With sharp double-cutaways and the recognizable Rickenbacker body shape made from maple, the semi-hollow Rickenbacker 330-12 12-string electric guitar has proven to be one of the brand's most popular models since the 1960s. The 330-12 has been used for its jangly sound, perfect for pop and various other genres, by the likes of Tom Petty, Johnny Marr, and Peter Buck, to name a few.

Overdrive can be subtle and produce warm slightly overdriven tones, think SRV. Distortion is easy to see as simply more overdrive, these tones are more saturated and compressed. The spectrum of overdriven tones is huge, from BB King’s slightly overdriven tube amp tones to Eddie Van Halen’s cranked Marshall, to Metallica’s thick distortion, to Smashing Pumpkins’ fuzz tones. It is all actually the same idea is a general sense, these tones may be gotten with amps, pedals, or a combination of both but it is all the same idea, overdrive. What was considered a heavy distorted tone in the 70’s is tame to the metal sounds of today.
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I wanna weigh in, I’m just an average player but having one of the best luthiers around and talking to them really gives you an idea of what quality your getting from a guitar. I play a martin DC 16gte, my singer plays a Chinese knock off Taylor. No one can tell the difference when he switched to the real genuine 314 CE Taylor (basically made the same way as the Chinese one), and we get no complaints about either guitar. Save your money, (buy quality) or buy the Chinese knock off and find it’s made the same and it will make you the same money playing and feel just as good in your hand as the 1000 dollar plus Taylor. Conclusions for Taylor or martin fans is don’t go name brand cause they (known or unknown) swear by them, is all personal preference, try everything in every price range find what’s right for you. My $750 DC 16gte Martin was right for me. My singer the 914ce Taylor Chinese knock off (327 bucks new) suits him better than his 1200 dollar original Taylor 314ce.
Practice amps often have an auxiliary line-in jack, so that the bassist can plug in a recorded music signal (often via an 1/8" jack), to practice along with a recording. The line-in jack can also be used to plug a drum machine into the amp, also for practice purposes. Some practice amps have a level control knob for the line-in input. Practice amps often have a headphone jack, with a feature that turns off the power amplifier when headphones are connected. This feature enables bassists to practice silently at night, to avoid disturbing others in adjoining rooms or apartments. Higher-priced practice amps aimed at pro bassists may have a DI out jack, so that the amp's preamplifier signal can be connected directly to a mixing board for a live show's sound reinforcement system or for a sound recording session. DI out-equipped units effectively turn the practice amp into a preamplifier unit.
If you’re a beginner, you may still be in the process of exploring different playing styles or developing your own. In this case, it’s best to go for a versatile guitar that can accommodate a variety of acoustic playing styles. Fortunately, the guitars on this list are also versatile players. Some, however, may cater to a more specific style. For instance, the Taylor 214ce’s bright sound and the Seagull Maritime’s wider nut make these models great for those who do a lot of fingerstyle playing.
The way Kristin Hersh rubs major and minor notes next to each other in her intricately plotted songs is truly haunting; a ghostly approach that didn’t even require selling her soul at the Crossroads. Blending plucky arpeggios and bluesy slides with punishing strumming, Hersh’s playing has actually gotten more aggressive as she’s eased into her 40s with 50 Foot Wave.
This is our top pick for the best dreadnought guitar under $500. It has the looks of something you’d see in a honky tonk bar. It is a really cool looking acoustic guitar. It is a classic with it’s sunburst color and decorated hummingbird pick guard. It is the more affordable version of the Gibson Hummingbird. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also has a pickup so you can amplify it for gigs. Owners describe it as having a big sound with great playability. Nice low action will make playing much easier. The tapered neck is great for beginners and makes forming chords less difficult. See more pictures of this guitar here.
This is a beautiful example of a 34 year old Japanese crafted Ibanez acoustic guitar that has the tone and the beauty, Love the Sunburst finish on this guitar that did a beautiful job with the thin Poly finish it stands up to the test of time and still shines like glass today just have a good look. It has a Spruce top… cant tell because of the sunburst if its solid or not but will assume its laminated…. Back – Sides & neck are all very nice grade Mahogany. Fit & finish as good as a $2000 guitar of today but this beauty has well aged woods now being well over 33 years old you could spend 3 x times the money and not get a better vintage guitar . The tone is surprisingly rich and with good volume it makes an excellent strumming or fingerpicking guitar. Its playing string action is very good making it a breeze to play and fun. The neck is real nice substantial and a medium profile with a soft V it feels like a vintage Guild from the 1960's ... nice job Ibanez!...Its in very good vintage condition too with several minor doinks to its top and a couple minor on the back and so on but overall its in very good condition both structurally & cosmetically and looks very good overall. The neck's frets are still good and fingerboard and frets have been lightly polished as has the entir guitar cleaned hydrated and polished and just look at the results, a new Martin bone nut has just been fit & installed as well as new Martin Marquis 80/20 Bronze light gauge strings, nicely setup to play very well like a much more expensive guitar now. Original tuners are doing a great job to this day some 34+ years later... Here is a very good Japanese Vintage Guitar of quality for a very good price too, She is not new or mint of course it has doinks and just a couple of fine hairline checks in its top I did not see at first its very hard to see but they are not wood cracks just fine hairlines to the finish and of no structural consequence what so ever. This guitar Plays and sounds very well and will make someone very happy its condition is JVG rated at easily 8.5/10 very good vintage, neck is straight without cracks fit and finish and workmanship are all in the excellent range. Great Japanese guitar for a great price… The 1980 Ibanez V300 TV, crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This guitar plays GREAT! .
Which is what you’ll be doing with the Omen-6: laying down heavy riffs and unleashing screaming solos. Two overwound Diamond Plus humbuckers are responsible for the guitar’s hot and thick output, while a thin “C”-shaped neck, 14-inch fretboard radius and extra jumbo frets keep things fast and comfy. Although this doesn’t have a tremolo for those dive bombs, a Tune-o-matic bridge and string-through body ensure your sustain will sing for days.
May Music Studio's Guide: The May Music Studio isn't a true "blue book." Rather, it is the website of a guitar studio that provides a quick tip guide to help you determine the fair market value of your guitar. The studio has years of appraisal experience and though they no longer offer appraisal services, their wisdom is distilled in the evaluation tips that they describe on their site.
Smaller-scale instruments are produced to assist children in learning the instrument as the smaller scale leads to the frets being closer together, making it easier for smaller hands. The scale-size for the smaller guitars is usually in the range 484–578 mm (19.1–22.8 in), with an instrument length of 785–915 mm (30.9–36.0 in). Full-size instruments are sometimes referred to as 4/4, while the smaller sizes are 3/4, 1/2 or 1/4.

The Blue Midnight was released in 2011 with a limit to the key of C, also on the less expensive side of the market. It features stainless steel cover plates with a wider back gap for enhanced volume while playing. The unique feature of this harp is the comb, which is made out of translucent blue plastic. The comb allows for brighter tone than the black combed models. It also has a special just intonation (JI) "Chicago tuning". It is also now available in other keys.[23]


The role of a pickup is simple. They pick up the sound produced by the guitar and create an electric signal which then travels via an amplifier. For instance, pickups do not relate to getting a partner with your music, but they are actually a characteristic of the electric guitar. They serve the same purpose that frets do on an acoustic instrument, but the pickups will determine the vibrations before sending them to an amplifier.
Dirk Wacker lives in Germany and is fascinated by anything related to old Fender guitars and amps. He plays country, rockabilly, and surf music in two bands, works regularly as a session musician for a local studio, and writes for several guitar mags. He’s also a hardcore guitar and amp DIY-er who runs an extensive website—singlecoil.com—on the subject.
With his exceptional talent, it seems that everyone wants to collaborate with Santana. What’s more, when he does join hands with another artist, it seems that his raw and authentic sound always shines through, taking the limelight. That is not to say that his tracks aren’t all different and uniquely great in their own way! There are so many manipulations that he has found and continues to find with the Latin rhythm. People say that the Grammy-winning guitarist can be identified with just one single note – now that’s an achievement!

Effects are electronic devices and circuits that process the electronic signal input from an instrument or mic. Also referred to as FX, they run the gamut from limiter or expander settings so subtle you can barely detect them to sci-fi modulation effects so extreme that the original sound is virtually undetectable. Think of your guitar or bass as your artist’s palette of primary colors. Effects are the equivalent of your brushes, tools, and color-mixing skills that add near-limitless creativity to your artistic vision.
My Carvin SH575 is a semi-hollow body electric. The size is similar to the Gibson 336, but sounds totally different. When you play this guitar you can't put it down, Carvins are made with computer aid wood carving CNC machines the proto-type of the guitar is measured with lasers and programed into the computer so every guitar they make is to the 1000th to the original. The finish and the detail is awesome. It also is wired with hum bucking pick-ups, piezo acoustic pick-up and Roland GK synth guitar. You can get some beautiful hybrid tones from this thing and I never can stop finding new ones. Try one of these out if you ever go to California I think there is like 5 stores around the L. A. / San Diego area, you will see what I mean.
While I have been able to find ways to get it to work for me most of the time, I have found that the controls for the video looping feature are not as precise as I would like them to be. There is definitely room for improvement. Another thing that I am missing is the option to control the speed of the video playback. Some competitors allow for the video playback to be slowed down or sped up while retaining the correct pitch. Guitar Tricks have been listening – Improvement have been made!This is a great help if you want to practice to play along at a slightly slower speed or if you want to review something in more detail. Luckily I have found a little helper too that allows me to control the speed of the video until Guitar Tricks are including this feature into their video player. I am using the MySpeed tool from Enounce. They advertise it to speed up videos to save time watching them. It also works a treat slowing videos down.
How long it takes to learn guitar depends on how good you want to get and how much practice you put in. How good you can get with 1-2 hours a day for a few months depends on what methods you use to practice. There are effective practice methods that will help you make the best use of your time. This course is one of the best. https://tinyurl.im/aH7K9 It's not just about how much you play but how effectively you play that will determine how good you will get.
As a rule, open-backed cabinets tend to have a different low-frequency characteristic to closed ones, partly because no air is trapped inside the box to act as a pneumatic spring. One characteristic is that low-frequency sounds, such as damped lower strings, cause the speaker cone to move a considerable distance, producing what is affectionately known as cabinet thump. In addition, there is interaction between the sound coming from the front and the back of the cabinet, which may cause some frequencies to cancel and others to be reinforced.
Aside from the superstrat ESP M-10 shown earlier. The ESP LTD EC-10 is also an affordable guitar but with a different body design derived from the Les Paul. The features of this LP inspired guitar that makes it different is the bevels on the body and belly cut at the back for comfort. Its major resemblance to a Les Paul is the humbuckers pick-ups equip on the guitar. Together with the bridge design for having a stopbar and tom bridge without a whammy bar.
For those other performances, we run into limits of computer memory, computer processing power and computer programmers' time (and talent). With increasing processing power available in the consumer market, simulations are in some cases surpassing storage intensive sample libraries in terms of acoustic similarity and perceptive preferences. In guitar world, though, there seem to be no VST players of the simulation variety contending for top honors against leading sample libraries - of which amplesound.net seems to be the leading collection (unless you like something Vienna Symphonic Libraries has to offer)
As you can see, this is simply a case where the Les Paul Custom is a feature-rich product, with more qualities that Epiphone can highlight as buying incentive. All the same contextual advice applies, as the LP Custom is every bit as versatile as the Standard (if not more) and can hang in just about any musical style. When deciding between them it's more a matter of price and aesthetics than any kind of style or playing scenario.
Thirdly, yamaha has been known for musical instruments for a long long time and is the biggest producer of musical instruments. On its logo, it has got two tuning pegs meaning unlike any other musical brand, it is the most diverse. The only reason that people say fenders and gibsons are better is because they were the original makers of contempory electric guitars and the fact that they're well known. So basically, all you're paying for is the badge.
Some effects, and the boxes that produced them, altered musical periods beyond recognition. The valve-driven Watkins Copicat, for example, will forever be associated with the sound of the late 1950s British music “beat” scene. Developed by Charlie Watkins in 1958, this odd machine supported a tape-recording mechanism that would record and play back any sound with varying lengths of delay in-between the replay heads. The device was critical to the rockabilly sound of the late 1950s, the “beat-group” sound of The Shadows, and the Liverpool Merseybeat scene of early 1960s (as well as the Birminghambeat, or Brumbeat scene). The sensation of hearing a guitar warble and wail to its own output encouraged guitarists to experiment with different styles of attack and vigor. For example, the noise that begins and ends the original 1962 recording of “Telstar” by the Tornados was made using the Copicat by creating a loop of echo and reverb effects. This produced what can best be described as some sort of space-echo/attack-helicopter noise.
Ok so currently i run a Mesa 20/20 along with a GSP1101 and a MXR 10-Band EQ pedal. I love the MXR but would like to get a EQ in rack form. I see about a millon rack EQs out there but not sure which ones are made for guitar? They seem more focused on live sound/PA/Home recording..I am not sure if there all the same, Meaning a PA EQ will work for a guitar rack.
We all have heard that tone starts in the hands of the guitarist.  Different players can play thru the exact same amp and guitar rig and produce sounds on opposite ends of the spectrum.  I like to refer to this base sonic level as the DNA of a player.  Thanks to mad scientists tinkering in their evil laboratories of sound, we now have the ability to alter a guitarist’s tonal genetic code with effects pedals.
This guitar comes with a 25.5-inch scale, 20 frets, and a 1.68-inch nut. The rosewood bridge features a compensated saddle for a smoother tone and warmer sound. The mahogany SlimTaper D profile neck makes it easy to play even if you’re a beginner, while the Grover machine heads will ensure your guitar stays well-tuned for an accurate musical performance.

Nickel trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.


If you are a first time builder or an experienced professional you know the value of building your instrument on a solid foundation. The Custom Shop Jag body is beautiful, high quality and made to spec. The Allparts neck is manufactured under license by Fender. The materials and quality level meet the standards set by Fender. Using these high quality materials will give you the sweet tone and sustain you are looking for.
On this clip you can hear more things. First of all, the size is defined by the separate recordings of the original riff and the delayed riff, thanks to some reamping! This allowed me to spread them across the stereo field so the sound develops across the horizontal axis, rather than the depth. I was also able to adjust the delay time so that it isn't behind the beat. Finally, I decreased the feedback level and I had always control over the dry/wet balance via the volume fader of the delayed signal track. Isn't that nice? And the cherry on the cake is that with this sort of manipulation you have much more flexibility! Listen to this example:
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Carved - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Richlite (Paper/Phenolic Resin Composite) - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Resomax - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Godin Tuner, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Seymour Duncan - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Cherryburst, Creme Brulee, Black, Burgundy
Almost criminally underappreciated, Irish blues rock guitar player Rory Gallagher was arguably the top guitar player of the 1970s. Capable of playing slide guitar as well as anyone that ever existed, he also excelled at blues improvisation. One of his best songs is “Tore Down,” a hard driving blues rock song with a truly tasty guitar riff and inspired soloing. Hopefully, with time, Gallagher will start to get a little more recognition.
There aren’t a lot of professional reviews of inexpensive amps, but James at Guitar Verdict raved about the Champion 20, saying, “For an amp of this price, the Fender Champion 20 watt offers a massive amount of value,” and calling it “a hard to beat offering.” At last count it had earned an average of 4.6 out of 5 stars in 595 Amazon user reviews and earned an A for review integrity from FakeSpot.
I borrowed the above quote from an article on effects pedals by Robert Keeley (a maker of seriously fine effects pedals) which can help you remember the order to place your pedals. I have a few slight modifications and additions to this that I use, but this is a great way to remember the rough order quickly, and it comes from one of the great pedal masters.

And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.


An effects unit or effects pedal is an electronic or digital device that alters the sound of a musical instrument or other audio source. Common effects include distortion/overdrive, often used with electric guitar in electric blues and rock music; dynamic effects such as volume pedals and compressors, which affect loudness; filters such as wah-wah pedals and graphic equalizers, which modify frequency ranges; modulation effects, such as chorus, flangers and phasers; pitch effects such as pitch shifters; and time effects, such as reverb and delay, which create echoing sounds.[1][2]
You might recognise this in the tone knob above. The only difference is that R11 is a variable resitance from 0 to 250 Kohm, and C4 is a fixed value. Several guitars have several combinations of R11 and and C4 to achieve different cut-off points. When R11 is 100% position, the resistance is maximised, so there is little incentive for eelctrical current to flow to C4. The signal is not affected as much.

Power attenuation[when defined as?] can be used with either low-power or high-power amplifiers, resulting in variable-power amplifiers. A high-power amplifier with power attenuation can produce power-tube distortion through a range of listening volumes, but with a decrease in high power distortion. Other technologies, such as dual rectifiers and the sag circuit[jargon]—which should not be confused with attenuation—allow high power amplifiers to produce low power volume while preserving high power distortion.[27]

Every guitarist who bends or vibratoes a string to make it sing owes a debt to B.B. King. With influences as diverse as T-Bone Walker, Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, the late guitarist turned the blues world upside down in 1952 with “3 O’Clock Blues.” Almost overnight, the harmonica was supplanted as the primary solo instrument in blues, as guitarists scrambled to imitate B.B.’s soloing style, especially in Chicago.
This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.
Rather than superfluous power, I suspect the copywriter really meant something like superior!! However, then again, maybe they did get it right, because they featured a 6A6 preamp tube that was exceptionally weak and microphonic. These amps also had a chassis built in Chicago, by Chicago Electric, with a cabinet made in Chicago, by Geib. These had performance problems and in 1937, National Dobro went back to using Webster chassis with Geib cabinets.

I have been playing Guitar and Bass for over 40 years. The items in this article not only enlightened me by explaining things that I did not even know, It helped me decide to make some changes to my current guitar, rather than spend a bunch of money on a new guitar that would probably be inferior to what I currently own. THANK YOU to the folks who furnished this information.

By moving up or down one level, in terms of magnetic strength, you can usually add or subtract a little edge from a pickup. If your guitar is too tangy, moving down one pickup level (e.g., from alnico 4 to alnico 2) may smooth it out. If you want to add bite, go with a slightly stronger magnet—like, alnico 5 to a ceramic magnet. The good part is that magnets are both easy to find and inexpensive in comparison to buying a whole new pickup.


Portable- you can carry them in one hand to jam with friends, take to your guitar lesson, or even play at a small party. The Fender “Frontman” 10 watt weighs only 8.5 pounds and brand new costs only $59. Another fun amp is the Danelectro “Honeytone” that only costs $19.99 and is equipped with a belt clip so you can walk or roller skate around while playing your guitar.

The world is full of guys who will zero in on all the details they find inferior about this guitar by noting the rather obvious fact that this is not a Gibson Les Paul Standard costing $3,000.00. There are some people who will complain that this guitar has a bolt on neck. True, the set necks of the more expensive Epiphones and Gibsons are nicer. But, considering the fact that every Fender Stratocaster ever made had a bolt on neck, is this really a big deal? Would Jimi Hendrix have played "Purple Haze" better if his Strat had a set in neck? Probably not.

In pop and rock music, the electric guitar is often used in two roles: as a rhythm guitar, which plays the chord sequences or progressions, and riffs, and sets the beat (as part of a rhythm section); and as a lead guitar, which provides instrumental melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In a small group, such as a power trio, one guitarist switches between both roles. In large rock and metal bands, there is often a rhythm guitarist and a lead guitarist.

While vintage guitars tend to hold a reputation as the best ever made, there are more high-end boutique makers turning out truly magnificent instruments than ever before. Following the wake of trail-blazers like Paul Reed Smith, the current class of boutique guitar makers includes the likes of Knaggs, Kauer, Swope, Fano, Huber, Koll and many many more. Keep an eye on this page for the latest and greatest luthier-made new and used electric guitars to hit the pages of Reverb.


Which brings us to this 1985 DT-250. While it sports the tail notch, the shape is a little more sleek and diminutive than the comparable Dean ML. The lower front bout is extended to be almost symmetrical with the diagonally opposite bass wing. The treble-side lower bout is shortened, giving the whole guitar a tasteful offset-X shape… X Series. To add dimension to the shape, Fuji Gen Gakki added “crystal cuts” to the edges, basically code for angled bevels.
Few dispute that, for tonal purity, the best distortion sounds come from cranking up a good tube amp. In particular, those with ears for tonal nuances buried even within a heap of distortion agree that a vintage-style, non-master-volume amp (or good boutique amp with the master up full to effectively take it out of the circuit) driven to the point where the output tubes are beginning to distort offers most players’ dream visions of the perfect overdrive tone.
Being a grand auditorium body shape guitar, it’s a little smaller than the typical dreadnought size that we’ve covered several times on our list. That’s no bad thing, and allows this guitar to be nice and flexible, especially when combined with the ‘Expression’ electronics system that allows for some good tonal customisation. Match up with an effective wireless instrument system.
This model comes in Takamine’s NEX cutaway guitar body, and features a slimline mahogany neck with 12”-radius rosewood fretboard. The result is an acoustic that plays really quickly, and is more than comfortable right up in the high frets. Ideal for virtuoso players. Takamine also use their own preamp system here, which includes three-band EQ and gain controls, mid contour switch, notch filter and EQ bypass. It all sounds great.

"Rocksmith 2014" is geared toward beginners and starts with the basics, like getting your guitar in tune. Then it'll pick a song based on your skill level. The earlier version's "journey" mode has been replaced by a "mission" mode (it is a video game, after all) with tasks like playing a song that "Rocksmith" recommends or hitting 75 percent accuracy. You get feedback after each run through a song, and you have tasks to check off as you play, like hitting five notes in a row. As you succeed, the game throws more tasks and notes at you, adjusting the difficulty as you go.


One of the key features that makes this stand out is the 7-inch high-resolution touch display which allows you to move amps, effects and set up your pedal board to exactly how you want it, sculpting the chain to your exact specifications. Want to run a reverb pedal before a distortion? Well, just move it around using the touch screen! The OLED scribble-strip and assignable colour LEDs appear above the switches and allow you to keep track of where your effects are – a great idea!
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic/Electric - Body Size: Dreadnought - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: 1/4" Output, Chrome Tuners, XLR Output - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ200T - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural

However, if you want a small guitar that will give the quality of sound you might expect from a larger guitar, or if you are considering this style as the first beginner guitar for a child or student, you may want to consider other models that are more typical of a guitar suitable for learning, recording or for growing and developing better skills.


\n\n Harmony branded some of their old acoustic guitars with the Nashville\nname. \n\n There was a Japanese company called Nashville\nMusical Instruments NMI \n\n I have an acoustic guitar with no name on the headstock, and\na label inside that reads nothing but Nashville. I tracked down the information\non it once. It's a cheap guitar from the 80’s, made overseas, imported by a US\ncompany that sells children’s toys now. I can't for the life of me remember the\nname of that company now. I was searching for it, with no luck, when I found\nyour question. \n\n There is also the Nashville Guitar Company NGC based in\nInglewood, TN \n\n
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Even working on the assumption that you're only using one mic, the professionals have an awful lot to say about where you might put it. For a start, it seems to be fairly common practice to audition the different speaker cones of your guitar amp. "They're supposed to sound the same," says Roy Thomas Baker, "but if you're using a 4x12 cabinet, each of these four speakers may sound different."
Of course, the effect is not as good as using a professional studio but most users report that reproduction is very good for a simple computer application. The interface of Guitar Rig is extremely well laid out and even for those new to amps and guitar effects, it doesn't take long to navigate your way around. If you intend to use Guitar Rig for live performances, a convenient Live View displays the most essential readouts and level monitors to keep your eye on.
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That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).

I've owned and played Martin, Ovations, Fender, and Gretsch acoustics but none has thrilled me more than the Breedlove Concert Pursuit with cedar top. The tone is definitely different - so balanced and the midrange really shines. Absolute joy to play despite this is not their top line. Not so much a strumming guitar - shines when finger picked. Last but not least, the tone when plugged in is so deep and warm it astounded me. Far better than the others I've had.

Twelve-string guitars produce a brighter and more jangly tone than six-string guitars. They are used by guitarists for chord progressions that require thickening. The twelve-string is mainly used as a rhythm instrument due to the extra effort involved in playing lead guitar using paired strings. Twelve-string guitars have twelve tuning pegs and double truss rods and are slightly more expensive than their corresponding six-string version.
They are based out of Nashville, TN, and all of their products are made in the United States. The Gibson Les Paul is possibly the most iconic model of guitar ever made. It’s been used by many players throughout the years, and it’s suitable for everything from jazz to rock to metal. Famous wielders of the instrument include: Jeff Beck, Duane Allman, Chuck Berry, Jack Bruce, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Dave Grohl, George Harrison, Tony Iommi, B. B. King, Jimmy Page, and many, many more.
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
The ADA MP-1 was a legend for it’s superior versatility at the time of it’s release. Since first becoming available during the 80’s, players vied after it for it’s midi switching capability via footswitch. Paul Gilbert is most famous for his loyalty to the amp during the spawn of his career.  It runs on two 12AX7 preamp tubes and has three main voicings — Solid State, Clean and Distortion. One downfall of this amp stems from it’s lack of an input volume control, but thanks to a host of mods available nowadays for this thing, one can look really look past this minor flaw. On top of that, you can find them used for around $250! A steal for 80’s tone-in-a-box.

Hmm… you still want to buy an electric guitar first up? Okay, but again spend extra money on a guitar that plays well, will keep its value and feels perfect in your hands. In other words, don’t focus too much on paying for extras like custom pick-ups, locking nuts and electronics you don’t need just yet. At the moment it’s all about fingers and hands, not foot-pedals.

Albert Lee‘s extensive use of the Telecaster earned him the nickname of “Mr. Telecaster”. His acolyte Ronnie Earl (then still Ronnie Earl Horvath) favored a Telecaster during his tenure with Roomful of Blues. Both John Tichy and Bill Kirchen of Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen wielded Teles, as did Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons with the Flying Burrito Brothers. Hugh Cornwell of The Stranglers has used Telecasters throughout his career. Joe Strummer (frontman of the punk band The Clash) used his worn and battered 1966 Telecaster (originally Sunburst but spray painted black) with its distinctive “Ignore Alien Orders” sticker from the beginning of his musical career until the day he died. In January 2007, Fender issued the G. E. Smith signature Telecaster in honor of Smith’s reputation as a modern master of the Telecaster. G.E. Smith was the lead guitarist in the Hall & Oates band and the musical director of Saturday Night Live. Tom Morello of “Rage Against The Machine” plays a black American Telecaster called “Sendero Luminoso” (Shining Path) for songs in drop-D tuning. Jim Root from Slipknot had a signature Telecaster released in 2009. Prince plays a Telecaster in the opening scene of his film, Purple Rain. Singer and Songwriter Jeff Buckley (Son of musician Tim Buckley) played an American Telecaster throughout his career. Lynval Golding, one of the guitarists for 2-Tone band The Specials, used a yellow telecaster throughout his time as a Special. Jonny Greenwood, lead guitarist of Radiohead uses a Telecaster Plus model with lace sensor pickups as his main guitar. British singer and guitar player Anna Calviexclusively plays a Telecaster through a Vox AC30. Danny Jones, of McFly, uses a Telecaster Vintage ’52. Deryck Whibley (frontman and guitarist of the band Sum 41) uses his own signature Telecaster Deluxe, issued in 2005. It features one knob for volume and tone, a single humbucker pickup near the synchronized six-saddle bridge and without the traditional pickup selector switch.

DR Strings makes strings that were specifically designed for drop d tuning, other alternate tunings, and even standard tuning. Known as DDT strings, DR spent over two years perfecting them. DR created a new patent pending method for constructing these strings to ensure great performance with lower pitches. Because of the amazing construction, and their ability to quickly lock into tune so quickly, DR calls their DDT's "Superstrings". Why not try a set? DDT's are available for electric guitar or bass guitar.

Dean has always had the reputation of making fast, loud and articulate guitars and is famed for its wide range of eye-catching models, including the ML Series and the iconic Razorback. Signature models are also a specialty and they produce guitars for the likes of Dave Mustaine and Michael Angelo Batio, as well as huge line of Dimebag Darrell signature guitars.

The following year the Standard model received a short-lived redesign seeking to reduce production costs and price on American Stratocasters. This revised version lacked a second tone control, a newly designed Freeflyte vibrato system, and a bare-bones output jack. A reshaped ‘Comfort Contour’ body with deeper forearm and waist contours similar to an early 1960s model was introduced. What it did retain was the 1970s-style headstock decal. The 1982/83 version of the Standard Stratocaster has little in common with the Dan Smith guitar, apart from the period when they were sold, but is sometimes informally (and controversially) presented as a “Dan Smith-era” or “redesign” guitar. After the Standard Stratocaster was discontinued in 1984, Fender Japan produced a 22-fret version with a flat 9.5″ radius and medium-jumbo fretwire until 1986.[14]

Looking at my beautiful but dusty Les Paul sitting in the corner, I walked over to my bookshelf to choose a book to once again work on my electric. Now, I will say that I am NOT shy about purchasing a book or many, many books if I want to learn something so there was quite a selection to choose from. I had a few books that focused on the electric guitar but for the most part they were incomprehensible or started you off with basic chords and strumming, then turn the page and WHAM! it was Eddie Van Halen time. Just no real steady work up in skills and a lot of confusing jargon. Which is probably why I set the electric aside.


Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
I took the Gearank scores we have calculated for individual guitars for each brand and combined them using a weighted average to produce a rating for each brand. I can best explain this by saying if a hypothetical brand had 2 models and one of them had 99 rating sources and the other one only had a single rating source then the first model's ratings would contribute 99% of the final rating for the brand. An interesting statistic; we processed more than 17,000 sources for these calculations.
Guitar FX BOX does REALLY real-time DSP. Signal is sampled from sound card input, processed and then sent to the output with VERY LOW LATENCY. Unlike many other "real-time" audio programs, I/O delay with Guitar FX BOX is extremely low, virtually undetectable! This is achieved using DirectSound (or WDM streaming) for fast access to the hardware (sound card) and fast DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Through DirectSound, latency is about 20ms with most sound cards, or even less. When WDM streaming driver is used, latency can go as low as 5ms! Nevertheless, exact total i/o latency still depends on hardware/drivers.

The better-quality Japanese guitars of the mid 1970s to the present have rivaled the quality of many new American guitars of the same time period. It is worth considering, however, that the 1970s were almost without a doubt the worst period in the history of American-made guitars as well as numerous other American manufactured products. I am firmly of the opinion that no Japanese maker has equaled the quality of pre-World War II Gibson and Martin acoustic instruments or electric guitars by Gibson and Fender of the 1950s through the mid 1960s, but I would be quick to agree that a Tokai or Fuji Gen Gakki top-line instrument of the mid 1970s would be in many cases every bit as good and in some cases superior to Norlin-era Gibson and CBS-period Fender guitars. While "Made In Japan" had a connotation of cheap and mediocre quality in the 1960s through the early 1970s, by the end of the 1970s "Made In Japan" was often viewed by consumers of guitars and other products such as automobiles as being as good as if not superior to American. Some of the Japanese instruments have gone on to be viewed not only as being of fine quality but worthy of consideration by collectors. While I personally do not collect Japanese made guitars and do not deal large numbers of these instruments, I would certainly agree that many of them are of excellent quality and provide good value.


The one major drawback of Guitar Tricks is the almost overwhelming amount of material that is available. There is a chance that you get distracted into trying out many different styles and techniques. You may find yourself jumping around from song to song and lesson to lesson wanting to see whether you are up to it. As a result you may not be able to follow your curriculum as initially planned. On the other hand, I strongly believe that this will broaden your horizon and make you a better and more versatile guitar player.
Another issue is the fact that, in this circuit, the tone pot always has a cap engaged. You could use a really tiny value for the smaller cap so there’s little perceptible cut at the minimum setting, but that can make a substantial part of the pot’s range a little too subtle. So my plan is to combine this with a Ned Steinberger-designed JackPot as the volume control. This part has an “off” setting that bypasses the tone circuit entirely for a maximum-bright sound. That way, I’d choose for the smaller cap a value that provides the minimum treble cut I’m likely to want. (I suspect I’ll wind up with something between .0022µF and .0047µF.)

225 Parsons St, Kalamazoo, MI, 49007 1917–1984 Also located next to railroad tracks, this facility had major expansions in 1945, 1950, and 1960.[83] Various brands were produced there, including Gibson, Epiphone, (1957–1970)[84][85] and Kalamazoo. During the depression of the 1930s, children's toys were produced there, and during WW2 it produced materials to support the war effort in addition to producing guitars.[86] Between 1974 and 1984 Gibson moved its manufacturing out of this facility to Tennessee. Most of this move happened in 1974, leaving only acoustic and some semi-acoustic production for this plant.[87] In 1985, Heritage Guitars began production, renting part of this facility.[88]


The beauty of an affordable small amp is that it can be high quality without the sacrifice of anything. I mean yeah some people say that the low tones disappear a little when the amplifier gets small, but don’t listen to them too much. Unless your low tones are being drowned out by some loud person screaming into the microphone so hard that the system starts screeching, even the smallest of amps can produce a respectable low tone. The small amplifiers are there to be portable and easy to have, so that you never have to deal with a back hurting (unless your instrument is heavy) or your arms being tired from anything other than playing the guitar too much. Which is why the Blackstar Fly 3 Battery Powered Guitar Amplifier is a great piece of equipment to have in your artillery. Portable, small and powerful in sound, what else could anyone ever want?
Typically do not use any effects, but have an EQ, Sustain, and Room echo sim in my effects chain with Ampkit on my iPad that I use pretty much 100% of the time, but my goal is clean ,clean, clean. I'm still just a beginner so I am holding off do effects until I at least learn how to play. I play more Jazz then anything else. I even play metal clean so I can hear my technique.
Pedals. I have a basic rule when it comes to overdrives, distortions, and fuzzes: When I engage them, I want the volume to either stay the same or increase a bit, so I’m “pushing” the amp with the pedal. Because drives compress the sound, they can tend to seem louder overall when you turn them on, but actually they might be reducing the overall peak level. I don’t want to diminish the natural output level coming out of my guitar, and I don’t want my guitar tone to vanish in the mix when I hit a pedal. As I mentioned earlier, I often run the tone control quite low on drive pedals, which I feel keeps them sounding warm and natural.
In the grand scheme of things, fixed bridges are as simple as it gets. Aside from saddles, which are used to tune in intonation, there are usually no other moving parts involved. The benefit of fixed bridges is their ability to retain intonation and tuning over time. If you're just starting out, sticking with a fixed bridge will make your life much easier. However, it does have its limitations compared to a tremolo bridge.
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]

Use a lead to connect the row that the positive (anode) leg of the input cap C1 is on to the row that the base (middle leg) of the transistor Q1 is on. Use a second lead to connect the emitter row (left hand leg) to the ground bus. Finally, use a lead from the collector (right hand leg) row to a new row on the other side of the breadboard, near the power bus.
My services include re-frets, fret dressing, fret end dressing, action adjustment, truss rod adjustment, intonation setting, nut replacement, bridge saddle replacement, acoustic pickup installation, electric pickup fitting/replacement, output jack replacement, pot replacement, re-wiring, sound post setting, tuner installation, brace re-gluing, broken headstock repairs, strap pin installation, re-strings, bridge setting, tremolo setting, Floyd Rose setting, custom scratch plate cutting, tuning problems, restoration, polishing, cleaning, wiring modifications...Get in touch I'm sure I can help!
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Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Amber

The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!


In nature, reverb is an extremely fast series of echoes that reduce in volume over time.  Depending on the size of the environment, the number of repeats and the timing at which they occur will change.  Digital reverb pedals are very good at replicating the differing types.  Basically, you can take small tiled bathroom and the Grand Canyon (and everything in between) with you to your gigs.
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.
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