic white dot markers. Audio versatility is pretty high here, and the guitar is capable of tackling everything from light jazz tones to alternative rock groove.
Acoustic and electric archtops are identical in design with the only difference being the addition of electro-magnetic pickups and pots. Archtops can either be full-bodied or thinline. The full-bodied archtop retains good volume and acoustic resonance when played unplugged though feedback may be an issue when amplified. The thinline body minimizes feedback by sacrificing acoustic volume and resonance.

The first analog delay units used magnetic tape to record the original signal and play it back shortly after. The most famous tape units are the Echoplex and the Roland Space Echo. As cool sounding as these units are they require a fair amount of maintenance and they are rather large and aren’t practical for the gigging musician. But boy do they sound good!

Originally the Stratocaster was offered in a 2-color sunburst finish on a solid, deeply contoured ash body, a 21-fret one-piece maple neck with black dot inlays and Kluson tuning heads. In 1956 Fender began issuing solid Stratocasters with alder bodies.[4] In 1960 the available custom colors were standardized, many of which were automobile lacquer colors from DuPont available at an additional 5% cost. The unique single-ply, 8-screw hole white pickguard held all electronic components except the recessed jack plate—facilitating easy assembly. Despite many subsequent Stratocaster models (including copies and the Superstrat), vintage Fender models are highly valued by collectors for their investment potential and players who prefer the timbre of older models.


If you never intend to do octave high vibrato bar stuff or play music in the style of bands like PANTERA (hard, fast metal, with lots of high note bending leads), or Jimi Hendrix (psychedelic rock), then exclude any floating or fancy bridge (also called a tailpiece). Non-floating tail pieces are usually more stable (keeping tune and intonation) and cheaper to buy.
With the new Shreddage 2X update released in July 2014, S2 is better than ever. Enjoy a brand-new user interface and totally rewritten engine, with intelligent string / fret selection, new features and options, even more customizable mapping, and new samples like powerchord slides and staccatos. You can also use new built-in effects pedals and save/load your own custom presets to use across multiple projects.
Through the late 1960s, Westheimer offered a wide range of Kingston instruments including electric basses and hollowbodies (and even amplifiers). By the mid-1970s, it was becoming increasingly expensive to build guitars in Japan, so Westheimer shifted production to Korea by building a factory there, which became Cort. Kingston guitars existed in one form or another through the 1970s and even in the early 1980s, but Westheimer was finding great success building budget and entry-level guitars in his Cort factory for big U.S. guitar companies such as Kramer, B.C. Rich, and Epiphone.
The Rocker 32’s secret weapon is its stereo capabilities courtesy of two output stages and a mono out/stereo in valve-buffered effects loop – and it’s this that opens the door to some tantalising effects possibilities. It also features a half-power option incorporated into the front panel standby switch. The enamel control panel follows Orange’s classic 1970s ‘graphics only’ format, using pictograms to describe the control functions. The Dirty channel includes gain, bass, mid, treble and master volume controls, while the clean Natural channel has a single volume control. The Natural channel may only have a single volume control, but it’s perfectly dialled in to flatter practically any guitar and it sounds wonderful, with a glassy treble giving way to an addictive chime at higher volume levels. The Dirty channel’s gain control has a very wide range, allowing fine control of moderately driven sounds, with plenty of Dark Terror-approved filth at the top of its travel, making it ideal for everything from classic Brit rock and blues to modern metal. The Rocker 32’s stereo capability will make it almost irresistible to effects users. Plugging in a decent stereo chorus and setting the outputs to dry/wet sends a clean uneffected sound through one side and a fully wet modulated sound to the other. This wet/dry combination generates the chorus effect in the air between the loudspeaker and the ears, creating a real three-dimensional soundscape that swirls and breathes like a classic Leslie rotary loudspeaker.
Considered by many to be the first master of the electric guitar, Charlie Christian was an unbelievable jazz player with stellar improvisational skills. His quick, fluent runs down the fretboard made for some of the most inventive and innovative jazz of all time. For a sample of Christian’s great guitar work, give a listen to his song, “Swing to Bop.”
If you’re using a bunch of high gain pedals, or a lot of pedals chained together, chances are you’ll get a little bit of hum or unwanted buzzing coming from your amp. This is especially noticeable if you’re using high gain amps and guitars. If your amp is buzzing when you’re not playing anything, you might benefit from a noise gate pedal as they cut out all that unwanted noise but preserve your tone.
• Why size matters: Fret width and height affect playability considerably. Fret wire measures at .078 to .110 at the crown, or top, and runs between .035 and .055 high. Taller frets, at .45 and up, tend to make for easier string bending and produce clear notes without much pressure. The latter makes them ideal for high speed playing. The furthest point of that concept is the scalloped fretboard, employed most notably by Yngwie Malmsteen and John McLaughlin, who played a specially designed Gibson J-200 with scalloped frets and drone strings with the group Shakti.
This depends on a number of things. Are you looking for placement in a series of pedals? If so, it should go towards the end of your chain. Are you looking at it as a functional point? If so, using an octave lower can give some hugeness to heavy guitar or might pull a fatter sound out of some higher solos, whereas an octave up is almost always great for a layering effect.
As a beginner, you are prone to make mistakes while purchasing your guitar due to lack of experience. Many end up buying very cheap guitars that with time start developing technical issues. Being in this business for a good amount of time, we have noted some of the common challenges faced by all beginners. When you want to buy a guitar as a beginner, there are a number of qualities that should be looked into before deciding which one to buy. These factors include:

In 1980, however, Martin had hired another guitarmaker, one John Marshall. Marshall had studied lutherie with Eric Schulte whose base of operation was in the far western Main Line suburbs of Philadelphia around Frazer, PA. Schulte himself had worked with the legendary Sam Koontz, who was responsible for Harptone and some Standel guitars, as well as his own. After learning the tricks of the trade from Schulte, Marshall became involved in the ill-fated Renaissance guitar company of Malvern, PA, just up the road from Frazer. Renaissance, you’ll recall, made those exotic plexiglass guitars and basses in around 1979 (plus a later series in 1980 designed by John Dragonetti). These were designed by John Marshall. Marshall left Renaissance to join Martin, where he was hired to work on the electric guitars which would become Martin’s 28 Series.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a pickup and amplifier set for musicians to use with existing guitars.
These Gibson Les Paul Reissue guitars simply perform better than those made the year after or the year before. Gibson is aware of this and has been for quite some time. That's why they've decided to push out a series of Les Pauls which aimed to match the ones from 1959. Are they equally as good? Probably not since the old ones are legendary, but they're as close as you'll get for a brand new guitar.
Description: Body: Maple - Burled - Top Wood: Maple - Burl - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany & Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 20, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid & Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ART-W - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold - Circuit Type: Passive - Pickups: Super 58 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Blue Lagoon - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case

ESP is a Japanese company, which focused on the production of electric guitars and basses. This brand was established in 1975 in Tokyo. They produce instruments under the label of “ESP Custom Shop”, “Navigator”, “Grassroots”, “ESP Standard”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” etc. Available price is Rs. 9,270/- onwards (approx). For more information, visit Espguitars.com (Global) or Espguitars.co.jp (Japan).


I've been to a PRS factory and seen the precision and skill with which they are made. Their quality control is incredible: they test each one individually and make adjusments until it is perfect. They won't let a bad one get through so if you buy a PRS guitar, you are guaranteed a high quality guitar. I mean, with the high price you pay, how could they not be wonderful? Plus, they sound, feel, and look amazing. (I also got to see Paul himself; it was pretty cool. What a nice, humble guy.)
A strong guide for those learning their way around an acoustic guitar, this book will teach you to play popular songs like “Angie,” “Barely Breathing,” “Behind Blue Eyes,” “Building a Mystery,” “Change the World,” “Dust in the Wind,” “Fast Car,” “Here Comes the Sun,” “Jack and Diane,” “Landslide,” “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” “Maggie May,” “More Than Words,” “Name,” “You've Got a Friend,” “Yesterday,” and others.

Very disappointed! This was a gift from Santa this morning and the amp failed miserably. Would not work at all. Not with a battery or an adapter(which by the way is not included). Amp started to smell like it was burning/melting even though it showed no power at all. Son is very disappointed to say the least and so is mommy. Only thing he wanted was an electric guitar and he couldn't even enjoy it this morning. How do I explain returning it to Santa...


Perhaps our favorite feature is a far more subtle aspect of this pedal's interior, which is a circuit design that runs your dry signal through an analog path, before reuniting it with the wet reverb signal, which is produced by a digital processor. This means your guitar's signal coming into the pedal is unimpaired by the digital components, giving you a far more pure and organic-sounding output. 
On guitars with tremolo bridges, the bridge must be stabilized before any adjustments are made. Regardless of the manufacturer, the correct position for any bridge, under string tension, is going to be parallel to and essentially flush with the top (or up to 1mm, or so, above the top). Ultimately, we want the bridge assembly to sit such that we have a range of adjustability over the bridge saddles, so that we can dictate the preferred string height over the fretboard.
Carrying on the tradition of his hero, Derek Trucks has taken Duane Allman’s sound and technique and forged ahead with one of the most soulful slide sounds ever to be heard.  His uncle, Butch Trucks, was the drummer for the ABB, and Trucks began to play with the band at a very young age before becoming a full time member and keeping Duane Allman’s heritage alive for a new generation of listeners.
Seller: atcycle (2,136) 100%, Location: Sugar Land, Texas, Ships to: US, Item: 122791185383 This Used Guitar, cosmetically in general is in good used condition, it's played and everything works fine. Includes tremolo bar. The string trees have been removed for tuning stability but will be included should you wish to use them. Please use the enlarge feature and look over all pictures as this is the best way for me to show / describe the condition to you. I will have other Guitars listed. PLEASE NOTE ALL FAULTS SHOWN IN PICTURES ARE CONSIDERED PART OF THE DESCRIPTION.This Lotus "Strat" triple single coil is one of the finest examples of high quality imports which strongly competed with the big boys back in the day. Those of us who were around back then, learned that frequently these guitars had better sound and build quality than the Name Brand at that time. They were so good that the Big Name Company had them build many guitars for them! Condition: Used, Condition: There are a few signs of wear typical of an older used instrument. Missing switch button., Brand: Lotus, Body Type: Solid, MPN: Does Not Apply, Dexterity: Right-Handed, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Color: Black, Body Material: Solid Wood See More
One glance at an El Dorado strap and you'll understand why so many musicians choose leather as their go-to pick for stage, studio or practice play. By combining sleek designer style with rugged, durable materials, these straps offer everything you need in a reliable accessory. And when you can keep your guitar secure while rocking out onstage, you'll be free to concentrate on the more important matter of dazzling your fans.
Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.
Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.
One of the greatest things about being a touring musician is having the opportunity to see, hear and play with some of the greatest guitarists on the planet. Over the course of my career, I’ve performed with legendary guitarists like Ted Nugent, Steve Cropper, and Glen Campbell, to drop just a few names. Playing lead for a headline act like Toby Keith also allows me to watch fantastic guitarists like Keith Urban and Brad Paisley take the stage before me.
Bass effects are electronic effects units that are designed for use with the low pitches created by an electric bass or for an upright bass used with a bass amp or PA system. Two examples of bass effects are fuzz bass and bass chorus. Some bass amplifiers have built-in effects, such as overdrive or chorus. Upright bassists in jazz, folk, blues and similar genres may use a bass preamplifier, a small electronic device that matches the impedance between the piezoelectric pickup and the amp or PA system. Bass preamps also allow for the gain of the signal to be boosted or cut. Some models also offer equalization controls, a compressor, and a DI box connection.
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category.

Im wanting to build my own 8 string fanned fret with a 30" scale length and a bit more string spacing than a standard 8 string. My Ibanez rg8 has about 9mm from center of string to center of string. I figure I will build a few with cheap lumber from home depot without expecting to play it at all. I want a neck through style as well. Does anyone know where to find some info on building something like this and specifically how to properly set up the frets?

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So here we are at the end of our journey (well, probably not yours). Maybe you have found the best guitar practice amplifier from this list and cannot wait to buy it or maybe you still want to have your options. BUT my point is that starting with an amplifier for practice is a great idea. Not only will the amp serve a very particular purpose it was made for but you will also save quite a lot of money. For instance, most amplifiers under $100 are great for practice so you can check out our list of the best cheap amplifiers for beginners. And while I know a lot of people don’t like the idea of “cheap” being in the same sentence as their instrument or equipment, the thing is cheaper does not necessarily means bad. Is a $100 amp going to win over an amplifier in the best amplifiers $1000 list? Probably not, but as I already mention the best “objective” amplifier (or what brands and people deem to be the best at the moment) is not always a good option for everyone. That is especially a case with someone who is just starting off their journey into the world of music, amps, guitars and everything of that sort.
The Givson Guitar Corporation makes guitars which sell under various brand names and are considered as among the best guitar brands on the planet. The company is famous to have devised the arch top guitar and created a few of the most iconic instruments in guitar history. Some iconic versions are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES 175 as well as the Firebird. The Les Paul Melody Maker is a popular model amongst many guitarists in different countries.

If you're in need of some assistance, you've come to the right place. At BestReviews, our goal is to help you find the perfect products to fit your individual requirements. We test items in our labs, gather feedback from existing customers, and consult experts. The result? Fair and thorough reviews that help you cut through the jargon. Read on for our full guide to electric guitars to learn all you need to know to pick the right one for your next jam session.
We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.
In 1969 MCA closed the Danelectro plant. This was blamed on MCA's shift to selling instruments to individual guitar stores instead of jobbers (such as Sears). At this time, Dan Armstrong bought most of the remaining parts, and continued manufacturing Danelectros through Ampeg. These instruments had single cutaway bodies with one humbucking pickup (not lipstick tube pickups), and no brand name on the peghead. Apparently Ampeg was having problems with the production of the see-thru Dan Armstrong guitars. In the interium, Armstrong sold the remaining Danelectros through Ampeg until the Dan Armstrong guitars were fully available.
Different forms of manipulation of similar bucket brigade delay chips were also at the center of the more advanced chorus and flanger pedals that emerged in the late 1970s. With ICs that themselves were capable of creating a controllable time delay in any given signal, the job of harmonically modulating part of a split, delayed signal to produce a warbling chorus or swooshing flange sound became a lot easier.
I have had Tracy do quite abit of work for me many times going back since the 90’s, however, now I am “on my own” living a long way from his shop. He is a super craftsman for sure and I wanted to watch how to do some minor things on my own as well as be able to help educate myself before finding someone locally to work on my guitars in the future. Great explanations and for my reference in future.
Also included was the GP, an equal double-cutaway model with a mahogany body, flamed maple carved top, glued-in neck, fine-tune bridge and stop tailpiece. The only models I’ve seen, which were also advertised, had twin humbuckers and conventional electronics. One source refers to a GP-1, which by nomenclature would suggest a single humbucker, but it’s not known if this ever actually existed. Also, it’s not clear if the GPs came in parts or fully assembled.

For many engineers, a simple one-mic technique gives them all the recorded electric guitar sound they need. Dynamic types, such as the ubiquitous Shure SM57, are ideal for capturing loud sounds, as they can handle high SPLs. For a more accurate representation of the amplifier as the human ear hears it in the room, a condenser or ribbon mic can be employed, although care must be taken not to damage the mic with very loud signals. Pointing the mic at the centre of the speaker cone produces the brightest sound, with the sound becoming increasingly warm the further off-centre it’s placed. It’s common to position the mic quite close to the speaker grille, unless a degree of room sound is desired. A good starting point is to place the mic just off-centre, at a distance of between two and six inches.
SOLD OUT ! We are VERY pleased to present a very special example Alvarez Yairi Classical guitar . The condition of this high end instrument is excellent plus and this guitar is simply wonderful. This is hand built example by The Kazou Yairi himself, Japanese Master Luthier. For those of you not familiar with the Premier Japanese Master Luthier Kazou Yairi and his masterfuly built instruments you may enjoy this vidio introduction to YAIRI GUITARS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPRyLPouYZM The model is CY116 and is a very high-end professional guitar and is in excellent Plus condition. Only the highest grade woods used as you can see ...choice AAA Flamed-Quilted and is 3-dimensional depth is a work of art as you can see by the pictures. This guitar plays and sound AMAZING and is truly inspirational. This guitar shows very little fret wear. There are just a few minor nicks or scratches which is normal wear for a guitar of this vintage that has been lovingly played. This one is a one owner adult owned guitar and comes with its high quality custom hard shell case too. General Specs: Alvarez Yairi CY116 Classical Acoustic Guitar The CY116's Solid Cedar Top is adorned by an elaborate wooden mosaic rosette. Burled Maple Back/Sides give this classical amazing clarity and warmth like the fiery Andalusian plains that inspired the music that this guitar was born to perform. With room-filling projection, the CY116 is a guaranteed conversation starter. You hear it in the elegant pacing of a classical air. You see it in the vivid charm of a folk dance. Specs: Burled Mahogany Back/Sides Solid Cedar Top Mahogany Neck Ebony Fingerboard Scale: 25 1/2" (650mm) Width at Nut: 2" (51mm) Rosewood Bridge Ivory Body Binding Wooden Mosaic Rosette Gold Vintage Open-Style Tuning Machines .
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While it can be a troubling task to find the perfect electric guitar to bring out your inner rock star, we hope that our electric guitar reviews & our comprehensive guide has helped you narrow down your choices. Our best piece of advice is to determine the type of genre you’re interested in playing. That will be a good basepoint for you to work from in order to determine the best electric guitar that fits your needs. Afterward, it is important to select the guitar that has the best components to give you the highest quality of sound. The color does not matter too much but the next most important factor to think about is certainly the wood type used to build the electric guitar. Picking the right type of wood is going to more or less, create better or worse sound.
A reluctant soloist, Yo La Tengo cofounder Ira Kaplan was credited with “naïve guitar” on the band’s first single in 1985 and didn’t begin taking the spotlight regularly until some two years later. Starting with a bucket of Velvet Underground moves, Kaplan became a consummate inside guitarist, too, a deceptively normal-looking dude folding in space jazz, barbed noise, spare country soul, and — when very occasionally called for — traditional feet-behind-knees rock jumps.

The Boss Katana KTN-HEAD Amp Head has become one of the most talked about amplifiers as it features the coveted Waza technology found in the beautiful BOSS Waza Craft Pedals. The same care and attention that goes into these pedals has gone into the BOSS Katana head to produce a versatile and highly  aerticulate amplifier. Packed with Five unique amp characters: Clean, Crunch, Lead, Brown (derived from the Waza amp), and Acoustic (for acoustic-electric guitars), the Katana head ensures you have enough sonic diversity for all genres. You can choose from 55 BOSS effects and load 15 on to the amp via BOSS Tone Studio editor software and you can actually use it without a cab thanks to the monitor speaker - making it a great practice amp that you can use to get your sound and hook up to a cab later on at your gigs.
Now that we mentioned some of the exotics, it’s time to go back to the roots. Epiphone Les Paul Standard is as old school as it gets. Legendary LP body style that brings a no-nonsense combo of hardware has always been the way to go. I actually have one of these, and after years of playing it keeps surprising me. I’d say it easily punches way above its price range.

PRS really took off back in the ‘90s when it seemed just about everyone had swapped out their Les Paul for a PRS. Eventually they capitalized on this trend and made the PRS more accessible by introducing the SE line of lower-budget guitars. But these aren’t beginner’s guitars. Even though they cost less than a standard PRS, they’re still high-quality instruments.

You might initially think that Music Lab is narcissistic for creating a line of guitar VSTs with the word “real” in them. But after you hear the first note, you’ll be kicking yourself for doubting it. There is a lot to cover with the “Real” line, and since they share many of the same features, we will slowly go over the components of these VSTs throughout the reviews for them.  

Also, a quick note on the topic of high pass filters: use them. They can be your best friend, but be careful as they're a double-edged sword. HP filters can quickly clean mud from your mix and open things up, but too much can lead to a thin, weak-sounding mix equally as quick. When applying them, I like to come from the top down, as I find that easier to dial in properly. By that, I mean instead of rolling up an HP filter and listening until I think it's removed what I'm looking for, I start way above with "too much" HP filtering and roll it down until I feel that I have all the information on the bottom I need. I find it easier to hear the effect this way, which therefore allows me to more accurately and effectively control my low end.

One very interesting and strikingly modern Teisco guitar, the YG-6, appeared in Japan in 1965. It was very near the classic Strat shape, with offset double cutaways and Strat-like contours, but the horns were more pointed. The neck had the new hooked headstock and the rectangular edge inlays. A large multi-laminated pickguard stretched from the upper horn down to the lower bout control extension. Three large rectangular single-coil pickups, with chrome sides and black center insert (exposed poles) sat in front of a roller bridge and the clever platform vibrato design. Three on/off rocker switches sat above the strings, plus a small sliding switch, presumably a mute. It had one volume and one tone control, and is an exceptionally handsome guitar.
In order to play your favorite song, you’ll need to learn guitar chords. Use the images and instructions below to learn how to play each chord. The ChordBuddy device can be used for assistance in knowing where to place your fingers In the images the circles represent where you will be placing your fingers (I=index, M=middle finger, R=ring finger, P=pinky). The X’s represent strings that you will not be strumming while the O represents strings that will be played without any frets.
I’m going to be doing a pickup upgrade in the next few months on a Strat-style HSS. I have an idea, maybe a crazy idea, about how I’d like to wire it but so far I have been unable to find any indication that it is even possible. This site seems like the best place to get an answer. The single coils in my guitar will be replaced with another set of single coils (Seymour Duncan SLS-1 lipsticks). The humbucker I plan on installing (DiMarzio Tone Zone) is capable of being coil-split, which I want to take advantage of BUT I would rather not install a push/pull pot. My wiring idea… Toggle Position: 1) Full Humbucker, 2) North coil only of humbucker for single coil performance, 3) middle coil only, 4) middle and neck, and 5) neck only. Is this even possible using the 5-position toggle switch I already have, or is there no way to do it besides using a push/pull pot or installing an additional mini-toggle?
For the younger children in the 4-8-year-old range, a scale length of about 22.7 inches is a good fit. Although some electrics come in scale lengths down to 22.2 inches, the extra length will keep your child from outgrowing the guitar too soon. For comparison, adult full-size guitars such as the Fender Stratocaster have a scale length of 25.75 inches while Gibson Guitars are an inch shorter. So if you are confused that what to buy for your new learner or the little one, you can go with the product that fits perfectly in your requirements.
The best guitarists of all time, voted on and ranked by many music fans, with photos and other info. With help from the wisdom of the crowd, you'll find a comprehensive ranking of the greatest guitar players in history. All the top guitarists are on this list - monster guitar heroes from rock, metal, blues, and alternative music. Are you on Team Eddie or Team Jimi? How about both!
We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks
In the earlier days of My Chemical Romance, Iero mainly used Gibson SG's & Epiphone Les Paul guitars (most notably his white Les Paul nicknamed 'Pansy' which proved popular amongst his fans but has since been broken while onstage) and Marshall amps. He has since switched to using Gibson Les Pauls (with the Neck Pick-up removed) and occasionally uses a Gibson SG. He also used a Fender Stratocaster in the Desolation Row video. He has recently collaborated with Epiphone to design the Wilshire Phant-O-Matic guitar which he used onstage for the My Chemical Romance 'World Contamination' Tour, the Honda Civic Tour and for the Reading and Leeds festivals.
Often forgotten when it comes to in-depth reviews, the best acoustic electric guitar can be pretty tricky to find. Guitarists often know what they’re looking for when it comes to a standard electric or acoustic guitar, but there are some additional things to look out for when it comes to the fusion of the two. On a bit of a budget? Check out the top acoustic electric guitars under $1000 here. Perhaps you are a beginner, if so - check out the top electro-acoustic guitars under 300 bucks! Want something more luxurious? Try an acoustic electric for under 700 bucks.
Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
Electric guitars vary greatly in sound, look and playability. Different designs, quality of craftsmanship, electronics and choice of woods make them sound, look and feel different from one another. It's the luthiers' goal to combine the best of these elements to create the next masterpiece. Our task is seeking and offering the finest tonewoods available to make that goal a reality.

To make frequency selective networks, we must use capacitors and/or inductors. Unlike resistors, both caps and inductors discriminate against some frequencies in favor of others. Capacitors preferentially pass higher frequencies; inductors pass lower frequencies more easily. Resistors help us set how much gets through, while caps and inductors select which frequencies get through. Inductors are big, heavy and expensive, so almost all tone controls use only caps and resistors.

By 1941, much of the pre-war Supro line had disappeared, to be replaced with what would eventually turn out to be a good portion – and look – of the post-war Supro line. Gone were the Supro Avalon Spanish, the acoustic resonators and the nifty amp-in-cases. The Supro Avalon Hawaiian was gone, in name, though its spirit was directly inherited by another lap, the Clipper. Also gone were the mated pickups in favor of a more traditional design with exposed polepieces. These with some variations, would prevail for the next decade or more.

One of the more common questions beginners have is why even bother with reverb pedals when most modern amps have a built-in version of this effect? To be honest, if you have a vintage tube amp with an actual spring reverb inside, there really isn’t a good reason to go with a pedal. However, most don’t. The thing that makes reverb pedals a much better solution in most cases is that you get a level of quality that can be used on stage.
Firstly, we advise sticking with a brand name you can trust. We’ve established that there’s nothing particularly premium about the guitars on offer at $200, but by sticking with Fender, Ibanez, Yamaha, Epiphone, Oscar Schmidt and the others on this list, you at least guarantee a guitar from a renown guitar manufacturer with some history, instead of something thrown together by a company who don’t specialise in instruments.

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