Electric guitars were originally designed by acoustic guitar makers and instrument manufacturers. Some of the earliest electric guitars adapted hollow-bodied acoustic instruments and used tungsten pickups. The first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp, the general manager of the National Guitar Corporation, with Paul Barth, who was vice president.[3] The maple body prototype for the one-piece cast aluminium "frying pan" was built by Harry Watson, factory superintendent of the National Guitar Corporation.[3] Commercial production began in late summer of 1932 by the Ro-Pat-In Corporation (Electro-Patent-Instrument Company), in Los Angeles,[4][5] a partnership of Beauchamp, Adolph Rickenbacker (originally Rickenbacher), and Paul Barth.[6] In 1934, the company was renamed the Rickenbacker Electro Stringed Instrument Company. In that year Beauchamp applied for a United States patent for an Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument and the patent was later issued in 1937.[7][8][9][10]
Kramer served a prison sentence on drug-related charges after the MC5 split up. When he got out, he teamed up with Johnny Thunders to form Gang War and later re-emerged as a solo artist on L.A. punk label Epitaph. Smith went on to lead the punishingly loud Sonic Rendezvous Band and married New York punk rock poet, artist, singer and originator Patti Smith. He passed away in 1994. But from the Clash to Fugazi, Crass and Green Day, the politicized wing of punk rock continues to fly the banner first raised by the Motor City 5.

Efficiency – also called sensitivity this is measured in dB at a distance of one metre. This has more to do with how loud a speaker sounds than its power rating. A Jensen P10R, for example, is rated at 95dB; a Celestion G12 65 at 97dB and an EVM12L at 100dB. The numbers don’t look that different, but the difference in terms of perceived volume is truly staggering.
{"pageName":"[mf] pdp: epiphone les paul special vintage edition electric guitar","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","events":"event34,event3,event45,prodView","evar51":"default: united states","list1":"silver,36-month,24 month","prop5":"[mf] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks: straps","prop6":"[mf] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks: straps: guitar straps","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: solid body electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: accessories: fretted instrument accessories and parts: fretted instrument accessories: straps and strap locks","products":";J40301","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] product detail page"}

{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars: victoria","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"victoria","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
Once you have the height of the strings over the fretboard adjusted, you can fine tune the intonation setting with an electronic tuner. If the saddle locations are already close to where they should be (based on your measurements), your saddle height should not have to be changed very much as you make the final intonation adjustment. If this is a tremolo bridge and it is blocked, tension the tremolo spring claw to the correct setting( this adjustment will be the subject of a separate article).
Some of the smaller amplifiers that I like to talk so much about are not really that small. I mean, the Marshall MS4 Mini Micro Full Stack Battery Amplifier is anything but small, in terms of sound at least. It has a powerful volume output that is hard to ignore for anyone, be it in some bar or in the street or at some gig. The tall tower like shape of the guitar is exceptional in design and yes, while the stack is a little on the big side, the affordable price of it and the quality of tone and volume is definitely worth the little bit of a size problem. Definitely worth your consideration!
: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! VoteinNovember
×