With the correct strings on the guitar, and the strings tensioned to the tuning you intend to use, place a capo at the first fret, or depress the low "E" string at the first fret. While doing this, depress the same string at the 12th fret. Site along the bottom of the string and note its relationship to the top of the frets up and down the fretboard between the fretted positions. The string in this situation, since it is under tension, is essentially a straight edge, and the curve, or profile, of the fretboard can now be seen. Generally, a gap of 1/64 - 1/32 " between the bottom of any string and the tops of the 6-7th frets (when fretting the string at the 1st and 12th frets or higher) is considered acceptable. You could go a hair flatter, or even a bit more curved depending on the needs of a given player, but start here.
Gibson announced a new interactive computerized Les Paul that produces more sounds, named the Dark Fire. It was released on December 15, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body and controlled by the “Master Control Knob” (MCK). The MCK allows players to change the pickups and coils, adjust each tone and tunings automatically and simultaneously, even during a song being played. Like the Robot, the Dark Fire features the ability to tune the guitar; however, in an improvement over the Robot, the player can tune it up to 500 times per battery charge, allowing the tuning pegs to adjust themselves to different tuning styles. Using the “Chameleon Tone Technology” Gibson claims this guitar will produce every imaginable guitar sound. In addition to the improved and advanced tuning features, the guitar has three types of pickups which include Burstbucker (humbucker), a P-90 single-coil and a bridge-mounted piezo acoustic, all of which contribute to organic blends of original sounds.
In the years since, Novak has built the instruments of choice for the likes of musicians like Charlie Hunter, Phillip De Gruy, Joe Louis Walker, and Henry Kaiser, to name a few. As time passed, he experimented with a variety of design ideas involving the use of non-traditional woods. At times, he was viewed as downright crazy from many a purist's standpoint. But he turned the other cheek, seeking the solutions that would satisfy his own personal playing requirements.


It was a great guitar to learn on, but you are ready for a serious gigging guitar.  Okay, if she was your FIRST love then don't dell her, keep her around for inspiration (plus she ain't worth any money anyway).  Do NOT upgrade her.  Once you start, there will be no end.  Sure great pickups will make her sound great, but you'll also want to replace ALL the electronics, and the tuners, and the bridge, and... well, you get the idea.


Dogwood Guitars is a full-service setup and repair shop. We are equipped to handle all of your acoustic and electric guitar adjustment and repair needs. The prices listed below are labor estimates and do not include parts such as new strings, bone blanks, fret wire, etc. I give free no-obligation evaluations of any guitar so that you can make an informed decision about your instrument and its care. Guitars are like cars; they need some routine maintenance to perform at their best.
Gibson Les Paul specifications during 1958–60 varied from year to year and also from guitar to guitar. Typical 1958 Les Paul Standard necks had a thicker “club-shaped” neck, thinner frets and lower fret height, which changed during the course of 1959 to develop into typical 1960 necks with a thinner cross-section and wider, higher frets. Les Paul Customs from the same period had totally different frets and were referred to as “The Fretless Wonder”, which were designed for jazz guitarists with thick flat-wound strings.[note 7][note 6]
McCarthy's probably one of the toughest guitar masters on this list. His craftsman's hands know not only how to help your instrument make magic again but also (we assume) how to put you in an arm or leg lock and make you scream "Uncle" if you mouth off too much about your guitar's condition. It's probably why guitar tough guys like Zakk Wylde of Ozzy Osborne and Black Label Society, Izzy Stradlin of Guns 'n' Roses and Jason Newsted of Metallica gravitate toward his repair shop. (Not to mention the guys of Motorhead). They know they're dealing with a true master.

switches between each pickup, weather its 2 or more you've got one to switch between each of them. pointed up = neck pickup (suggested for solos and high pitched stuff) middle = both pointed down = bridge (suggested for metal or lead guitar) the fenders with a 5 way blade switch its all the way up = same way , solos up a bit = neck and middle pickup middle = all the pickups (this can vary between guitars) down a bit = middle and bridge down = the bridge by itself some guitars with two pickups have a 5 way blade which you hear 5 clicks , this isn't a broken guitar if its the case you got an awesome slightly new thing called a coiltap which makes say a les pauls neck pickup split the sound inside the pickup and giving you a more fender sounding pickup sound... very cool.
The Kent 800-series hollow bodied guitars all had asymmetrical bodies and the pickup closest to the neck was tilted. There are several Kents that had symmetrical hollow bodies and no tilted pickups. The pickups are either humbuckers or wide single coils with covers. They resemble Gibson ES-style guitars. The necks and headstocks are very similar to the Kent 800s. They're probably newer than the 700s and 800s. I won’t be covering those here.
As can be seen from our reviews above, it clear that the best guitars are those that meet the needs of the player—whether beginner or intermediate player—the best electric guitar should be able to provide quality sound, last for a considerable time, easy to play and always reliable when needed. Although every single guitar listed here are of top quality, there are different guitar for every budget, style and genre of play.
The people at VOX know a thing or two about creating great sounding amps, after all the AC30 is probably one of the most famous amps of all time. The VOX Valvetronix VT40X modelling guitar amp actually recreates the sound of these great amplifiers and so many more. In fact, you have 11 famous amps to choose from which can expand to 20 when using the included Tone Room Editor as well as 13 effects built in. The hybrid digital/analog power amp provides you with all the warmth of a tube amp but with digital stability! If you want more power, you have the VOX VT100x or the smaller version – the VOX VT20X.
I've spent a few weeks on this kit - I will update with progress. Cutting out the headstock and finishing the guitar was fun and not too difficult. I chose to use TruOil and a natural finish, which takes a few weeks to finish. The body I got was made from 4 pieces of joined wood, and I wasn't careful about checking for glue spots, so there are a couple in the finish, but it still looks great. The neck fits nicely and feels good. It is straight and correctly set up for string tension (a little bit of bow before the strings are on).
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
Single coil pickups utilize a single magnet. They also typically have a lower output than humbucking pickups, which means they aren’t capable of producing as much distortion as a humbucker equipped guitar. However, because they’re not intended to be used with extreme levels of distortion they have a very rich and musical voice when played with lower amounts of gain.
This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.

The second issue of the Les Paul guitar was introduced to the public in 1954. Called the Gibson Les Paul Custom, this entirely black guitar was dubbed the Black Beauty. The Les Paul Custom featured a mahogany top to differentiate the instrument from its Goldtop predecessor’s maple top. It also featured the new Tune-o-Matic bridge design and a pickup with an alnico-5 magnet, P-480, in the neck position. In addition, since 1957, the Custom was fitted with Gibson’s new humbucker pickups, PAF,[16] and later became available with three pickups instead of the more usual two. The three pickup model retained the standard Gibson 3-way switch so not all pickup combinations were possible. The neck and bridge-only settings were retained, but the middle switch position was set to enable the middle and bridge pickups. A common modification was to restore the standard neck/both/bridge switching combination and add a switch to enable the middle pickup on its own.[citation needed] The guitar is wired as a “normal”2 pick up Les Paul except there is a master volume , master tone, (for front and back pu) while the middle pick up has its own volume / tone. this allows the middle pu to turned out of the circuit or mixed with the other two. allowing many different tones.
The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.

One of the most popular instruments ever known to the world, the guitar is something truly special. Versatile in its ability to play different genres, and coming in a variety of styles, every guitar has something different to offer, allowing musicians to make their individual instrument truly their own. From highly sought after models, to everyday pick up and play options, the guitars found here were made to accommodate literally every need a guitarist could ever have.
Ovations reached the height of their popularity in the 1980s, where they were often seen during live performances by touring artists. Ovation guitars’ synthetic bowl-shaped back and early use (1971) of pre-amplifiers, onboard equalization and piezo pickups were particularly attractive to live acoustic musicians who constantly battled feedback problems from the high volumes needed in live venues.[citation needed]

Over the years in my travels, I've seen more Peavey amps on real working musicians' stages than any other amp manufacturer. The fact that real, everyday working musicians use and depend on them also dictates that Peavey amps are out there making more money for real working musicians in total, than any other amp out there. Yes, I know, the big act shows have huge backlines of Marshalls behind them, but they are in the minority, as there are more lesser-famed bands and musicians out there working than there are "stars". I "stepped down" to Peavey almost 20 years ago, when I was beginning to have reliability issues with my Fender amps...issues I couldn't afford to keep having while on the road. I still have my old Fender amps, but I've been gigging regularly and exclusively with only Peavey for the past almost 20 years now. I still get the tone I want and need and the reliability I expect in order to keep making a living in music. And by the way, I've been gigging since 1963.


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Fuzz is an indistinct, nasty overdrive that is synonymous with Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face is the most famous fuzz pedal, known for the way is breaks up and adds something special to any guitar tone. Fuzz pedals are most commonly used on top of clean or lightly overdriven tones, as this is where the character of the pedal can really come through; used on top of already distorted tones they can be great for making a load of noise! Two main types of fuzz are available – silicon (which sounds softer and more rounded) and germanium, which sounds harsher and more treble-y.

Recording? The best amps for recording WON'T be big, 100-watts Marshalls, for instance! On the contrary, small amps are the best choice. We're talking about small valve amps, here. That's because, unlike with bigger, louder amps, you can crank up small valve amps, pushing them to tone heaven. If you did the same with bigger amps, it wouldn't work - you'd sound so loud you wouldn't be able to make a good recording! This technique has been used by many, many top artists. Despite using big & loud marshall amps onstage, Jimmy Page used a small Supro valve amp on the early Led Zeppelin albums. Likewise, the Arctic Monkeys used an old Fender Champ on most of their debut album.
But opposites not only attract—sometimes they also make groundbreaking music together. This is certainly true of Zoom’s collaboration with Doe and Cervenka. Since that band broke up, Zoom has gone on to do session work with everyone from the late John Denver to the Raconteurs. He’s also become semi-legendary as a guitar amp hotrod guru, having tweaked circuitry for Jackson Browne, the Black Crowes, Los Lobos, L7 and Social Distortion, among many others.

Teisco's very FIRST solid body electric guitar, the 1954 Teisco, Model J-1. 1 single coil Pickup. Front plate says, "NIHON ONPA KOGYO CO. LTD TEISCO". Back plate says, "TEISCO ELECTRIC GUITER MODEL J1". Yes, Guitar is misspelled as "GUITER"!. Maple neck is a "ball bat" with very pronounce "V". Guitar is currently set up for slide with "flat-wounds". VERY ROUGH CONDITION and lots of "character". Where to start, hm....? Firstly it has termite, yes, termite damage to the back. Don't ask me how, I don't know. The top is veneered with a beautiful quilted maple, but is missing a big section on the front. The tailpiece is missing it's cover. The wood bridge is partially inverted and sagging, due to string tension. The pick guard is warped (normal to many vintage guitars). We're pretty sure the brown bakelite knobs, while cool, are not original. Some of the frets have been changed, mostly by removing from the last 6 slots and relocated. 95% of the veneer is missing from the back. The tuners are mostly original with a couple of replacement gears. A couple of the tuner button shafts are bent, but tuners still function. The great thing is the way it is currently set up, it makes a heck of a "slide guitar". The original pickup sounds incredible through both our shop Trace Elliot and Marshall JCM-800!!! No case included.
The Blues Harp has been around since the early 1970s. Until the 1990s, it was functionally identical to the Marine Band, the only differences being the cover plates and the varnish on the front of the wood comb, and the Blues Harp's profile was thinner as well. At one point, Johnny Cash promoted the Blues Harp.[20] In the 1990s, Hohner made the Blues Harp part of its Modular System (MS) line. This new Blues Harp lost its uniqueness, and is interchangeable with the other models in the MS line, but it currently remains the standby of many players who use MS harps.
I have a hunch its a cheapo guitar and probably not worth a neck reset. Can't tell if it has a bolt on neck. my other guitars all have more warped soundboards though. The saddle is sort of cradled in wood by the bridge, the angle could be better, but I'm surprised there is any angle considering the saddle only pops out like a millimeter. The bridge curves down towards the pins to provide the angle. It probably has been set up in the past by someone who wanted an acoustic guitar to play like an electric, then it got reversed it later by way of the truss rod.

A Twitter follower once asked me what electric guitar I’d recommend for a beginner with a max budget of around $200 total (for guitar, amp, tuner, etc.). So, I wrote a blog post for her where I recommended two all-in-one “starter packs” that are a great value for someone with such a low budget. The guitars in those starter packs are worth around $150, give or take.
The Effect: Flangers belong to the modulation class of effects and are among the most unusual tools you can have as a guitar player. Being similar to phasers, flangers are often the subject of numerous controversies. At the end of the day, this effect is a different kind of beast. One of the best examples of a good flanger is the Electro-Harmonix Stereo Electric Mistress. This pedal was based on an older design that’s credited with pushing flangers to the mainstream. Another thing to know about flangers is that they can make or break your tone. Due to their aggressive nature, one has to be careful how much of this effects they use. It’s easy to get overwhelmed and lost in it.
After all, we each have our own favorites, whether it be a particular player, style or era. However, that doesn’t mean such a list can’t be based on some element of objective reasoning. To some extent, the proof is in all of us: anyone who picks up the instrument borrows at least a handful of techniques and stylistic tendencies that someone else brought to the table. The key is determining which guitarists have had the most impact among the larger number of players—in other words, who has contributed most across the board to the way we approach the instrument.
After the success of the DD-500, RV-500 and MD-500 units, Boss's GT-1000 is a floorboard combining all three. Sleek and modern, it's a formidably robust beast. To the rear, there’s the usual array of inputs and outputs, including USB recording out and an input for an additional expression pedal plus jacks to insert two mono pedals, or one stereo external pedal and a nifty send for amp channel-switching. In terms of editing, it’s not the most intuitive. For example, when you switch between patches in a bank, you’re not just turning off, say, a ‘Tube Screamer’, but switching to a different chain that doesn’t have a gain block - standard in rack-style processing, but tough for beginners. Sounds-wise, the 32-bit, 96khz sampling finds the GT-1000 punching above its weight, and on the effects side, there’s a wealth of modulations, delays, reverbs and drives. If you run a larger, more traditional pedalboard, perhaps the so-called ‘Bossfecta’ of the MD, RV and DD 500-series units would provide more flexibility, but for most players, the GT-1000 is a highly practical solution. 
It depends on what you call important. Does an electric guitar's tonewood affect the tone? No. Sorry. When the thing capturing the sound is directly under the thing generating the sound and, it makes no sense for the wood, which vibrates in a secondary fashion, to have any effect on a tone that has already left the guitar. Think of it in layers, like this:
I had this guitar handed down to me. It is in pretty rough shape. I think it is in good enough shape to restore to good condition/used shape. Before I attempt such a thing I would like to know more about the guitar itself. I know the history of Lyle and "Lawsuit" guitars so that part is done. The body has a cherry red finish with 2 "f" openings. The neck has had some stress on it, enough to have the wood lift a little on its grain pattern about 2 inches long from the nut to the fret board. I am not sure if injecting glue into this will keep the neck from breaking in the future. The fret board is loose at the nut but I believe I can glue it again. This is not the first restoration I have done. I have restored a flute and a grenadilla wood clarinet. Any comments regarding how to or if I am wasting my time will be welcome.
In 1968, Jimi Hendrix talked about his love for a Houston blues luminary who wasn't known outside the region: "There's one cat I'm still trying to get across to people. He is really good, one of the best guitarists in the world." Albert Collins, who died of lung cancer in 1993, played with his thumb and forefinger instead of a pick to put a muscular snap into his piercing, trebly solos. His fluid, inventive playing influenced Hendrix, sometimes overtly: Jimi liked Collins' sustain in the song "Collins Shuffle" so much that he used it on "Voodoo Chile."
Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.

Tone wise, flamenco players appreciate the snappy and bright tone that this guitar reproduces, while acoustic guitarists find the playability and feel to be easy to transition to. Whether you want to focus on classical flamenco style, or you are merely looking to the sound of nylon string guitars into your collection, the GK Studio will not disappoint. The combination of its solid European spruce top and Cypress back and sides is a treat to look at and great to listen to. You can visit Cordoba Guitars for the complete specifications. You can also see two more Cordobas in our nylon string guitar roundup.

Amplifiers for electric guitars are more likely than bass amps to have multiple "channels", but some bass amps also have channels. By providing two or more "channels", each with its own gain, equalization and volume knobs, a bassist can preset various settings (e.g., an accompaniment setting for playing a backing part and a solo bass setting for playing a bass solo). In a heavy metal band, a bassist may use a multi-channel amp to have one setting with an aggressive overdrive, while another channel has a "clean" sound for ballads.
The Blues Harp has been around since the early 1970s. Until the 1990s, it was functionally identical to the Marine Band, the only differences being the cover plates and the varnish on the front of the wood comb, and the Blues Harp's profile was thinner as well. At one point, Johnny Cash promoted the Blues Harp.[20] In the 1990s, Hohner made the Blues Harp part of its Modular System (MS) line. This new Blues Harp lost its uniqueness, and is interchangeable with the other models in the MS line, but it currently remains the standby of many players who use MS harps.
Played by people such as Paul Simon and Richie Havens, Guild has been a top-of-the-line Acoustic guitar manufacturer since 1952. While they originally stuck to archtops, they branched off into more complicated builds. They also make solidbody electric guitars and even some semi-hollowbodies. Guild is known for their commitment to quality and tone. They were bought by Cordoba recently, but the general consensus is that the buyout is a good thing. When owned by Fender, their electric lineup was neglected and now they’re making a comeback. An additional aspect of Guild guitars is their durability. They have a very solid build and can easily shrug off some wear and tear while still sounding like it was when it was brand new.
As stated previously, the closer 2 coils are to one another, the greater the cancelations will be when they go "out of phase". So, wiring a humbucker out of phase with itself is going to produce a lot of cancelations, a huge reduction in volume and a very thin sound. If that's not enough, the pickup will not be humbucking either. Still there are some people that like this kind of sound. The best way to put a humbucker out of phase with itself is to wire the coils out of phase in series. (see below)

When it comes to classic British amp manufacturers, Orange is certainly one of the most legendary. And while many of their amps are pretty inaccessible unless you have many many zeroes in your bank account, they do offer a few superb inexpensive options – one of the best being the Micro Terror half stack you see here. Sold as a set, this tiny titan of an amp has all the brand’s classic style and sound in a package that’s just a fraction of the size. You might think that, with such limited functionality, it’s a bit of a one trick pony – and it is, except it does that one trick better than anyone else. Of course, if you’re looking for a more aggressive hard rock sound, you could always opt for the Micro Dark version for the same price.

I have my El Maya EM 1300 ( El Maya Japan, Kobe instruments) since 1989 but it was built during the end of 1982 and EL Maya Strat version, guitars are neck trough body, amazing instruments they are better then any guitars i ever played maybe I'm not objective , only my US Hamer is close or on that level. Does Anybody have any El Maya? and that you maybe wish to sell it? More over what are the fer prices for the almost mint state of those guitars, regards miki.


Ok so currently i run a Mesa 20/20 along with a GSP1101 and a MXR 10-Band EQ pedal. I love the MXR but would like to get a EQ in rack form. I see about a millon rack EQs out there but not sure which ones are made for guitar? They seem more focused on live sound/PA/Home recording..I am not sure if there all the same, Meaning a PA EQ will work for a guitar rack.
I have a yamaha sg 1000 like Carlos Santana's. It rocks! I tried it with a Gibson sg of the same price and it didn't match the quality. Then I tried a Les Paul Gibson about one and a half grand more, even that wasn't as good as the sg 1000. Lets face it, the Japanese (this does include Ibanez for they are awesome too) kick ass when it comes to quality and price!
The reality is, each of these approaches to adding effects to your tone has advantages and disadvantages. Are you a no-effects type of player, or a pedalboard kind of player? Maybe you like some pedals for your dirt, but would like your delay and reverb in the effects loop of your amp. Or maybe you would like to go the full on w/d/w route, for the ultimate in power and programmability! Let’s take a closer look at the options that are out there.
Every guitarist who bends or vibratoes a string to make it sing owes a debt to B.B. King. With influences as diverse as T-Bone Walker, Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, the late guitarist turned the blues world upside down in 1952 with “3 O’Clock Blues.” Almost overnight, the harmonica was supplanted as the primary solo instrument in blues, as guitarists scrambled to imitate B.B.’s soloing style, especially in Chicago.

The chorus effect sounds like a lush underwater soundscape that is created by doubling your guitar signal and slightly shifting the second one out of time and pitch with the original.  This effect can be very subtle, which sounds as if you’re playing out of two different amps separated in space, or highly modulated to sound as if two different players are playing the same part at the same time.
For guitarists who must have original-era Strat® sound, look and feel, the Classic Series '60s Stratocaster Lacquer epitomizes the instrument during its second decade, when musicians used it to conjure and create electrifying sounds never before imagined or experienced. With authentic features including a nitrocellulose lacquer finish in classic Fiesta Red, everything about it takes you back to a wildly creative time when rock music came into its own—from surf to psychedelia and more—and players started to discover in earnest just what a phenomenal instrument the Stratocaster really was.
Want to know more about how to distinguish all these guitars? Until a few years ago there wasn’t a good (or any!) English language reference book for Japanese guitars of the 1960s. But my co-author on this piece, the esteemed Frank Meyers of Drowning In Guitars, has written an excellent primer on this subject which can help demystify the confusion around a lot of these guitars. You can pick up your own copy here.
Learning to do your own setup is just as important as learning how to play. If you feel uncomfortable doing it, go to a pawn shop and spend that 50 bucks you would have spent on a setup and buy a hack bass instead and pratcice on that. You can also practice your soldering and anything else without fear of ruining it and end up saving a ton of money in the long run!
A real household name, Yamaha make everything from motorcycles to grand pianos! But the Japanese company also produce a great range of affordable electric guitars, which they have done since the early sixties. Their very successful Pacifica range was launched in 1990, and includes their entry-level PAC012 to their premium PAC611, and everything in between.
Like Kleenex for tissues or Dumpster for large garbage containers, the brand Teisco has become a kind of shorthand for “strange looking Japanese guitar from the 1960s.” When someone posts a picture on a forum of a vintage Japanese guitar that he’s trying to identify, five people will immediately shout out “Teisco!” Occasionally, they’re even right.
Like trapeze tailpieces, top mounted vibrato bridges transfer the string tension to a guitar’s side, offering more natural string resonance. Embedded units like the Vibrolas found on Gibson Flying Vs transmit the tension to the guitar’s body. Through-body units do neither, employing strings to absorb the string tension. Another system, the TransTrem, developed by Steinberger in the ’80s, has locking positions that allows players to transpose their tuning to other keys.

If you’re a player performing live or in a studio, all of this is just the opening pre-credits sequence to your signal then being captured via a microphone, which then sends current through another cable to a mixing board, which then has its own preamplification, equalization and filtering, which either goes to the power amplifiers of a public address system or to some kind of recording device, which then involves…aw, I’m getting tired, and I think we’re getting the point: how can anyone call *any* of this “natural”? Does *any* of this occur in nature? Does any of this sound like we’re carving a flute from driftwood or clapping a couple empty coconut shells together?


Before recording, make sure that the guitar is in tune, with a fresh set of strings, and that you check the tuning regularly. New strings always produce a brighter sound and better sustain. If the instrument has been properly set up, string and fret buzz should be minimal; while this type of noise is much less obvious when playing through heavily- distorted or overdriven amplifier settings, it can be very distracting when using clean settings or recording directly.
An open tuning allows a chord to be played by strumming the strings when "open", or while fretting no strings. The base chord consists of at least three notes and may include all the strings or a subset. The tuning is named for the base chord when played open, typically a major triad, and each major-triad can be played by barring exactly one fret.[60] Open tunings are common in blues and folk music,[59] and they are used in the playing of slide and lap-slide ("Hawaiian") guitars.[60][61] Ry Cooder uses open tunings when he plays slide guitar.[59]

Solid state systems grew in popularity in the 80s and 90s, as the digitization of audio signals posed a more reliable and less expensive alternative to tube amplification. In recent years, however, many guitarists have been willing to fork over a little extra scratch to get their hands and their ears on the sounds of the past, on the warm tones that the computers can't seem to capture.
I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.

There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.


This old Nickelback hit is made up of only four different chords, written in the Key of G. During the verses only use G – C – F to progress, while the chorus of the song will add an Am (A minor) to change things up a little bit. This is a fun song to listen to and play along with, especially since the song is set a slower tempo, especially for a rock song.
Ibanez offers a wide variety of electric guitars, bass guitars, and acoustic guitars. They’re not the best at producing super high-end guitars for pros and enthusiasts, but they are excellent guitars for any beginner. The price you typically pay for an ibanez is usually between $200 and $500. If you’re set on Ibanez, they do offer higher end models that can cost over $2,500. Despite their reasonable prices, the quality of Ibanez guitars is decent. Ibanez tends to have good performance at economical prices. Not every aspect of their guitars are perfect as they are a cheaper brand, but they do tend to put a little more effort into areas that matter. For example, the necks of their guitars are typically mahogany or basswood. These materials are known as the high-end materials that the top guitar models would use.

The body was perfectly flat and the sanding sealer that was on it was great. I however in wanting a finish that was like a mirror used a enamel filler primer. The body was then shot with 6 coats of enamel black, wet sanded, and hung up to cure for 2 weeks. After curing the body was then shot over a matter of another couple of weeks with 10 coats of clear (remember that temperature and humidity have an effect ... full review

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For the most part, you might want to get a preamp that has at least some type of EQ on it. Tone shaping on an acoustic electric guitar can really give you an edge or at least a semblance of control before the sound guy butchers it during your gig, although you can do this with an effects pedal. Even though this is something that takes the time to learn, it's better to have the option readily available when you decide to step up to that level.
This is an amazing acoustic guitar for the new generation of guitarists that is quite presentable, especially in stage performances. It comes with a black border and has a free gig cover. The fret board is made from rosewood, which makes it quite easy to handle. It has incredible rigidity, with truss rods on both sides. It produces a considerably high quality of sound and is cost effective with prices ranging from about INR 4,999. This may sometimes be accompanied by free packing and shipping. Find more information on the site link below:

For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.
Here we have something quite beautiful and very sweet sounding that I picked up directly from the very talented luthier himself while in Hawaii ...I liked this one because it has some very beautiful intricate inlay hand work see the gorgeous inlaied rosette and fingerboard not overstated just classicly tasteful WoW.. this is a Gorgeous all SOLID WOOD Hawaiian figured Koa Tenor Ukelele. I love the tone of this beauty and so will you its classic Uke tone is rich and full and plays like butta... Top wood : Solid Koa Back & Sides Material Solid Koa Neck Material : Solid AAA flamed grade Mahogany, Headplate wood: Solid Koa Strings : Italian Aquila Strings Fingerboard wood : Solid Rosewood Bridge wood : Solid Rosewood Nut Material : Real Buffalo Bone Finish : Polished Satin nitrocellulose instrument lacquer Scale Length : 17" Overall Length : 26 1/2 "( 673 mm ) Fingerboard Width At Nut : 35 mm Fingerboard Width At 12th Fret: 43.8 mm # Of Frets Total : 20 Hand picked for its great solid construction and impecable workmanship fit & finish are top notch, excellent volume & tone -playability and beauty. You will be hard pressed for find one this sweet for twice the price... Just $329. Direct comes with a top shelf hard shell case / included .
Fuzz is an indistinct, nasty overdrive that is synonymous with Jimi Hendrix. The Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face is the most famous fuzz pedal, known for the way is breaks up and adds something special to any guitar tone. Fuzz pedals are most commonly used on top of clean or lightly overdriven tones, as this is where the character of the pedal can really come through; used on top of already distorted tones they can be great for making a load of noise! Two main types of fuzz are available – silicon (which sounds softer and more rounded) and germanium, which sounds harsher and more treble-y.
The body is very much the same, composed of a chambered basswood topped by an elegantly contoured laminate maple top - complete with the easily identifiable Gretsch style pickguard. The neck specifications also follow the Pro Jet Bigsby, with a shorter than usual 24.6" scale maple neck, 12" radius rosewood fingerboard, and 1.6875" nut width. It has a total of 22 medium jumbo frets with Neo Classic thumbnail inlays serving as fret markers. Because its not a Filter'tron pickup, the sound of this guitar will be subtly different, but apparently good enough for the many users that have rated this guitar highly and even recommend it.
• Don’t always blame the frets: Buzzing doesn’t necessarily mean there’s a fret problem. Some guitar players set their bridges for super-low action in their quest for speed, and that can makes frets buzz. For beginners unfamiliar with how accurately tuned strings sound or more experienced players exploring dropped and open tunings for the first time, buzzing can also be a buzz kill. Low tunings like dropped D and open D and open C may prompt guitars with normal action to buzz due to the slack in the strings unless a guitar is set up properly to accommodate such tunings.
The playing of (3-5 string) guitar chords is simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings, in which the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds tuning, all-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation. On the other hand, in regular tunings 6-string chords (in the keys of C, G, and D) are more difficult to play.
FYI, Dave might be backed up due to demand if he is still working, so I'd call those places up and ask them in advance. Twin Town isn't too bad a drive if you've got a car, maybe 15 minutes from Bloomington, but the place up in Fridley is about a 20-25 minute drive. They might be the best at working on short notice though as they're a smaller place. Definitely give them all calls.
On top of that, the Champion 20 offers built-in effects, including reverb, chorus, flanging, delay, auto wah, vibrato, and tremolo. All of these effects can be chosen using a single knob, with an additional FX Level knob to control the mix of the unprocessed sound with the effect. These effects can’t match the flexibility and adjustability of separate effects pedals—for example, with the exceptions of reverb+delay and reverb+chorus, effects can’t be combined—but they can at the very least give beginners an idea of how these effects work. Many guitarists may find the Champion 20’s built-in effects to be all they need.

Taylors are okay as guitars go, but... I've owned three, sold them all in mint condition and lost considerable coin in doing so. I think they belong on this list because they charge hand made prices for MASS PRODUCED guitars. Don't believe me? Take the Taylor that you own and do a search for it on eBay. That's right, at this very moment there are hundreds of guitars just like yours for sale on eBay. And that's only checking this one sales venue! These guitars are worth half of what you paid because the market is saturated with them. Taylor cranks out hundreds of them per day and 100's of thousands per year. If you're shopping and seriously considering a Taylor, you can get comparable quality and far better value elsewhere. Choose carefully and you'll see your investment go up in value. Aside from some special, collectable models of Taylor, you will loose money on this brand.
Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
Epiphone finds it right to imitate Gibson for their guitars. Now owned by Gibson, the brand still brags about its Gibson-like style, especially when it comes to Les Pauls, SGs, Flying Vs., Explorers, and other Gibson classics. For greenhorns, the Epiphone Les Paul Standard comes in as the best choice offering quality specs in an affordable range. From then onward, you can get your hands on the Les Paul PlusTop PRO and the Les Paul Custom PRO without burdening your pocket.
Finding a good pickup for an acoustic guitar is a real personal choice that will depend on your budget, style, aspirations, and the actual guitar you own – that’s why we’ve written a focused article on the best acoustic pickups. Among the myriad of acoustic pickups on offer, you’ll find the quickest to install are transducer pickups, which attach to the face of your guitar – an affordable solution, although the sound quality isn’t as advanced as others. A step up is both undersaddle and soundhole pickups, which have their own pros and cons, while – at the higher-end – you’ll find internal microphones and hybrid mic/pickup systems, which offer a beautifully rich, natural tone. A great example of one of these hybrid systems is the LR Baggs Anthem Tru-Mic.
12. Once your wiring loom is complete, install it in the guitar, and reattach the pickup and ground wires. Test the guitar through your amp and make sure everything is working. If it is, congratulate yourself on a job well done. If it’s not, check that you’ve wired everything together properly. Also, check your solder joints and redo any that aren’t shiny or look a little iffy.
These guitars are to hard for most people to understand, but there is so much quality to these guitars, more than most brands. Its like a science project making them most of the stuff on Manson Guitars hasn't even been heard of being used, or even invented by any other brands. Ill tell you what I wouldn't save my money up for a expensive strat that no ones really going to be impressed with or appreciate save your change for one of these bad boys, people will pass out of enjoyment though.
Another early analog delay was the Binson Echorec, this unit recorded your guitar signal onto a magnetic disk much like a hard drive does. This unit was favored by David Gilmour of Pink Floyd. Analog delay pedals made their debut in the 70’s with the use of what was called bucket brigade chips. These chips move the signal down a line like the way an old bucket brigade would pass buckets of water down a line to put out a fire. The most famous of these pedals is the Electro Harmonix Deluxe Memory Man.

While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
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Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.

For its tops (soundboards), Ovation used sitka spruce, a wood which Kaman engineers had been using in helicopter blades. In the 1970s, Ovation developed thinner sound-boards with carbon-based composites laminating a thin layer of birch, in its Adamas model, which has been viewed as one of the most radical designs in the history of acoustic guitars. The Adamas model dissipated the sound-hole of the traditional soundboard among 22 small sound-holes in the upper chamber of the guitar, yielding greater volume and further reducing feedback during amplification.[1] The Adamas design strengthened the sound-board, reducing the traditional design’s bracing and hence its weight. In the 1980s, another innovation was the introduction of shallow-bowl guitars, which appealed to electric guitarists.


Every decision, action, employee hiring, design of new models, etc.-comes from the C.E.O.-Henry J. He dictates every single decision that happens within the company. His power and control over the company is unimaginable. Nothing will change until he leaves or sells the company. First of all the C.E.O. hires every worker- (which is why you wait an eternity to get hired). He doesn't delegate hiring to other departments like other "normal" companies do. That is why you apply, take tons of tests, wait 3 to 5 months (not weeks!), take a drug screen test, if you pass that, then you are finally hired- for a factory job- not a job at the White house! Managers demean workers- most managers don't even have a high school level of education- while most of the workers have some college experience or a 4 yr. degree (including me). Why do the young (20 to 40 yrs. old) educated guys take the job? (1st)- it looks good on the resume, (2nd)- you get to work on guitars, which seems cool at first, until you realize it's a place you do not want to be -most guys leave after a year on average. There is no chance for advancement or a raise. The attitude from Mngt. is intimidation- to rule by fear. They actually get a thrill from firing people, they actually want you to fail, I have never seen anything like it. Everything is about hitting your daily numbers at any cost. Pay raises have been non-existent for years without explanation of why. H.R. is the worst I have ever seen. The women in H.R. dress extremely inappropriate and unprofessional. When you go to H.R. to ask questions, they literally sigh and roll their eyes like you are bothering them -instead of them actually doing their jobs. Nobody knows anything-when you ask for help, you get annoyed responses because they just want to hit their personal number to get out and go home. Managers do as little as possible to not get noticed, but do just enough to keep their jobs- while the workers do all the work to make them look good. Turnover is constant. Stress levels are off the charts. 2012 was my 1st yr. of 2 yrs. working there. We were doing from 650 to 800 guitars a day- (Massman Dr. plant). In comparison the Custom Shop makes about 50 a day. The Memphis Plant- 50 a day. The Montana plant- 50 a day- us =650 to 800 a day! We made the most guitars in 2012 ever -but for the first time nobody received a yearly bonus?!? Which makes no sense -until you figure out everything is about cutting costs-all ordered from the C.E.O. People will skip all their breaks and even lunch to hit their number to get out on time. Countless times we had no lacquer because Mngt. hadn't ordered on time?!? We would have no parts for the guitars (bridges, tuners, etc.)-because they forgot to order on time?!? Yet no one from Mngt. would take accountability for it. One day, 5 people in my dept. (20-30 in the whole plant overall) were fired with no warning (one lady had been there 18 yrs., one guy-8 yrs., etc.)-yet Gibson's attendance policy in their own handbook states you have to be given a oral warning, then a 1st written warning, then a 2nd written warning- yet all the workers were not given any warning. And the reason why is that it had been a slow Christmas season in sales, so they were all let go (ordered by Henry J. -the dictator) to cut payroll-but didn't follow their very own attendance policy-because they don't have to. There is no union, no protection for your job. They tell you you are fired, and to just deal with it, while the powers-that-be don't have to be accountable for anything. It is a dictatorship. A guy I worked there with has been there 20 yrs. And one day he counted up all the workers he remembered being fired or had quit in the 20 yrs. he had been there - it was 350 to 400! If you fail a drug test, you can keep your job?!? So you take 2 weeks off and go to drug rehab- but if you break the attendance policy - you are gone?!?- It's because the company doesn't have to pay you for 2 weeks, and it's something of a tax write off as well (that's what I was told). So basically you can break the law and do drugs- and still have a job. All in the name of saving money. The back break room refrigerator has not been cleaned in 2 yrs! No clock in the main break room for over 5 yrs. and counting! Gibson charged their own employees and their children to attend the company's (workers!) halloween party!?!? Gibson owns Tobias basses-made them 2 yrs. then stopped. Owns Slingerland drums, but hasn't made them in over 12 yrs (pics of them on the website are from late 1990's)! Baldwin pianos (makes on a on-order basis only, and only in Japan, not America anymore). Valley Arts guitars-stopped making them in 2002-12 yrs. ago. Etc,etc.etc! The point being is they buy up all these brand names- and have them on their website as if they are still being sold - but they are not! But they don't say that on their website. The C.E.O. has them to just build value for the Gibson/Epiphone name - to make it more valuable- to sell the company one day at maximum profit. I know this because managers told me this who had first hand knowledge. Guys have been punched in the face during arguments. One guy took a screwdriver and smashed it through the top of a hollow body guitar out of frustration! Arguments are a daily occurrence. My friend would come into work to start his shift, and be so nervous, he would throw up in the bathroom- because of the stress levels and negative atmosphere. Every day literally felt like you were going to prison! I really wanted to make this job work out for me. I am a musician (as are many who work there, many of us play gigs on weekends or nights). My long-term plan was to use my degree, and move up to a corporate position-until I found out what a nightmare the company is. I found out through everyone that I asked that corporate is run the same way! Many might be surprised by this review, because Gibson guitars are really revered by musicians. And outwardly the company has a reputation of the highest quality. But working there was the exact opposite, you would almost rather dig ditches! I have pretty much done it all- I owned my own business, waited tables, worked out in the heat-landscaping, worked in sales, marketing, management, etc. And I have never had such a negative work experience- ever! It affected my health mentally and physically (standing everyday for 10 hrs. or more). And let me tell you for those of you reading this -no job is worth that!
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The Last of Us™ has been rebuilt for the PlayStation®4 system. Now features full 1080p, higher-resolution character models, improved shadows and lighting, in addition to several other gameplay improvements. 20 years after a pandemic has radically changed known civilization, infected humans run wild and survivors are killing each other for food, weapons and whatever they can get their hands on. Joel, a violent survivor, is hired to smuggle a 14-year-old girl, Ellie, out of an oppressive military quarantine zone, but what starts as a small job soon transforms into a brutal journey across the U.S. The Last of Us Remastered includes the Abandoned Territories map pack, Reclaimed Territories map pack, and the critically acclaimed The Last of Us: Left Behind single-player campaign that combines themes of survival, loyalty, and love with tense, survival-action gameplay.

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The iconic helmet and armor. The legendary story. The heart-racing combat. Halo has defined a generation of action-packed gaming and online multiplayer gameplay for more than a decade. Now, you can re-experience the thrills, adrenaline and immersive storylines of the Halo franchise, remastered and revamped for the Xbox One. With The Master Chief Collection, you'll not only receive stunning visuals, white-knuckle adventures and deep, rich storylines, you'll have a chance to honor the iconic hero who has been central to so many of your gaming conquests. Featuring a remastered Halo 2: Anniversary, Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary, Halo 3 and Halo 4, Halo: The Master Chief Collection lets you experience the legendary story of the iconic hero with the full Xbox One treatment. A total of 45 campaign missions and more than 100 multiplayer and Spartan Ops maps await you, as well as an all-new live-action digital series and access to the Halo 5: Guardians beta. Dive into the adventure with Master Chief in Halo 2: Anniversary, which celebrates the 10-year anniversary of the classic game. Lock and load for a fully remastered campaign, or switch between that and the original 2004 version with the Classic mode. Use all-new skills to blast through the campaign, and get ready for the 23 original multiplayer maps, as well as six re-imagined ones, for a thrilling online combat experience. Take advantage of the all-new Master Menu, which lets you play through all four unlocked campaigns, start to finish, or seamlessly jump around as you choose. Be one of the first to experience the next generation of Halo multiplayer with the Halo 5: Guardians beta access. Then, kick back and relax with a thrilling new live-action adventure featuring elite UNSC operatives exploring a strange and treacherous world in the Halo: Nightfall digital series, brought to life by 343 Industries, director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan and Executive Producers, Ridley Scott and Scott Free TV President, David Zucker. Get ready to experience the future — by fully understanding your past.
If you are looking for a simple and old school way to spice up your guitar sound, tremolo is a great option. Tremolo lowers the amplitude of your signal at a regular rate. It's like having a machine move your volume knob back and forth rhythmically, and it's one of the first effects that were built into early amplifiers. While simple in concept , tremolo adds a great movement to you tone, in either a subtle or intense way. The choice is yours. On low settings, a pleasant motion effect can add some ear candy to your tone. Set on high, a “stutter” or “chop” effect can add emphasis to a song or riff. Some pedals will even split the repeats in stereo, which adds a genuine vortex to your tone.

In the 1960s Japanese guitar makers started to mainly copy American guitar designs and Ibanez branded copies of Gibson, Fender and Rickenbacker models started to appear. This resulted in the so called Ibanez lawsuit period. After the lawsuit period Hoshino Gakki introduced Ibanez models that were not copies of the Gibson or Fender designs such as the Iceman and Roadster. The company has produced its own guitar designs ever since. The late 1980s and early 1990s were an important period for the Ibanez brand. Hoshino Gakki's relationship with Frank Zappa's former guitarist Steve Vai resulted in the introduction of the Ibanez JEM and the Ibanez Universe models and after the earlier successes of the Roadster and Iceman models in the late 1970s/early 1980s, Hoshino Gakki entered the superstrat market with the RG series which were a lower priced version of the Ibanez JEM model.

In the present scenario many brands are providing the better quality Guitars and serving their customers the best services. Nowadays music industry is demanding better performances. For performing the best people are switching one to other brands. The brands are competing with each others to maintain their selves in to the top 10 chart. So please strike down to your strings for the right notes.
I'm going to break this review into pros and cons. Pros: Top notch wood, electronics, wonderful bound neck and great machine heads. The action/fretboard are wonderful (after being setup). Sounds beautiful!, and more so if you take my advice. One last pro, all of the cons are easily remedied. Cons: The saddle, nut, and bridge pins are plastic (kind of like putting crap tires on a good sports car). I replaced the saddle and nut with tusk, and for the bridge pins I went with brass. It was like the volume went from a 4 to a 8, and the tone went from nice to beautiful and singing. It was about a 40$ upgrade, that made it sound like a thousand dollar guitar. This is the first time I bought a guitar before playing it. The gamble more than paid off. Been playing guitar for 25 years, and I
Multiple stages of valve gain/clipping can be "cascaded" to produce a thicker and more complex distortion sound. In layperson's terms, a musician will plug a fuzz pedal into a tube amp that is being "cranked" to a clipping "overdriven" condition; as such, she will get the distortion from the fuzz which is then distorted further by the amp. During the 1990s, some Seattle grunge guitarists chained together as many as four fuzz pedals to create a thick "wall of sound" of distortion.
There are several aspects that make the acoustic guitar different from the electric one. The most notable difference is the fact that the acoustic types do not need a source of electricity or rather they do not have to be plugged in for them to be heard. They are relatively large and are built with a hollow chamber for the magnification of the guitar’s resonance thus giving out sound that originates from the plucked strings. It also has a bridge that is essential for the transmission of vibration of the strings to the body. They are self contained, needing minimal preparation to play. In other words, they are the guitars to be bought by all those looking for simplicity.
I have a friend with a cool little music store here in St. Louis. I pop in from time to time since he always has a great selection of vintage lap steels, as well as an ever-changing assortment of oddball pieces to check out. As I was on my way out the door after one of my most recent visits, I spotted an early 80s Harmony “Flying V,” and immediately stopped in my tracks.
It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings, because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. But nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?
Left Handed 1968 Fender Strat with an insanely rare Blonde Custom Color! This had to have been a special order guitar – has “Blond” written in the neck pickup cavity(see pic). I think I’ve seen one other factory left-handed Blonde Strat, but certainly not from the Hendrix era(both the white Woodstock and black Band of Gypsies Strats were from 1968).
The question is, does koa do anything for the sound, or is it just for the esthetics? The material in instruments always affects the tone, and koa makes the tone brighter while still being deep and satisfying. Sound is always hard to describe in words, because we experience sound differently, but if you’re curious about what it sounds like, just check it out on YouTube.


We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


Claimed to have been invented by guitarist Victor Griffin of Pentagram (who tunes it 1/2 step down).[37] Also used in the song "March of the Fire Ants" by Mastodon, "Rusty Cage" "Holy Water", and "Searching With My Good Eye Closed" by Soundgarden on their Badmotorfinger album, "Cowboy Hat" and some of "Silver Side Up" by Nickelback, "Gasoline", "Shadow on the Sun", "Bring Em Back Alive" and "The Worm" by Audioslave and "Prison Sex" by Tool. Today is the Day have used it on every album since Temple of the Morning Star, Shining use it on most of their album Blackjazz, and Black Label Society used this on much of their early material, often to emulate a 7-string guitar. Used also by Silverchair in the songs "One Way Mule" and "The Lever" from their album "Diorama".
When you're in the market for an instrument, whether it's brand new or new-to-you, our impressive selection gives you plenty to choose from and we'll be happy to help you find the right fit. Maybe you need some equipment for a few gigs or a short tour? Our rentals department can hook you up. There are even lessons and free workshops here to discover, so you can always learn more about music no matter your skill level. For all the details, you can drop by to visit us in-person or give us a call.
Gibson has issued two Signature Les Paul guitars for Joe Perry of Aerosmith. The first was developed in the 1990s and was customized with an active mid-boost control, black chrome hardware, and a translucent black finish. It was replaced in 2004 by a second, more visually distinctive Les Paul, the Joe Perry Boneyard Les Paul. This guitar is characterized by Perry’s custom “Boneyard” logo on the headstock and a figured maple top with a green tiger finish, and is available with either a stopbar tailpiece or a Bigsby tailpiece; Perry typically uses a Bigsby-equipped Boneyard model in Aerosmith and solo live shows.
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
The Effect:These pedals keep the original clarity of your sound intact, depending on how you tune it, you can use a little bit of overdrive, that adds some grit to the signal, with higher tuning you can get relatively more aggressive overdrive sound that’s still tame and if you push your overdrive pedal to the limits you might get a similar sound to that of a distortion pedal’s lower settings. A good overdrive (like the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer) is an essential solution for those of you wanting sound enhancement with lower interference, while having the option to add some aggression in your sound, but without taking it to extreme degrees.
Well, sanding the bridge isn't really a standard procedure, haha. Only, to be able to get the (in my case adjustable) saddle low enough without the strings hitting the bridge I had to sand it down. This Landola is an old, but not particularly valuable guitar, so I decided to try that (and it had been severly damaged to begin with, I bought it like that just to have a go at trying to repair it)
Jump up ^ Miller, Jim (1980). The Rolling Stone illustrated history of rock & roll. New York: Rolling Stone. ISBN 0-394-51322-3. Retrieved 5 July 2012. Black country bluesmen made raw, heavily amplified boogie records of their own, especially in Memphis, where guitarists like Joe Hill Louis, Willie Johnson (with the early Howlin' Wolf band) and Pat Hare (with Little Junior Parker) played driving rhythms and scorching, distorted solos that might be counted the distant ancestors of heavy metal.
It is also believed that 'Terada Musical Instrument Co., Ltd. of Japan also made some guitars for Ibanez during this period.' It's thought that 'these would be mostly hollow-body guitars, but may also included some solid-body Artist series models.' There is no proof whatsoever for either of these assumptions. It's most likely that this is a big misunderstanding caused by an over generalization in the database of the "Guitar Dater Project" website, which is not able to assign the right factory to a vintage Ibanez guitar based on its serial number. The false information this website generates has been propogated in numerous advertisements of sellers of vintage Ibanez guitars. There is no proof whatsoever of any solid body Ibanez guitar produced by Terada. On the contrary: the fact that the production of solid body Ibanez Artist guitars shifted to Iida Gakki 1987, while hollow-body and semi-hollow Artist guitars became Artstar labels with H serial numbers, shows that the original production before 1987 came all from the FujiGen Gakki factory, which was experiencing capacity problems during that time period caused by their commitment to produce guitars for Fender Japan. If Terada had produced AR models already, they would have continued doing so. The AR and AS models shared the same necks under the Artist flag. Splitting the production up from a situation in which they were already both made in the Terada factory wouldn't be efficient, so it is highly unlikely that pre-1987 AR and AS models were ever made there.
Two full steps down from Drop D. Utilized by bands such as A Day to Remember (on Mr Highway's Thinking About The End, Welcome To The Family, Violence (Enough is Enough), Life Lessons Learned the Hard Way and Sticks and Bricks), In Flames, Hostility, Issues, Static-X, Bring Me the Horizon (since Suicide Season), Hellyeah, Amaranthe, Breaking Benjamin (since Phobia), Parkway Drive, Otep, Spineshank, RED, Bury Your Dead, Eye Empire, Dirge Within, Remembering Never, and occasionally Chevelle, Darkest Hour, Evanescence, 9oz. of Nothing, and For the Fallen Dreams.
There is traditionally a gap between how we enjoy the sound of our guitars and the way they’re represented plugged in. Enter Yamaha, a leader in stage-ready acoustic technology for decades - and in the A5R ARE, it may have just offered us a very desirable solution. The A5R''s rounded fretboard edges offer an enjoyable playing experience that mimics the feeling of guitars that have been played in to a degree and it has an ethereal quality in the high ranges, even though some treble resonance is traded with the lower action. The A5’s resonance and bright balance is a fine showcase for the clever SRT2 preamp - we actually couldn’t dial in a ‘bad’ sound on it because the treble and bass controls mirror the natural subtlety of the pickup/mic dynamic design. An electro experience that captures the sound of an unplugged acoustic? The SRT2 is one of the closest to get there yet. An update that marks the A Series out as an essential consideration for players who rely on a consistent and controllable stage sound.
Echo and delay are created by copying the original signal in some way, then replaying it a short time later. There's no exact natural counterpart, though the strong reflections sometimes heard in valleys or tunnels appear as reasonably distinct echoes. Early echo units were based on tape loops, before analogue charge-coupled devices eliminated the need for moving parts. Today, most delay units are digital, but they often include controls to help them emulate the characteristics of the early tape units, including distortion and low-pass filtering in the delay path and pitch modulation to emulate the wow and flutter of a well-used tape transport.
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
1958-1969: replaces the "U" models and now has a double cutaway body with short horns. Masonite/poplar frame bodies, 13.25" wide. Models numbers include the "Standard": 3011 (black 1 pickup), 3012 (bronze 1 pickup), 3021 (black 2 pickup), 3022 (bronze 2 pickup), 5025 (blond 2 pickup). The 3021 is considered THE Jimmy Page model. "Seal" shaped pickguard and concentric knobs on 2 or 3 pickup models. Round control knobs.

Their are also guitars made with a "compound radius", which is a little rounder in the lower register, and a little flatter in the higher register. The true best of both worlds. Warmoth makes necks with a 10"-16" compound radius, as do some production guitar companies. I have a custom made guitar with a 16"-24" compound radius, and it's REALLY flat. Takes some time to get used to. It's breeze to rip on, but not nearly as comfortable to play rhythm on as my other guitars.
Flawless build, the action is set up so well I don't see any need to tinker with anything. Pulled it out of the box, tuned it and strummed a few chords, then set it aside for 24 hours. Re-tuned it the next day and it has stayed in tune. I cannot find anything amiss or out of place on this one. Per the serial number, this is a 2015 Indonesian build. The wood is simply perfect in appearance and the tone is outstanding for a thinline. Yeah, I am happy with this one. Recommended.
Since 1998, many high-end US-made Fender Stratocasters such as the American Deluxe, American, Hot Rodded American, American Special and American Standard series came with an HSH pickup rout instead of a “swimming pool” (or “bath tub”) cavity to increase the total amount of wood that actually can resonate, producing a more complex tone. The HSH rout allows players to modify their pickups to the most often seen after-market configurations without re-routing or cutting into their guitar’s body, while maintaining more wood than a “swimming pool” rout.
• Ready-made sound : ELECTRIC SUNBURST offers a high-quality set of effects, amplifiers and cabinet emulation. Three distortion and four modulation effects provide the sound of classical pedals, while five amp models and a choice of ten cabinets offer an authentic guitar sound – exactly the same. Finally, a high-quality console equalizer, two compressors, tape emulation, reverb, delay and tap delay allow you to get a real guitar sound!
Im sure are techs at these stores that aren't bad AT ALL, but when you don't know who they are, I wouldn't trust them with a truss rod while you're not there standing over trheir shoulder watching them. I may just be paranoid, but hey, better safe than sorry is the way I look at it. I've done my own setups. And I plan to keep doing it until the day comes when I order myself a custom bass that I worked my ass off for, then I'll be willing to spend $50 on a 'properly' done setup. I dunno

I have a Montclair guitar, it sounds like I have an original but I have some questions. I purcahsed this quitar about 40 years ago. It is a dark brown archtop, with two cutaways and a pick guard like in the picture. On the top of neck the only says Montclair, strait across, and on the back it says "steel reinforced neck". On the inside the only number is L 6089.
Because overdrive and distortion add a lot of high frequency harmonics to the signal they will quickly muddy up the sound if a large number of notes are struck simultaneously. i.e. full open chords and full barres don't work with overdrive, they muddy up. What you play are simple forms, generally no more than three notes simultaneously. For example an "A" power chord is (high E to low E)
It would be great if we could be born with all our favorite music already memorized. But we're only human, so we don't get that luxury - if we want to know a song, we have to learn it! The process starts with reference materials, so don't wait to start building up a repertoire of your own favorites. Add the tablature to your collection and make sure to practice, and you'll be playing like your favorite guitar heroes soon enough.
Play It Loud: An Epic History of the Style, Sound, & Revolution of the Electric Guitar is just that: a swooping, all-encompassing timeline of the instrument’s early days to its beyond-essential role in pop culture and music. Written by Brad Tolinski and Alan Di Perna, with a foreword by Carlos Santana, the book dives into the electric guitar’s place in our society, tracing its evolution in sound, style, look and purpose. Here are 10 things we learned from reading:

What a Beauty! This is a beautiful example of a RARE Vintage Japanese Alvarez 5053 made on 1/11/74. This one is Rare folks with its Old style script logo in mother of pearl inlay check that out...The first thing you can't help but notice on this guitar is how beautiful this guitar looks amazing fit & finish apperance is top shelf..its as good or pretter then others including the Martin ... its not just pretty guitar to look at and admire either it is really well build to play built using some very EXOTIC and beautiful looking tone WOODS as well very high end feel to this one ...as seen in the pics ( new better pics soon to come )It was built using a beautiful grained Sitka spruce top and the gorgeous Back is vivid book matched Brazilian Rosewood as is the sides BR and this examle overall is truly a stunning example, along with the backs center flamed maple section in contrast of the Brazilian Rosewood side sections WoW!, and the beautiful vintage hexagonal cellulloid inlays. modeled after the Martin D41, this guitar is in excellent used vintage collectible condition with only a few finish checks to this guitars glass like finish that one has that warm natural patina only a real 37 year old guitar can earn. Overall very good - excellent vintage condition! It's bound body is masterfully ornately - multi bound, as is the Honduran Mahogany neck & headstock is bound. Action is excellentt and can be easily adjusted up or down to meet your preference by way of an easily adjustable bridge . Truly is a great playing & sounding highly collectible Japanese vintage guitar in its own right. Its Very rare and it has old Alvarez Script Logo! Who cool is that....This is a super rare guitar that tend to go quickly that is getting harder and harder to find! in any condition let alone like this baby it both plays beautifully but it sounds fantastic! Let me know if interested Thanks for looking! Joe.
[author image=”https://www.producerspot.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/alan-steward-avatar.jpg” ]Alan Steward is a Producer, Engineer and Musician with over 30 years experience in the music business. He worked with Grammy winning artists from the Temptations to the Baha Men. His music has been used in TV shows and feature films. He is also well-known as a producer of loops for music production and owns a recording studio in Germany.[/author]
Maton earned international renown for their superb acoustic and electric guitars and basses, which have been played by scores of famous performers from The Easybeats to The Wiggles.[1] George Harrison owned one of their MS500 models, which were introduced in 1957 and famed British session guitarist Big Jim Sullivan owned and used a Maton ‘Cello’ guitar for many years during the peak of his career, playing it on recordings with Sarah Vaughan, Sammy Davis, Jr., Johnny Keating and his Big Band and Neil Finn from Crowded House.

The bridge pickup is a Modern Player Humbucker, which gives this Telecaster a little more “punch” than the traditional model. And like the Stratocaster, Fender's Tele design is also know to be one of the most versatile guitar in existence, capable of anything from hard rock to country and lite jazz tones. The pickup configuration of the modern player makes this a substantially heavier Telecaster, in terms of tone and resonance.
We perform within include rings. Personal big assortment of pedals, a few I really like, a few foul odor. I quickly discovered how the just people who worry about the results tend to be additional music artists. The actual people( ladies dance mostly) might treatment much less. Therefore right now I acquired the tuner, as well as generate your pedal with regard to single sculpt.... that is this, as well as my personal sculpt rocks ! as well as straight forward. With regard to facilities felines it might be another tale.
Bass guitars (like guitars) in many ways are like cars. Their appearance is a major factor in your buying decision. But also like cars, especially for the first-time buyer, there are far more important factors to know about in order to ensure you buy a bass guitar that is both properly playable and that stays in tune, enabling you to make progress with it. 
Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.
The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
In the 1950s, Gibson also produced the Tune-o-matic bridge system and its version of the humbucking pickup, the PAF ("Patent Applied For"), first released in 1957 and still sought after for its sound.[citation needed] In 1958, Gibson produced two new designs: the eccentrically shaped Explorer and Flying V. These "modernistic" guitars did not sell initially. It was only in the late 1960s and early 70s when the two guitars were reintroduced to the market that they sold well. The Firebird, in the early 60s, was a reprise of the modernistic idea, though less extreme.
1966 Yamaha FG180 Nippon Gakki Japan crafted over 50 years ago early RARE light GREEN LABEL in top vintage condition WoW Now at JVGuitars we are very proud to present such a SWEET and RARE FIND folks... This is an excellent example of the Japanese Vintage Yamaha FG180 is from 1966 Folks that right an oldie but a real goodie for for sure she is about 51 years old and as you can clearly see from our high resolution pictures it has been very nicely taken care of for over 5 decades just for you today thats AMAZING!!! WoW She's one of the very first of the highly sought after original first FG180 run with its light green label FG180 prototype to the later 1970's FG180 Red Label, She's HERE NOW at JVGuitars its been Pro set up and polishing and is all round vintage excellent condition no cracks no issues no warps no pulling no funny business from what I see and thats a lot of guitars this guitar is far above average for such a vintage piece. she's in top playing condition and the cosmetics are very good as well with natural play wear and patina of such a well loved guitar. Here are the General Specifications Scale Length 650mm (25 9/16") Body Length 505mm (19 7/8") Total Length 1038mm (40 7/8") Body Width 412mm (16 3/16") Body Depth 100 - 118mm (3 15/16" - 4 5/8") Nut Width 44mm (1 3/4") Top Material Sitka Spruce Back Material Mahogany Side Material Mahogany Neck Material Mahogany Fingerboard Material Rosewood Fingerboard Radius R400mm (15 3/4") Bridge Material Rosewood Nut Material Urea Saddle Material Urea Bridge Pins Black ABS Tuners Open Gear (Chrome) Body Binding Rosewood + Cream + Black Soundhole Inlay White + Cream + Black Pickguard Black Body Finish Gloss Neck Finish Gloss Color Natural Case FREE Original Marigold lined Semi hard Chipboard case. This Rare FG180 has been treated with care and respect and love for 5 decades and someone is going to be very pleased in deed. To purchase this rare beauty. contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com quality .
Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.

Guitar Center Albuquerque provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Albuquerque area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Albuquerque can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.
Seagull guitars were first manufactured in Quebec in 1982. Their goal was to introduce a high-quality guitar with all the essentials for a reasonable price. It goes without saying that they completed that goal, as Seagull guitars are still here today.Seagulls are great for both beginners and pros. They are durable and high-quality. They have incredible sound-quality and they have something for everyone. They make both acoustic and electric guitars at reasonable prices. Seagulls are easy to play even for beginners. Additionally, they strive to reduce the impact guitar manufacturers have on the environment. They use sustainable wood sourcing so that they can avoid deforestation. Reclaimed wood is often used in the production of Seagull guitars. 

The guitar offers a carved mahogany top with a set neck and a slim-tapered profile (a shape normally reserved for more premium guitars). The rosewood fingerboard sports premium trapezoid inlays for a really pro look. The Alnico classic humbuckers are true, high-output gems that, paired with the set neck, will offer a rich, long sustain. There are two tone knobs and two volume knobs, as well as a three-way selector switch for all of those classic Les Paul sounds. The stop bar tailpiece and the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge give you rock-solid tuning stability, so you won’t have more frustrating retunes than you absolutely need.


The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.

The first edition of the Telecaster Custom was produced between 1959-1968, and featured a double-bound body. While the guitar was known as the Telecaster Custom, the decal on the headstock read “Custom Telecaster”. Later editions of the Tele Custom were popularized by Rolling Stones‘ guitarist and composer Keith Richards, featuring a Fender Wide Range humbucker in the neck position and a single-coil pickup in the bridge. The market generally refers to the guitar as the “1972 Custom”, indicating the year this model was originally released.


Ovation guitars are produced in the U.S. as well as in Korea and China. Those models in general have a wooden top. Recently Ovation significantly reduced the production of U.S. made Ovation models. From 2010 on better models (e.g., Legend, Elite, Custom Legend, Custom Elite) used to be available, both, made in the U.S. and made in Korea. Before that, the mentioned models were U.S. made. In recent years many U.S. made guitars could be identified by the LX in the product name (e.g., Legend 2077LX), whereas the Korean-made version of the same guitar had AX in its model name (e.g., Legend 2077AX). Again, this name-system has not been used throughout the whole guitar model range (e.g., Ovation 1617ALE). Nowadays only a few U.S. made models are being produced, mostly signature and limited edition models (e.g., Custom Legend 1769-ADII Al DiMeola). Production of the standard model range of Ovation guitars in the U.S. has been seized.[24]

In the studio, a dynamic noise filter such as the Symetrix 511A, Drawmer DF320/330, Rocktron Hush or Dbx Silencer can be less obtrusive than a gate for cleaning up guitar parts to which delay/reverb has not yet been added. Very generally, such devices work by progressively reducing the audio bandwidth once the sound falls below an adjustable threshold. Transients pass through with very little change, while high frequencies are removed from the tail end of decaying sounds, which reduces the subjective hiss level. A conventional expander then mutes the signal entirely at very low levels.
A small number of bass units do not fit into the "combo" amplifier, standalone amplifier or separate speaker cabinet categorization or typologies. Some bass amp combos have a removable amplifier. With the amplifier unit taken out of the combo cabinet, the user then has an easily portable amp head (which can be taken to a recording studio for use as a preamp, to lay down bass tracks) and a separate bass speaker cabinet, which could be used with another bass amp head. As well, some amp heads have a small built-in speaker which produces enough sound so that it can be used as a practice amp, so that the bassist can practice when she/he has the head, but not the speaker cabinet. This way, a bassist in a touring band could practice electric bass using her amp head, even if her speaker cabinets were still locked up in an equipment van.

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Because most electric guitars offer far more adjustability than acoustic guitars, the setup and adjustment of the guitar is more important than it is with acoustics, which don’t have much to adjust. We decided John and I would test the electrics first right out of the box, with their stock strings and factory setup, then get a professional to set them up with Ernie Ball Regular Slinky strings in gauges from .010 to .046—for decades, this has been one of the most popular string sets for electric guitars. Our setup technician was Avishay Shabat, who heads the Guitar Groomer repair shop in Woodland Hills, California, and who also manufactures his own line under the Shabat Guitars brand.
On the other hand, practicing with your band should allow you a bit more flexibility with sound. You can ask the rest of the band to accommodate for you a little, lowering the sound on their own instruments (ask the drummer to be nice to the drums). Even during an all out practice session a small amp might be able to keep up with the rest of the band’s volume, if powerful and high quality enough.
STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.
All of these soundfonts can be opened with most zip programs, but if you are not sure or you haven't got a zip program you can use 7zip in windows or xarchiver in linux. I chose the SF.tar.bz2 format as it compressed to almost half the size of the original. Let me know if you have any problems downloading or extracting the files. These samples have been tested in SFZ free player in windows (check this forum for download details) and Qsynth in linux.

Like the Strat above, the Fender Telecaster shares the title of being one of the most legendary electric guitars ever produced, and owes a lot of its authentic vintage sound to its unique pickups – which are both fantastic and frustrating at times. A Tele will usually feature two single-coils: a smaller one at the neck and a larger, slanted pickup at the bridge. They both deliver a twangy sound, with the bridge offering great treble tone and the neck a little more balanced. The neck pickup’s main complaint is that it is often muffled in output – unless you find a good set such as the Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele Pickup Set, which keeps things crisp and clear.
Speaking of tiny little helpers that could fit anyone, let me introduce to another seemingly impossible amalgamation of great sound and great look. The Line 6 Micro Spider 6-Watt Battery Powered guitar amplifier has a whole lot of qualities that make it the favorite small amplifier of so many musicians who are constantly on the go or don’t have too much space. With its small form and light body it can be easily transported anywhere you go, while its battery negates the need to be constantly plugged into an outlet and hoping that you have some kind of source of energy. The best part of the amp is of course the sound of the guitar, which is quite outstanding for the price it is offered up at. One of the best options of small guitar amplifiers available for you that I want you to remember when you start attempting to make a decision on buying one. Great stuff to have, really.
With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.
The original guitar recording preamp was almost certainly the Scholtz Rockman, but within a few years we had several sophisticated competitors (from Sansamp, Groove Tubes and Mesa Boogie) using both solid-state analogue and tube circuitry. These all include speaker emulation of some kind, though usually offer few or no effects. On the whole they are easy to use and some produce excellent results, though they have less tonal flexibility than digital systems designed to model the characteristics of a range of specific commercial amplifier and speaker combinations.
Eddie's Guitars specializes in the finest electric guitars available today. We have spent many years seeking out the best builders, brands and models available from yesterday and today. From classics like Fender Custom Shop and Gibson Custom Shop to boutique builders like Collings, PRS, Tom Anderson, Grosh and John Suhr we have every avenue of the sonic world of guitar covered.
Well, I’m glad you asked. Don’t be fooled by the price and the size of this thing, as it’s a veritable Pandora’s box of effects waiting to be unleashed upon the world. You have over 75 onboard effects to choose from including distortion, compression, modulation, delay and reverb modelled on some of the biggest hitters in the industry, like the Boss DS-1, Metal Zone, Fuzz Face, Big Muff, Pro Co rat and many, many more. The team at Zoom have also thrown in a simulator to allow your guitar to sound like an acoustic.
Inspired by the Fuzz-Tone’s ability to add an aggressive swagger to any guitar melody, the mid-60s saw an explosion of copycat fuzz stompboxes. Most of the imitations were atrocious, but some became infamous. A few deliberately tried to combat the limitations of guitars themselves, like Gary Hurst’s 1965 Sola Sound Tone Bender MKI, which reused the three-transistor circuit of the Fuzz Tone. For the MKI, Hurst tweaked certain resistor values, which extended, or sustained, the guitar notes for longer. A two-transistor version of the tone bender (the MKI.5) morphed into Jimi Hendrix’s favorite stompbox, the simple and durable Arbiter Fuzz Face. The later model, the MKII, was at the heart of Jimmy Page’s secret sound in early Led Zeppelin recordings, When the Fuzz Face was released in 1966, it set a precedent for Hendrix imitators (“I Don’t Live Today” being the most frenetic extension of the Fuzz Face’s limits). With a keen ear for experimentation, Hendrix would often prefer the Fuzz Face’s tone when the battery was half-charged, in large part because germanium transistors fluctuate according to voltage. Guitarists would often have to wade through different batteries in order to find their own tone.
There are more expensive versions of the Alex Lifeson signature available, but the SE that we’ve chosen has a really nice balance of price and specification. This is a firmly mid-range guitar, and is really good value at that. It’s a slightly thinner body style, but with PRS’ nice traditional acoustic hybrid shape, and comes with all of the high quality hardware and electronics that you’d expect from PRS.
You might initially think that Music Lab is narcissistic for creating a line of guitar VSTs with the word “real” in them. But after you hear the first note, you’ll be kicking yourself for doubting it. There is a lot to cover with the “Real” line, and since they share many of the same features, we will slowly go over the components of these VSTs throughout the reviews for them.  
The Yamaha APXT2 is a 3/4 size version of the world's best-selling acoustic-electric guitar, the APX500III. This well-constructed, compact guitar makes a great companion when you're on the road. The APXT2 features an ART-based pickup system and Yamaha's proprietary tuner, offering great sensitivity and accuracy for quick tuning. The APX T2 also includes a gig bag.

The F Series Martin electrics were before my awareness of the diversity of the guitar universe, but I recall the appearance of the GTs, which got to stores in Wisconsin in the summer of ’67. I recall admiring the cool shapes and burgundy finish, although I’ve never been a fan of DeArmond pickups and, rightly or wrongly, always considered them a weakness. As already indicated, the GT Series was hardly a winner and fell victim to the general guitar malaise that swept the world guitar markets in around 1968. The same guitar bust that did in Valco/Kay and a host of Japanese guitarmakers did in Martin’s archtop electrics.
Your first step should be to think about what you’d really like to add to your sound. If you like the clean tones you get from your amp but can do without the buzzy onboard distortion, consider adding an overdrive or distortion pedal to your rig. If you’d prefer to experiment with chorus, a phaser or a pitch shifter, start there. There are no wrong answers when it comes to effects, and the units you choose and how you decide to use them are part of the creativity of playing guitar.
Sure, the Teach Yourself to Play Guitar: A Quick and Easy Introduction for Beginners book is for those brand new to the hobby. But experienced players will love the chord chart that comes with it. It includes the basic major and minor ones along with the more uncommon ones for a great reference. Some of the riffs are a bit obscure, but it doesn’t detract much from its value.

The solid body electric guitar is the most common body type and is made from a solid slab of wood. Solid body guitars can range from a simple, single-pickup model, to an ornately figured and decorated, multi-pickup instrument with a slew of electronic options. Although solid-body guitars don’t produce as much resonance as hollow-body models, the woods used still have an impact on the instrument’s sound.
Another thing to bear in mind is pot taper. Two most commonly used tapers are linear and logarithmic. Linear taper, as name suggests, linearly increases resistance throughout it’s range. That’s ok for some applications, but not for volume pots. Our humanoid ears work in logarithmic fashion, so volume pots need to have logarithmic taper in order for us to hear smooth transition between quieter and louder settings. If volume jumps suddenly in the first 20%-30% of volume pot range and then does almost nothing in the rest of the range, it’s likely that you got a linear pot instead of logarithmic.
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!
In addition to the Valvetronix, Vox has developed a line of analogue effects pedals. Dubbed Cooltron, the line provides guitarists with vintage sounding overdrive, compression, boost, distortion and tremolo. The pedals use low-power 12AU7 tubes to create vintage soft-clipping preamplification. Two of the Cooltron pedals, the Big Ben Overdrive and the Bulldog Distortion, won the Guitar World magazine Platinum Award.[3] Cooltron pedals:
Some of Jackson’s most famous models – such as the Soloist, the Kelly and the Rhoads – are a common sight on the biggest stages around the world as the biggest names in metal use them, including Randy Rhoads, Adrian Smith, Marty Friedman and David Ellefson. Thankfully it’s not just premium guitars on offer, meaning guitarists on a budget can easily pick up a quality Jackson (the Dinky Series in particular) for just a few hundred bucks.
This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 
Bass effects are electronic effects units that are designed for use with the low pitches created by an electric bass or for an upright bass used with a bass amp or PA system. Two examples of bass effects are fuzz bass and bass chorus. Some bass amplifiers have built-in effects, such as overdrive or chorus. Upright bassists in jazz, folk, blues and similar genres may use a bass preamplifier, a small electronic device that matches the impedance between the piezoelectric pickup and the amp or PA system. Bass preamps also allow for the gain of the signal to be boosted or cut. Some models also offer equalization controls, a compressor, and a DI box connection.
We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of
Many readers will already know that germanium has been the effects buzzword of the past many years. These transistors are considered softer, rounder, more musical. Don’t be fooled: that doesn’t mean they make music all by themselves, you have to make music through them. But that’s not such a bad thing. Open up a Fuzz Face for the first time and you’re likely to be startled by its simplicity, and other early fuzzes like Maestro’s Fuzz-Tone (1963) and Sola Sound’s Tone Bender (1965) are equally basic. As far as the Face goes, you’ll find fewer than ten components on the board, two of them being those crucial AC128 or NKT275 transistors. Interestingly, the Tone Bender originally used two OC75 germanium transistors made by Mullard, the revered British tube manufacturer.
While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
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