This thing has taken quite a rap from what I've seen. People griping about it not being as good as the previous model. I don't know much about the other model, I didn't have one. So, I'm unbiased. I've had tons of peddles, singles and multi fx. I absolutely love this! I've been playing for over 20 years on stage. I'm a worship leader at a big Church. This is great for replacing my single peddles. I thought it was very comparable in sound. I use it through an American Peavey classic 30 with an English Celestian speaker. It rocks, period. I think the sound quality is great. I don't need tons of options. I hate too many. I like have the excellent fewer options. They are great! I love how easy it is, I had it figured out right away. I've used both. On stage and studio. This is ... full review
A good guitar builder can pick materials that provide a predictable result. The process of making a guitar that costs $10,000 and one that costs $1,000 is identical, or at least very similar. The big difference is likely that in the more expensive one, personal attention has been put into selecting, drying, storing, and cutting the tonewood. The cheaper, which is mass produced by less skilled labor, consists of the same species of wood, but from a pile that came out of a container, in the order it was stacked. This means that two guitars from the same batch can sound quite different. They can sound exactly like the expensive guitar, but they can also sound different.
The full-size guitar in black by DirectlyCheap should therefore be on your list for consideration. Made out of linden, basswood and catalpa with a particularly ornate inlay around the sound hole, this model has a really lovely sound for the price. Just keep in mind that, like other guitar shipments, when you receive the guitar, you will have to “set up” the neck. If you need help with this, a guitar tech will assist.
I remember the first time I saw Eddie Van Halen on MTV, the way he played two hands on the fingerboard during his short “Jump” guitar solo. I loved his cool “Frankenstein” guitar, so named because he cobbled together a variety of guitar parts and decorated his creation with colored tape and paint. Even as a 13-year-old who grew up primarily listening to, and playing, classical music, I felt compelled to run out and buy his band’s “1984” LP at my local Tower Records store.
The Blues Junior's compact dimensions, light weight and pedal-friendly credentials have made it one of the most popular gigging combos in the world, but for 2018, Fender has updated it to the new Mark IV specification, which features various tweaks, including Celestion’s excellent A-Type loudspeaker. Controls include gain, bass treble and middle, reverb level and master volume, with a small push-button ‘Fat’ switch. In use, the Junior unleashes a stunning range of Fender tones, from spanky, sparkling cleans, to fat and smooth midrange crunch that’s spot on for blues and classic rock. The Fat switch adds a generous midrange boost and can be remote-controlled from a footswitch for greater versatility, while the improved reverb circuit is very impressive, with no noise and a smooth, warm delay that feels more integral to the overall amp tone, harking back to the best blackface reverbs of the 1960s. No matter what guitar you use, the Blues Junior flatters single coils and humbuckers alike, not to mention drive pedals with plenty of volume. The sounds are top-drawer, comparing well against many so-called boutique amps costing four times the price. Factor in the compact dimensions and light weight, and it’s easy to see why the Blues Junior remains a firm favourite.

It makes sense to start with the most famous, the poster-boy of the acoustic guitar world. It’s the first thing non-players imagine when they think of an acoustic guitar and, sure enough, it’s one of the most versatile instruments you can pick up. By versatile, we mean it is just as much at home in a variety of musical settings and genres, from rock to folk, indie to punk.

Gibson did not take Fender too seriously at first; Fender were just an amplifier company that made a few guitars. They didn't regard the solid-body Broadcaster launched in 1950 as a serious musical instrument, lacking the depth of tone of a Gibson electric-acoustic. But music was changing, guitarists wanted different sounds, and music was getting louder. Fenders instruments proved to be more appropriate for the emerging musical scenes. Over the next decade Fender created a number of solid-body guitars that defined genres. Guitars like the Stratocaster, Telecaster and Precision and Jazz basses proved to be exceptionally popular and have stayed in production ever since.
On my bench today, a partscaster with a Hamer Slammer neck, Carvin Rail in the bridge, Ry Cooder Dearmond middle, and PRS P90 in the neck. Wasn’t quite right (throbby) with the usual 3 250K pots and an 022 orange drop (i know, i know, but they aren’t that expensive). So, i went with 500K master vol, 500K master tone (found an old ceramic PRS 022 cap too), and an acme blender pot (neck and bridge) in the last position. Now it’s fun. Lots of variety in positions 1, 2, 4, & 5. 3 knobs and a whammy and she’s done.
You can use similar two-mic techniques, minus the effects, on a single amp to capture a variety of larger-than-life guitar sounds. One trick that I stumbled upon involves miking a twin-speaker amp with two mics that are close in response, but not matched (see Fig. 1). The first time I tried this, on a session with guitarist Paris Slim, I used an Electro-Voice RE20 and a Sennheiser 441.
The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.
To wire three two-conductor pickups we only need one pole. Common goes to volume pot input and 3 switched terminals are connected to pickup outputs. That way, we will select one pickup in positions 1-3-5 and two pickups wired in parallel in positions 2-4. When middle pickup has reverse polarity, noise will cancel out in positions 2-4 and they will be wired in so called “humbucking” mode.
I have a Lyle Acoustic Guitar Model 690 purchased about 1966 or 67. It appears to be in near brand new condition as I've rarely played it and it has been stored in a felt lined case its entire life. All the keys still turn, it has steel strings. I'm ready to part with it and want to ask a fair price and not get soaked. Does anyone have any idea what this beautiful instrument is worth?
This fully analog simple plug and play guitar amplifier is enjoyable to play with. It has a switchable clean and dirty channel with separate volume knobs that shares a 3-band EQ treble-mid-bass and gain control to add more grit so players can arrive on a crunch and lead sounds. Other useful attributes on the amp are set of input jacks for a headphone and audio source to play along with a backing track.

It’s easy to remove your pickup or pickguard and slide some foam rubber behind the unit. Start with soft foam first, and then increase the density to find the difference you like. Conveniently, the gray foam used in aftermarket pickup packaging makes great damping material: It’s soft enough that you can double it up (see Fig. 1 and 2) to create more pressure on the pickup’s back plate, too. This is a relatively no-frills mod that requires minimal materials and tools.

If you’re a player performing live or in a studio, all of this is just the opening pre-credits sequence to your signal then being captured via a microphone, which then sends current through another cable to a mixing board, which then has its own preamplification, equalization and filtering, which either goes to the power amplifiers of a public address system or to some kind of recording device, which then involves…aw, I’m getting tired, and I think we’re getting the point: how can anyone call *any* of this “natural”? Does *any* of this occur in nature? Does any of this sound like we’re carving a flute from driftwood or clapping a couple empty coconut shells together?


Previously, Epiphone guitars were considered to be the biggest competitor of Gibson. However, they were later acquired by Gibson who has retained the name of this brand to distinguish them from their pricey brothers. You can certainly consider it a budget-friendly production from the high-end guitar makers. Epiphone, just like the Gibson’s Les Paul, shares the same design but is available at a much lesser price. When it comes to craftsmanship, then we must say that Gibson is much better than this one. Unfortunately, Epiphone utilizes low-quality products such as mahogany and other electronic components.

Relatively new to the amplifier world, Paul Reed Smith is building some of the most interest amps out there. After tapping legendary amp builder Doug Sewell to head design, the company has produced a range of boutique-quality amps for a fraction of the price. The Sonzera 20 is a reliable amp that is incredibly versatile, with a full tube sound similar to American amps from the ’60s.
Bottom Line: The biggest downside of the Line 6 M5 is that you can’t use more than one effect at the same time, and that it’s missing a looper function. But then again, you’re asking it to be more than what it’s trying to be. This is a Swiss Army Knife of a pedal that can morph and change shapes to whatever effect you need (we should also mention it’s true bypass when switched off). Sure, the drives/distortions are a weak area, but most effects are nearly indistinguishable from the classic pedals they are trying to emulate. We love this quote from a user:
Mother-of-pearl rosette inlay. If you’ve had acoustic guitars with mother-of-pearl accents, you’ll appreciate the beauty of the mother-of-pearl inlay around the sound hole. This particular rosette pattern is inspired by the 1920’s Domingo Esteso design, which will be a treat for those who love specific historic details like this. Even if history isn’t your concern, the mother-of-pearl colors enhance the pattern.
There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.
Now, the body size isn’t the only thing to think about. There’s also whether or not there’s a cutaway, and how this is implemented. A cutaway makes it easier for you to access the higher frets, because you can place your hand right next to them. Naturally this will reduce some of the resonance because there’s less body beside the neck, but it’s a tradeoff that a great many guitarists are happy to make if they want to be able to play those higher frets well.
Once everything is assembled, check through the instructions one last time for any additional notes on connections, power etc (don’t waste all your hard work by blowing up the board with the wrong power supply). Then plug in your pedal and give it a try. There’s a good chance it will work first time. If not, go through the instructions again step by step and look to see where the problem might be. Missed, incorrect, or reversed components are the most common causes and can be diagnosed just by checking each step carefully.
First Act is a very peculiar guitar company. They have guitars that sell at Toys R Us that will literally fall apart in your hands. They sell pedals that are a complete joke, leaving you with the impression that they must be a bad, bad joke. Then something strange happened, I did a little research and found some info that was stunning. First Act has a couple of guitar lines that are some of the finest guitars I have ever seen, heard, or even read about. They have guitars that go for $3000 plus and are better guitars than any person commenting on this board will ever have the opportunity of even being in the same room with (including myself) Who would have thought?! Go figure.
Get a ruler (or straightedge if you want to be all fancy) that is at least as long as the neck, but not so long that it reaches all the way from the nut to the saddles (and watch it doesn’t lean on the pickups or pickup surrounds either). If you can’t get one between these lengths, and are willing to sacrifice a ruler, get one that’s too long and cut it to length. Alternatively, you can just cut a little out of one edge so that you can still make full use of the other edge of the ruler. Now lay the edge of the ruler along the frets (don’t rest it on top of the nut, saddles, pickups or pickup surrounds).
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Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.
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The rest seems like a bit of an odd ball selection. It's the age old argument of technique over substance. BB King puts more into a small handful of notes than Malmsteen does in several hundred. One of the most musical guitar players to have graced the earth. In fact I think it was BB who stated that it's not the notes you put in but the notes you choose to leave out that count. Now that's music.
A closer look at a 1981 Gibson Victory MV-II electric guitar. The Gibson Victory MV, or 'Multi-Voice' guitars had very wide tonal palettes; with coil-tapped humbuckers they could produce typical Gibson tones, but were also designed to 'out-Fender' Fender. Two models were launched in the summer of 1981. Whilst the MVX, was designed to do everything a Stratocaster could do, the MVII was 'primarily for the discerning country player' - placing it squarely against the Telecaster.
GUITAR RIG 5 PLAYER is the free, modular and expandable effects processor from Native Instruments, combining creative effects routing possibilities with ease-of-use and pristine sound quality. The included FACTORY SELECTION library provides one stunning amp with 17 cabinet emulations, plus 13 effects and sound modifiers to shape and enhance any audio signal.
In the 1980s, digital rackmount units began replacing stompboxes as the effects format of choice. Often musicians would record "dry", unaltered tracks in the studio and effects would be added in post-production. The success of Nirvana's 1991 album Nevermind helped to re-ignite interest in stompboxes. Some grunge guitarists would chain several fuzz pedals together and plug them into a tube amplifier.[47] Throughout the 1990s, musicians committed to a "lo-fi" aesthetic such as J Mascis of Dinosaur Jr., Stephen Malkmus of Pavement and Robert Pollard of Guided by Voices continued to use analog effects pedals.[48]
The Epiphone brand scores another spot in this list with the Hummingbird Pro, a stylized take on the popular dreadnought shape. This guitar is the affordable version of the original Gibson Hummingbird, as seen in the hands of big name artists like Keith Richards, Noel Gallagher, Sheryl Crow and many more. It is a modern and more cost effective take on the guitar that Keith used on many of The Rolling Stones' popular tracks, including "Play with Fire" and "Satisfaction".

Standard tuning but with the 6th string lowered two whole steps. Used by Alter Bridge on the song "My Champion" (tuned down a half-step) as well as Sevendust on the song "Mountain" (tuned down one and a half steps). Also used by John Mayer on the song “Neon”, and by Chino Moreno of Deftones on some songs such as "Swerve City" and "Hearts/Wires", tuned down a full step.

While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.


More expensive amplifiers may have a patch bay for multiple inputs and outputs, such as a pre-amp out (for sending to another guitar amplifier), a second low gain input, to use with active basses, an in jack to create an effects loop (when used with the pre-amp out jack), an external speaker output (for powering an additional speaker cabinet), and stereo RCA jacks or an 1/8" jack, for connecting a CD player or MP3 player so that a player can practice along with recorded music. Some amps have a 1/4" jack for connecting a pedal to turn the amp's onboard overdrive and reverb on and off or to switch between channels. Some amps have an XLR jack for a microphone, either for the guitar amp to be used for singing (in effect as a mini-PA system), or, for acoustic guitar, to mix a mic signal with a pickup signal.
Fender released the first successful solidbody electric guitar, the Broadcaster, in 1950. (Remember, the original Esquires were problematic.) Gibson produced the first Les Paul 24 months later. And a mere six years after that, a small run of sunburst Les Pauls flowed out of Gibson’s Kalamazoo, Michigan factory. Originally just another instrument, those Les Pauls now occupy a mythic status in the minds of guitarists and collectors everywhere. The instruments, along with a small handful of Fender Stratocasters and examples from one or two other manufacturers from roughly the same era, represent the Holy Grail in guitar tones.
Harmony Hollywood H38- OK, here's the one we will sell. She's about the same as above but with opposite color combo. This one has a nice vintage DeArmond Gold Foil Pickup. Action is medium, but if you would like a lower action, we will be happy to cut that bridge a bit down. Guitar is in  nice vintage condition. All original except the period style Rosewood Bridge and reproduction Harmony Pick Guard. SOLD
BYO takes pride in providing you with a BETTER guitar kit. We have worked with our supplier for many years, making sure we provide our customers with the highest quality products. We have our kit manufactured to our specifications and we have been providing guitar kits to builders for over a decade! We inspect each kit before we ship, checking for great neck fit, and making sure there are no problems with the body and neck. We repackage the all the hardware and electronics, putting all the correct screws with the correct parts and making sure you get ALL the parts for your kit. We don't just re-sell kits, we also have a custom shop where we make USA made guitar kits. We use this know-how to make sure our imported kits are of a higher quality and will give you a great experience and a great guitar. If by chance we miss anything, we are happy to replace, repair, exchange or refund. We have also written clear, easy to understand, step by step instructions that will make building your guitar a breeze, but if you have any questions, we are happy to answer any questions you may have along the way.
 How to Order Custom Guitar: THIS IS A PRE-BUILD PRICING. You will receive the custom guitar exactly as pictured. Please make sure to choose the required options marked with the RED ( * ) asterisks and it will compute automatically the options you choose. We also offer Optional Upgrades but they are not required. And then once you hit on Buy Now button, go to the top most portion of the website and you can see a cart image logo and click on that then you can see VIEW CART and CHECKOUT to determine the total cost of the guitar including the shipping and the discount.

The Fender Super-Champ X2 HD is a true champion when it comes to versatility and quality, combining old school tube technology with modern amp voicing and digital effects, all in a compact and portable 15W amplifier head. With a single 12AX7 preamp tube and two 6V6 power amp tubes, you can't lump this amp with conventional amp modelers, but you also can't group it with traditional tube amps because it does let you choose from 16 amp voicings that cover everything from clean Tweed tones to high-gain metal. In addition, the amp comes with 15 effects that include variations of reverb, tremolo, modulation and delay. With its low watt rating, the Super-Champ X2 HD is ideal for practice and recording, while being loud and portable enough for small venue gigs. Finally all these features are made available in a compact and more importantly - affordable package.

Anyways, it sucks to not have a camera to show stuff or even a way to measure stuff I'm describing. I'll have to obtain a few small things to set it up. like a saddle and an allen wrench that doesn't suck. Probably whatever caliper or shim they use to do real setups as well. Maybe latter frames just have tilted bridges after a while. I don't really know. The bridge is rather thick. If you lower the bridge, do you just sand it?


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The godfather of all that is sought after in rack gear; behold, the Soldano SLO Rackmount Amplifier. Those of you that have heard of the SLO (Super Lead Overdrive) already know that this thing can be brutal when it comes to lead tones. Possessing one of the tightest crunch and overdrive channels known to man, the SLO Rackmount is hailed as a grail piece of gear for many guitar players. The SLO-100 offers two channels, Normal and Overdrive, each with independent Preamp gain and Master Volume controls.  A footswitch is also provided for effortless noise-free switching between the two channels.  The Normal channel has a Bright switch and a Clean / Crunch gain selector switch.  Standard features include a tube-buffered effects loop and a slave output.  Bass, Middle, Treble, and Presence controls provide the tone shaping.  From Clapton to Van Halen, from Warren DeMartini to Lou Reed – and from you to Mike Soldano himself, the SLO is simply the player’s choice.
The brands and individual guitars that we have selected are based on a combination of our joint 80+ years of experience and the ratings and feedback from people who have bought them. The leading brands are dominated by Martin and Gibson/Epiphone as you might expect, and there's not a lot of change this year in terms of brands expect that Seagull has earned their way back into this list at the expense of Fender - we had to make the cut somewhere.
Also new in ’66 was the SM series, a variation on the E-100 and ET-100 introduced in the previous year, very similar to the Ks except the cutaway horns were flared outward in the classic Teisco “tulip” shape which would dominate later in the decade. These had fairly flat rectangular chrome-covered pickups, with a rectangular indentation stamped in the center and six flat round poles, plus to long half-slots along both outer edges. The SM-2L (Teisco Del Rey ET-210) had the hooked headstock, small striped metal pickguard along the lower body, two on/off sliders, volume, tone, roller bridge and Bigsby-style vibrato. The SM-2L retained the German carve relief of the K series. A plain-Jane SM-2 (Teisco Del Rey ET-200) followed, sans German carve, and with a bridge/tailpiece assembly. The SM-1 (Teisco Del Rey ET-110) had just a neck pickup with volume and tone controls, bridge/tailpiece assembly, no German carve or striped metal pickguard, and the Strat-style head of the previous ET-100.
When playing seventh chords, guitarists often play only subset of notes from the chord. The fifth is often omitted. When a guitar is accompanied by a bass, the guitarist may omit the bass note from a chord. As discussed earlier, the third of a triad is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality; similarly, the third of a seventh is doubled to emphasize its major or minor quality. The most frequent seventh is the dominant seventh; the minor, half-diminished, and major sevenths are also popular.[79]
The Gruhn Guitars repair shop has been world renowned for decades for its unrivaled expertise, skill, and respectful repair practices. Though our full-time staff of luthiers primarily focuses on repairing and restoring the instruments we make available for sale, beginning in 2016 we are also pleased to offer our repair services to loyal customers as an extended benefit of buying an instrument from Gruhn Guitars. Instruments purchased from Gruhn Guitars will be moved to the front of our repair queue and will be repaired at a discounted labor rate. As a sign of our appreciation for your business, Gruhn Guitars is here to help you for years to come to keep your instrument in the same prime working order as when it was listed for sale at the shop.

The first electric instrument amplifiers were not intended for electric guitars, but were portable PA systems. These appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes enabled economical built-in power supplies that could plug into wall sockets. Previously, amplifiers required heavy multiple battery packs. People used these amplifiers to amplify acoustic guitar, but electronic amplification of guitar first became widely poplular in the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively used amplified lap steel guitars.[2]
Founded by the American Orville Gibson in 1902, Gibson is without a doubt the other legendary electric guitar brand. Their most famous model holds the name of the very popular guitarist Les Paul, who collaborated with Ted McCarty in its design back in the 1950's. Unlike the Telecaster and Stratocaster, the Les Paul boasts a mahogany body, a set mahogany neck, a rosewood fingerboard, and a maple top. Among the many Les Paul players we find Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin:

During the NSF grant cycles, the STEM Guitar Project has exceeded initial estimates of faculty impacted by recruiting over 450 STEM educators, with an additional 500 faculty exposed via national education conferences. Thus far, this effort is impacting over 20,000 students nationally over the 8 years because of faculty members adopting or adapting the curriculum developed through the project.
Hi Paul, sorry you’re having trouble. If you’ve got one of the ‘import’ type switches described above you have 8 contacts (lugs). The “5 positions” are the 5 resting positions the switch lever can be set to (which correspond to your 5 possible pickup selections). You need to get the hang of switches before you attempt to rewire one of these so if the idea of a 2-pole 3-way switch doesn’t make sense then you should probably put the soldering iron down and look for a local guitar tech who can help you, your local guitar shop is a good place to ask.
I took lessons with him when i was 8 years old. I stopped taking lessons when i was 12 years old. In those four years i have learned so much about guitar in such a little time. Patrick is an amazing teacher and by the time i left his teaching, i joined 4 bands and played at the whiskey twice, the house of blues four times, and the grove once. All amazing experiences and it all started from Patrick. I am 16 now and i will never forget what he has done for me. If you are thinking about eventually taking on guitar at all, Pat is your man.
In some modern valve effects, the "dirty" or "gritty" tone is actually achieved not by high voltage, but by running the circuit at voltages that are too low for the circuit components, resulting in greater non-linearity and distortion. These designs are referred to as "starved plate" configurations, and result in an "amp death" sound.[citation needed]

American guitar manufacture was at its peak in the 1960s, with numerous highly-respected guitar companies making instruments at all levels; from the likes of Kay, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Fender and Gibson. But Harmony was one of the very biggest producers, at one point the biggest, selling guitars branded both as Harmony, and rebadged for numerous other distributors. In fact, in the mid/late 1960s, Harmony was said to produce more guitars than all other American guitar manufacturers combined. Most were entry or intermediate level instruments though, and although examples of most models are easy to find, examples in really good condition are rare.


As mentioned above, the Martin DSR2 comes with an all-solid wood body, with traditional solid spruce as its top. In conjunction with the solid sapele back and sides, this configuration produces premium level Martin dreadnought tones, albeit with stripped down aesthetics. The neck is as familiar as it gets, with its 1.75" nut width and 25.4" scale length.
(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.

This little-known company is responsible for the St. George badge. This particular badge was made from 1963-1967. It also produced the rare Shiro guitar. It is possible that the company may also be responsible for the Pleasant guitar badge after 1966. This company may have been a small offshoot of Aria Guitar Company, founded by Shiro Arai, but that has not been verified as of today.
Have a Columbus series 3 superstrat. Jackson/charvel knockoff. It plays ok with a dimarrzio bucker and 2 single coils od unknown origin. It original had a locking trem which could only dive and I replaced with a FR that can only do same because I wouldn't risk routing the ply body. Anyway the interesting point (and I'd love to find out) is that under the "Columbus series 3" badge can clearly be see the faint etching of another badge in gothic script "Winchester". Any thoughts?
For better or worse, by 1982 the taste for natural-finished, neck-through guitars with lots of switches and active electronics had begun to move on. On the horizon were the brief affair with weird-shaped “heavy metal” guitars and the impending first Strat-mania and the rise of Superstrats which would pretty much define the remainder of the decade. 1982, and the 18 and 28 Series, marked the end of Martin’s direct manufacture of electric solidbody guitars.
What does all this have to do with guitars? Crudely speaking, the metal strings of an electric guitar are a bit like dynamos: they make electricity when you move them. Under the strings, there are electricity-generating devices called pickups. Each one consists of one or more magnets with hundreds or thousands of coils of very thin wire wrapped around them. The magnets generate a magnetic field all around them that passes up through the strings. As a result, the metal strings become partially magnetized and, when they vibrate, make a very small electric current flow through the wire pickup coils. The pickups are hooked up to an electrical circuit and amplifier, which boosts the small electric current and sends it on to a loudspeaker, making the familiar electric guitar sound. Usually, the amplifier and loudspeaker are built into a single unit called an "amp."
An equalizer (more often called EQ) is the device that allows you to adjust certain frequencies within your tone. The 3-band part implies that the EQ offers three points of control: bass, middle and treble. While 3-band is the standard, you can also have 2-Band EQ (which tend to offer just bass and treble), as well as 4-band EQ, 5-band EQ (low-bass, mid-bass, midrange, upper-midrange, treble) and upwards! Of course, the higher the band, the more versatility the amp offers. But 3-band tends to be the easiest to get to grips with.
Being in the entry level section of the market, the Blackstar ID:Core Stereo 20 V2 is meant to be an all-in-one practice rig complete with amp modeling and effects. But what makes it stand out is the use of two 5" speakers for a fuller stereo sound, which complements the amp's versatile voicing features. Speaking of voicing, this amp is loaded with 6 essential tones to play with, two variations of clean (warm and bright), crunch (normal and super) and overdrive (OD1 and OD2), which by themselves are enough to play most musical styles. But being from Blackstar, this amp is equipped with their ISF (Infinite Shape Feature) knob that lets you fine tune the voicing of the amp to your preference. In addition, the ID:Core Stereo 20 V2 comes with 12 built-in effects, covering essential modulation types, delays and reverbs, all of which add up to a portable amp that gives you a lot of tone options.

Over the years, the Gibson Memphis factory has become synonymous with creating some of the most accurate recreations of timeless classics. From the ES-335, ES-345 and ES-355 to the compact magic of the ES-339, the Gibson Memphis factory has built legendary instruments that pay tribute to the vintage masterpieces of yesteryear. To up the ante, the Gibson Memphis factory is now offering Limited Edition runs, showcasing the creative talents of their phenomenal crew, while boldly moving forward into a bright future. From unique models to exclusive colors, features and options, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs are redefining the concept of what makes a Gibson so unique, taking things a step further. With limited availability and an incredible demand for these unique instruments, Gibson Memphis Limited Runs have become highly collectible, sought after instruments with features us unique as the players who own them. Wildwood Guitars is honored to present our selection of these prized instruments to our exceptional customers. We invite you to find your own unique treasure among our inventory, just don’t blink… you might miss it!
Australian singer Frank Ifield also owned and used a Maton guitar, which he later had fitted with a custom-made scratch plate, made in the shape of a map of Australia. Frank gave this instrument to his guitarist Ray Brett when he returned to Australia, and it has been featured on an episode of the BBC programmeAntiques Roadshow. Although these guitars are now normally worth around UK£2,000, expert Bunny Campione valued Ifield’s guitar at between UK£10,000 and UK£15,000, because Ifield had used it in songs featured in a compilation album alongside The Beatles‘ first two singles.[2]

The noise out of my chain drives me nuts. I want it when I want it, not when all is shut off. I am running a Clapton Signature Strat with humless pickups into my Blues Deluxe. No effects and it is quiet as the dead of night. Plug in the effects (All Boss BTW) and it just starts humming. I have been playing with it and cant seem to isolate the culprit (s)… Frustrating.

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Les Paul developed one of the first practical solid-bodied electrics made of wood, which he dubbed "The Log". He built the prototype himself -- possible the first practical solid-bodied electric -- in the late 1930s. In 1941, he approached Gibson about making it, Gibson, but they weren't initially interested. Meanwhile, Leo Fender had been independently been developing his own solid bodied guitar, which was released commercially as the Esquire in 1950. By then, lots of people were recording electric guitar.

Double bass players performing in genres where the bass is slapped, either by pulling the string until it snaps back onto the fingerboard or striking the strings, such as traditional blues, rockabilly, psychobilly jazz, folk, and bluegrass often blend the sounds picked up by a piezoelectric transducer with the sounds picked up by a small condenser microphone mounted on the bridge. The microphone picks up the resonance coming from the body and the sounds of the strings being plucked, bowed, or slapped. The two sound signals are blended using a simple mixer and then routed to the amplifier. While many upright bass players use combo amplifiers, bassists in genres that use high stage volume, such as the punk-rockabilly genre of psychobilly use "bass stacks". Some jazz bassists and other bass players who play in small venues use specialized, expensive upright bass amps, like the Acoustic Image combo amplifier.
Despite racial laws still in place at the time, the youngsters knew that they were buying African American music and it didn’t stop them. The shallow radio pop music no longer appealed to them and they found blues music expressed many of the emotions and views. The kids felt a connection to the music, they felt frustrated and wanted a voice and culture of their own.
The world of audio effects is one that can be confusing even for experienced engineers. Especially in modern computer-based recording systems, there's a bewildering array of options, and to add to the confusion, some effects are widely referred to by more than one name. In this article, I'll take you through the most common effects, explaining how they work and where you might want to use them in your music. Meanwhile, SOS 's team of writers has contributed a wealth of expert tips and tricks, which you can find in the boxes scattered through this article.
Large speaker cabinets such as 8x10" enclosures may have wheels and a "towel bar" and dolly wheels to facilitate transportation. Speaker cabinets with 1/4 input jacks typically have two parallel jacks, so that the amp head may be plugged into one cabinet, and then a second cabinet can be "daisy chained" by connecting it to the first cabinet. Cabinets with horn-loaded tweeters often have an attenuator knob for controlling the tweeter. Some 2000s-era speaker cabinets may have Speakon jacks; these jacks are often used with high-wattage amps, because they are safer, as the cable connections are hidden inside the connector and thus it is impossible for the user to touch the metal contacts when plugging in the amp cable.
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Whether he was playing as a Muscle Shoals studio musician or as one of the lead guitarists in The Allman Brothers Band, Duane Allman was brilliant. Both his standard playing and slide playing were some of the smoothest and most adventurous the world has ever seen. To hear Allman at the height of his guitar playing prowess, give a listen to “The Allman Brothers Live at The Fillmore East.”
TRUE. Tommy can be good but I find he has a lot of filler and some overly fluffy tunes sometimes. It makes it sound like he’s trying too hard to play it with as many different chords as possible before finally landing the first note. (which is usually late). and for clapton below me I could agree but I think Jimmy Page’s playing is just as good but he’s more reckless. he’s reckless for good reason though, it’s like he’s transfering his feeling to it like Jimi Hendrix would but Page’s guitar sounds like your heart wanting to rip out of your chest to claim your biggest desire once and for all. The kind of vibe when you finally realize your in love after a LONG time of dullness. Jimi is groovy, and Clapton likes to serenade seeming like an old gentle man from any age.
If you’re looking for a solid start on how you will sound without settling for a tube amplifier due to its price, maintenance and back breaking weight to carry around. The Marshall MG30FX combo amp is surely one of the best out there on capturing iconic sounds, as well as the legendary Marshall tones that other brand of amplifiers frequently emulates, adding it to their bank of amp models.
The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?
In the world of amplifiers, there are amp stacks and combo amps. For beginners, a combo amp is usually the way to go, since they combine the amp circuitry and the speaker together into one unit. Check out models like the Marshall MG Series MG30CFX 30W 1x10 Guitar Combo Amp and the Fender RUMBLE 25 1x8 25 W Bass Combo Amp for a few examples of this type. For the biggest professional setups, on the other hand, a combo amp may not be quite beefy enough. That's where stacks come in, based on a head (such as the Peavey 6505+ 120W Guitar Amp Head) paired up with a speaker cabinet. You can even find some pre-made amp stacks here, like the Line 6 Spider IV HD150 150W and 4x12 Guitar Half Stack, to save you the legwork of shopping for both parts separately.

The company’s craftsmanship and innovation remain unmatched. Aside from their traditional ranges, Gibson also offers seriously high-tech instruments. This Mashable review of one of the brand's most revered models lauded not only its full-bodied tone but also Gibson’s penchant for taking risks. Its modern-take-on-an-old-icon kind of thinking allows it to constantly raise the bar—and the prices too, unfortunately.
Semi-hollow guitars are guitars which have an exposed opening, generally in the form of two f-holes on the top of the guitar’s body. The inner chamber of the guitar is then divided into two by a block of wood which runs through the body. A perfect representation of this type of guitar is the Gibson ES-335, which has been used at some point or another by musicians such as: Eric Clapton, Otis Rush, Warren Haynes, Dave Grohl, and B.B. King.
In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing contemporary classical music for the electric guitar. These include Frank Zappa, Shawn Lane, Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, Brian May and Randall Woolf.
The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.

Most of the better machine heads on the market these days use a standard .375" headstock hole, so swapping tuners isn’t that hard to do. The problem comes with the mounting at the rear of the peghead. Luckily, if you use the type that screw down from the front side with a nut and washer, you can swap and test before you drill additional mounting-screw holes.
Marshall's current best rated amplifier is the humble 1-Watt DSL1HR, an all-tube, dual channel amplifier head that gives you genuine Marshall tone and appeal in a more compact and practice friendly format. It is based on the JCM2000 Dual Super Lead (DSL) series that the company released in the late '90s, but with some modern enhancements to make it more user friendly. What's cool about this amp is that it can go lower than 1W via its built-in attenuator, which lets you switch to low power mode that has a 0.1W power rating. This means that you can crank the amp's dual ECC83 preamp tubes and ECC82 power tube at very low volume levels, great for quiet practice and for recording. Speaking of recording, Marshall equipped the DSL1HR with a speaker emulated Line out, using Softube's cabinet simulator technology. Other features include having two channels: classic gain and ultra gain, built-in reverb and pedalboard friendly effects loop in and out. More importantly, this tube amp is affordably priced and comes bundled with a footswitch.
Since treble frequencies pass through a capacitor, what would happen if you routed the positive lead THROUGH the capacitor rather than having it ground out frequencies?  The answer: just the opposite - the signal from you pickups would pass through the capacitor and only treble frequencies would get through.  Aha!  A new type of tone control.  The illustration below shows this type of wiring in a bit of an advanced concept.
Established over a century ago as a piano and reed organ builder, Yamaha has since expanded into building other musical equipment and even went on to successfully expand into other industries. But in all this success, Yamaha continues to stay true to their musical roots, producing highly rated instruments, amps and other gear. While they are not primarily a guitar amplifier builder, Yamaha's extensive reach and resources give them an almost unfair advantage over the competition, as exemplified by the success of their THR line of desktop guitar amplifiers. This line of portable amps combines Yamaha's penchant for student friendly features and modern studio functions that many guitarists appreciate, ultimately securing Yamaha a special spot on this list.

I've been coming in since they opened, and it's been crazy cool to watch this little corner shop grow into a major Seattle contender. That's really saying something, as there are some really incredible locally-owned guitar shops in the Greater Seattle Area. As has been mentioned, the service is the selling point. The entire staff are very, very cool people who are perfectly happy to talk shop without trying to push you on a sale. There's a lot of regulars, and combined with the student roster, it definitely has it's own little built in community. Their selection these days is insane, especially since they target a lot of awesome smaller brands that NOBODY else in the area carries. I'm pretty sure this is the only place in town you can go to play the Reverend line, not to mention damn near every PRS model currently in production. The locally-made boutique stuff they stock is awesome too, and I would have never even known about it had it not been for the shop. Kyle, the tech, is an expert. The other guys all do good work as well. This is my go-to shop for basically everything guitar-shop related. And I'm very picky.
Finding a good pickup for an acoustic guitar is a real personal choice that will depend on your budget, style, aspirations, and the actual guitar you own – that’s why we’ve written a focused article on the best acoustic pickups. Among the myriad of acoustic pickups on offer, you’ll find the quickest to install are transducer pickups, which attach to the face of your guitar – an affordable solution, although the sound quality isn’t as advanced as others. A step up is both undersaddle and soundhole pickups, which have their own pros and cons, while – at the higher-end – you’ll find internal microphones and hybrid mic/pickup systems, which offer a beautifully rich, natural tone. A great example of one of these hybrid systems is the LR Baggs Anthem Tru-Mic.
The SparkFun Proto Pedal is an easy-to-assemble kit that makes building guitar effect pedals easier. Let’s face it, most guitar pedals start with all-too-similar circuitry – you need the input and output jacks, the bypass switch, and a barrel jack for power input. In some pedals, there may be as much wiring involved in the jacks and switch as there is in the effect itself. The SparkFun Proto Pedal takes care of the hard part and provides you with a simple infrastructure; all you need to do is decide what simple circuit to make to gain your desired effect, and you’ll be ready to rock!

Add to this the physical attributes and ergonomics of a .strandberg* that work together to relax muscles, joints and tendons when playing. Some players are freaked out by the low weight, others by the lack of headstock and some have a natural playing position that places their thumb right at the edge of the EndurNeck™ and is not comfortable at all.
Martin’s first truly electric guitars were the Style F thinline archtops which began in prototype stage in 1961 and entered production in 1962. The F Series consisted of three models, the F-50, F-55 and F-65, all with bodies slightly less than 2″ thick and made of maple plywood with bound tops. All three had shapes roughly reminiscent of the dreadnought that made Martin famous, though slightly exaggerated with a wider lower bout. The cutaways were fairly wide and radical, cutting out at almost a right angle from the neck. The glued in necks had unbound 20-fret rosewood fingerboards, dot inlays and the typical squarish Martin three-and-three headstock. Necks joined the body at the 14th fret. Each bore an elevated pickguard and had a distinctive moveable adjustable bridge made of clear plexiglass.
Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
Cole Clark guitars are made largely using Australian indigenous timbers. Solid timber is used in preference to plywood.[2] Clark’s discovery of the best type of wood for his guitars came whilst searching in Australia in 1998. He came across Bunya Pine, and found out that it had the perfect characteristics for the sound board on an acoustic guitar. Whilst researching this type of wood, Clark also discovered that Bunya is about 18% stronger than Spruce wood, which a traditional choice when constructing a guitar. Blackwood is also another favourite material of Cole Clark’s for building their guitars (http://www.coleclarkguitars.com/technology.asp).
Electric guitars have come a long way since then, and today you’ll see many different designs. But you can still find big hollow-body jazz boxes that hearken back to those early days in the lineups of many manufacturers. They’re best suited for jazz players looking for a warm, woody sound. Of course the technology has improved greatly in the past eighty years, but these instruments still have a nice vintage vibe. You’ll sometimes see these instruments referred to as semi-acoustic.
A tremolo pedal takes your signal and chops it up, making it sound like the volume is dropping and reappearing very quickly. Imagine what it would sound like whilst holding a note and turning the volume down on your amp and back up again and you’ll get the idea. A tremolo allows you to change the speed at which the volume drops happen and how severe the cut off is. You can have it set to completely cut your sound out or just gate it, which allows a certain amount of sound through at each interval. The BOSS TR2 Tremolo is one of our favourites here at PMT.
A Flanger simulates the sound effect originally created by momentarily slowing the tape during recording by holding something against the flange, or edge of the tape reel, and then allowing it to speed up again. This effect was used to simulate passing into "warp speed," in sci-fi films, and also in psychedelic rock music of the 1960s. Flanging has a sound similar to a phase-shifter, but different, yet is closely related to the production of chorus.
The Boss Katana Head is a full featured amplifier head that can handle stage, recording and practice duties. It does this with its built-in power attenuator, which lets you choose between 100W, 50W and a super quiet setting of 0.5W. To complement the 0.5W setting, Boss even added a built-in 5" speaker into the amp head - making the Katana head to be technically a combo amp in head form factor. Complementing its versatile power rating is its built in amp modeling, which gives you five voicings from acoustic, to clean to high-gain. As expected, this amp comes with essential effects from Boss, with over 50 of them to choose from, 15 of which can be loaded to the amp for quick use, albeit limited to just 3 effects running simultaneously. Finally, all these features are packed in sleek looking profile that feels really solid, as expected from Boss.
I ordered this for my 6 year old nephew for Christmas. He wanted one because I had just recently bought my 3rd. I thought a smaller one would be nice for him to start learning. Just opened the box and the amp doesn’t work! At all! Light turns on but nothing else happens! Hooked guitar up to my own amp and it sounds nice so it’d definitely not the guitar or cords fault. Trying to get a replacement but no luck.
Predating many of the newer brands on this list is another Californian company – B.C. Rich, who has been producing heavy rock guitars since arriving on the scene in 1969. Since the seventies, B.C. Rich has been a name synonymous with high-quality electric guitars featuring weird and wonderful shapes, including the Warlock, the KKV and the Mockingbird.
If you have been looking for an electric guitar that effectively blend tradition with modernity; the Gibson Les Paul Faded 2017 is the excellent choice that fit such description. This guitar stands as the perfect union between the old and the new—featuring a 490R modern and 490T humbuckers, closely followed with 22 frets designed for amazing bends and great feel.
There’s been a steady evolution in effects signal processing since the 1940s. Guitarist-innovator Les Paul was among the first and most avid effects developers, experimenting with echo and multi-track recording to add sonic excitement to his music. The first foot-switched effect showed up in the late ‘40s with Harry DeArmond’s Trem Tol tremolo processor that was later used by Bo Diddley. In the 1950s and early 1960s other effects were developed, but they tended to be expensive and some had operational issues. Meanwhile amplifier makers such as Fender and Gibson were building reverb and tremolo effects into their amps. These tube amps also produced tasty distortion and overdrive effects when gain and volume were cranked up to maximum settings. Today, many effects are designed to reproduce those sounds.
Later makes of fuzzes—and later generations of those above—moved on to silicon transistors. Many players found the silicon-based models a little harsher sounding, however, and the legend of the magical germanium transistors began to grow. Even so, plenty of guitarists get along just fine with the silicon variety. Eric Johnson, often credited with ears of canine keenness, has used a silicon-transistor Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face to drive the dirty rhythm of his famous multi-amped, multi-routed set-up. He also holds the unit together with a rubber band because he says the bottom plate’s central mounting screw affects its tone. Make of this what you will.
Along with sweep picking, economy picking serves a more economical way to play single note ideas. It’s a form of alternate picking that calls for you to sweep the pick across strings when making your way to the next adjacent string. If you’re ascending, you sweep down and vice versa. They key is to make the motion have the same resistance sweep picking calls for while still utilizing a fluid alternate picking wrist approach. Just like most techniques, but with the same emphasis as sweep picking, you must start out slow and be mindful of the technique when starting to learn it. Be patient and work at it. It will come, and when it does – look out!
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black
If you want to access some resources that will help dealing with a specific tonal pursuit, piece of gear or other questions related to your rig, I’d recommend giving Guitar Tricks 14-day free trial a test run - there’s no obligations and you’ve got nothing to lose - except two free weeks of one of the most comprehensive and thorough guitar education websites in existence.
Solo, lead, and rhythm guitarists everywhere can now access the best selection of instantly downloadable digital sheet music and guitar tab on the internet. Put down the pick for just a moment and put your fingers to work browsing through Musicnotes.com's vast archives of guitar tabs ready to be enjoyed by musicians of all ages. Our collection features a weekly updated catalogue of some of guitars greatest compilations.
Many of the modulation type effects pedals are made to approximate some aspect of the original rotating speaker.  That’s correct, you heard right.  The Leslie Cabinet was made as a companion to the Hammond B3 Organ and literally had a rotary speaker that could produce all of the common modulation effects depending on the speed setting.  Many companies now offer digital pedal versions that mimic the Leslie sound very well, so lugging around a huge speaker cabinet isn’t necessary, unless you are a purist or have a crew of roadies available.
The TG-64 was definitely a boss guitar, but even cooler was the TRG-1 transistorized guitar, also introduced in ’64. This guitar did Nat Daniels one better and, instead of putting the amp in the case, put a transistorized amp and speaker in the guitar! To be fair, Danelectro did produce some guitars with a miniature tube amp built-in, but it’s not known if these ever made it to production status. But the TRG-1 is a remarkable guitar available in a confusing number of variations.

For some performances - those well controlled performances of an orchestral guitarist, let's say - machine notation can get a lot closer to producing a true sound than it will to the variations offered by a virtuoso jazz guitarist, blues master or metal thrasher jamming outside the box. In some cases, the machine sound might already fool some of the most discerning listeners -- if the performance does not test the limits of the mechanical emulation.
Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.

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The JEM70V is a Steve Vai signature model based on early JEMs he helped create. It comes with 3 different DiMarzio Evolution pickups that were handpicked by Steve Vai himself to give him the various tones that he needs for his expressive solo work, and intricate rhythm textures. The body is crafted from basswood, while the low profile 5-pc Maple/Walnut and 24-fret, 25.5" scale length rosewood fingerboard provide the fast playability expected of the brand. Other features include the Edge tremolo, 1.69" nut width, tree of life inlay, and it comes wrapped in Seafoam green finish.

What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.
Merson emerges again as an importer in the late ’50s and early ’60s (as the guitar boom was building), marketing Giannini acoustic guitars made in Brazil and Hagstrom electric guitars made in Sweden. Recall that in the ’50s, the accordion craze had given great impetus to the success of music merchandisers. But by the end of the decade, the collapse of the fad left them holding the squeeze-box, as it were. After some meandering, the Folk Revival picked up at the end of the decade, creating a growing market for acoustic guitars. Hence the Gianninis.
Great guitar this is my 2nd one fist one i purchesd in 2010. Had to pown it I was realy upset about it but nothing i could do. I was so happy to find another one here on Amzon!!! Only thing it did not come with A pick card as addvertized. Thats why iam giveing it 4 in stead of 5 stars. Case that comes with it is realy cheep you would think the money invested the would at least give you a padded soft case.I have orderd a hard shell Gator case for it it will be here in 2 days. This is why it gets 3 stars. Iam a pro. Guritist and song writer,singer. Guitar it self gets 5 stars

If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.
Obviously, what I've done is to give myself a choice of three different sounds--a close, ballsy sound, a mid-range room sound, and a more distant room sound. By setting all three mics up at the same time, putting them each in a different input, and assigning them all to the same track on tape, I've given myself the option of having any one of those sounds immediately available to me, or a combination of them.

PRS Guitars was founded in 1985 by Paul Reed Smith in Maryland, USA. They build high-end guitars, even if they also have a more affordable Asian range (the SE series). The most popular PRS endorser is Carlos Santana, but we could also count Dave Navarro and Al Di Meola among them. Santana's guitar is equipped with dual-coil pickups and a mahogany body with maple top. It looks a bit like a Les Paul with two cutaways. And the sound is closer to a Les Paul than to a Fender.

First of all, let’s clear up some minor confusion over the name. It has been variously reported, including by me, that the name “Teisco” stands for the name of a company in Tokyo; however this is not the case. Teisco was simply the name chosen by one of the company’s founders, Mr. Atswo Kaneko. There was another prominent company called the Tokyo Sound Co., Ltd. which was responsible for making Guyatone guitars, another major early Japanese brand, some of which came to the United States as Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen & Jacobson and others. However, neither of these companies or their guitars had anything to do with the Teisco brand.


It is easy to make the mistake that the tone control set-up in an electric guitar is a simple single stage Resistor / Capacitor filter, where the two components are in series, the other side of the capacitor goes to ground, the signal is applied to the other end of the resistor and the output is measured across the capacitor. If that were so then your first calculation is roughly correct, while in a practical situation in the second, the capacitor would be fed from the impedance of the signal source. Lets say this is a test generator with an impedance of 600 ohms – the -3dB cut off would be around 12kHz. This is not the case for the typical electric guitar.

The downloadable section also offers some add-ons and upgrades for software you may already have, making it easy to bring it up to date. A few examples of available add-ons, both downloadable and packaged, include sound libraries, loops, refills, virtual instruments and effects plugins. These can open up new possibilities for music software that you already use regularly, allowing you to get more out of it. If you're a producer or studio engineer, take a look at the professional-grade sound workshop software like Avid Pro Tools, Steinberg Cubase, Ableton Live and Propellerhead Reason. You can also expand your tools into moviemaking to produce music videos with Sonic Reality Cinema Sessions and several other video editing options.
I have a Montclair guitar, it sounds like I have an original but I have some questions. I purcahsed this quitar about 40 years ago. It is a dark brown archtop, with two cutaways and a pick guard like in the picture. On the top of neck the only says Montclair, strait across, and on the back it says "steel reinforced neck". On the inside the only number is L 6089.
Before taking the plunge, make sure that you have the necessary tools to build the guitar of your dreams. Most kits will require you to have screwdrivers, pliers and soldering iron for the assembly process. While others require more, like wood glue, bandsaw and other wood routing tools. Once you've decided on the finish, you'll also have to get finishing tools like sandpaper, wood sealant, primer, paint and more. It is also recommended to have a dedicated room or space for you to work on, a nice working table would also make work a bit more easier.
This is a no brainer, but a value that must be considered before any purchase no less. As mentioned above, your abilities on the instrument will likely affect the price range you’re looking at, which may have an effect on the brands you shop within as a consequence. For instance, if you’re not looking to buy a high end guitar, you probably won’t even bother testing out a Gibson, as their guitars will likely be out of your range. The reverse is true as well, an experienced player on the market for high end tone probably won’t be satisfied by many of Yamaha’s offerings.
Behold anther complete package from Les Paul guitar Epiphone series of electric guitar, with everything that you need to start playing right from the onset. For every beginner looking for that perfect set, this guitar they can rely on, not just for its sound quality, but also for the fact that it is a complete package offering lots practicality in terms of mastering the act of strumming and sound generation.
I think Matts’ advice is good, (old guitar strings can be helpfull for “fishing”) but if you change your p’ups and switching often an accessible control cavity is a great thing, just be sure to drop all pots and such into the body and drill through the potentiometer holes so you know where to place template and assure router bit won’t hit anything dangling in the body.
No matter what style of music you are into, you won’t have to look far to find a like-minded guitar builder. The electric guitar can trace its roots back to the big-band days, and there are several companies that excel at creating excellent guitars for jazz. Likewise, there are those companies that have grabbed on to the heavy metal genre and make guitars built for extreme mayhem.

The Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar features a rosewood top on a mahogany body. The maple and walnut neck with a slim Wizard neck profile is topped with a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with jumbo frets and Tree of Life vine inlays. This model also has a striking wooden pickguard and matching headstock, as well as wooden control knobs, earning it the nickname “Woody.”
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Maton established itself early on the Australian rock scene in the late Fifties, assisted by Australia’s tariff regime, which made imported guitars far more expensive than the local equivalents. Maton guitars were used by many well-known Australian pop and rock groups including Col Joye & The Joy Boys. The company also made one of the first sponsorship deals in Australian rock, supplying Melbourne band The Strangers with a full set of the distinctive ‘El Toro’ model guitars and basses (notable for their outlandish ‘horned’ body shape) while the group was working as the house band on the TV pop show The Go!! Show in the mid-Sixties.
For 2017, they introduced (or re-introduced?) the Firebird Studio. The Studio has regular tuners with protruding keys, and it has regular humbuckers instead of minis. It is not a Firebird, it is a Les Paul with the body of a ‘bird. This lie of a guitar sells for a whopping $1300, and the real version of the guitar - which is identical in every last detail to the cheaper 2016 model I own - now retails for $1500!

Frets are positioned proportionally to scale length—the shorter the scale length, the closer the fret spacing. Opinions vary regarding the effect of scale length on tone and feel. Popular opinion holds that longer scale length contributes to greater amplitude. Reports of playing feel are greatly complicated by the many factors involved in this perception. String gauge and design, neck construction and relief, guitar setup, playing style and other factors contribute to the subjective impression of playability or feel.
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