Above here's a blast from the past. The reissue of the 1960's Harmony Stratotone H49 Jupiter. Originally this guitar was manufactured in Japan, but these babies came straight from China many years later. They copied them right down to the T including those Gold Foil Pups. Guitar is hollow body and has a volume, volume, tone, tone, master tone knob, with a really cool 3 way switch. They don't come up on Ebay to often and this ones like brand new but was briefly used. Sold

Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, we have decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities: the smooth oval neck grip, the well balanced asymmetrical body shape, and the neck heel allowing unrivaled playability.
The other US-based manufacturers were from Chicago Harmony (formerly owned by Sears), National-Dobro (Supro/Valco) and Kay. Chicago was the largest guitar manufacturing area of the US at the time. The only other manufacturer of Silvertones during this period was the Japanese-based company, Teisco (or Teisco Del Ray as it was formerly called). Teisco created some of the wildest designs for Silvertones, in our opinion. The earliest model was the TG1. This was the first guitar to incorporate an amplifier and speaker into the body of the guitar. Although some people look down on the Japanese guitars we think they've got some really interesting sounds and innovations not found on American made guitars.

It’s interesting to note that luthier Steve Klein introduced a guitar that got a lot of press in the early ’80s with a body virtually identical to the Ovation Breadwinner. According to Charles’ son (and future president of Kaman Corporation), Bill Kaman, Jr., Ovation considered “pointing this out” (i.e., legal action), but given its bad track record with solidbodies, figured it wasn’t worth the effort.


Now imagine the puddle again, but this time imagine some wood blocks (12 inch long 2x4's for those of you with rusty imaginations) that are placed on their sides in the puddle in the shape of a three-sided box with the open side facing the pebble's point of impact. The radiating lines go in to the box and bounce back or reflect off the walls. Soon, there are so many lines radiating around in that imaginary box that they all collide with each other and become a random, jumbled mess. Eventually, the size of the lines and the number of them diminish. That my friends is reverb.

Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
Austin-based John Grammatico is building some of the best amps available, and with his current range of products he’s managed to capture the spirit of legendary vintage amps while utilizing modern reliable components. The LaGrange is a small 15 watt amp that will sound great with either single coils or humbuckers. Expect a warm, woody sound with throaty mids and bell-like highs. The sound is transparent, harmonically rich and well worth the investment.
Micro size and simple for live performance. 4 types of guitar effect in one strip: compressor, overdrive, delay and reverb Design for blues, jazz and country music etc. Max. delay time: 500ms Aluminum-alloy, stable and strong, LED indicator shows the working state. Sonicake Multi Guitar Effect strip Sonicbar Twiggy Blues is an effects pedal combo for roots/outlaw rockers. It combines the four most important effects: compressor, overdrive, delay and reverb in one, and it features a built-in cabinet simulator for getting a real stack sound straight from the PA system. It’s a tool that can take you back to the 60's, to that golden age of rock n' roll. Taste it! Specification: Power: DC 9V 5.5x2.1mm center nagative, 105mA Max. delay time: 500ms Dimension: 262mm ( D ) x 64mm ( W ) x 4.
These multi-effects pedals are exactly what the name suggests: all-in-one models that pack multiple effects into a single box. There are a few benefits to this, one of which is value, since getting more than one effect at once gives you great bang for your buck. They also tend to come with presets that give you customized mixes of their various effects, which can do a lot to teach you how different effects interact and how to mix and match them yourself.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.
Speaking of, you’ll probably look to upgrade either the bridge or the tuners at some point, because heavy whammy use will pretty quickly throw this out of tune. If you don’t use a whammy often, this makes a very fine choice, indeed. The neck is satin finished for better feel. All in all, a very worthwhile guitar that comes in at less than half the price of most of the other options on this list.
The CX-12 is a 12-hole, 48-reed chromatic, uniquely designed with a one-piece plastic housing and a more ergonomic slide button. It is available in several keys including a tenor-C. The standard model is charcoal black in color, but a gold colored one is available in the key of C only.[42] A variant of the CX-12, the CX-12 Jazz, has slightly different outer body features for better ergonomics, a red and gold colored housing, and higher reed offsets which aid in better tone for jazz harmonica players.[43]
New, used, nylon or steel string — or electric — for your first guitar take your time, choose carefully and never be afraid to ask for advice. Best of all, search for a good music shop near you and actually pick up the guitar, pluck the strings, listen to the sound. The people behind the counter want to help you, so that you come back for another guitar — and another, not to mention strings, string cleaner, capos… Don’t forget, this isn’t just buying any old guitar. This is the beginning of your dream coming true.

Whenever I can do that, it’ll be a good day. Instead, we’re looking for a the correct combination of quality and cost, just like the aforementioned guitars. Ibanez usually gives you a great guitar for what you pay, so here we’ll narrow things down a little more and look at some of the best Ibanez guitars and "honorable mentions" for our greater list.

In the 1970s and 1980s, with jazz-rock fusion guitar playing, jazz guitarists incorporated rock guitar soloing approaches, such as riff-based soloing and usage of pentatonic and blues scale patterns. Some guitarists used Jimi Hendrix-influenced distortion and wah-wah effects to get a sustained, heavy tone, or even used rapid-fire guitar shredding techniques, such as tapping and tremolo bar bending. Guitarist Al Di Meola, who started his career with Return to Forever in 1974, was one of the first guitarists to perform in a "shred" style, a technique later used in rock and heavy metal playing. Di Meola used alternate-picking to perform very rapid sequences of notes in his solos.
From its beginnings in 1970, Mesa/Boogie was beloved for its small-but-powerful Mark series amps; in 1989, however, the company decided to take its game to a new audience. The result was the Rectifier range of bigger and beefier Dual and Triple Rectifier amps. Since then, the Dual Rectifier has become one of the most popular rock amps on the planet.
The old Harmony and Kay guitars were notably inferior in playability and sound to professional-grade instruments by Martin, Gibson and Fender. Typically the necks on the student grade instruments were clumsy in contour compared to a professional-grade instrument, and generally the action was much higher. Neckset angles on student-grade acoustics were often quite poor on Day One such that they were physically hard to play when new. By the time they were ten years old, the neckset angles had often shifted so much that they were virtually unplayable. While today many craftsmen are very adept at resetting necks, in the mid 1960s no one I knew had mastered techniques for doing this. Even companies such as Martin and Gibson did not reset necks if guitars were sent back to them for warranty service. Martin's typical approach at that time was to plane the fingerboard, such that it was virtually paper thin by the nut and full thickness by the body joint, and then refret. Gibson would frequently tackle such a problem by sawing the neck off at the heel joint, chopping the remainder out from the dovetail with a chisel, and installing a new neck. Student-grade instruments with poor necksets frequently were simply thrown away. Truss rods in student grade guitars usually were little more than window dressing. Although many of these guitars bore labels reading "steel reinforced neck" or actually had a truss rod in the neck, these rods usually were not functional. Martin had a steel T-bar in the neck from late 1934 through the 1960s, and Gibson and Fender both had highly functional truss rods, but Harmony, Kay and other makers of student guitars usually installed rods so poorly that any attempt to adjust the rod was simply an exercise in frustration and futility. While Harmony and Kay as well as some other makers turned out many hundreds of thousands of guitars and greatly exceeded the number of instruments produced by Martin, Fender and Gibson combined in those days, a surprisingly small percentage of those instruments have survived over the years, such that good condition original examples are remarkably scarce today. Some of these instruments have become quite collectible and now bring prices exceeding $1,000. Kay hollowbody electrics with the so-called "Kelvinator" peghead, especially the early Barney Kessel models, are now considered to have a considerable "cool factor." Likewise, original Danelectro "longhorn" guitars and basses have a visual flare as well as a funky distinctive sound of their own.
If you wanted to quantify what is meant by "best," which you really should, then we actually would need to consider the specifications of guitars in the given price range. Although there may be differences of personal preference when it comes to areas such as individual tone woods used, fretboard scale, and nut width, we could still make very good general assumptions about whether laminates are better than a solid wood model, whether synthetic fretboard material was favorable to natural wood, whether one pickup is better than two, and/or whether including a built-in tuner is preferable. In other words, Forget about the names of the manufacturers and do a real comparison of specifications of guitars in the given price range.

I have a vox valvtronics amp I bought a while ago it has a real preamp tube and loads of very accurate effects great reverb 3 kinds good modulation effects awesome distortion and tube overdrive and very important it is easy to adjust effect level and a power knob that lets you adjust output 1 to 60 watts like a pr attenuator its great so you don't loose that sound of a cranked up amp when you don't want it to loud it also has a easy to use tuner this amp is very user friendly unlike some modeling and effects carrying amps and you can easily adjust effects levels with separate knobs no confusion also a pedal to control effects is available for about 50 dollars is a great studio or small gig still amp and saves a lot because all of the effects it offers its like having a vox tone labe on top of a amp exactly you can sound like van halen led Zeppelin pink floyd lady gaga or the beatles and more and the price is very competitive to all others in its category

The Octavia was created by Roger Mayer for Jimi Hendrix in 1967. It’s musical debut can be heard on “Purple Haze” on the Are You Experienced record. One of the many ground breaking sounds on this recording. The pedal produces a doubling effect an octave above the fundamental note. The octave is similar to a ring modulator in that it is kind of dirty and strange sounding.


Portland, OR was probably the place of import, but all the Lyles were 'licensed' copies of Gibson, they weren't seconds. The acoustic guitars were built in Japan, with laminated tops and sides. Over all construction on the guitars was very good for the materials used. I gave my Humminbird copy to my son after playing it for 25 years, and he still plays it today. Unfortunated during that 25 years, I had to have the bridge reset 3 times due to the weakness of the laminated top. My luthier asked me why I didn't just buy a Gibson or a Martin for as much money as I put into repairing that Lyle...I told him the tone was worth the extra expense.
Pete Cornish (Pete Cornish Ltd.): “Compressors should be first in line from the guitar. Do not use a volume pedal first, as this will defeat any compression, and leave the system with maximum noise if the volume pedal is reduced to zero. I tend to connect any distortion devices and high-gain pedals first in line, and the lower-gain pedals later. I have found that the higher-gain devices control sustain, and the lower-gain devices control the tone if they are connected in this order. Modulation devices can come next.
A guitar tuner pedal is an absolute must have if you’re serious about guitar as it provides accurate tuning instantly and can even allow you to tune your guitar to alternative tunings such as Drop D, open tunings and more. Check out our top 12 Best Guitar Tuners blog for more info on guitar tuners. The absolute industry standard is the BOSS TU-3 tuner pedal - a must have.
The brand’s biggest boom through the fifties and sixties was largely down to the birth of rock n’ roll. Thanks to their excellent hollow and semi-hollow models, Gretsch guitars were used by icons including Chuck Berry, Chet Atkins, Bo Diddley, and George Harrison. Since 2002 the production side of things has been run by Fender, although the Gretsch family still own the company.
While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.

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ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.

Funny, the Dorado was manufactured in Japan during the 70's and the Japanese factory worker must have arbitrarily placed a model number when he or she felt like it. However, it seems that Serial Numbers (presumably in proper sequence) were always assigned and hand written with a black ink pen. My example, while space is present, is void of any model number.

Hold on now, this is my story, right? Anyways, realizing that I don’t use multiple amps live, and that I tend to stick with 1 basic amp sound, this was going to be easier than I thought. The amp sound I use is more of a Fender Twin sound with a little more mids, but not as much as say, a Deluxe. The gain is something I get from my pedals (like an 805 Overdrive and a Vapor Trail Analog Delay).  I didn’t need a device for live playing that replicated dozens of amps, cabs, and microphones. My setup is simple: Good pedals plugged into a simple modeler like the Tech 21 Fly Rig 5.  It is a simple amp modeler with reverb that I can even use as a full pedalboard if mine goes down. Getting use to IEMs with a well-mixed band took a little bit of doing, but after a few gigs, I had adjusted just fine. You can change your own balance of the band in your own ears, but it is sort of like listening to a CD and playing along with it. It is not much different than what I do at home, anyway, so once I got over the ‘hangup’ of not carrying my amp (my back thanks me), and not seeing my amp behind me, it made a lot of sense. We take 50% less gear now to gigs, and the recordings (and reviews) are much, much better. My ears don’t ring for 2 days after. I can still get glorious feedback (from my pickups hearing the PA sound), and all of the little tricks I do on guitar remain in tact. The pickups on my guitar still deliver the same sound. To my ears, it is easier to mix out front, and much, much easier to balance all of the instruments without all of the stage volume. We also have a lot more room onstage to move around. 
This type of chip delivers a beautifully coloured representation of your sound. It may not be the most accurate and you are limited in the number of repeats and delay time.These are not to be confused with Tape Echo which was used for a long time in the world’s largest studios. No, these pedals were made out of necessity to take a form of delay on the road easily.
My first guitar was a fender knockoff. My first professional guitar was a Gibson LP custom. I like the richer tone of the Gibson for ballads, folk and country and the Fender gives you the edge you need for rock, garage and loud stuff. Foot pedals get the sounds you need for just about any style of music with either brand. The fender neck is a bit easier to move over because it is thin and fat-fingered guys like me need a bit of help that way. The Gibson reminds me more of my acoustic guitars. Strings are an important selection for any guitar to be comfortable and get the right sound.
I signed up for the Free GuitarTricks Trial and the first lesson that I checked out was titled something like “Blues Style Level 2 – How B.B. King Starts The Blues”.  You wouldn’t believe it. Shortly after starting this lesson I felt that my playing sounded the way it should be sounding. It sounded kind of the same as how B.B. King sounded. I was over the moon. This was simply an amazing experience and I never looked back. Today I am almost sure that I would probably be a Rock Star today if Guitar Tricks would have been around 20 years earlier ;-).
I was a little concerned buying a guitar on Amazon. I had not even played a sample on the Gretsch acoustic. I've played Martins, Fenders, Washburns, etc. but never heard of the 'Gretsch'! It arrived within a few days of ordering with the case I ordered too. I had it delivered to my office so that it wouldn't be sitting on my porch until I got home. I opened the box to examine the guitar and co-workers asked me to play something. As I was tuning the white Gretsch I broke a string, so playing it for my friends was not going to happen. When I got home I re-stung the guitar and as I was tuning it I was not very impressed. I like the look but come on we purchase a guitar to play! After it was tuned I began to play a few chords and licks.
The idea behind this site is to share my experience with Do It Yourself approach to guitars, amplifiers and pedals. Whether you want to save a couple of bucks by performing a mod or upgrade yourself instead of paying a tech, or want to build your own piece of gear from scratch, I'm sure you will find something interesting here. Also, this is the home of DIY Layout Creator, a free piece of software for drawing circuit layouts and schematics, written with DIY enthusiasts in mind.

The Canadian firm Godwin is another popular name for producing best quality electric and acoustic guitars. (Have you heard of Seagull acoustic guitars? It’s the same brand.) Godwin outshines among the world of guitars due to producing high-end instruments with surprising variations. They even manage to touch bass too. Not only the Godwin guitars depict quality, but also reflect classiness.
Before Gruhn Guitars puts out any of our fine instruments for sale, they go through our repair shop to get them ready to play. Some older instruments require extensive repairs and restoration, while others just need new strings and basic setup. But every guitar, mandolin and banjo has to meet the high standards of the repair crew before it's released for sale. Our repair staff has over 75 years combined experience repairing, restoring, building and designing guitars.
1991 saw the introduction of guitar designer Jol Dantzig's first truly workable acoustic-electric hybrid guitar design. The instrument, called the DuoTone, was conceived while Dantzig was at Hamer Guitars. (Dantzig was also the designer of the first 12 string bass.) Adapted by players like Ty Tabor, Stone Gossard, Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy, the DuoTone was a full "duplex" instrument that could switch between acoustic and electric tones. Recently there have been many entries in the hybrid category (capable of both acoustic and electric tones) including the T5 by Taylor, Michael Kelly's "Hybrid," the Parker Fly and the Anderson Crowdster.
The Epiphone Les Paul SL guitar (seen here in a Vintage Sunburst finish) is a great option for beginner guitarists out there as well as those in need of a high quality, budget friendly guitar that actually sounds and feels great. This is one of our best cheap electric guitars thanks to the fact you get a Les Paul style guitar packed with ceramic single coil pickups capable of spanning a range of different genres for under £100.
Personally, I just don’t understand how you can justify calling guitars that go for 2-3x the price an “alternative”. In a list like this, you should be providing alternatives that provide superior quality, sound, and ergonomics for a SIMILAR pricetag, not a jump from $200 to $600. Also, the concept that a beginner musician will have absolutely any clue that these guitars will sound poor is almost laughable to me. A good amp will do a lot of the work, and another portion of your sound goes into technique and playing style. An actual guitar itself is less important than the amp and the player. Think of an amp as a GPU and the player as the CPU cooler: if the GPU runs fine and the CPU cooler can do its job efficiently then your CPU will manage just fine as long as it isn’t so horribly behind as to bottleneck the GPU. Also, tonewoods only affect tone in a very small way that unless you are doing a back to back comparison on a clean channel with a flat response cab is very, very difficult to notice, and once you add any crunch or dirt or even distortion it’s just out of the question altogether. If somebody has never picked up a guitar then they could hardly appreciate a Mexican Strat more than a Squire at all.
For our example pedal board, we’ll pick the ST-2 Power Stack. Another category with many choices is modulation.These are effects like flanger, phaser, chorus, tremolo, and others. Let’s use the most versatile of these—the BF-3 Flanger. Another group is ambience effects, such as delays and reverbs. We’ll use one of each: a DD-7 Digital Delay and the FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. There are some pedal effects that can add notes or alter the pitch of what you’re playing. For want of a more esoteric name, we’ll call these “pitch-altering” pedals. From this category, let’s throw in a BOSS OC-3 Octave.
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Simon Stockhausen began his stellar musical career at the age of five. His multi-faceted and wide-ranging oeuvre has since embraced all manner of projects and styles, including jazz and improvisational collaborations, countless compositions for ensembles and chamber groups as well as work for major European theatre companies and orchestras including the Hamburg and Berlin Philharmonic Orchestras. In 2009 he further extended the range of his musical endeavors with the creation of a sound design company through which he produces sounds, patches and libraries for software synths and plug-ins, serving sound designers, musicians and post production professionals.

Guitar effects pedals alter the pitch, tone, and sound of your electric guitar or bass guitar, and as such, it is important to ensure you are armed with as much knowledge about them as possible before making a selection. The alterations made by these effects pedals include acoustic effects, compression, delay, reverb, distortion, overdrive, equalization, loopers, samplers, noise gates, pitch, octave, modulation effects, wah, multi effectors, volume, expression, and filters. They are available from brands such as Boss, MXR, TC Electronic, Electro-Harmonix, Catalinbread, and Fulltone.

PRS McCarty 594 Electric Guitar The PRS McCarty 594 is a vintage-inspired electric guitar with plenty of premium appointments such as a . It’s part of the Core Electric Series, the company’s lineup of high-end guitars. This means that the McCarty 594 has all the bells and whistles you can expect from a premium instrument. For pro musicians, this is an investment worth every penny.
Still not ready to give up, in ’87 Ovation contracted with a Korean manufacturer to bring in a Celebrity line of solidbody electrics. These were Strat-style guitars again, with bolt-on necks, pointy/droopy six-in-line headstocks (with a bi-level carved relief along the bottom, per style), two-octave rosewood fingerboards, triangular flag inlays, and a double-locking vibrato system. We’re not sure what the pickup brand was, but there are models with two XK-110 single-coils and one XK-120 humbucker, plastic-covered with no exposed poles.
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.
One app I can recommend for playing these SoundFonts on smartphones or tablets is bs-16i from bismark.  Large SoundFount files like Nice-Keys-* listed at the top of this page have been tested and run perfectly on newer iPads with 3gb of Ram or more. For iPads with 2gb (Air2) it is best to limit the SoundFont size to around 600mb. For older devices try SoundFonts around 300mb.

Following a raft of recent updates, the MS-50G now boasts over 100 effects and 22 amp models, six of which can be used simultaneously in any order. Add a chromatic tuner into the equation, and you're looking at a pedal for all seasons. The very playable amp models cover the popular options: there are three Fenders ('65 Twin Reverb, '65 Deluxe Reverb, Tweed Bassman), a Vox AC30 and a Marshall Plexi. You also get a Two-Rock Emerald 50, while a Diezel Herbert and Engl Invader cover the high-gain side of things. Effects include modulation, filter, pitch shift, distortion, delay and reverb. Most are generic, but some, particularly in the overdrive/distortion category, are modelled on well-known devices - the Big Muff and TS-808, for example. Each patch can be constructed from a chain of six effects blocks, each with a modelled amp or effect, DSP permitting. It all adds up to the most practical, cost-effective way to expand your pedalboard by adding a single pedal.

Let me begin by saying this guitar is really good right out of the box. It has a booming sound, and really fills a room even when not plugged in. However, to make it really shine, you should perform a basic setup. I replaced the saddle and pins with bone and sanded the bone saddle down to lower the action. The nut is good from the factory. I also oiled the rosewood fretboard and added Martin phosphor bronze medium strings. After doing this work, the guitar sounds every bit as good as my 90’s Martin DR which is stellar. At this price range, I didn’t expect much, but what I received was a very pleasant surprise. Don’t hesitate to buy this package!


Good questions. Firstly, swapping the saddle around has the effect of moving the tapered top edge of the saddle closer to, or farther from (depending on which way it was to start with) the front of the bridge. If you're wanting the string to be as long as possible, for example, you'd need to make sure the saddle is oriented in such a way that the tapered edge is at the tail end (farther from the pickups). If you look at my pictures above, you'll see that my D-string saddle is originally oriented in this way, but in my case I need to SHORTEN the string, so I rotate it and this gives me more forward adjustment. Since you need to do the opposite of me, you'd therefore need to make sure your saddle has the same orientation as what mine had BEFORE I changed it. I really hope that makes sense.
FuzzPlus2 is an update of our popular free download Fuzz+. The basis of the plug-in is a transform model of a famous vintage fuzz pedal. There are four controls: Fuzz knob: This controls, as you might imagine, exactly how much fuzz is applied to the signal. Tone knob: This controls the brightness of the distorted signal. Output knob: This is the output volume of the device, when it is active. Bypass button: This works just like the switch on a stomp box. When the blue light is lit, you're money. When it's not, the input is passed directly to the output. This can be automated for a slightly different vibe than automating the effect bypass of your host. free vst plugin.
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