Bought an ovation a couple of years ago and it hasn't failed me yet. Mine's a fairly lower in the range Ovation Celebrity, but it's excellent. One of the most comfortable feeling guitars I've ever held, good projection, nice tone, even been known to out do a Gibson further down the neck. Plus bonus feature is that it does sound so much clearer and warmer out of the amp
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: ibanez","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"gretsch guitars","prop5":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] sub category"}
The one major drawback of Guitar Tricks is the almost overwhelming amount of material that is available. There is a chance that you get distracted into trying out many different styles and techniques. You may find yourself jumping around from song to song and lesson to lesson wanting to see whether you are up to it. As a result you may not be able to follow your curriculum as initially planned. On the other hand, I strongly believe that this will broaden your horizon and make you a better and more versatile guitar player.
For punchy tones and a clear, high tone, you might want to consider the EMG JH James Hetfield Humbucker Set. Designed specifically for Metallica's front man, this set features both a neck and bridge pickup that can be used together or separately. If screaming highs and bluesy lows are what you're after, the Seymour Duncan SH-1 1959 Model Electric Guitar Pickup is a solid choice. Its enameled wire, nickel plated studs and balanced coil windings produce great sustain, making this neck pickup a great addition to your Gibson or Les Paul. For an electric guitar pickup that offers great range for different genres, a Gibson '57 Classic Plus Pickup can help you make your musical mark. This bridge pickup delivers a slightly higher output without sacrificing the rich, vintage tone of your instrument. The Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 Pearly Gates Pickup is another great choice if you want some kick combined with a well-rounded sound. Your choice for an electric guitar pickup really comes down to personal preference and what kind of sound you're looking for. Whether you're jamming in the garage, recording live in the studio or taking centre stage every night, you're sure to find the electric guitar pickup that best suits your needs.

Boost pedals increase the strength of your signal going in to your amplifier. This means you don’t have to use distortion to get that volume jump when you want to make the chorus or lead line jump out. A boost pedal increases the signal without adding distortion, and can be used to fatten up your sound, ‘pushing’ your amplifier harder and louder, just without the grit that a distortion pedal will add.
Traditional sets can sometimes feature vastly different tensions between strings, causing players to compensate with altered techniques. New York string icon D’Addario set out to even the playing field with its Balanced Tension XL sets, which boast mathematically equalised resistance for a similar feel from string to string. That means even effort when bending, strumming, plucking and slapping, and even improved dynamic control.
One and a half steps down. Famously used by Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi in the 1970s, as well as Carrie Brownstein, Dimebag Darrell of Pantera, Eyehategod, Architects, Dying Fetus, Anata, Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney, Between the Buried and Me, Machine Head (tuned 40 cents sharp), Down, All That Remains, Bolt Thrower, Pete Loeffler of Chevelle (on Wonder What's Next), Billy Howerdel of A Perfect Circle and Ashes Divide, Wes Borland of Limp Bizkit, Guns N' Roses (on "Jumpin' Jack Flash" and "I Don't Care About You"), Slayer (on "Gemini" from Undisputed Attitude, Diabolus In Musica, the majority of God Hates Us All as well as "Cult" and "Black Serenade" from Christ Illusion), and Stone Sour, as well as former guitarist Jim Root's other band Slipknot on the song "Snuff". Also used by Kyuss on the Sons of Kyuss EP and on the songs "Isolation", "Big Bikes" and "Stage III" from Wretch. Used by Metallica on the song "Bad Seed" from the album Reload, by blink-182 in "Obvious". Also used on Considered Dead and The Erosion of Sanity by Canadian technical death metal band Gorguts.
it has 3 lateral braces after the soundhole, 1 before, so I guess so. the saddle makes it so the truss is the only set up option. The action is high right now for me, so I hope a decent allen wrench will turn it and its not an old peice'o'poo worn out latter brace deal. when I looked for a "belly" it could have just been straight tilted over I guess and not looked the same.
It is a standard dreadnought with 26 frets. There are no electronics, no cutaway, and no fancy upgrades. It has a book matched sitka spruce top, rosewood fingerboard, adjustable rosewood bridge, cream colored plastic binding, rosewood back and sides, and a black inlaid headstock. The neck is not one piece and is made from presumably African mahogany. It has closed gold tone tuners, black beveled pick guard and some plain black line art for a rosette. This guitar is void of polyurethane and has a lacquer finish, so much the better.
hi-thanks joe -i have  installed a push pull pot to get middle and neck and all three pickups totegher-it works prefect but when not pulled it has seemed to change the sound on my normal five  selector sound and made all my normal five sounds very twangy-is this normal as when i pull the push pull pot up the extra sounds get clearer-is it becuase i have two tone caps on the push pull one on top half and one on the bottom but i thought that should not matter when the tone is at 10-thanks sean
Don’t feel like you have to spend a fortune either. While there are some very pricey boutique pedals on the market that get outstanding reviews, there are also affordable pedals that will do the job just fine. Consider brands like Boss, DOD and MXR for some great pedals at affordable prices. If you end up with a pedal you don’t like as much as you thought you would, you can always trade it in and get something different.

{ "name": "Alpine White", "skuUrl":"/bass/epiphone-thunderbird-classic-iv-pro-electric-bass-guitar/h82691000001000", "status": "instock", "statusText": "In stock", "pimStatus": "R1", "inventoryText": "In Stock & Ready To Ship", "inventoryKey": "in_stock", "price": 549.00, "formatedIntegerValue": "549", "decimalValue": "00", "isOnSale": false, "easyPayOptions":"36,16,7500006,36 Months Promotional Financing,10/28/2018,0% Interest for 36 months*. 36 equal monthly payments required. Valid through,549.0,false,/pages/Gear-Card-Rewards.gc", "msrp": 915.00, "salePrice": 549.00, "listPrice": 549.00, "isPriceDrop": false, "priceDropPrice": "", "savingPercent": "0.00", "promos":["freeShipping","topRated","topSeller","flexibleFinancing","international"], "warranty": true, "freeWarrantyAvail": true, "sku": "site1skuH82691000001000", "displaySku": "H82691 000001000", "serialized": false, "stickerDisplayText":"Top Rated", "shipsFree":true, "condition": "New", "priceVisibility": "1", "scene7SetID": "MMGS7/H82691000001000_MEDIA_SET", "invMsgVendorDropShip":"false", "invMsgOverSized":"false", "invMsgBackOrdered":"false", "invMsgPreOrder":"false", "invMsgPromiseDate":"", "invMsgAvailability":"", "invMsgDetail":"", "invMsgAddOnText":"", "currencySymbol": "$", "styleImgUrl": "https://media.musiciansfriend.com/is/image/MMGS7/Thunderbird-Classic-IV-PRO-Electric-Bass-Guitar-Alpine-White/H82691000001000-00-140x140.jpg", "styleImgAlt": "Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO Electric Bass Guitar Alpine White", "freeGiftWarning":false, "freeGiftWarningTips":"", "isShipsInternational": true, "pdpLoyaltyPoints":"4,392", "pdpLoyaltyPointsMultiplier":"1.0", "checksum":"397377354900", "restrictionType":"", "restrictionError":"" }


Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.


You have to have wood to get wood, and it’s unfortunate that a noticeable depletion on this natural resource is affecting the guitar industry even though guitar-making isn’t the primary reason for this depletion. When you talk about tonewoods, you have to mention sustainability in order to protect the natural resource and ensure a future of musical instruments.
Of our five testers, three picked the Fender Champion 20 as their favorite, one ranked it second, and one ranked it the best of the three amps that included digital processing. It simply has everything a beginning guitarist needs. Even if you don’t know much about guitar amps, it’s easy to get a good tone fast. At 12.2 pounds, measuring 13 by 13.7 by 7.5 inches (HWD), it’s easy to carry around or tuck into a corner of a small bedroom.

Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
If you're getting your amp for the purposes of playing out with a band, it's very tempting to invest in a large amplifier, whether that means a big combo or a half-stack (don't even mention a full stack). I get it; it's what the pros use when they're rocking out at festivals. The reality there is that the vast majority of the time, whenever you see a guitarist with a wall of sound, it's comprised mainly of dummy cabs with no actual speakers. It's for the look.
Slash is a longtime fan of legend Seymour Duncan's hand-wound pickups, and for his new Epiphone Firebird, Slash choose custom Seymour Duncan "Slash" open coil-humbuckers for the rhythm (APH-1) and the lead positions (APH-2). These were Slash's first custom pickups made with Seymour Duncan and feature Alnico II magnets and are slightly overwound for a boosted output. Each pickup has a single conductor cable, a long-legged bottom plate, and a wooden spacer. Controls include individual Volume and Tone pots with traditional Black Top Hat knobs with metal inserts and pointers along with a Switchcraft 3-way Toggle switch. Tone controls for both pickups also feature Sprague "Orange Drop" capacitors (0.022uF, 600V, 5%), the same capacitors Slash uses on his custom designed Les Pauls.
Vintage guitar amps are older guitar amplifier "heads", speaker cabinets and combo amp/speaker cabinets, which guitarists, record producers and bandleaders seek out for their unique tone. Some[which?] recording studios have a selection of the most popular vintage guitar combo amps, amp heads and speaker stacks, so that performers can get a retro sound. During the 1980s, when most guitar amps being manufactured used "solid state" semiconductor technology, many musicians seeking an older style of sound (for blues, roots rock, etc.) favored older amps that used vacuum tubes (called "valves" in the UK).[23] Popular vintage models include the Fender Showman, Bassman and Vibroverb amps, and older models made by Ampeg, Gibson, Marshall, and Vox,[24] as well as other smaller companies such as Valco, Danelectro, and Premier.
This guitar needs love. It is in used condition with the biggest flaw being near the input jack.  This is the super rare RT series that were only produced for a couple of years and it is MIJ. Has tremolo but no arm If you are reading this, then you know what these are about.. I am the second owner of this guitar. Was bought from a guitar shop locally in San Jose, CA. No returns please

One of the newer brands on this list, Jackson Guitars was established in Glendora, California in 1980. However they’ve made a huge impact to the world of metal, and their guitars are used by some of the biggest names – Randy Rhoads, Adrian Smith, and David Ellefson to name a few. Some of their most famous models include the Soloist, and the Rhoads.


Just start out small, when i first started playing guitar I wanted to learn every metallica song there is, and sure enough I did, it took me about 5 years to get there and a bunch of different gauges eventually with time you start to develop the feel for what gauge satisfies you the best. Now I mostly use hybrids ranging from 10-13's, but just like everyone I started out with softest strings that are out there in existence but I used to break them alot so there were many beers out there that I didn't get to drink because the will to play guitar was stronger hahaha. But in the end it was worth it cause now I get to have all the fun on the guitar, and all the chicks are digging it hahaha, no they're not. And one more thing never obey the rules it's just something that stuck up guitarist make up because they don't want to be outdone find out what pleases you the most and keep on doin that.

The only proper way to make a "high string action" Martin guitar play correctly is to do a "neck set". This repair involves removing the neck on the guitar, and refitting the neck at a slightly increased angle, which lowers the string action. If done correctly, this does not affect the value of the guitar (and in fact can make it more valuable, as the guitar is much more playable). Generally speaking, most players would agree if the "string action" is more than 3/16 inch (5 mm) at the 12th fret, the guitar needs a neck set. This measurement is taken from the bottom of the low-E string, to the top of the 12th fret.
ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
Gretsch G5422G12 Electromatic Double Cutaway Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$999.99In Stockor 12 payments of $83.34 Free Ground Shipping Reverend 2017 Airwave 12 Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$1,199.00In Stockor 12 payments of $99.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING D'Angelico Premier DC Electric Guitar, 12-String (with Gig Bag)   New from$899.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $75 Free Ground Shipping Ibanez Artcore AS7312 Electric Guitar, 12-String   New from$499.99In Stockor 8 payments of $62.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 12-String
NEW ARRIVAL SORRY SOLD OUT QUICKLY ...She's super clean Genuine Ibanez Hoshino Factory release this is a cool collector piece of Japanese Law-suit modle guitar history WoW is this well made guitar Beautiful in person just impressive . This vintage J200 is now over 39 years old that plays with ease and has a HUGE SOUND... really sweet beautiful tone that rings out pretty loudly and its playability makes this guitar fun to play and an excellent choice in your next cool Japanese Vintage guitar... she's in better than average cond too well taken care of Adult owned right here in California she's in top form folks. With its Nice medium slim taper flamey maple neck 1-11/16ths at the nut. Classic beautiful original pick guard looks exactly like the old age Gibson, the detailed workmanship fit & finish you will be sure to notice and love. Ready to tour or record tonight! every time you pick it up to play. TO SEE THE PICTURE GALLERY OF THIS GUITAR CUT & PASTE THIS LINK THEN CLICK OR RETURN: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/73ElDegasJ200BlondFlamed?authkey=Gv1sRgCKTqjqGy09roBw#slideshow/5573434646760239042.
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
If you’re a very dynamic player who likes to play soft and loud, a compressor is a must have: by raising the soft parts and lowering / adjusting the loud parts, you will get an even sound that works for most applications and won’t make ears bleed: the simplest way to describe it is as an “automated” volume control. The EQ, on the other hand, is crucial if you have a problematic guitar, an amplifier with limited tone-shaping control or, simply, need a creative way to alter the way your guitar sounds. EQ can be placed in front of the amp for shaping the sound going inside the amp or in the send/return (after the amplifier section) as a volume boost/eq boost.
Been meaning to try this for years.... Should have done it earlier! It really works well for me, despite a puny Atom cpu in an HP netbook and a kludged lead from an electric Ukulele stuck into the microphone socket. Yes, this lash-up can be noisy - the impedances are mismatched, the signal levels too, but a very respectable result indeed. The processing is highly effective and the presets are (of course) variable in their suitability (not every effect is ideal for a ukulele) with gems that include a really decent and surprising choice of autowah effects. Never thought I'd say that. The user interface is logical, but there is a lot of it. That's because it can do so much. Fortunately there is a 'Random' button that creates random new patches for you - keep pushing it and some fun stuff can emerge. Documentation is helpful - press F1 and have a look, it even includes hardware suggestions and hints. I intend to follow that religiously so as to get the best from this gem - and I'll be spending money to get the suggested full fat Behringer interface (~£20) from Amazon, and trying a less-compact machine with some more CPU to see if that adds to the experience. Problems? A couple of the presets do seem to crash Rakarrack - but apart from that irt has been solid. Recommended to give it a go, if you have not already done so. Both guitar an uke work well with this.
Modulation effects (like phaser and flanger) follow effects like wah and overdrive. This allows the modulation effect to process and modify the tone built by the effects before it. If you put a modulation effect before the overdrive, then you are overdriving the sound of the flanger. This is a lot more difficult to control so the ME-80 places it after these effects.
Their are also guitars made with a "compound radius", which is a little rounder in the lower register, and a little flatter in the higher register. The true best of both worlds. Warmoth makes necks with a 10"-16" compound radius, as do some production guitar companies. I have a custom made guitar with a 16"-24" compound radius, and it's REALLY flat. Takes some time to get used to. It's breeze to rip on, but not nearly as comfortable to play rhythm on as my other guitars.
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
Get a quality amp and make sure you set your guitar up right (Jon Walsh has a great tutorial online─be sure you stretch the strings starting at the smallest, or you'll end up getting over confident and break a string.). Make sure your pickups are quality, and you're good to go. And you can even get a good modelling amp if you want to create tons of tones without forking over tons of cash for effects pedals. (I recommend Fender Mustang v.2 series; it's been tested against other modelling amps and has the best overall rating. Fender Fuse software is awesome compared to everything else I've seen. Check them out.) If you have any questions, let me know. I spent months researching before I bought my guitar and amp, and I couldn't have made a better choice imo. However, if I had just a little more money, I would have upgraded from a Mustang II to a Mustang III.

Onboard effects had already appeared on various guitars, especially Höfner and Vox models, but these were not truly “active” in the modern sense. Alembic, with support from the Grateful Dead, was exploring active pickup systems, but these were still basically custom-made instruments. Both had a master volume and tone control with three-way select and a “band rejection filter tone switch,” also called a midrange bypass filter. Ovation was among the first to offer linear potentiometers to correlate movement with effect. Controls inside were mounted on a circuitboard with individual trim pots that can be adjusted to control the volume of each pickup.

Lol I agree I'm a nirvana freak, not a kurt freak.... but dam fender all you can make is the same butt ugly designs that you have made for years come up with a compleatly new body design and I mean COMPLETELY NEW and just use the same components or better for a new guitar called, idk caster lol or DOUCHECASTER lol don't matter to me just hive us something new
Distortion is an important part of an electric guitar's sound in many genres, particularly for rock, hard rock, and metal. A distortion pedal takes a normal electric guitar signal and combine harmonic multiplication and clipping through the use of analog circuitry to create any number of sounds ranging from a fuzz sound to the sound of an overdriven tube amp and beyond! Distortion is essential to Heavy Metal Music.
Of course, the effect is not as good as using a professional studio but most users report that reproduction is very good for a simple computer application. The interface of Guitar Rig is extremely well laid out and even for those new to amps and guitar effects, it doesn't take long to navigate your way around. If you intend to use Guitar Rig for live performances, a convenient Live View displays the most essential readouts and level monitors to keep your eye on.
{ "thumbImageID": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/J46176000002000", "defaultDisplayName": "Fender American Professional Precision Bass Maple Fingerboard", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51500000030578", "price": "1,449.99", "regularPrice": "1,449.99", "msrpPrice": "1,450.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black-1500000030578.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/J46176000003000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Black/J46176000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Antique Olive", "sku": "sku:site51500000030580", "price": "1,449.99", "regularPrice": "1,449.99", "msrpPrice": "1,450.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive-1500000030580.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive/J46176000004000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Antique-Olive/J46176000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Olympic White", "sku": "sku:site51500000030579", "price": "1,449.99", "regularPrice": "1,449.99", "msrpPrice": "1,450.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Olympic-White-1500000030579.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/J46176000002000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-Olympic-White/J46176000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "3-Color Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51500000030581", "price": "1,449.99", "regularPrice": "1,449.99", "msrpPrice": "1,450.01", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Fender/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst-1500000030581.gc", "skuImageId": "American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst/J46176000001000", "brandName": "Fender", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Rated", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/American-Professional-Precision-Bass-Maple-Fingerboard-3-Color-Sunburst/J46176000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
{ "thumbImageID": "StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco/L26865000001000", "defaultDisplayName": "Ernie Ball Music Man StingRay5 Special H Rosewood Fingerboard Electric Bass", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "HD Yellow", "sku": "sku:site51500000222156", "price": "2,199.00", "regularPrice": "2,199.00", "msrpPrice": "2,200.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-HD-Yellow-1500000222156.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-HD-Yellow/L26865000005000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-HD-Yellow/L26865000005000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Vintage Tobacco", "sku": "sku:site51500000221730", "price": "2,199.00", "regularPrice": "2,199.00", "msrpPrice": "2,200.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco-1500000221730.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco/L26865000001000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Preorder", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Vintage-Tobacco/L26865000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Classic Natural", "sku": "sku:site51500000221728", "price": "2,199.00", "regularPrice": "2,199.00", "msrpPrice": "2,200.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural-1500000221728.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural/L26865000002000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Preorder", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Classic-Natural/L26865000002000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Ivory White", "sku": "sku:site51500000221731", "price": "2,099.00", "regularPrice": "2,099.00", "msrpPrice": "2,100.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ivory-White-1500000221731.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ivory-White/L26865000004000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "Preorder", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Ivory-White/L26865000004000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Chopper Blue", "sku": "sku:site51500000221729", "price": "2,099.00", "regularPrice": "2,099.00", "msrpPrice": "2,100.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/Ernie-Ball-Music-Man/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Chopper-Blue-1500000221729.gc", "skuImageId": "StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Chopper-Blue/L26865000003000", "brandName": "Ernie Ball Music Man", "stickerDisplayText": "", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/StingRay5-Special-H-Rosewood-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass-Chopper-Blue/L26865000003000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
Yamaha is the most revered and leading manufacturer of full-line musical instruments. With its wide range of guitars, the company has become a best seller and is easily one of the best guitar brands in India. The C Series are the popular and affordable nylon string guitars by Yamaha suitable for beginners and young learners. The electric guitars of Yamaha available in India are of the Pacifica and RGX series. The Pacifica series offers the most value for money combining affordability with performance.

Here we have a Faithful Recreation of the classic Martin D-18 that was well crafted in Japan over 33 years ago. This is an excellent vintage Japanese guitar as it has been well taken care of all these years And has spent its years in California in the perfect climate to preserve the guitars original structural and cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still JVG rated at very good to excellent with no cracks or finish checking none – clean and still shines like glass….. its 1-11/16ths at the nut neck is a nice comfortable medium slim profile, neck is straight with correct amount of slight relief, action is good medium low and plays with ease and sound is clear and volume is good, tone is vintage sweet from its Aged tone woods. This is a true Lawsuit model as it has the direct image shape & size of the vintage Martin it copies is is a very cool D-18 guitar, its 33 years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. .

In the 1950's company called Don Noble and Co, was founded in the 1950’s by Don Noble, a well-known accordion player and entrepreneur.  He began by importing Italian made musical instruments, mainly accordions, in an era when the "stomach Steinway" was very popular and accordions were being sold door-to-door, and accordion academies were common in most larger cities. But he also imported guitars under the Noble brand name.


If you're looking for a one-stop music shop with an amazing selection of guitars, drums, keyboards, recording, live sound, DJ equipment and more, Guitar Center Twin Cities is it. Whether you're a beginner or a gigging pro, our team members have the expertise and musical talent to get on your level and help you make great choices. Located adjacent to the Rosedale Shopping Center by the Best Buy in Roseville.First and foremost at Guitar Center Kansas City, we strive to give you the experience that Guitar Center is known for nationwide: big-store selection and prices with small-shop expertise and personality. From sales and repairs to lessons and rentals, our staff in every department is well-trained to cater to Midwest music-lovers. Our store and lessons studio are open every day of the week, so there's always a right time to visit even if you're on a busy schedule.

Not everyone's ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. Now, I'm not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it's probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts.
There were East coast and West coast distributors of wholly different instruments bearing the Hohner name in the late 70's-early 80's. One of them had decent guitars, the others were ****************e. Don't know which was which, but I do know the Hohner strat my friend bought new in Upstate NY c. 1980 was a stinkin' piece of crap. Not sure if it was a representative sample.
While some Supros were more or less re-branded Nationals, many represented totally unique designs in the Valco line. When the Supro equivalent to the National Grand Console was introduced in 1958, it featured a radically different body design. In place of the National’s conventional all-wood construction, the Supro 1475B Console Sixteen featured two wooden necks connected by three chromed metal rods that ran all the way through each neck. It’s not obvious why this design was chosen; it doesn’t have any advantages other than its unique aesthetics, and I don’t believe it could have made construction any cheaper. The Supro was cheaper than the National – $175 vs $235 – but the difference was likely due entirely to the more “exclusive” name on the National.
The Fender Tele Jr. is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar that the Fender Custom Shop produced in a limited run of 100 units in the early 1990s. It uses a Telecaster body shape, scale length, and electronics controls (albeit, with a reversed control plate). However, many of its construction and electronic features—for example its set-in neck and P-90-style pickups—are similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul Junior (hence the name) and Gibson Les Paul Special electric guitars.
This is worse than the Rolling Stones magazine’s list. Paco De Lucia, Django Reinhardt, Andres Segovia, Sabicas, Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Jeff Beck, David Gilmour, Jimi Hendrix, John Williams (no, not the movie score composer) IMO the top ten. It’s much harder to play jazz, flamenco, and sometimes classical, than it is to play blues or rock. These guitarists are all infinitely greater than Jack White, John Frusciante, Tom Morello, or John Mayor.
The Fender Telecaster was developed by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1950. In the period roughly between 1932 and 1949, several craftsmen and companies experimented with solid-body electric guitars, but none had made a significant impact on the market. Leo Fender’s Telecaster was the design that finally put the solid-body guitar on the map.

We are your Vintage Pickup specialists.   We have cornered the market of manufacturing the most accurate vintage pickup reproductions to which can not be equaled.  Our process is to chemically analyze an original pickup magnets and wire, then we reproduce them with the exact same magnets and wire.  We don't use stock magnets or wire.   We don't degauss magnets and say they are vintage.  Our magnets are only as strong as the elemental composition will hold.  Our wire is specially manufactured for us, we have many batches of wire with all different types of resistances and O.D.'s.  Our wire also is processed differently than modern conventional wire, these little details are what makes the Klein Pickups Reproductions the most accurate in the world.   We have a full array of models that we reproduce.  Check out our site for the full list of all of our offerings.   As a small business we always appreciate your business & support.  -Thanks
Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.

About a year ago (or maybe more) I was in a real Marc Bolan/T Rex phase, and I came across a Lotus Les Paul copy in my local Sam Ash used for $199. Like the idiot I am, I played it, and it played and sounded good, so I bought it. Well, that did not sit well with my folks, who made me take it back a few days later. It had a bolt-on neck and was quite heavy, but other than that, it looked sweet. I even was smart enough to take a picture of it:


Buying an electric guitar will also require less force to play, but obviously the sound and styles you will be playing will be very different. I am a guitar teacher and I often recommend people start on an electric guitar,because it doesnt require as much hand strength. As for type of electric guitar, anything with a low action (strings close to the neck) will work well, try some out and you will feel the difference. But getting overly technical with guitar specifications is unnecessary, its like shopping for a mountain bike by comparing the tires...silly, eh.
I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring
Like Kleenex for tissues or Dumpster for large garbage containers, the brand Teisco has become a kind of shorthand for “strange looking Japanese guitar from the 1960s.” When someone posts a picture on a forum of a vintage Japanese guitar that he’s trying to identify, five people will immediately shout out “Teisco!” Occasionally, they’re even right.
Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.

We use technologies, such as cookies, to customize content and advertising, to provide social media features and to analyze traffic to the site. We also share information about your use of our site with our trusted social media, advertising, and analytics partners. You indicate your consent to this use by clicking “I Agree” or by continuing to use this website. View details.


Serial #59640 New York label Epiphone Triumph circa 1949. Blonde finish. Spruce top, tiger flame maple sides and back. Cherry neck with diamond mother of pearl inlay. Small nick less than an inch wide on left front. Original Frequensator tailpiece with nickel finish, partly worn. Grover tuners fastened with screws and glue. Edging on back body has .25” gap at connection.Blonde natural lacquer finish in good condition. Glossy and brilliant color. Shipping quote inside US only. Ask for quote outside the US. 
Electronics, guitars and otherwise are as standardized as this book would have you believe. My problem was the 5-position switch. The one I took off the guitar was not the same as the replacement and the descriptions in the book were not sufficient to help me understand how to hook up the different switch. Fortunately, the rest of the circuit descriptions were right on and I got the guitar running (I had to use the old switch). If they author had described the signal flow through the switch I might have been able to figure it out. But the book is an invaluable resource for the DIY'er. I'm sure I'll be using it a lot more.
And finally, it is always a good idea to have your amp set on with clean settings in order to get a clear image of the sound of your effects chain. Hitting the distortion on the amp, for example, will distort EVERYTHING in your chain, so it’s best to leave the distorting to your pedal where it can be better contained. But in the end, experiment! While these are merely a few suggestions of the general way a signal chain works, you are only limited by your creative implementation.

hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.
Clean or replace switches. To clean switches use solvent such as contact cleaner in a spray into the toggle itself, you may also use other solvents such as WD-40, always work the solvent around by using the switch as indented. To replace switches first obtain a proper switch that applies with your guitar, then soldering in accordingly. Work in a well-ventilated space to avoid harmful fumes from solder or solvents.
Struggling to get your guitar sounding sweet and creamy? Don't fret! STUDIO GUITARS is here to warm up your sound with a selection of certified studio-fresh guitar loops recorded by Prime Loops' own professional master of the strings! Using some of the most classic equipment around, we've covered every curve of this awesome instrument's sound with an incredible collection of acoustic and electric guitar samples.
I’ve been looking for a long time for information on what goes on inside a typical Strat-style 5-way switch, and this site helps me understand these switches a bit more. But I still have questions, though: 1)Why is it necessary to use jumpers from one lug to another? 2)As I understand it, a 5-way switch is 2 separate 4-lug switches wired together, each with 3 input lugs and presumably 1 output lug, OR are these lugs INPUT as well as OUTPUT lugs? (I get the impression that they are dedicated to either input or output, but looking at some wiring diagrams, it appears that inputs from pickups can come from either side of the switch.) 3) Is one side the INPUT side and the other the OUTPUT side, or are both sides of the switch mirror images of one another? In other words, must the signal from the pickup enter the switch at one side, and exit the switch at the other side? It seems I can only really understand how these switches work in terms of inputs (from the pickups) and outputs (to the output jack or volume pot). Without knowing whether a certain lug is acting as an input or an output, it can be hard to understand which way the signal is travelling.
Being relatively new to the ABQ area, I've been checking out the local music shops and finding myself underwhelmed - that is until I walked into Grumpy's. Kevin is probably the last honest guy in the business. His pricing is more than fair - whether you're looking for repairs, custom builds, or gear - and he's more than willing to dispense advice or talk shop (not to mention his sense of humor). To put it succinctly; he knows his shit and doesn't blow smoke up one's ass! Sure, the shop doesn't have the "selection" that a place like GC might have, but Kevin can probably get anything you need. (Besides, what's more important - knowledgeable, down-to-earth customer service at a locally owned shop, or being ignored by douchebag wankers who came of age playing along to Miley Cyrus?!) Go to Grumpy's!
FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer (and practical playability). Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.
Ibanez is one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to gain a significant foothold in import guitar sales in the United States and Europe, as well as the first brand of guitars to mass-produce the seven-string guitar and eight-string guitar. The company has an impressive lineup of products ranging from instruments to pedals and accessories.
Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
Solid Body Guitars: For those looking for a more versatile array of tones blended with the deepest number of volume options and full-blooded sustain, the electric solid body is the right machine. The differences between various types of solid body models are vast — even between an SG, the most popular model Gibson makes, and a Les Paul, Gibson’s six-string flagship. A wide variety of tone woods, including mahogany, maple, alder, spruce, maple and, commonly for the fretboard, rosewood and baked maple, are employed. They are extremely versatile instruments and have been spotted in the hands of players as wide-ranging as Les Paul and Zakk Wylde.
By the late 1950s, the Les Paul was considered “staid and old-fashioned” as well as too heavy and expensive, no longer competitive with the Stratocaster, and by 1961 Gibson stopped producing the traditional Les Paul in favor of a lighter redesign called the SG. The mid-1960s, however, brought a resurgence of interest in the Les Paul, a development credited to one man and one album: Eric Clapton, using a Les Paul plugged into a Marshall Bluesbreaker amplifier as recorded on Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton (the “Beano” album, 1966),[13] set the standard for tone for a new generation of guitar players in blues and rock and roll (see Keith Richards’ contribution to the Les Paul legend below in the section ‘Renewed interest in the Les Paul models’ below). [14][15] Clapton was initially followed by American guitarist Michael Bloomfield and British guitarist Peter Green, and the subsequent rise in the instrument’s popularity was such that by the late 1960s Gibson reintroduced an updated Les Paul and a variety of other instruments “in its mold”, including a bass guitar.
Ovation makes a great acoustic electric that is only $469. It has a spruce top with a lyracord bowl back. Some people don’t like the rounded back as it’s hard to keep it in your lap, so a strap may be needed if you should choose this guitar. The onboard pre amp has a built in tuner which makes staying in tune very simple. It’s nice not having to keep up with a separate tuning device. The reviews for this guitar are positive, citing great tone and playability. Click here for more information and pictures of this guitar.
Flanging is the strongest of the standard modulation effects. The feedback control increases the depth of the 'comb filtering' produced when a delayed signal is added back to itself. Because it is such a distinctive effect, it is best used sparingly, though it can also be used to process a reverb send to add a more subtle complexity to the reverbed sound.
Many guitarists have chosen this iconic axe for its versatility and capability to sound great in any genre of music, but the Les Paul is most widely known for its heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll vibe.  A great example of this would be Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin fame.  Once Page began using Les Pauls, he never looked back and helped to give the instrument its indelible place in the history books of music.
For the uninitiated, effect pedals usually take the form of small-ish metal boxes which sit on the floor in front of you. These can be switched on and off using your feet. Hence, pedals. The technology contained within these pedals is designed to alter your tone in any number of ways. For example, cleaning it up and making it louder through to adding layers of shimmer, fuzz, whammy or ‘verb. Don’t worry, we’ll refer back to these terms later because they are genuine terms in the wacky world of pedals.
Schecter Keith Merrow KM7 MKIII Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$1,699.00In Stockor 12 payments of $141.59 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Limited Edition Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom-7 Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$949.00In Stockor 12 payments of $79.09 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING ESP LTD SCT-607B Stephen Carpenter Baritone Electric Guitar, 7-String   New from$1,099.00In Stockor 12 payments of $91.59 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Ibanez FRIX7FEAH Iron Label Electric Guitar   New from$899.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $75 Free Ground Shipping See All Electric Guitars: 7-String
Launched in the late 1990s the SE models are manufactured in South Korea by a third-party company (World Musical Instruments) then shipped to re-sellers and dealers in the United States. This is a major part of the cost-cutting technique, in addition to a more flat (as opposed to carved) body shape and cheaper pickups/electronics. So be advised, I’m not telling you that you’re getting a $2000 guitar for $600.
These pedals are different, but are both based on the same idea. Pitch shifters shift the whole pitch of your guitar up or down by a set amount (often an octave), giving you a higher or lower tone than would normally be possible. Jack white uses a Whammy pitch shifter in the solo for Seven Nation Army, which has a foot pedal that rocks back and forth (similar to a wah pedal) allowing you to go up and down a full octave or more smoothly and quickly.
alright i think we all need to stop hating on john mayer. I don't think that he really would even call himself one of the best guitarists of all time, he's obviously not far enough into his career to be criticized about this stuff. But i love him, and he eventually will make it on this list. Oh, and for all you who say he sucks and whatever, if he is so bad then why has he played with so many of the people who actually should deserve to be on this list?

There are some guitarists who place the compressor last, though, to boost their signal just before it hits the preamp of their amplifier. The drawback to this approach is that any hum or hiss introduced by other effects will be increased by the compressor's output gain. Sometimes you can remedy this by placing a noise gate before the compressor, however, the noise reduction can have an effect on the tone quality. A best-of-both-worlds approach might be to put your compressor first and use a signal booster just before your amplifier. Some guitarists also like the sound of putting their wah or envelope filter before the compressor to give it a wider frequency range to affect. Experimentation is always encouraged, but putting the compressor first is recommended.
Buy a kit if you want to make things easier. Several companies produce electric guitar kits that include all of the parts you’ll need, prepared and ready to assemble. If you just want to get your feet wet, these can be a good choice. While you won’t get the full experience of making a guitar from scratch, you’ll still get the satisfaction of putting it together and finishing it yourself.[6]
The device can be mounted on and removed quickly from almost any flat-backed acoustic guitar, using a system of magnetic rails. The ToneWood-Amp is designed for guitars with either a magnetic or piezo pickup (bridge or soundhole), but the team behind the device say they're also putting together a “Technician-Free” pickup bundle for those guitars without a pickup.
Rickenbacker has produced a number of uniquely designed and distinctively trimmed acoustic guitars. Although a small number of Rickenbacker acoustics were sold in the 1950s and were seen in the hands of stars like Ricky Nelson[9]and Sam Cooke,[10] the company concentrated on their electric guitar and western steel guitar business from the early 1960s onward. From about 1959 through 1994, very few Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were made.
Dexter Holland (b. 1965) is the rhythm guitarist of punk rock band The Offspring and has played Ibanez guitars for most of the band's existence. He currently uses a custom diamond plate RG with a custom Jägermeister logo on the twelfth fret, as well as DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups, though he used to use a brown and green custom RG and has been seen with a custom Purple RG.
As a rule, acoustic guitars with laminated spruce tops do not have the same resonance as those made from unlaminated tonewoods, but the Fender FA-100’s fuller dreadnought design provides a richer tone than some customers may expect. If price is a consideration, the Fender has been described as a “cheaply made guitar with a fantastic sound.” What’s more, When you buy a Fender product, you're investing in quality. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has been manufacturing instruments and equipment since the 1940s.
This may seem like an odd value to consider, but most guitarists need to feel a certain connection to their instrument. It’s part of what makes being a guitarist different from other types of musicians; a sense of individuality as well as style. Your guitar will be a significant investment regardless of which brand you settle on, and while sound and construction are more critical factors overall, it’s important that your instrument inspires you. Different brands are known for cultivating different images; Gibson’s and Fender’s were made famous by the rock gods of yesterday, while Taylor’s unique acoustic bodies will conjure up a different vibe for a folk player. Again, this aspect speaks to your individual needs as a guitarist.
Semi-acoustic guitars have a hollow body (similar in depth to a solid-body guitar) and electronic pickups mounted on the body. They work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Whereas chambered guitars are made, like solid-body guitars, from a single block of wood, semi-acoustic and full-hollowbody guitars bodies are made from thin sheets of wood. They do not provide enough acoustic volume for live performance, but they can be used unplugged for quiet practice. Semi-acoustics are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive, or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, sixties pop, and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes. These can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B. B. King's famous Lucille. Feedback can also be reduced by making them with a solid block in the middle of the soundbox.
Yea um John Mayers way misunderunstood and under rated, watch the 'where the light is live in LA' DVD(and actually watch it before you think of posting a reply) and tell me he aint an amazing guitarist, im not saying hes a god but hes definetly an amzing guitarist n i rekon he deserves a spot just for the fact that hes one of the few guitarists of this generation with some talent.
More often than not a customer chooses bone as a replacement for cheap plastic nuts supplied on new guitars. It's such a good material for instruments because it's really dense – meaning vibrations travel through it faster meaning that more vibration is transferred to the rest of your instrument - essential! It's also great because it contains natural lubricants which are essential for tuning stability.

A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.

EDIT: I didn't even think of scale size. I think that the difference between a few inches of string shouldn't make as much difference as some of the other factors I've described above. The conservative bet would be to get a short-scale, since that puts the frets closer together, which might make it easier for your fingers to stretch between them. (did I say that right? hmm...) If you're concerned about weight, go with a Fender or ask your Carvin rep what the weight of the guitar you're looking at is, and compare with other guitars. Lighter guitars will have a different tone than heavier guitars, but if it makes the difference between being able to play and not, then do whatever it takes!


Next up is another electric guitar from Fender Standard, namely the American Special Telecaster. This one has two Texas Special Tele pickups and it’s perfect for great American genres like country, rock and blues. This American Special Telecaster has a lovely alder body and the neck is maple. Just like number one on our list, the 50’s Stratocaster, it’s vintage-looking, but the Vintage Blonde model we’re reviewing looks vintage in a cooler, less sentimental way.
In ’41, the old Avalon Hawaiian was renamed in the No. 88 Supro Clipper Hawaiian Electric Guitar. This instrument would become a mainstay of the Supro line for many to come, and marked the debut of pearloid plastic coverings for Supro guitars. This was very similar in shape to the Baton. The body was still roughly rectangular, but now with a curved lower edge. The shoulders now had two symmetrical scalloped “cutaways.” The head had a curve with a slight peak; despite the Regal look, these were made by National Dobro. The fingerboard was genuine rosewood with dot inlays. This was covered in “sparkling brown plastic,” i.e. pearloid. The pickup was the new exposed-pole unit with the handrest, contained in a large square metal plate complete with tail slots for fixing the strings, otherwise similar to the plate on the Baton. One volume and one tone control knob sat on either side of the strings. The back was done up in non-slip grey suede. It could be had with a curly, plush-lined, grey shark Servitex case. In April of ’42, the Clipper cost $54.50.
Despite its high production figures, Fernandes is better known in the United States for its Sustainer system, which uses electromagnetism[1] to vibrate a string for an extended period, so long as the user continues to fret a note.[2] Unlike the similar manual E-Bow sustainer, the Fernandes Sustainer can be used with a standard plectrum, because the sustainer is imbedded in the body of guitar. Fernandes' custom shop has installed numerous Sustainers into guitars built by other manufacturers.
The neck, which extends from the guitar body, includes the fretboard and headstock on which the tuners are mounted. It contains a metal truss rod that prevents neck bowing and twisting, and can be adjusted to help the guitar maintain consistent pitch. The fretboard is usually made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, although some models, usually with maple necks, have a fretboard made of the same wood as the neck. Most fretboards have position dots or other markers inlaid in the fretboard. Some models have markers on the upper edge of the fretboard offering the player easy visibility.
Solid Body Guitars: For those looking for a more versatile array of tones blended with the deepest number of volume options and full-blooded sustain, the electric solid body is the right machine. The differences between various types of solid body models are vast — even between an SG, the most popular model Gibson makes, and a Les Paul, Gibson’s six-string flagship. A wide variety of tone woods, including mahogany, maple, alder, spruce, maple and, commonly for the fretboard, rosewood and baked maple, are employed. They are extremely versatile instruments and have been spotted in the hands of players as wide-ranging as Les Paul and Zakk Wylde.
There are tons of different online retailers and ebay stores that you can find a great deal on parts and supplies, but those were just some of the ones that I have purchased on and been satisfied with their service and parts. NOTE: Do your research when it comes to parts and the quality of the parts you buy. I like to get feedback and reviews from Harmony-Central. You might not be able to get reviews on everything, but it helps you out allot.
well it does not effect the strings electronically. however. each pickup depending on its position on the guitar is designed to pick up a specific range of tones. the pickup closes to the neck is meant to pick up the bass range whereas the one closest to the bridge is meant to pick up the treble(higher) end of the tonal spectrum. all that aside when you actually move the switch it might have a reverberation throughout your guitar because the switch is just really hard or stiff. it might need to be broken in no worries there.
Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.
^ “Pete Townshend: On Guitar-Smashing Regrets, Stylistic Evolution, and Becoming a Gear Aficionado”. “It’s interesting to think that the Marshall sound I helped Jim and his guys develop was built around the very low output and thin, surfy sound of the Rick. The sound I wanted was Steve Cropper, but very loud. The early Marshall with a Rick gave me that. The semi-acoustic body and a speaker stack feeding right into the guitar was what allowed me to refine tuneful feedback.”

Usually, electric guitars have six metallic strings – although there are certain variants used in specific musical styles with seven or even a dozen strings (six pairs). This kind of guitar is used in all kinds of musical styles, from jazz, to metal, pop... and of course Rock'n'Roll music. Actually, the origins of the electric guitar can be traced back to the 1930s Swing-era Jazz movement, when guitarists started experimenting with steel pickups adapted to their hollow-bodied instruments, as a way to get a louder, more substantial sound than what would be possible from a regular guitar. The first commercial electric guitars came up in the mid 1940s, and by then a solid-body was already in use – thus introducing the much familiar look that's now typically associated with electric guitars.
There are over 200 choices of electric guitar strings, combining Ernie Ball's diverse selection of materials, string gauges, and styles. Ernie Ball electric guitar strings come in a variety of different high quality materials including M-steel, cobalt, nickel, stainless steel, titanium, and bronze. Our guitar string sets are available for 6-string, 7-string, 8-string, 9-string, 10-string, and 12-string guitars.
If metal is your jam, and you want an amp that will deliver brutal high-gain tone, this is your amp. Sized in a convenient combo package, this 60 watt beast features two channels with independent three-band EQ, pre/post gain controls and presence and resonance adjustment. It’s loud and powerful, yet small enough to throw in the back seat of your car.
Hughes & Kettner is another new comer that's making really good progress in the market, thanks to the surge in popularity of their TubeMeister line of low-wattage tube amps. For a company that just started in the mid '80s, this is an incredible feat, and it seems like they are not letting up because they continue to get good market feedback from users and experts alike. This is mostly due to their commitment to building quality tube driven musical equipment, the same commitment which inspires their latest guitar amp models. Nuno Bettencourt, Alex Lifeson, Tony Macalpine, Allan Holdsworth are just a small sample of big name guitarists who help further expand the company's reach.
Peavy amps are especially well appreciated by the metal community, thanks to their good overall reliability and the high volume of sound some models produce. The 6505 Series is a favorite of metal guitarists due to its power and versatility. This is most often used as a head for double stacks of speakers, but it can also be purchased as a 2×12” and 1×12” combo for convenience.
Just SOLD OUT: here is a great sounding wonderful 43 year old Vintage Japanese OOO guitar in excellent vintage condition. We have already set her up with our Martin Bone Nut & Compensated Saddle and action is dialed in to Martin specs. We also upgraded the original plastic bridge Pins to SOLID Ebony with Abalone dot with brass ring and of course a new set of Martin Strings 80/20 Bronze 12's.. and this guitar Sounds like a true vintage classic if not familiar with the Morris brand thats ok many are not, I have know of these for 2 decades now many of these were made in the Terada factory in Japan... another name you may not have heard of none the less they are know to make the highest end guitars in Japan in those days and also today, for makers like Ibanez virtually all of their top end guitars like Musicians - Artists - George benson GB line and the old Aria L-5's and Ibanez L-5's and many others continuing on today in that great Custom Shop tradition. This is one of them and is very well constructed with top workmanship and fit and finish build quality is comparable to a Martin- Taylor_Gibson and so on... that is to say no worries this guitar Morris has an excellent pedigree. Guitars of great playability and great sounding what more do you need?.... This guitar was built from wods aged at least 20 years at time of build that was over 40 years ago and just look at its condition to this day... it has truly stood the test of time. See for yourself... it this price range a wonderful classic 000 style Japanese true Vintage guitar in its own right. Great Value and great fun Japanese vintage collectible. For a song. .
When consulting our buying guide, the first thing you need to think about is your budget. How much can you afford to spend? Generally speaking, musical instruments tend to get better the more expensive they get, although this is of course not always the case. And even if you would buy a really expensive guitar you might not be experienced enough to notice how good it is.
Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
Gain is the strength of the electronic signal carrying your sound. A standalone gain booster is essentially just a preamp, and can be an effective way to overdrive the preamp section of your amp, creating easier musical-sounding breakup and increasing the amp's power. A gain booster in a stomp box lets you instantly boost your sound level for solos without altering your fundamental tone.
-have any of you ever heard of chet atkins. he could play anything the guys you mention but, they could not or can,t play any thing he played-hell non-finger style players you have to go with nokie edwards from the ventures. you guys are obviously rock only players and listen to only them only -do yourselves a favor and get his albums-mister guitar and workshop-they show just how good he was and then make a comment here
The Hughes & Kettner Tube Meister 36 is a distinct looking tube amplifier head that's packed with features. For something that's compact, this amp can do quite a lot of what bigger amps can in terms of functionality, including having three channels that let you switch between clean, crunch and lead and a full set of complementary controls to tweak each channel to your liking. Another interesting feature of this amp is its TSC (Tube Safety Control), which automatically keeps the tube in bias and monitors them to extend their use. Finally, this amp head comes with a built-in Red box DI, so you can plug the amp head straight to any PA system or recording console without any problem. The people also installed a power attenuator into the amp, which lets you lower the rating to just 1 Watt for quiet practice. Wrapping up its features is the built-in reverb, which compliments the amp instead of distracting users.
Bassists pairing an amplifier "head" of a certain wattage and a speaker cabinet (or speaker cabinets) with a certain wattage power-handling capacity may require advice from music store amplifier expert or an audio engineer. One of the reasons that many beginning bassists choose combo amps when they are starting is because with a combo amp, the manufacturer has ensured that the speaker and power amp are compatible from a power handling and impedance perspective. While there is a widespread belief that an amplifier with a rated wattage that is higher than the rated wattage on a speaker cabinet will harm the speaker, in fact, a clean, un-clipped power amplifier signal can be above the rated wattage of a speaker without damaging the speaker, as long as the power amp is sending out a clean, unclipped signal. There is a much higher risk of damaging a speaker when a clipped (unintentionally distorted) power amplifier signal is sent through it, even if the wattage is far below the rated wattage of a speaker. For example, a bassist could use a 700 watt power amp which is running with zero power amp clipping through a speaker cabinet rated at 500 watts without damaging the speaker; however, if a 100 watt power amp that is heavily clipping is plugged into the speaker cab, this could blow the speaker.
EMG DG20 David Gilmour Wired Pickguard   New from$329.00In Stockor 8 payments of $41.13 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Seymour Duncan SH4 JB Humbucker Pickup   New from$79.00In Stockor 4 payments of $19.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson '57 Classic Humbucker Pickup   New from$164.99In Stockor 4 payments of $41.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING EMG JH Set Custom James Hetfield Signature Pickup Set   New from$249.00In Stockor 6 payments of $41.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Pickups
Compressors – The role of these pedals is to lift up quiet sounds and rein in loud sounds, compressing the dynamic range of your signal – that is, the difference between the quietest and loudest sounds. They work wonders for songs with a blend of quiet and loud parts, since they let you play hard without busting eardrums, and the soft sections won’t be drowned out by ringing ears. Compressors also have the nice side effect of increasing sustain, letting your notes sound out longer before dropping off.
This acoustic guitar model has been over the time well renowned as the best selling in the UK. This is owed to its high value and sound quality, accompanied by its trendy design and ease of use. It has a shortened scale length that makes it easy to play, even for beginner guitarists. It mostly comes in a warm natural color and is for the right handed guitarists. It is quite affordable, with prices ranging from around INR 8900. You can click below to find more product details on the official link.

Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.
The rotary speaker effect is based on an actual rotating speaker system invented by Donald Leslie called the Leslie speaker. It was often paired with a Hammond organ, but in the 60’s guitar players also began using it for the unique tone and effect it gave the guitar. The original Leslie speaker cabinet used a two speaker system with a rotating horn and bass woofer drum. This created a cool, swirling effect where the music seemed to move around the room. Obviously, guitar pedals can only simulate this rotatary effect, which can be enhanced with a stereo amp setup. Of course you could use an actual Leslie speaker (or one of the newer competitors), but costs are high and it requires lugging around an extra speaker cabinet.
For his work on Supernatural, Glenn Kolotkin turned to elaborate multi-miking as a way of managing Carlos Santana's complicated setup. "I used multiple microphones on Carlos' guitars: Electrovoice RE20s close, Neumann U47s further away, an SM56, U87s. He was playing through an assortment of amplifiers at the same time, and by using multiple microphones I was able to get just the right blend."
For a slightly more distant, but fuller sound, bring up the fader on the mid- distance mic. Slowly add that signal to the close sound described in the previous paragraph. You'll have the detail of the close mic, but with the fullness that comes with adding some "room" sound to it (just like sitting in the tenth row). This is a pretty standard approach that will give you a pretty standard rock guitar sound.

With the PAC112V there is no harm going with the crowds. The Pacifica is a crowd-pleaser precisely because of its versatility – and so whilst it might have a very recognisable look, this electric gives you the opportunity to craft a sound that is entirely your own. The only drawback is its weight, which is not much of a drawback at all – particularly for this price.


This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
The difference extends far past just the look and feel.  Roundwound strings have a shorter life, create more string noise, and wear on your frets more, but feature a brighter tone, longer sustain, and lower tension.  You'll also hear more harmonics and be able to grip them better for bending and finger picking.  Flatwounds last longer and have a warmer sound... pretty much the opposite of what we listed for roundwound's.
Think Eddie Van Halen in Eruption. Phaser effects create a swirling tone by splitting the signal and then moving each part in and out of phase with each other. Like chorus, it can sound dated, but it is great for adding a little bit of craziness to any riff or solo. Some pedals such as the famous MXR Phase 90 only have one control for the speed of the effect, while more modern designs also have controls for the depth and level of the phasing.
ACT TRMOLO ERSETZEN DER SAITEN Das ACT Tremolo erlaubt zwei Arten der Saiteninstallation. 1) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Rückseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht. 2) Die Saiten werden durch Einsetzen des Kugelendes in den Saitenschlitz und Einhaken des Kugelendes unter dem Saitenfänger an der Unterseite der Tremolo-Einheit angebracht.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop18":"skucondition|0||historicalgrossprofit|1||hasimage|1||creationdate|1","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop17":"sort by","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
The Ampeg Bassamp Company, founded in 1949 by Everett Hull, responded to the growing demand for electric bass equipment by producing a line of bass amplifiers. Ampeg bass amps were widely used by electric bass guitarists in the 1950s and 1960s. The first bass amplifier offered by Ampeg was an 18-watt model with a single 12" speaker and a rear ventilation port called the Super 800. In 1951, they introduced a 20-watt version with a 15-inch speaker. In 1960, they introduced the B-15 Portaflex, a flip-top 25-watt tube bass amplifier with a single 15" speaker. While the Ampeg Portaflex had a pleasing bass tone, and was used by studio bassists such as James Jamerson and Carol Kaye, it was not powerful enough to be used in a stadium or arena concert.[3]
Phaser: A phaser or "phase shifter" creates a slight rippling effect—amplifying some aspects of the tone while diminishing others—by splitting an audio signal in two and altering the phase of one portion. Three well-known examples of phaser are the two handed tapping part on the Van Halen instrumental "Eruption" and the keyboard parts on Billy Joel's "Just the Way You Are" and Paul Simon's "Slip Slidin' Away".[77]
Let’s kick things off in style. This guitar is one of Epiphone’s mid range semi-hollow models. As such, it has to meet much more refined standards. Many wondered if Epiphone was capable of delivering such a guitar, but the answer is a strong yes. With its three Dogear Alnico pups, this thing is a beast. If you know how to handle a semi-hollow, you will find that Epiphone Riviera Custom P93 brings a lot of range. At least that’s the type of impression it left on me.
Similar to five-string bass guitar tuning, seven-string tuning allows for the extra string a fourth lower than the original sixth string. This allows for the note range of B standard tuning without transposing E standard guitar chords down two and a half steps down. Baritone 7-string guitars are available which features a longer scale-length allowing it to be tuned to a lower range.
eyelet boards. Today BYOC leads the way in DIY FX kits for guitarists. With distribution in Canada, Europe, Australia, Great Britain, and Asia, and over 25 thousand kits sold worldwide, BYOC is a leader in DIY effects. And our goal has not changed – to bring guitar players a product that is more than just some DIY effects project that merely “works”, but a complete stompbox that will rival or surpass any of the big name boutique pedals on the market today.
Super nice !.... Beautiful Patina exceptional Booming sound much like the old Martin 000 or old Gibson for that matter for a fraction $ and this ONE is a really good one folks. These are a well kept secret sort of ... known for their GREAT rich mature sound. This example is in fine all-round Original condition without any of the over 60 group problematic issues- none found anywhere upon close examination, no NONE nada -- neck issues -frets ARE good - tuners ARE good - bridge IS good - Solid Top is without a crack it s wood is FREE of cracks, Back is OK no buckle rash , no buldge to its Spruce top, The bridge is tight and NEW MARTIN STRINGS and just JVGuitars Set up this baby plays and sounds amazing at this price point unbelievable! Made in Japan quality with a beautifully grained high grade Mahogany medium soft V NECK feels like an old Martin too ....looks at the neck grain they used a beautiful Honduran mahogany not African or other this one is cool See the Pics of that ...its original Tortious pickguard is nice too..... nearly 40 years old its amazing but she's not new or mint of course she has a few minor doinks and plenty of that natural vintage patina and such but overall she's JVG condition rated at vintage excellent used condition rated. She Plays with easily and will bring a warm smile to your face when playing GREAT TONE fingerpicking rich and punchy its a very fun guitar to play... she's over 45 years old and in this kind of condition..... you better snap this gem up before she's gone or I change my mine and keep her for myself...haha this is my business I need to sell but you get my point its a good one folks. This is one amongst several of the FG150's Red Label Nippon Gakki's we have and I call it ( # 3 ) Contact Joe by email to BUY it: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
The Meisterklasse is a high-end harmonica on the modular system, made in Germany, featuring chrome-plated cover plates, an anodised aluminium comb, and extra thick 1.05mm nickel-plated reeds. One other feature that sets the Meisterklasse apart from most other Hohner harmonicas are its full-length cover plates, which extend all the way to the ends of the harmonica's comb rather than sharply angling down before the ends to form an adjoining surface parallel to the reedplates and comb. The only other Hohner harmonica possessing this quality is the curve-framed Golden Melody.[25]
A different take on the standard tone control is the Varitone circuit sometimes used on Gibson guitars (such as the Blueshawk). The Varitone is actually a variable notch filter consisting of one of several capacitors (selected with a rotary switch) in series with an inductor, forming an LC circuit.[15] When placed between the signal and ground, this circuit starts to attenuate frequencies around its resonant frequency, as determined by the following formula:
Tremolo bars - Many lower-end guitars are designed to look cool and are equipped with floating bridges for super tremolo bends and flutter. They look cool , but a sad fact is many of these lower end models have low quality hardware. There is nothing more frustrating than being a newbie, buying a hot looking guitar, and have to fine-tune it every 2 minutes. Avoid this, or buy a decent bridge for around $100.00 extra and install it.
You don't have to use long, distinct delays: short delays up to 120ms can be used to create vocal doubling effects, normally set with little or no feedback. Nor do you have to dedicate a delay to a single sound: you can configure it via an aux send so that several tracks can be treated with different amounts of the same delay or echo treatment, which not only saves on processing power (or buying separate units!), but can help to make elements of your mix work better together.
The LGXT comes with 2 Seymour Duncan custom humbucker pickups that give it a classic electric guitar sound. The piezo pickup with custom preamp EQ makes it sound very much like an acoustic guitar. With the built-in synth pickup you can get just about any sound you want via a Roland GR series synth. It has a silver leaf maple solid body with a figured maple top and a mahogany neck with a richlite fingerboard on top which Godin says makes the action even better when using a synth. It has a full 25.5" scale length and 1.6875" nut width.

NEW ARRIVAL SORRY SOLD OUT QUICKLY ...She's super clean Genuine Ibanez Hoshino Factory release this is a cool collector piece of Japanese Law-suit modle guitar history WoW is this well made guitar Beautiful in person just impressive . This vintage J200 is now over 39 years old that plays with ease and has a HUGE SOUND... really sweet beautiful tone that rings out pretty loudly and its playability makes this guitar fun to play and an excellent choice in your next cool Japanese Vintage guitar... she's in better than average cond too well taken care of Adult owned right here in California she's in top form folks. With its Nice medium slim taper flamey maple neck 1-11/16ths at the nut. Classic beautiful original pick guard looks exactly like the old age Gibson, the detailed workmanship fit & finish you will be sure to notice and love. Ready to tour or record tonight! every time you pick it up to play. TO SEE THE PICTURE GALLERY OF THIS GUITAR CUT & PASTE THIS LINK THEN CLICK OR RETURN: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/73ElDegasJ200BlondFlamed?authkey=Gv1sRgCKTqjqGy09roBw#slideshow/5573434646760239042.
Harry Rosenbloom, founder of the (now-bankrupt) Medley Music of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, was manufacturing handmade guitars under the name "Elger." By 1965 Rosenbloom had decided to stop manufacturing guitars and chose to become the exclusive North American distributor for Ibanez guitars. In September of 1972 Hoshino began a partnership with Elger Guitars to import guitars from Japan. In September of 1981, Elger was renamed "Hoshino U.S.A.", retaining the company headquarters in Bensalem, Pennsylvania as a distribution and quality-control center.
Music man make the best regular production (i.E. non custom shop) guitars on the planet. Nobody else comes close. This is the quality that everybody else should be reaching for. The fit and finish and playing comfort are second to none. And the oil finish on the necks is to die for! These guys don't just churn out minor variations on the same 60-year old theme, they actually innovate, they challenge, they dare. Wonderful new designs, made for real players. The results are outstanding. Roasted maple and all-rosewood necks, new chambering and tonewood construction ideas. They are so far ahead of the game it makes you wonder why the rest of the industry stays so stagnant. Music Man are the only guitars I will buy now. I'm so proud to support them!
We as a team are always extremely inquisitive and wondered about something, which can be anything, happening around us. One day we planned to share these things which are enough to spice up soul of internet freaks and we made Coolexample.in. Here on Coolexample.in, we pick, research and display some really cool examples which hit us somewhere in our daily lives. The website let the visitors to explore chunk of daily stuff they may need to know about. You will get a bunch of trending information from around the globe. Every latest buzz, from footpath to limelight, we have it all, in Article, Charticle And Listicle way with the categories- Taza Khabar, Hottest In Cinema, Top Tenz, Education, Jobs & Career, Tech In Trend, Sports. So, if you’re a viralmaniac, quench your thirst here!

The Mustang bass debuted in 1966 as (along with the Coronado) Fender's first shortscale bass, however the Competition finishes were not seen until 1969. It was effectively the same instrument, with sports stripes, and initially a matching coloured headstock. The competition colours were Red, Orange and Blue (although blue was officially called Burgundy). Have a closer look at this 1969 Fender and check out the soundclips through various vintage amplifiers.

In the 1920s, it was very hard for a musician playing a pickup-equipped guitar to find an amplifier and speaker to make their instrument louder as the only speakers that could be bought were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output". The cone speaker, widely used in 2000s-era amp cabinets, was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
The specifications of the neck and string setup dictate the guitar's overall playability. As such, it is important to get a handle of important specs which include scale length (the length by which the string is stretched from the bridge saddle to the nut), nut width, fingerboard radius, and neck profile (shape of the back of the neck). Beginners normally want guitars to play easier, and will prefer those with shorter scale length, thin nut width and neck profile, and flatter fingerboard radius. On the other hand, experienced players will have grown accustomed to a specific neck configuration, if this is your case, you will want your new guitar to have similar specs to what you already like.
Hey Frank i removed the pick guard and discovered why they were so tall.I just bought the guitar the day i asked you about it and it was late very late after midnight and i found out someone used pick guard screws to just secure them to the PG…lol And i have it back together correctly installed now.No pictures yet here is a better detailed description.The body is solid wood stained factory dark cherry.Rosewood fretboard semi-enclosed tuners…SSS P/U arrangement in a 3 ply black PG and 5 way switch and probably weighs 8 lbs.Thanks ….Larry
Pedaldoc – is a company specialized in the production of kits to convert standard guitar effect pedals into boutique sounding pedal stomp boxes. They carry “do it yourself” kits to modify many topselling Boss pedals, Electro harmonix stompboxes, Vox 847´s wah pedals and more. The only thing needed to perform one of their mods in is about an hour of your time and a soldering iron. Their kits are designed for guitar and bass players who may not have any knowledge of electronics and all the components that need to be substituted are clearly market on a picture of the pcb board of the pedal.
For every guitarist who’s dreamt of combining the biting twang of a Telecaster® with the sleek, ergonomic contours of a Strat, we created this limited-edition guitar: The Whiteguard Strat. Tele hardware, electronics and playing feel? Check. Ash Strat body with lacquer finish and custom-shaped white pickguard? Check. The unique style and sound you can only get from Fender? You better believe that’s a check.
There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.
{ "name": "Vintage Sunburst", "skuUrl": "/Epiphone/Les-Paul-Special-Vintage-Edition-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst-1500000014892.gc", "status": "backorderable", "statusText": "Back Order", "skuItemType": "New", "inventoryText": "Available 11-20-2018", "inventoryKey": "available_date", "availableDate": "11-20-2018", "price": 149.00, "isOnSale": false, "msrp": 248.00, "salePrice": 149.00, "easyPayOptions":"0,0,8200002,12 Months Promotional Financing,10/31/2018,Special 12-month financing + $7 back in rewards Valid through,149.0,true,/pages/Gear-Card-Rewards.gc", "formatedIntegerValue": "149", "decimalValue": "00", "listPrice": 149.00, "isPriceDrop": false, "priceDropPrice": "", "savingsAmount": 99, "discountPercentage": 40, "promos":["coverageEligible","freeShipping","international"], "warranty": true, "sku": "site51500000014892", "shipToStore": false, "displaySku": "J40301000004000", "displayId": "1500000014892   POS #: 112318357", "serialized": false, "stickerDesc":"Top Seller", "stickerDisplayText":"Top Seller", "shipsFree":true, "condition": "New", "commerceType": "New", "priceVisibility": "1", "scene7SetID": "MMGS7/J40301000004000_MEDIA_SET", "invMsgVendorDropShip":"false", "invMsgOverSized":"false", "invMsgBackOrdered":"true", "invMsgPreOrder":"false", "invMsgPromiseDate":"11-27-2018", "invMsgAvailability":"", "invMsgDetail":"", "invMsgAddOnText":"", "currencySymbol": "$", "styleImgUrl": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/Les-Paul-Special-Vintage-Edition-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Sunburst/J40301000004000-00-140x140.jpg", "styleImgAlt": "Les Paul Special Vintage Edition Electric Guitar Vintage Sunburst", "freeGiftWarning":false, "freeGiftWarningTips":"", "kitCarouselItems": [], "availableInStoreOnly": false, "isShipsInternational": true, "checksum":"93895071200", "restrictionType":"", "restrictionError":"" ,"storeInfo":[ { "storeName" : "La Mesa", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } , { "storeName" : "San Ysidro", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } , { "storeName" : "San Marcos", "storeStatus": "Ship to Store" } ] }

Let’s start with body style. This is quite simply the shape of the guitar’s body, and there are potentially a lot of them to consider. As a general rule, the larger the body, the more resonant it will be, giving it a deeper, richer tone. This is clear for things like the hummingbird, with the big square shoulders, and the dreadnought style body, which is generally the largest body type you’ll encounter. The drawback of larger bodies of course is that they’re more cumbersome and less ergonomic to play.


Guitar FX BOX does REALLY real-time DSP. Signal is sampled from sound card input, processed and then sent to the output with VERY LOW LATENCY. Unlike many other "real-time" audio programs, I/O delay with Guitar FX BOX is extremely low, virtually undetectable! This is achieved using DirectSound (or WDM streaming) for fast access to the hardware (sound card) and fast DSP algorithms optimized for real-time processing. Through DirectSound, latency is about 20ms with most sound cards, or even less. When WDM streaming driver is used, latency can go as low as 5ms! Nevertheless, exact total i/o latency still depends on hardware/drivers.
Harmoniser – a frequency-based effect that sounds like a second guitarist is playing in harmony with the original guitar signal. The effect is created by doubling the guitar input signal and then shifting the pitch of the double up or down at a certain interval (usually a 3rd, 5th or octave). The harmony effect is often used in the metal and hard rock genre to play solos.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.
3.  This one is not so much a customer fix as customer negligence.  A crack in the top of an acoustic that is not addressed right away.  Dirt and grime are allowed into the crack and oxidizes the surfaces so that what could have been fixed with a diamond patch on the inside has now become a fix that includes taking away the rotten wood and inserting a splint.  It can be very difficult to match the new wood with the old, and you better make sure the customer knows that his or her guitar will not look brand new.

In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing contemporary classical music for the electric guitar. These include Frank Zappa, Shawn Lane, Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, Brian May and Randall Woolf.
×