In 1932, John Dopyera left Dobro and came back into the National fold, regaining control of the company. We can only speculate that the absence of Beauchamp has something to do with his decision. National and Dobro merged in 1935, becoming the National Dobro Company. However, until the end of the ’30s, when National Dobro finally completed its relocation to Chicago, Dobro instruments continued to be made in L.A. by what had been the separate Dobro Corporation, even though it was a part of National Dobro. Got it? Hmmm…


It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
In the studio, a dynamic noise filter such as the Symetrix 511A, Drawmer DF320/330, Rocktron Hush or Dbx Silencer can be less obtrusive than a gate for cleaning up guitar parts to which delay/reverb has not yet been added. Very generally, such devices work by progressively reducing the audio bandwidth once the sound falls below an adjustable threshold. Transients pass through with very little change, while high frequencies are removed from the tail end of decaying sounds, which reduces the subjective hiss level. A conventional expander then mutes the signal entirely at very low levels.
Marty is another player who’s built up his videos and YouTube Channels over a number of years and it’s become a vast resource for lessons at all levels. There’s a lot of stuff about how to play particular songs or how to mimic a certain musician’s style, but mixed up with these are plenty of absolute beginners’ lessons that teach the basics. There are some guest artists explaining different techniques, but mostly Marty’s The Man. The good thing about Marty is his great patience during the videos—he takes plenty of time to explain things and demonstrates them nice and slow, so you hardly ever have to stop and rewind the videos. Marty has a quirky sense of humour, too. It takes the hassle out of the harder lessons to master. He has a good website linked from his YouTube channel and a few cool, free giveaways. Check that out at www.guitarjamz.com
The road toward becoming a better guitarist is paved in… books? It certainly can be, although there are plenty of routes that both beginners and professionals take to improve upon — and bone up on — their craft. The books on this list are about history and technique. They’re books that you’ll pull off the shelf for years to come to look up a vintage guitar you’re curious about or a chord progression or song you’ve been meaning to master. You may find additional inspiration reading the autobiographies of your favorite guitarists, but we decided to leave those off this particular list. If you’re in the market for a good guitar book, read on.

MOD® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All effects pedals operate on a 9V battery.

This guide is as marvelously written as it is exceedingly informative. It takes a long look at each of the major and minor American guitar companies — Gibson chief among them — and recounts the story of every guitar to come off their workbenches. Buoyed by scads of historical photos and thoroughly researched copy, this book earns its place at the top of this list.

The Les Paul 100 by Epiphone is an entry level electronic guitar. The body is made of mahogany which is known for warm/balanced sound with a good sustain. The rosewood fretboard enhances the sounds and sustains. A C-shaped neck provides the beginner with incredible comfort. Finally, this guitar features two humbucker pickups for clean and great sound.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 
Praises and recommendations continue to flood the reviews of the Fender Super-Champ X2 HD, pointing to its great value for money as its main selling point. Even users who are not happy with some of the extra features agree that the amp gives you more than what you pay for. As expected from a Fender tube amp, clean tone is well received, while others are equally happy with the other voicings. Another plus for the Super-Champ X2 HD is that it gets good feedback from guitarists of different playing styles and instruments, be it single-coil equipped or even those with active humbucker pickups.
i have a grand total of 1 pedal. it's an overdrive pedal that i only use when playing heavier songs. Other than that, i tend to play just guitar and amp. My amp has reverb and i tend to set that at about 1/3 the way round. Does that count as effects? My settings are set just on the edge of break up so i get a nice clean tone, but when i hit it harder, it gives a little crunch.
The beauty of an affordable small amp is that it can be high quality without the sacrifice of anything. I mean yeah some people say that the low tones disappear a little when the amplifier gets small, but don’t listen to them too much. Unless your low tones are being drowned out by some loud person screaming into the microphone so hard that the system starts screeching, even the smallest of amps can produce a respectable low tone. The small amplifiers are there to be portable and easy to have, so that you never have to deal with a back hurting (unless your instrument is heavy) or your arms being tired from anything other than playing the guitar too much. Which is why the Blackstar Fly 3 Battery Powered Guitar Amplifier is a great piece of equipment to have in your artillery. Portable, small and powerful in sound, what else could anyone ever want?
One reason why the sound changes in different parts of a given room is that sound reflecting from room boundaries reaches your recording microphone later than the sound travelling directly from the amp, causing phase cancellation — in effect a series of peaks and dips in the recorded frequency response, the spacing of which is related to the delay between the direct and reflected sounds. Keith Olsen suggests lifting and/or tilting the amp to minimise the effects of phase cancellation. "Leo Fender put those legs on the sides of a Fender Twin, and he did it so the guy in the orchestra could actually hear it when he was playing soft. But the other reason is that when you put a mic up against an amp tilted that way... you don't get phase-cancellation problems off the floor and wall. Let's take it one step farther. Let's lift that speaker cabinet off the floor and put it up on something that is stable enough to be able to give the speakers a platform to work from, but where... the reflected sound is going to be so far down in volume to the direct, it's of no real consequence... All these things start adding together into mic technique, stuff that you learn over years."

I have 12 years whit my SL3 Jackson and 12 years whit my RG7420, so far I have replaced both POTs on the jackson, the frets are really worn out and FR chrome is peeling.. great guitar crappy components. oh, I havent had to replace anything on the Ibanez yet other than the stock pickups for something better. both are made in Japan =). So dont tell people that Ibanez sucks before actually owning one...

As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.


Small guitar amps, contrary to popular belief, have the ability to produce a very powerful sound. You don’t need a whole lot of surface area to have an impressive sound, as so many chihuahuas have proven by keeping up their owners nights on end with their barking. The small amplifiers, the best of them, have sound comparable to the sounds of the larger amplifiers. This has been proven many a time, especially by the band called Annihilator. The guitar player for the band has a very specific set up for himself, with a relatively small amp being one of the main parts of the set up. While his is not as small as some of the ones here, it just goes to show that a live performance does not need a large amp for good quality sound.
Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!
One look around our shop and you'll see that we're serious about offering our customers a large selection of instruments, equipment and gear. You'll find both new and used instruments, and our top-notch staff are here to help you choose exactly what fits your needs, preferences and budget. If you're interested in learning new skills and techniques, check out the group workshops we host on a regular basis. We cover a wide range of music topics, so stop by and see what class we're holding next. Can't make it in? Give us a call at 505-889-6300, and we'll be happy to answer all your questions.
Searching for something to give them a boost, in July ’68, Ovation introduced its first electric guitars – the Electric Storm series. Two models were available initially, the Thunderhead and the Tornado. These were f-hole semi-hollowbody thinline, equal double-cutaway guitars with German-made bodies, bolt-on Ovation necks, and Schaller hardware. Most had Schaller pickups with metal covers, a row of poles along each edge, and split, small, black inserts in the middle. Each was available with or without vibrato.
Curiously, Les Paul also contributed to recording... along with building his own recording studio at his home, he built his own disc cutting system, and did multitrack recording on acetate discs... recording on a disc, then overdubbing himself and that original disc playing onto another disc, and so on. He later worked with Ampex on multitrack tape machines, and released the first multitrack electric guitar recording on Capitol records in 1949... however, Sydney Bechet had released a multi-track recording using Paul's techniques back in 1941. 
Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.

Guitar pedal multi-effects units comprise several effects in just one package. Multi-effects units utilize digital processing to bring out different sound effects when playing guitar. These digital multi-effects pedals come with internal memory in order to save your individual settings. Among the top-rated multi-effects brands you might want to check out are the DigiTech RP and GNX series, the Boss ME-20 and ME-50 models, the Boss GT-6 and GT-8, the Zoom G2, G3, and G5, various Behringer models, and the Line 6 POD.
Electri6ity has been around for a while now, but I think it's still the cat's meow of sampled guitar libraries because of how deeply sampled and deeply controllable it is. Its wealth of articulations will allow you to create stunningly realistic guitar tracks, but the trade-off is that there are a lot of keyswitches and keyswitch combos to learn at both ends of the keyboard, and it's a big library that costs $400. For that reason, it may be a little overwhelming to be a "go to" library, but if you have the ambition to learn and use it, your guitar tracks will have no competition.
In a pinch, you can check for standard string action using a business card; it should just fit between the fret and the string at the 12th fret. Be prepared to adjust the neck at least a couple of times a year, particularly if you live in an area with large humidity swings between summer and winter. If your action is very low and you're still having difficulty playing bar chords, etc., you may want to switch to lighter gauge guitar strings. Be prepared to re-adjust the neck after you restring, because lighter strings exert less pressure on the neck, so you may now have an underbow.

So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category. For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave. BOSS also has a few pedals that make your instrument sound like some other instrument. The AC-3 Acoustic Simulator will do the job. Some effects change your sound with filtering. This effect type can be used in different places in the signal path, so we’ll use the GE-7 Graphic EQ. A few BOSS effects defy categorization, but are nevertheless very useful in any signal path. The most common of these is the CS-3 Compression/Sustainer. Loopers fall into this category also, so let’s add an RC-3 Loop Station to the mix. And you might want the NS-2 Noise Suppressor to kill the noise in your rig, so let’s add that in, too. What about a tuner? The TU-3 is the most popular pedal tuner in the world.


Paul Reed Smith’s offering to pro musicians with exacting standards, the PRS McCarty 594 takes its name from two things. The first is its scale length of 24.594 inches and the second is that it’s a 1959-spec guitar with four knobs. According to Paul Reed Smith, this vintage-inspired instrument aims to recreate the most desired classic Gibson tone, that of a ‘59 Sunburst.
Every new 2008 Les Paul Standard will benefit from Gibson’s proven chambering technique, which leaves each guitar with perfect tone, balance, and weight. Prior to gluing the maple cap on top of the mahogany body, the expert craftsmen at Gibson USA carve out carefully mapped-out chambers in the body using a Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) router. The positioning of the routes was established after careful examination of the resonant characteristics of the Les Paul. Gibson approached this process with the awareness that every change to the formula would have repercussions on the instrument’s sound. So, in addition to relieving the stress on a player’s back and shoulder, these lighter Gibson guitars also enhance the tone palette in a manner unique only to these guitars. The results are comfortable, lightweight guitars that are acoustically louder, with increased sustain and resonance.
Today's use of Torres and post-Torres type guitars for repertoire of all periods is sometimes critically viewed: Torres and post-Torres style modern guitars (with their fan-bracing and design) have a thick and strong tone, very suitable for modern-era repertoire. However, they are considered to emphasize the fundamental too heavily (at the expense of overtone partials) for earlier repertoire (Classical/Romantic: Carulli, Sor, Giuliani, Mertz, ...; Baroque: de Visee, ...; etc.). "Andrés Segovia presented the Spanish guitar as a versatile model for all playing styles"[5] to the extent, that still today, "many guitarists have tunnel-vision of the world of the guitar, coming from the modern Segovia tradition".[6]
I've been playing music my whole life, guitar since 16 (>30 years!!!). I'm used to distortion, delay, and some sort of phase for my unique sound. With this little devil, I make my guitar scream and whine like I'm playng straight from hell! Makes me sound almost as evil as I am in real life. For this DIYer, I have some good noise until I can build all my own pedals. Many presets, I only needed to modify two of the for my sound. Now i can sound like the true 80's hardcore punk and thrash metal songs and sounds that I grue up with.
Vox quickly grew. In 1964 Tom Jennings, to raise capital for JMI's expansion, sold controlling interest in JMI to the Royston Group, a British holding company, and sold American rights to the California-based Thomas Organ Company. Displeased with the direction his old company was taking, he left the company in 1967, which was around the same time that Marshall overtook Vox as the dominant force in the British guitar amplifier market. While Royston's Vox Sound Equipment division set up new operations in the Kent town of Erith, Tom Jennings set up a new company in his old Dartford location, joined later by Dick Denney. Jennings Electronic Industries operated for several years, making an updated and rebadged version of the AC30 along with other amplifiers, as well as a new range of organs.
Left Handed 1968 Fender Strat with an insanely rare Blonde Custom Color! This had to have been a special order guitar – has “Blond” written in the neck pickup cavity(see pic). I think I’ve seen one other factory left-handed Blonde Strat, but certainly not from the Hendrix era(both the white Woodstock and black Band of Gypsies Strats were from 1968).
These 8 free guitar lessons are from Chris Buono’s 60 Electric Guitar Techniques You MUST Know where he’ll describe and demonstrate 65 of the most popular electric guitar techniques found in blues, rock, jazz, metal and other contemporary genres of music. He also shows you how they’re notated in standard notation and tablature to help you get the most out of reading or writing sheet music, tabs, and charts.
Eric Clapton was in a bad mood during the photoshoot for Blues Breakers. The 1966 Clapton/John Mayall collaboration sees Clapton on the album art reading a copy of UK comic book the Beano. He was so aghast and bored by the idea of a photoshoot that day that he refused to make eye contact with the photographer, therefore settling on staring at a comic instead. Nicknamed “The Beano Album”, it’s often considered to be one of the most important guitar recordings ever made.
I took a guitar to this great place to have new strings put on it. I explained to the owner that the guitar belonged to my son who had been killed in a car accident. I was donating the guitar to a pro...gram called SOAR. A program for veterans to learn to play. They are a therapy type program for any veterans. Thank you for the help I received to be able to give this guitar to this worthy program. They are great people in the guitar store. See More
The octave pedal raises or lowers your pitch an octave. This makes a huge sonic impact as soon as it is heard. This pedal will make your guitar sound huge, broad and bass-rich or fierce and piercing - even both. It's best to look for a pedal with a “mix” knob, so that your original tone is not completely lost. One step and you can change the direction of the riff or the entire song. This effect was used extensively by Jimi Hendrix in combination with a fuzz tone, while more modern users include Tom Morello and Jack White.
By 1970, regular distribution of Japanese-made guitars, including Lyle brand guitars, began in America. In the early 1970s, Arai joined with instrument manufacturing company Matsumoku to produce guitars. It is inconclusive if they continued producing Lyle guitars at this time, but they did launch the Aria Pro II line in 1975, which included set-neck copies of the Gibson Les Paul and SG, and Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars.
The electronic transistor finally made it possible to cram the aural creativity[when defined as?] of the recording studio into small, highly portable stompbox units.[citation needed] Transistors replaced vacuum tubes, allowing for much more compact formats and greater stability.[citation needed] The first transistorized guitar effect was the 1962 Maestro Fuzz Tone pedal, which became a sensation after its use in the 1965 Rolling Stones hit "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[41][42]

Amazingly well made and a beautiful guitar. The finish is incredible, it looks like a guitar that should cost a $1000 and up. Mine is the red color and found it in a pawn shop looking very rough, price on it was $99 and at first I thought it looked like a $99 guitar so I didn't pay any attention to it. I was looking a some Epi SG400s and a couple of Gibson's but for some reason I went back to the Samick. I had some cleaner with me and I grabbed a rag and started cleaning it up, after a few minutes of scrubbing this beautiful guitar appeared. I plugged it in along with the Epis and Gibson SGs and played them side-by-side and I was amazed at the sound I was getting from the Samick. I compared it along with the other SGs and the finish and the build quality smoked the others. I am all about American made guitars but this Korean made SG has completely changed my opinion about Asian made guitars, especially when I compared it to a $900 Gibson. I wasn't even looking for a new guitar but I couldn't let this one get away. I bought it and have played it for hours every day for the last week. It's amazing, the neck is the smoothest and easiest to play that I've ever seen, I like it much more than my Ibanez RG with the Wizard II neck I've got. I am now looking out for other Samick Artists Series guitars and if you see one for a good price try it out.
The double-neck guitar is designed so that two guitar necks can share one body. This design allows the guitarist to switch between either neck with ease. The double-neck guitar will normally have a standard six-string neck and a twelve-string neck. Other combinations, such as a six-string neck and a fretless neck, are available. The double-neck guitar may be used in live situations when a guitarist needs a twelve-string guitar for the rhythm part and a six-string guitar for the solo break.

If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.
Many readers will already know that germanium has been the effects buzzword of the past many years. These transistors are considered softer, rounder, more musical. Don’t be fooled: that doesn’t mean they make music all by themselves, you have to make music through them. But that’s not such a bad thing. Open up a Fuzz Face for the first time and you’re likely to be startled by its simplicity, and other early fuzzes like Maestro’s Fuzz-Tone (1963) and Sola Sound’s Tone Bender (1965) are equally basic. As far as the Face goes, you’ll find fewer than ten components on the board, two of them being those crucial AC128 or NKT275 transistors. Interestingly, the Tone Bender originally used two OC75 germanium transistors made by Mullard, the revered British tube manufacturer.
You'll then learn G major and the variation you can play of this chord, where you hold the B string at the third fret, or just leave it open. The final chord you'll learn is F major. This one is tricky because its a barre chord, but there is a way of making these types of chords a little easier to learn, as shown in the video. You will also be shown the partial barre chord shape of F major, and will see how moving this shape around gives you any major chord you want to play.
This is where you want to go. I brought Steve an old Telecaster with a faulty input jack. He not only had the parts needed to fix it, but came up with a better, more stable solution that would avoid the same problem later, all in a few minutes while I waited, and for the walking-around money I had in my pocket. He is professional, expert, friendly, and reasonable. I couldn't ask for more.

InstantDrummer provides tempo-sycronized drum loop sessions that can be accessed easily from within RiffWorks guitar recording software. Most RiffWorks InstantDrummer Sessions are loop recordings of professional drummers brought into the InstantDrummer format for easy manipulation by RiffWorks users. Play along with InstantDrummer sessions by famous drummers like Alan White (Yes, Lennon), Jason McGerr (Death Cab for Cutie), John Tempesta (Rob Zombie, Exodus, Testament, Tony Iommi, The Cult), Lonnie Wilson (Brooks and Dunn, Faith Hill, Tim McGraw), and Matt Sorum (Guns N Roses, Velvet Revolver). Use them in your recordings royalty free!
We have already covered one Behringer reverb, which was the epitome of affordable and functional simplicity. However, this brand has a couple more aces up their sleeve, including the more advanced RV600 (click for full review). What this pedal offers is a significantly more versatile solution that brings you additional flexibility at a bargain price.

This how-to guide will cover the aforementioned effects, as well as fundamentals like the function of typical delay controls, and where to place your unit in an effects chain. Although there are countless delays on the market—many of which have mind-boggling features—we’re going to use a basic delay pedal setup similar to what you’ll find on a Boss DD-7 as our reference point. We’ve also provided some sample settings so you can get the most out of your delay pedal right away.
After a certain point of decreasing the price on the amplifier systems you are offering to the buyers, you get a return in the shape of an increasing size of the amplifiers themselves. Which is not really that much of a problem, especially when the Fender speaking you are talking about look vintage and sounds like it could be from the future. The Fender Mini Tonemaster Battery Powered Electric guitar amp is a little on the big side among smaller amps, in terms of size and in terms of sound. While it might be a little tiring to carry with you, the sound you are going to produce for the price of almost nothing is going to feel worth it, every second of the song.
Now that we’re comfortable with the basic wiring of a guitar, we can look at some of the more popular mods. This article introduces mini toggle switches and push/pull pots, and shows how we can use these to modify a Strat in such a way as to allow use to add the neck pickup to any selection. This expands the number of available pickup combinations to 7.
What's so special about the Epiphone Les Paul Special II Electric Guitar? The super-low price for starters and that's not all. It gives you all the essential elements of a Les Paul. Made with a mahogany body, bolt-on mahogany neck, smooth 22-fret rosewood fingerboard, this baby is every bit as handsome as its uptown cousins. Features 700T/650R open-coil humbucking pickups that deliver long, singing sustain and true Les Paul tones. The LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and stopbar tailpiece add more sustain and make string changing easier. Limited lifetime warranty. Strings: D'Addario; 10, 13, 17, 26, 36, 46
While an acoustic guitar's sound depends largely on the vibration of the guitar's body and the air inside it, the sound of an electric guitar depends largely on the signal from the pickups. The signal can be "shaped" on its path to the amplifier via a range of effect devices or circuits that modify the tone and characteristics of the signal. Amplifiers and speakers also add coloration to the final sound.
This is a great pedal to learn from. The instructions are clear and the circuit is pretty basic. The kit itself is complete and the components are good quality. The effect is unique when compared to other diy pedals, and adds a nice flavor to your sound. About the only thing I would add is an led to know when the effect is on, the circuit can always be modified. To update, I was able to change the .047cap with a .022 cap to get a clearer sound while using my bass with it.....sounds great for some of our rockabilly type songs. So if you would like to use this for your bass just change that one cap and you're good to go.
You can get a rough idea of what the All-Electric looked like in Gruhn/Carter’s Electric Guitars (Miller Freeman Books, 1995), although this example has been refinished and replated, with a new fingerboard, tuners and added tailpiece, and is an atypical 14-fret Spanish model, possibly assembled at the end of the ’30s from leftover parts. Toward the end of National Dobro’s presence in Los Angeles, a great many guitars were assembled and shipped from remaining stock, often as exports.
The name has a long and involved history that is interwoven with that of the resonator guitar. Originally coined by the Dopyera brothers when they formed the Dobro Manufacturing Company, in time it came to commonly mean a resonator guitar, or specifically one with a single inverted resonator. This particular design was introduced by the Dopyeras’ new company, in competition to the already patented Tricone and biscuit designs owned and produced by the National String Instrument Corporation.
Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.
The fact that the output is electrical has made possible a dizzying array of sounds produced by electrically and electronically modifying this electrical output. Besides the volume and tone controls on the guitar and on the amplifier, a variety of outboard devices are used to obtain custom sounds and effects. As an attempt to organize these effects, consider the following classifications:
Back in the 1930s jazz and big-band guitarists began to make the switch to electric guitars in order to compete with the volume of other instruments onstage. Early electric instruments were hollow-body guitars. They were big, and featured an arched top that helped with power and projection. They had f-holes to facilitate amplification acoustically, and the first rudimentary pickups that allowed the guitar to be plugged into an external amplification system.
A rivalry sprang up between Fender and Gibson, creating some of the solid-body electrics most coveted by musicians and collectors, including the 1952 Gibson “Les Paul” model with a curved top and a combination bridge-tailpiece (the guitar was designed primarily by McCarty, with input by the famous guitarist who endorsed it), the 1954 Fender Stratocaster, and a 1958 version of the Gibson Les Paul with a new “humbucking” pickup that transmitted less background interference from electrical equipment.

Description: Body: Maple - Flamed - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Sunburst, Orange
We perform within include rings. Personal big assortment of pedals, a few I really like, a few foul odor. I quickly discovered how the just people who worry about the results tend to be additional music artists. The actual people( ladies dance mostly) might treatment much less. Therefore right now I acquired the tuner, as well as generate your pedal with regard to single sculpt.... that is this, as well as my personal sculpt rocks ! as well as straight forward. With regard to facilities felines it might be another tale.
Extra Features: This is where we’ll bucket a bunch of extras that could be important to you, depending where you are in your guitar playing journey, and what gear you might already have. Some multi-effects pedals include handy tools like a tuner, a looper pedal, a built-in expression or wah pedal, an input for an external expression pedal, the ability to double as a USB interface, the ability to be powered by batteries, and so on and so forth. It comes down to personal preference, but we generally like to see the inclusion of a tuner, and looper pedal, since both are extremely useful tools for most guitar players no matter their skill level.
When I received this Epiphone LP Special II Les Paul Electric Guitar, Vintage Sunburst I discovered there are cracks in the wooden body, under the paint. I can tell that the wood was cracked before it was painted because the paint flows into the crack in one instance on the back, is visible up over the "shoulder" close to the strap peg and can be seen under the paint on the front. In another instance the paint bridges a crack on back below the cutout shoulder and can be seen under the paint in the right light front and back. Is this normal? (There was no sign of shipping damage on either the outer carton or on the inner product box). Regarding playing, the bass strings buzz on the frets when fretted (not my fingers) which probably can be corrected by adjusting the bridge. I was under the impression that Epiphone guitars were ready to use right out of the box. I have contacted Epiphone/Gibson company to advise on the cracks and the buzzing bass strings. I am concerned that the cracks may get worse, and if this is this normal for a guitar in this low price range made in china. I got a reply from Gibson Customer Service which said "We would need to see pictures, but it would be highly unusual if there actually were cracks in the wood. The set up on an instrument can shift during shipping and handling, so a new instrument may need to be set-up." I will probably return this instrument and buy one in person from a music store where I can see and try the product before buying it.

Sound engineers prevent unwanted, unintended distortion and clipping using a number of methods. They may reduce the gain on microphone preamplifiers on the audio console; use attenuation "pads" (a button on audio console channel strips, DI unit and some bass amplifiers; and use electronic audio compressor effects and limiters to prevent sudden volume peaks from vocal mics from causing unwanted distortion.
Hello. This is a great article. Does strymon have a user fourm group anywhere. I own the g system, i love it for its effects, but it cant do everything i want. I found strymon, and instantly bought a timeline. I have also ordered big sky and mobius. Is there a way to connect the strymon up to the gsystem, and haveva patch on the g pull up a bank on the strymon, and also be able to choose one or multiple strymons.
There’s been a steady evolution in effects signal processing since the 1940s. Guitarist-innovator Les Paul was among the first and most avid effects developers, experimenting with echo and multi-track recording to add sonic excitement to his music. The first foot-switched effect showed up in the late ‘40s with Harry DeArmond’s Trem Tol tremolo processor that was later used by Bo Diddley. In the 1950s and early 1960s other effects were developed, but they tended to be expensive and some had operational issues. Meanwhile amplifier makers such as Fender and Gibson were building reverb and tremolo effects into their amps. These tube amps also produced tasty distortion and overdrive effects when gain and volume were cranked up to maximum settings. Today, many effects are designed to reproduce those sounds.
Les Paul was an extraordinary pioneer of music and instrument development, and he also paved the way for popular music today from blues and jazz to rock, country, and metal.  The Les Paul electric guitar stems from one of the best electric git brands to date – Gibson.  This came to be with Paul’s and Gibson president Ted McCarty’s collaboration to find the best electric guitar with resonance and sustain but with less distortion.  Since they couldn’t find one, they had to make one.
Their are also guitars made with a "compound radius", which is a little rounder in the lower register, and a little flatter in the higher register. The true best of both worlds. Warmoth makes necks with a 10"-16" compound radius, as do some production guitar companies. I have a custom made guitar with a 16"-24" compound radius, and it's REALLY flat. Takes some time to get used to. It's breeze to rip on, but not nearly as comfortable to play rhythm on as my other guitars.
Here, Rocksmith has a major challenge: It must provide considerably more information onscreen than competitors like Guitar Hero and Rock Band. Those games got off easy—they only needed to relay which of the colored "frets" to play. Because Rocksmith is teaching you to play a real guitar, it has to tell you which fret and which string to play simultaneously. That requires a more complicated visual setup.
Featuring the Wilkinson WTB Bridge this classic 3-saddle design has been around for over 50 years and is still regarded as the ultimate tone machine. Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.
* The Chinese examples I have seen tend to weigh more. One Indonesian model I saw weighed a full pound and half less than the Chinese model right next to it. There is not, unfortunately, any way to tell from the box or from the barcode or SKU number on the box what factory a given example inisde the box came from. The system will deal out whatever is in stock at the moment.
Depending on the components used in the delay pedal, delays can either sound exactly like the original source sound, or the delays can sound like they have a modulation effect on them. In fact, some of the most popular delay pedals apply a phaser modulation effect on the repeated delay sounds. Stacking different effects on top of one another in a single pedal is not uncommon at all, and delay pedals typically have some other effect added-on.

The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
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The Indiana Thin Body Acoustics give you all the sonic punch you need but in a more compact body size. Starting with a spruce top that's matched to mahogany back and sides, the I-TB2 Series were created for acoustic players that find that a traditional dreadnought body size is a bit too bulky. Having a tighter profile gives these guitars and almost electric guitar feel and they're perfect for the stage or studio. Great action and playability right out of the box! An on-board 3 band EQ gives you total control at the touch of a button and all players love the extended cutaway for upper fret access. Sealed diecast tuners, nickel silver frets, gold hardware, high gloss finish and 10 Year Warranty make the Indiana Thin Body Acoustic series a great alternative for any player.
There were also four full-sized archtops; the Model EP-14, Model EP-15, Model EP-17 and Model EP-18. These were basically all variations on the same guitar, with glued-in necks, non-dipped heads, mini-strip plastic inlays, single rounded cutaway, f-holes, adjustable bridge, trapeze tail and translucent pickguard. Rocker switches were mounted on a small plate on the upper shoulder, while the volume, tone and jack were on a small plate on the lower treble bout. The EP-14 (shaded mahogany) and EP-15 (natural) had two pickups. The EP-17 (shaded mahogany) and EP-18 (natural) had three pickups, some two-tone, some flat rectangular metal-covered.
The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
For visual clarity, I’ve indicated ground connections with a down-facing triangle. As you probably know, all ground wires must be electronically connected to each other. (One convenient method is to solder all pickup ground wires, the output jack ground, the pickup selector ground, and the bridge’s ground wire to the back of the volume pot, and then run a jumper wire to ground the treble control. In conventional wiring, all pots must be grounded, but here, it’s not necessary to ground the bass pot.)
A typical modern guitar tube amp has both a preamp stage and a master power amp output stage. The preamp section will be supplied with a set of smaller tubes (frequently 12AX7 or the lower-gain/lower noise 12AU7), and the power amp section has a set of large tubes (EL34, EL84, 6L6, etc.). The preamp controls input gain and typically provides treble, midrange and bass tone controls.
Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.
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The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
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Since we only want to check how straight the neck is, we need to isolate this aspect of the guitar. In other words we don’t want the height of the nut or the placement of the saddles to confuse us, so we take them out of the equation. Don’t worry; we’re not going to remove any of these components, just circumvent them. I use a ruler to do this, but you can do it using only strings. I’ll describe both methods below.


Guitar amplifier design uses a different approach than sound reinforcement system power amplifiers and home "hi-fi" stereo systems. Audio amplifiers generally are intended to accurately reproduce the source signal without adding unwanted tonal coloration (i.e., they have a flat frequency response) or unwanted distortion. In contrast, most guitar amplifiers provide tonal coloration and overdrive or distortion of various types. A common tonal coloration sought by guitarists is rolling off some of the high frequencies.

Here we have for your consideration the Booming classic vintage Yamaha FG 160 Acoustic Guitar Made in Japan in the early 70's from Nippon Gakki factory. This example is an eary 70's a more RARE version Yamaha FG 160 again this example is the Made In Japan Nippon Gakki and not to be mistaken for the similar Korean version of the FG-160 which is also nice but not the same as these apples/oranges this is a great guitar. This example was built over 35 years ago and was built to very high detailed standards workmanship are wonderful quality as well as some of the best woods available in that time period to compete with the great Martin and now this Yamaha is quite well aged and is a true SINGING vintage guitar in its own right. This one has the Amber/Tan label and not the Red Label. The frets have good height and appear newish and though to probably to have had a fret job done sometime in it's past. The guitar has it's natural age and patina with a few expected minor nicks,dings and scratches from a well loved and played instrument. This fine example is on the way... We upon receiving we will remove strings clean and detail the guitar oil rosewood and polish finish, set intonation and set up this guitar to play very well and may include new bone nut/saddle/strings we have several of these old Yamahas and they are amazing instruments very well compared to Martin, Taylor, Gibson for there fine construction and playability with amazing tone for this kind of money... Here s a link to Harmony Central if you care to rehttp://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Guitar/product/Yamaha/FG-160+/10/1 All New pics and additional info soon to come... Interested ? ask Thanks .
This mod is a little different—and definitely not as affordable as the ones we’ve been talking about up to this point. When players think about modifications that involve tuning machines, the subject revolves around tuning stability. That’s all well and good, but I’ve rarely encountered a quality machine that slips—because the mechanical torque required to turn the tuner’s capstan is pretty stout. Problems of pitch are usually more related to capstan wobble or a bad nut-slotting job.
1991 saw the introduction of guitar designer Jol Dantzig's first truly workable acoustic-electric hybrid guitar design. The instrument, called the DuoTone, was conceived while Dantzig was at Hamer Guitars. (Dantzig was also the designer of the first 12 string bass.) Adapted by players like Ty Tabor, Stone Gossard, Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy, the DuoTone was a full "duplex" instrument that could switch between acoustic and electric tones. Recently there have been many entries in the hybrid category (capable of both acoustic and electric tones) including the T5 by Taylor, Michael Kelly's "Hybrid," the Parker Fly and the Anderson Crowdster.

Ampeg was swallowed up by Japanese electrical giant Magnavox in 1971, when they wanted to get in on the electric guitar copy craze of the 1970s. Magnavox produced electric and bass guitars under the Stud badge as well as the successful Ampeg brand. It's been suggested that Magnavox was also responsible for producing Selmer acoustic guitar badges during this time, but that has not been verified. Selmer was sold to Magnavox around the same time they bought Ampeg, so it certainly seems plausible they could have made Selmer acoustic badged guitars as an offering for that market. Stud badged guitars were made until '75, with Ampeg guitar production continuing until 1980. Opus was another badge made by the company. Magnavox lost their interest in Ampeg shortly thereafter and the brand languished until it was resurrected over a decade later by another American company.

The list of musicians who are (or who have been) in love with their vintage Fender Bassman amps—especially the 4x10 tweed variety made between 1957 and 1960—is pretty much endless. Just for starters (past and present), there's Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Mike Campbell, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmie Vaughan, John Fogerty, Josh Homme, Brian Setzer, the guy up the street from me... . Again, this is just the tip of the iceberg, people. After all, many professional music industry analysts have heralded Fifties 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest amps—ever.


Tone wise, flamenco players appreciate the snappy and bright tone that this guitar reproduces, while acoustic guitarists find the playability and feel to be easy to transition to. Whether you want to focus on classical flamenco style, or you are merely looking to the sound of nylon string guitars into your collection, the GK Studio will not disappoint. The combination of its solid European spruce top and Cypress back and sides is a treat to look at and great to listen to. You can visit Cordoba Guitars for the complete specifications. You can also see two more Cordobas in our nylon string guitar roundup.
Fernandes Guitars is a guitar and accessory manufacturer, that originated in Japan in 1969, building flamenco guitars. As the company grew it expanded production to include more acoustic guitars, electric guitars, bass guitars, amplifiers, and accessories to become one of the biggest guitar manufacturers in Japan. Fernandes also owns Burny, a brand for Gibson replicas.
As you can see, this is simply a case where the Les Paul Custom is a feature-rich product, with more qualities that Epiphone can highlight as buying incentive. All the same contextual advice applies, as the LP Custom is every bit as versatile as the Standard (if not more) and can hang in just about any musical style. When deciding between them it's more a matter of price and aesthetics than any kind of style or playing scenario.
So what is the point of getting a small guitar amp? I mean you can get a whole lot of sound out of a medium sized amp without all of the sound issues that the small amps have. And yeah they are more ungainly and harder to lug around, but at least they have the sound and power required to handle a live performance and even band practice. Plus you can turn down the sound and practice at home just as well, right?’
The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:
Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA.: The Guild of American Luthiers. 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. Retrieved 9 October 2012.
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Loop pedals — or loop stations as they're often called — have exploded in popularity in recent years as more and more players have embraced the ability to build multiple parts and loops during gigs and practice sessions. With popular options like the TC Electronic Ditto Looper, guitarists can lay down a basic chord progression while soloing on top. Loop stations are also a popular option for vocalists who can use these devices to build harmonies or deploy creative vocal effects. Whether you're in need of a basic option like the Electro-Harmonix 360 Looper or a more elaborate solution like the Boss RC-505, there's never been a better time to get into the world of looping.
Do these sites harm the artists, or do they spread the understanding of music? Do they generate more sales of music, or reduce it? Do they provide education and stimulate participation by young people in the creation of music? Do they remove the incentive for artists and publishers to faithfully reproduce official versions of TAB, lyrics, or music notation or do they encourage people to seek official versions when they find the unauthorized versions lack the detail or accuracy they demand?
A Phase Shifter creates a complex frequency response containing many regularly-spaced "notches" in an incoming signal by combining it with a copy of itself out of phase, and shifting the phase relationship cyclically. The phasing effect creates a "whooshing" sound that is reminiscent of the sound of a flying jet. This effect dominates the sound in the song Star Guitar by Chemical Brothers. The song was not played with any guitars but you can hear the phasing effect. The instrument being phased was actually a synthesizer. Some electronic "rotating speaker simulators" are actually phase shifters. Phase shifters were popular in the 1970s, particularly used with electric piano and funk bass guitar. The number of stages in a phase shifter is the number of moving dips in the frequency response curve. From a sonic perspective, this effect is equalization-oriented. However, it may be derived through moderate time-based processing. Some phaser pedals include:
Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.
Whenever I can do that, it’ll be a good day. Instead, we’re looking for a the correct combination of quality and cost, just like the aforementioned guitars. Ibanez usually gives you a great guitar for what you pay, so here we’ll narrow things down a little more and look at some of the best Ibanez guitars and "honorable mentions" for our greater list.
The Epiphone ES-335 Dot was the world's first semi-hollowbody electric guitar, introduced in 1958. Today, it's made by Gibson, but it is still prized by jazz and blues musicians looking for a classic sound. Setting up the Dot involves adjusting the truss rod to correct for any underbowing or overbowing of the neck because of humidity changes. The bridge saddle on the Dot may also be adjusted to get the right distance between the string and the fretboard, called the “action.”

“Volume pedals work well just before any delay or echo effects, as you can fade in and out of delays smoothly. A volume pedal at the very end of the chain just before the amp input will control master volume, and can also be used as a mute. Reducing the signal at this point will also reduce any noise. I put clean boosts right at the end—also just before the amp input—to ensure that any effects earlier in the chain would not be overloaded.”


The volume knob can act as a boost which can take your guitar from clean sounds for rhythm playing to dirty overdrive tones for soloing. When playing a song keep your volume knob at 6 or 7 when playing chords or verse parts and when it’s time to deliver a rockin’ solo roll up the volume to 10 and you will not only hear a boost of gain (overdrive) but also a volume lift over any other instruments in the song.
On round hole martin guitars, the serial and model numbers are stamped on the neck block inside the instrument. The number can be seen by looking inside the sound hole. Look at an angle towards the neck. All f-hole Martin archtops have their serial and model numbers stamped on the inside center of the backstripe, roughly under the shadow of the bridge (and best seen from the bass side "f" hole).
The 2008 Les Paul Standard sports a revolutionary enlarged neck tenon designed by Gibson’s team of pioneering engineers. The expanded neck tenon features an innovative interlocking joint that allows the neck to be dropped into the body from the guitar’s top side, as opposed to sliding the neck in from the rim. When the glue is added, a solid unyielding bond is created that maximizes the wood to wood contact between the neck and the body, offering increased stability and superb transfer of vibration for enhanced tone, improved sustain, and superior resonance. It is also the largest neck tenon in the history of the Les Paul.

Mic orientation, or the angle of the mic in relation to the speaker, becomes more critical as the mic is moved closer to the amp. Pointing the mic at the center of the cone will yield more active highs and better transient detail but fewer lows. As you move the mic toward the outer rim of the speaker, maintaining a 90-degree angle with the grille cloth, the low frequencies gradually increase because of proximity effect and other factors, resulting in a sound that may be warmer, softer, or more powerful. Many engineers like to blend these complex characteristics by angling the mic between 30 and 60 degrees off-axis from the center of the speaker.
I wonder if this list shouldn’t be renamed as Best Electric Guitar Brands, since there does seem to be a strong focus on electric guitars in this list. Yamaha does make a very good line of acoustic guitars, and Ibanez and Epiphone also manufacture acoustic guitars, and the Gibson Hummingbird would make any top 10 list of acoustic, but it’s the only one on this list that seems world class for an acoustic manufacturere(other manufacturers on the list may also make acoustics, but I’m not familiar with them) I doubt if they would be considered the best guitars or the most highly respected brands.
They have the same basic principles, but most people start on acoustics. This is because they are more difficult to play, but you build up your finger strength and calluses (tough lumps of skin on the end of your fingers; you'll need them!) much faster. But the acoustic guitar is limited. If you feel an electric guitar is the way you want to go, then by all means get one. Just because most beginners have acoustics doesn't mean you have to. The best thing to do would be to go to your local guitar shop, tell them your budget, and see what they have to offer. You can get starter packs which come with a guitar and an amplifier but you may be better off looking at some cheap electric guitar models at your local shop, as the starter packs can be really inconsistent. Good luck, my man

Because of the miniaturization of all things electronic, you can now get full-sounding, authentic guitar sounds from a unit the size of a disposable camera — as long as you listen to it through headphones (meaning that it has no speaker or power amp of its own). These battery-powered wonders come with belt clips for untethered practicing (great for checking your stage moves in the mirror).

Telecaster is the original solid body guitar. Ever since this iconic model has only grown in popularity. This Tele we look it at here is a bit different. It comes packing an H/S/S pickup configuration, which you don’t see that often on these guitars. With that said, it feels and sounds awesome. I had it setup with a vintage Marshall Plexi and the sound was just impressive. There’s definitely more tonal range than you get in a standard Telecaster.
Indeed, for some unknown reason, George Beauchamp and Paul Barth left National in 1931 and started Ro-Pat-In, with Rickenbacker, for the purpose of making electric guitars based on a Beauchamp design (developed while he was at National) for which he would eventually receive a patent. Ro-Pat-In began making cast-aluminum Electro electric Hawaiian “frying pan” guitars in 1932, followed shortly that year by an electric Spanish guitar. In ’34, Electros became Rickenbacker Electro guitars, and founded the Rickenbacker dynasty, but that’s another story…
Schecter PT Electric Guitar Simple and straightforward - this is an apt description for the Schecter PT, a modern-day version of the guitar that Schecter custom-made for The Who’s Pete Townshend. The Schecter PT has a no-frills yet tasteful look with a vintage vibe. An alder and maple tonewood combination delivers a bright and even tone, and you’ll find the price too hard to resist.
Nothing says rock and roll quite like an electric guitar—and whether you're just learning to play or you've been practicing for years, the right instrument can make you feel like a rock star. Selecting the right match for you is a matter of personal taste and playing style, but the broad selection available at Amazon.com can help you find the guitar and the accessories you're looking for.
The Marine Band 365 Steve Baker Special (365/28 SBS) possesses the same construction as the original 365, but with low pitched tuning to their natural major keys, available in C, D, G, A, and F. It is named for, and was developed in part by noted harmonicist Steve Baker, who resides in Germany and has contributed to the design of several other Hohner harmonica models, including the Marine Bands Deluxe and Crossover.[18]
Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
I am leaning toward Justin and keep watching Marty I jumped way ahead into intervals and in the middle of the presentation it clicked. He knows his stuff. As a newcomer I want to see a bit of the whole picture as I learn basics. PS senior .Found this review very good of top sites and subscribers. AndyGuitar claims on Amazon to be the number one you tube guitar teacher. Not college educated like Justin, J Kehew or Marty Swartz . I will check these others out. Thanks for the review. I would have missed some. So many flooding You Tube

Time controls the length of time between any two repetitions of your signal. It is most often measured in milliseconds (ms). Most delay pedals don’t have a delay-time readout that would enable you to determine exact delay times in milliseconds, so you typically just adjust the Time knob to get an approximate time based on the unit’s available range. For instance, the Boss DD-7 (street $179) has a Mode knob that selects between four time ranges—up to 50 ms, 51–200 ms, 201–800 ms, and 801–3200 ms—and the Time knob then adjusts the setting within the selected range.
I myself own an Ashton and I think that they are overall really great guitars. I own an Ashton SL29CEQLTSB Acoustic Electric and it is simply amazing. It comes with a built in tuner and the strings last for quite a very long time. I have owned a couple guitars in my time and I am happy to say that the sound is impressing. So all of the other people who put down this guitar either know nothing about guitars, are super spoiled and want the best of the best, or just had bad luck with them.
You want a guitar that isn't going to fight you - If you're a smaller person, you'll want a guitar with a smaller body. And if you have particularly small hands, it might be worth looking into a 3/4-size guitar to start out. The way the guitar looks is going to matter a fair bit as well. If it doesn't look good, you aren't going to be as inspired to pick it up and practice.
The Epiphone brand scores another spot in this list with the Hummingbird Pro, a stylized take on the popular dreadnought shape. This guitar is the affordable version of the original Gibson Hummingbird, as seen in the hands of big name artists like Keith Richards, Noel Gallagher, Sheryl Crow and many more. It is a modern and more cost effective take on the guitar that Keith used on many of The Rolling Stones' popular tracks, including "Play with Fire" and "Satisfaction".

“This is a very complicated mix of economy versus market, demand versus what products are they putting out, versus are their products as good as they used to be, versus what’s going on with the Internet, versus how are the big-box stores dealing with what’s going on,” Smith says. “But I’ll tell you this: You put a magic guitar in a case and ship it to a dealer, it will sell.”

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The electrified hollow body arch top was created so the guitar could compete with the volume of horns in the big bands of the 1930s. And they’ve evolved considerably since then, growing from fat jazz boxes with necks that meet the body at the 12th fret to nimble, thin-lined instruments with cutaways like the Gibson ES-125 and Epiphone Casino, which are experiencing a renaissance today. From the single blade pickup in Christian’s guitar, modern hollow bodies now sport all types of pickups as standard equipment: humbuckers, single-coils, piezo-electric and so on.
I got this guitar just a couple months ago, not knowing much about guitars and not really knowing much about quality or anything I did a lot of research about what would be the best purchase for the right price for a beginner guitarist.. and I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG700, Fantastic reviews and ratings for beginners with great overall quality and overall sound, especially for the cost. I did a bit more research, comparing instruments and what not just to be sure I didn't purchase something that was made out of cardboard and shoe strings when I stumbled upon the Yamaha FG800, which was said to be the upgrade of the 700. I did some reading and though it didn't have as many reviews it was said to have improved sound and durability for the exact same price. Knowing that Yamaha has pretty much always been rather good quality
The Tone knob is basically a filter to cut highs. And, once again, the pickup will sound best when turning it all the way up. With the ever-growing amount of effects amps have to offer and those available in pedal format, we often forget that this setting even exists. This basic control allows you to, for example, smoothen a jazzy sound or choke a way-too-shrilling fuzz, or anything else in that line that comes to your mind. Only your ears can tell if the sound is convincing or not!
On guitars with bound fingerboards, shrinking of the binding can produce a gap large enough to catch the treble E string when pulling it over the edge. If only a few our present I will fill the gap to eliminate the problem. If the binding shrinkage has introduced gaps at every fret, the board should be re-radiused to eliminate all gaps and re-fretted.

So I'm babysitting this guitar for a broke person and I happen to be not so much broke and he left this guitar over here. Not that I'd take advantage of anyone, but after playing it, I wouldn't mind having it. I went through 3 pages of google and didn't really find any info on that or ebay. It's a P37. It's a dread. Looks pretty cheap judging by the ornamentation. It's painted black with decal inlays and all that classy stuff. I haven't measured it but the fretboard is really wide, the neck is really skinny and D shaped. I think it has a shorter scale length too... and the finish looks thin. It seems old because the saddle barely pokes out and the action is still rather high but then the soundboard doesn't belly out. The bridge is raised all around the saddle though, so it could just be a strange bridge setup. It is rather loud. It says "quality handcrafted guitars" under the company name in the soundhole, not sure if I believe it, but the totally different neck, action and volume level than what I'm used to, makes it pretty fun to play.


Johnny Marr is a chief architect of the post-modern rock-guitar aesthetic. As the guitarist for seminal Eighties poetic pop stars the Smiths, he created a tonal palette and crisp stylistic approach that still forms the roadmap for much modern rock guitar playing. It was Marr who created the orchestral guitar soundscapes that enhanced the moody drama of Smiths singer Morrissey’s introspective lyrics and ironically detached vocals.
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
I have tried many different wiring schemes as well, with 3-way switching, 3-way with coil taps, and even bypassed the tone control (since I never dial back the tone in my playing anyway). I have played this guitar through high-gain amps (Carvin V3, all three channels, Carvin Vai Legacy), through VOX AC15, Vox AC30 (both with Greenbacks and with Celestion Blues speakers), and an Orange 2x12 combo. In all of these excellent amps where my Carvin SC90 guitar sings and sparkles and does whatever I want it to, this Frankenstrat with Duncans or with Carvin P'ups sounds like a fart after 12 glasses of cheap Charles Shaw wine.
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Like Ibanez, Jackson is known for targeting the metal crowd. They have a variety of instruments available from affordable lower-cost guitars to high-end pro/enthusiast guitars. Jackson likes to keep their designs unique. Think of an 80s metal band and what they might be playing. If you thought of pointy guitars with sharp angles, Jackson might be what you’re looking for. Jackson not only sounds metal, it looks metal too. The Jackson King V, for example, is a staple instrument. If you know who Dave Mustaine is, you’ve heard of Megadeth. Because he was a co-founder and its guitarist. He is one of the people who made the Jackson King V as famous as it is. However, the design can be a bit too over the top for some people. Not everyone wants their guitar to be as “loud” as the sound it produces.
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It's Mal - i posted the comment ref the muted G string on my Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute - thanks for your response it was very good of you. I'm going to be playing (when i say playing i really mean faffing with) my guitar later so i'll have a look at the saddle, though i have rubbed my finger over it to see if there were any obvious issues which there wasn't. I have also rubbed the graphite from my clutch pencil over it when changing strings - no improvement; i'll get magnifier out and take a closer look and let you know, i may take you up on your kind offer if i'm still stumped.

Kingston guitars were built in Japan and imported into the U.S. by Jack Westheimer, who was an early pioneer of importing and distributing Japanese instruments during the late 1950s and 1960s. At first, Kingston guitar models were limited to acoustics that were similar in style to Harmony’s Stella line. Westheimer’s electric line at the time was built in Japan by Teisco and branded as such before the name changed to Teisco Del Ray. By the mid-1960s, however, Westheimer was no longer importing Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray) guitars, and he turned his attention back to the Kingston trademark, but added electric guitars this time.


Here just in is a well crafted Japanese made Orville by Gibson J200 this is not a Gibson but is a copy of the Gibby by Orville Japan... So this would have been a sanctioned build and not the Lawsuit setting them apart from other makers like Alvarez and Ibanez and Aria and a few others in fact Orville is Mr. Gibson's first name Orville Gibson so This is NOT a Gibson but a very professionally built version of the J200 its an excellent high quality copy Beautifully crafted workmanship and amazing woods... must see... previous owner love this one so much they also had it professionally customized with its Grovers and logo in MOP... plays absolutely excellent with its low easy to play string action, and notice its old Gibson correct bridge with the ABR-1 type adjustable bridge for precise intonation adjustments over the 60's Gibson correct nylon saddles... nice touch... Its spruce top is really nicely grained and figured with beautiful Patina of the real vintage gibby.
Another popular value pack comes courtesy of one of the greatest rock'n'roll guitarists of all time. For those who have an appetite for destruction, look no further than the Slash AFD Les Paul Guitar Outfit. Endorsed by the Guns N' Roses shredder himself, this pack comes with the killer AFD Special-II guitar that's equipped with new Ceramic Plus humbucking pickups, and a built-in Shadow pickup ring E-tuner. Additionally, this pack also contains a custom gig bag with the Slash "Snakepit" logo, Slash signature Dunlop Tortex picks, and much more. 

Seriously, Yamaha above ESP?! Japanese made ESP guitars are among the best in the world, no wonder so many people play them. They have great designs and an ESP standard is not to high in price compared to a USA Jackson or custom shop guitar. Ibanez prestige are very nice to (I hate the necks personally) but the build is really good. ESP blows Gibson out of the water by a VERY large margin. Gibson has lawsuits against them for selling "USA" made guitars that were discovered to be imports from cheap labor offshore factories. All ESP and Ibanez prestige guitars are made in Japan and are immaculate in terms of quality and consistency. ESP is more a metal guitar but they have much better tone than any of the others listed, the only one here that might have a sweeter tone is prs but for $8,000 and only a fractionally better tone that is subjective they can keep it. I personally like ESP and Schecter best but Jackson is really good too. Not to knock Ibanez, but their necks are way to thin ...more
But this was different. This was build quality, and it completely wrecked the sound, feel and playability of the guitar. A competent pre-shipment QC inspection should have caught this and sent it back to be fixed at the factory, and they didn't. No serious guitarist would stand for ANY guitar made this way, at ANY price point. Yet there it was, on display on a guitar positioned as the flagship model of the brand, occupying the most expensive price point in the market.

Freshly Realeased from the JVG Vintage Vault..... Just serviced with fresh set up & cosmetic clean up remove grime etc, lube & adjust tuning gears, rehydrate the woods and polish out to the Beauty you see now...detailing & set up here at the JVG shop she's 100% ready NOW and a real rare style beauty too. She's a very clean example of a real Vintage guitar its over 35 years old and is a Japanese Vintage Acoustic guitar. She Plays like butta now! .

Since a guitar’s sound is primarily determined by the interaction of the strings vibrating and the magnets in the pickup, you might wonder why wood makes a difference. In fact, the wood has a significant effect on the way a guitar sounds. The resonance from the wood determines how long the strings vibrate and the shape of their motion. Wood also allows the pickup itself to move. This combination makes wood an important factor in the overall tone of the guitar.
It’s safe to say a wah-wah pedal will be your first stompbox if it’s not already. The wah is a sweepable fixed bandwidth filter that has a treadle you rock back and forth producing vowel-like inflections. The phrasing possibilities are only limited by the player. These days, you have an array of major as well as indie pedal builders who make incredible wah pedals such as Dunlop, Vox, Fulltone, Teese, Xotic, and Wilson Effects.
In a pinch, you can check for standard string action using a business card; it should just fit between the fret and the string at the 12th fret. Be prepared to adjust the neck at least a couple of times a year, particularly if you live in an area with large humidity swings between summer and winter. If your action is very low and you're still having difficulty playing bar chords, etc., you may want to switch to lighter gauge guitar strings. Be prepared to re-adjust the neck after you restring, because lighter strings exert less pressure on the neck, so you may now have an underbow.
Not only is Mick funny, but the book is extremely useful for learning theory, efficiency, technique, playing over chords and more. Similar to Creative Guitar (recommended below), Mick is all about having you put in the work to learn what he's laying out. While you'll spend more time learning this way, it'll pay off and at the same time, teach you a great way of learning.
Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p113 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "Segovia's visits to South America also inspired new music. The Mexican composer Manuel Ponce (1882–1948) responded by producing a greater number of extended works than Turina and Torroba had achieved."
While most collectors aren’t necessarily going to boast that they own a number of Harmony guitars, we shouldn’t forget the important “first axe” role Harmony played for many guitarists. This company took mass production of guitars to the next level. And though you may have to sort through a few to find one that is completely intact and doesn’t allow a car to drive under the strings, they were quality-made instruments for the most part. For those of you who first learned on a Harmony Archtone, this is certainly a childhood treasure!
Compared to other plastic exterior multi-effects, the RP360 XP feels solid and durable. And this is reflected in many reviews, which mention the pedal's reliability as one of its good traits. Versatility and value for money also came up a number of times, both from pedalboard owners that have downsized, and beginners who are just trying out multi-effects.
The first edition of the Telecaster Custom was produced between 1959-1968, and featured a double-bound body. While the guitar was known as the Telecaster Custom, the decal on the headstock read “Custom Telecaster”. Later editions of the Tele Custom were popularized by Rolling Stones‘ guitarist and composer Keith Richards, featuring a Fender Wide Range humbucker in the neck position and a single-coil pickup in the bridge. The market generally refers to the guitar as the “1972 Custom”, indicating the year this model was originally released.
I think that a good EQ in the loop is awesome. If you find an amp that has a great overall sound, but you wish that it was a bit brighter, darker, etc, but you find that you loose the character of the distortion when you get the tone you like you can play with both EQs to have a lot of controll over the final sound. It won't make up for a crap amp, but it can make a great amp a whole world of awesome.
There are two different Vox Shadows (the Shadow made between 1060 and 1965 and the White Shadow made in the early to mid 80's). The Shadow is a double cutaway solid body with six-on-a-side tuner headstock,with 3 single coil pickups, the hardware is chrome, it has a white pickguard, tremelo bar with a retangular cover over the bridge with the VOX logo on it. It also has one volume and two tone controls and a pick-up selector knob on the lower cutaway bout. This is based on information from the 7th Ed. of the Bluebook of electric Guitars....Hope it helps...John
A lot of amps, especially in higher price ranges, have a lot of effects and features. They catch an eye and are pretty fascinating, but in a lot of cases, they are … useless. Well, not all of them but I am pretty sure that if an amp has a hundred different features you won’t be using all of them or even half of them. Features on amps are like the stand at the registrar of a grocery shop. They just catch an eye and you want WANT WANT them (for no other reason than it is interesting and cool looking)! Well, if you are going for an amp is the $100 price range you won’t have as much luxury or freedom to choose from a lot of features. Most practice amps are pretty standard and basic (in the best of ways). And to be honest, I don’t think as a beginner you really need a lot more than the basic effects and functions.
Nitrocellulose lacquer is one of the great original-era Fender electric guitar finishes, and is still used today on select instruments. Thin, porous and delicate, it’s a premium finish prized for sonic qualities that let body woods breathe with their true tonal character, and for an appearance that ages and wears in a distinctive way appealing to many players.

They may not always be the first thing you reach for, but the MIDI effects plug-ins that come with most DAW applications like Logic and Cubase often offer something very different from most audio plug-ins. For example, arpeggiators and step sequencers can be great for use in the composition process, and you can use MIDI note to controller data (CC) plug-ins to generate automation data for the parameters of other plug-ins. As they process only MIDI data, and not audio, MIDI plug-ins put very little strain on your computer. Matt Houghton


From standard EADGBE, all the strings are tuned up by the same interval. String tension will be higher. Typically requires thinner gauge strings, particularly the first string which could be as thin as six thousandths of an inch (about the thickness of a single human hair). A capo is typically preferred over these tunings, as they do not increase neck strain, etc. The advantage of these tunings is that they allow an extended upper note range versus a capo used with standard tuning which limits the number of notes that can be played; in some cases, instruo B♭ or E♭ (such as saxophones, which were frequently encountered in early rock and roll music) are more easily played when the accompanying guitar plays chords in the higher tuning. If standard gauge strings are used, the result is often a "brighter" or "tighter" sound; this was a common practice for some bluegrass bands in the 1950s, notably Flatt & Scruggs.
“Well, the legends didn’t use pedals.” Whenever somebody says something like this, and you ask them to whom they are referring, they’re often misinformed and factually wrong. “Jimmy Page”. Uh, ever see him use a Tone Bender Mk II? “Jimi Hendrix.” Please feel free to complete a Harry Potter novel while I finish laughing. “Stevie Ray Vaughan.” Ibanez and Maxon should retire a green Tube Screamer colored banner with his name hanging from their company rafters. This list goes on and on. Yes, there are lots of cool dudes back in the old times who didn’t use pedals to help them create some classic tones, but once they had the chance, they chose to.
In the 1920s, it was very hard for a musician playing a pickup-equipped guitar to find an amplifier and speaker to make their instrument louder as the only speakers that could be bought were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output". The cone speaker, widely used in 2000s-era amp cabinets, was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
At the end of 1931, Beauchamp, Barth, Rickenbacker and with several other individuals banded together and formed the Ro-Pat-In Corporation(elektRO–PATent-INstruments) in order to manufacture and distribute electrically amplified musical instruments, with an emphasis upon their newly developed A-25 Hawaiian Guitar, often referred to as the “Frying Pan” lap-steel electric guitar as well as an Electric Spanish (standard) model and companion amplifiers. In the summer of 1932, Ro-Pat-In began to manufacture cast aluminum production versions of the Frying Pan as well as a lesser number of standard Spanish Electrics built from wooden bodies similar to those made in Chicago for the National Company. These instruments constitute the origin of the electric guitar we know and use today by virtue of their string-driven electro-magnetic pick-ups. Not only that, but Ro-Pat-In was the first company in the world specifically created to manufacture electric instruments. In 1933 the Ro-Pat-In company’s name was changed to Electro String Instrument Corporation and its instruments labeled simply as “Electro”. In 1934 the name of Rickenbacher” was added in honor of the company’s principal partner, Adolph Rickenbacker. In 1935 the company introduced several new models including the Model “B” Electric Spanish guitar which is considered the first solid body electric guitar. Because the original aluminum Frying Pans were susceptible to tuning problems from the expansion of the metal under hot performing lights, many of the new models were manufactured from cast Bakelite, an early synthetic plastic from which bowling balls are made.[2]
In ’41, the old Avalon Hawaiian was renamed in the No. 88 Supro Clipper Hawaiian Electric Guitar. This instrument would become a mainstay of the Supro line for many to come, and marked the debut of pearloid plastic coverings for Supro guitars. This was very similar in shape to the Baton. The body was still roughly rectangular, but now with a curved lower edge. The shoulders now had two symmetrical scalloped “cutaways.” The head had a curve with a slight peak; despite the Regal look, these were made by National Dobro. The fingerboard was genuine rosewood with dot inlays. This was covered in “sparkling brown plastic,” i.e. pearloid. The pickup was the new exposed-pole unit with the handrest, contained in a large square metal plate complete with tail slots for fixing the strings, otherwise similar to the plate on the Baton. One volume and one tone control knob sat on either side of the strings. The back was done up in non-slip grey suede. It could be had with a curly, plush-lined, grey shark Servitex case. In April of ’42, the Clipper cost $54.50.
Whether you are a beginner or a professional, you can find the right strings for your level and guitar type. Thinner string gauges are typically better for beginning musicians because they are easier to bend with an uncalloused hand. If you are looking for strings to stand up to heavy shredding and produce more volume, then thicker gauges are what you are after.
I would like to start off the list of the best small guitar amps by talking about one of the best small guitar amps out there, which unfortunately dedicated the entirety of its existence to being used for the purposes of laying acoustic guitars. Unfortunately, because I would love to have one of these to work with my electric guitars. On the other hand, the fact that the amp works with acoustic guitars best, means that those of you looking for a mini amp for your acoustic guitar are in luck. The amp does a great job of amplifying the sound of an acoustic guitar, keeping it clean and clear of any kind of electric distortion, so that if there was no increase in volume, nobody would understand the point of the pick up. While small, the pick up is still on the larger side as compared to the rest on the list. The design is vintage and cool, so that the guitar is enjoyable to look at for everyone.

Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
Not surprisingly, we’ve established that each type of guitar has its good and bad points. For mine, the secret is to look harder at the huge variety of steel string acoustic guitars. For instance, if you’re aiming to eventually play electric guitar, you can choose an acoustic with a narrow fret board, thin neck and cut-away body around the fourteenth fret. This gives you the feel and function of an electric guitar without annoying the rest of the house. You can learn those lightning licks to perfection, before investing in serious electric guitars and amplifiers. The downside? They don’t really cater for percussive, aggressive styles of acoustic playing. The body-thumping, string-thrashing kind. For that, you should look at guitars with more robust neck and body construction.
As his Tuareg brethren continue their separatist insurgency in northern Mali, the leader of Tinariwen again can lay claim to being one of the world’s few literal rebel rockers. Ibrahim gets credit for inventing the modern Tuareg electric guitar style adopted by Etran Finatawa, Bombino, and other Saharan musicians. He generates this gritty, grungy, churning sound by hammering open strings on his Fender axe in a laid-back desert boogie reminiscent of his late northern Mali peer Ali Farka Touré.
Epiphone are a well respected subsidiary of Gibson, and have been making musical instruments since their founding in what is now Turkey, Europe, in 1873. After being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone are now best known for manufacturing affordable versions of some of the most iconic guitar models around, including the Les Paul and SG. However they do make a couple of original models, such as the Casino, which was famously used by the Beatles.
During Michael Laskow's 20-year tenure as an engineer/producer, he worked with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, Eric Clapton, Cheap Trick and countless others. He continues to write articles for magazines like Recording and Electronic Musician. He's also the founder of TAXI, an independent A&R company that links record labels with unsigned artists and songwriters.
When playing the electric guitar, you’ll have to simultaneously use both hands. One hand will be responsible for fretting and the other hand will be responsible for strumming or plucking. Depending on which is your more comfortable side and whether the electric guitar is designed more for one side than the other, it will impact your play style and music quality.

Carrying on the tradition of his hero, Derek Trucks has taken Duane Allman’s sound and technique and forged ahead with one of the most soulful slide sounds ever to be heard.  His uncle, Butch Trucks, was the drummer for the ABB, and Trucks began to play with the band at a very young age before becoming a full time member and keeping Duane Allman’s heritage alive for a new generation of listeners.

There were also a number of guitars that featured the same headstock style as the 700-800 models that featured symetrical hollow or semi-hollow bodies similar to some of the Gibsons. Gibson aficionados refer to the bodies as having "Mickey Mouse ears". One model had a deep jazz guitar-style body. They all had what appear to be humbucker pickups, some black and some plated. The Kent name only appeared on the headstocks.
A chord is inverted when the bass note is not the root note. Chord inversion is especially simple in M3 tuning. Chords are inverted simply by raising one or two notes by three strings; each raised note is played with the same finger as the original note. Inverted major and minor chords can be played on two frets in M3 tuning.[56][74] In standard tuning, the shape of inversions depends on the involvement of the irregular major-third, and can involve four frets.[75]
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The Boss Katana Head is a full featured amplifier head that can handle stage, recording and practice duties. It does this with its built-in power attenuator, which lets you choose between 100W, 50W and a super quiet setting of 0.5W. To complement the 0.5W setting, Boss even added a built-in 5" speaker into the amp head - making the Katana head to be technically a combo amp in head form factor. Complementing its versatile power rating is its built in amp modeling, which gives you five voicings from acoustic, to clean to high-gain. As expected, this amp comes with essential effects from Boss, with over 50 of them to choose from, 15 of which can be loaded to the amp for quick use, albeit limited to just 3 effects running simultaneously. Finally, all these features are packed in sleek looking profile that feels really solid, as expected from Boss.


The extra-versatile twin-channel layout with independent controls delivers a wide variety of tones from clean to overdrive. The Sonzera 20—which we recently reviewed—packs a hell of a punch for players who need a versatile workhorse amp that pairs well with pedals and sounds incredible on its own for any style of music. While the Sonzera 50 Combo is well suited to the stage, the 20 is easy to haul to gigs, has a lower output that’s better suited for the studio—and its “American style” voicing thanks to its 6L6 power tubes (the Sonzera 50 features EL34 tubes).
Some Korean Ibanez serial numbers are purely numeric with no alphabetic characters. According to Jim Donahue these guitars were manufactured in the Cort factory, in which he had the supervision. Because they had no date stamps available when they started, the serials numbers of Artstar models in this factory were written by hand. These handwritten serial numbers are hard to decipher. The production of these Artstar models at the Cort factory was discontinued in 2003.
In general, the typical situation is that HSH gives me options of cleaner/thinner/clearer tones which aren't as achievable with HH (even with volume and tone pots in use!). These are options I use very frequently, and I'd feel pretty restricted with HH! Though of course, this isn't the case for everyone. Indeed, I'm quite fascinated at the variety of tones Ron Thal and Andy Timmons get from the overly-simple SH set up they prefer!
Guitar chords are usually represented by the name of the root note, and the scale it is based on, such as A Major, written as simply A. An A chord built on a minor scale is called A Minor, and written as Am. An A chord built with a 7th is called A7, and so on... Diagrams are used to show how the chord is actually to be played on the guitar, with finger positions mapped out. For a complete overview about chord structure, check this guitar chords formula chart.
Wengrow said that Gibson got outmaneuvered by its competitors. “In the 1950s and 60s, it was really just Fender and Gibson as the two main guitar makers and they became the standard bearers. But other guitar makers such as Ibanez, Jackson, Yamaha and Paul Reed Smith, came to existence and copied their standards but continually updated many features and customizations that better reflected the idiosyncrasies of the times, often for cheaper prices.”

The roots of the Supro story go back to the ’20s and the sometimes tempestuous relationship between Czech immigrant/instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and dapper Vaudeville musician George Beauchamp (pronounced “Beech-um”). Both were searching for the guitar’s holy grail of the era, more volume. Disagreement, and some animosity, has always surrounded the account of just who was responsible for what, but Dopyera ended up building an ampliphonic or self-amplifying guitar (or “resonator” to most guitar buffs) for Beauchamp. John applied for a patent on his tricone design on April 9, 1927, obtaining it on December 31, 1929.
A guitar amplifier (or amp) is an electronic device or system that strengthens the weak electrical signal from a pickup on an electric guitar, bass guitar, or acoustic guitar so that it can produce sound through one or more loudspeakers, which are typically housed in a wooden cabinet. A guitar amplifier may be a standalone wood or metal cabinet that contains only the power amplifier (and preamplifier) circuits, requiring the use of a separate speaker cabinet–or it may be a "combo" amplifier, which contains both the amplifier and one or more speakers in a wooden cabinet. There is a wide range of sizes and power ratings for guitar amplifiers, from small, lightweight "practice amplifiers" with a single 6" speaker and a 10 watt amp to heavy combo amps with four 10” or four 12" speakers and a powerful 100 watt amplifier, which are loud enough to use in a nightclub or bar performance.
If the Complete Technique book is good for quick starts, this would be the bullet train. Another Hal Leonard selection, this is a trim 48 pages for teaching you how to hold a guitar for the first time. Tuning up, easy chords, and strumming. If you got a guitar on Friday, use this to put together your first three-chord jam by Monday. Will it sound good? No, no, it will not. But you’ll have started, which is key. Some of the other books on this list are dense with both concepts and pages, which might delay your starting. Don’t let that happen.
Compressors – The role of these pedals is to lift up quiet sounds and rein in loud sounds, compressing the dynamic range of your signal – that is, the difference between the quietest and loudest sounds. They work wonders for songs with a blend of quiet and loud parts, since they let you play hard without busting eardrums, and the soft sections won’t be drowned out by ringing ears. Compressors also have the nice side effect of increasing sustain, letting your notes sound out longer before dropping off.
This is an American brand of guitar that is available in India. It was created in the year 1873. After a few years, it was bought by Gibson Guitar Corporation. Epiphone has a compact non-cutaway body made entirely from laminated mahogany. The neck features smooth slim taper profile, fretboard made of rosewood and 20 frets. Epiphone guitars India price starts from 14,000 INR approximately. This is the brand of guitar that is nylon strung and offers highest standards in acoustic and electric guitars.
As you'd expect, the most important decision to make with multi effects pedals is the choice of which effects, specifically, you want in them. The Electro-Harmonix Epitome Multi-Effects Guitar Pedal, for instance, is a veritable buffet of effects including flanger, chorus, reverb, pitch-shifting and more. But if you're looking for an expression pedal, you'll probably be more interested in a unit like the Vox StompLab IIG Modeling Guitar Effect Processor, which has one of those built in. Both of these multi effects pedals are top sellers, which comes as no surprise considering the versatility they bring to the table.

Wildwood Guitars is proud to be recognized as one of nine authorized online Gibson dealers. We invite you to browse our extensive inventory and discover the magic of one of the greatest American brands of all time. Located in the heart of Tennessee, the Gibson Memphis factory is known for crafting the majority of Gibson’s incredible semi-hollow and hollowbody instruments. These guitars are overflowing with the soul of the city they’re born in, and they represent the ultimate in both vibe and versatility.
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Probably one of the greatest is Glenn Schwartz, formerly of the James Gang and Pacific Gas & Electric. Considered to be a "white" Jimi Hendrix, he was asked by Jimi to play at what was to be his last birthday party. Glenn played behind his back and with his teeth (now with his gums) before Jimi ever did. Now out of the limelight (and out of his mind) Glenn plays (and preaches) on Thursdays at a blue collar bar in Cleveland. ONE F*CKING INCREDIBLE PLAYER. Should be on any list.
While the general purpose is to emulate classic "warm-tube" sounds, distortion pedals such as the ones in this list can be distinguished from overdrive pedals in that the intent is to provide players with instant access to the sound of a high-gain Marshall amplifier such as the JCM800 pushed past the point of tonal breakup and into the range of tonal distortion known to electric guitarists as "saturated gain." Although most distortion devices use solid-state circuitry, some "tube distortion" pedals are designed with preamplifier vacuum tubes. In some cases, tube distortion pedals use power tubes or a preamp tube used as a power tube driving a built-in "dummy load." Distortion pedals designed specifically for bass guitar are also available. Some distortion pedals include:
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While he could put out an album of his farts or slap his name on any shitty guitar and still make millions, he is a painstaking perfectionist who spent years agonizing over every minute detail of his EVH Wolfgang guitar and EVH 5150 III amp before offering it to the public and who has refused to release a new Van Halen album until he feels it’s ready.
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