Mic placement is pretty crucial. You can get a million different EQ responses depending on where you throw the mic in front of the cab. I personally have the best luck - or at least I think so - when I back the mic off a little bit. I know a lot of engineers throw it right on the grille to get the bass boost, the proximity effect and all that garbage, but I find that if I back it up about six inches, I get a more balanced EQ curve.
One important thing to keep in mind about effects pedals is that the signal is doing a lot of work going through the complex electronics in them, and some effects play better as inputs for others. This all means that the order of your pedals does matter to some degree, depending on which effects are in the lineup. You can, of course, experiment to see how different orders affect the sound and that can be part of creating your own signature effects profile. But as a rule of thumb, here’s the basic order you should follow for your first foray into effects chaining:
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First up we have the most widely used and most useful pedal ever created – the Distortion pedal! If you’re wondering “What is a distortion pedal” the clue is in the name with how this pedal sounds. It basically takes your signal (the guitar) and distorts it, adding volume, crunch and sustain to your sound and is basically used as a contrast to the natural sound of your guitar. Often used in the chorus of some of your favourite songs.
Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?
And how does adding a pedal, basically one more optional pre-amplification stage that you can turn on or off at your leisure, make somebody less “real”? Imagine some old-school guy is just using guitar to a (insert amp brand)? Great! I love them too. Which one? Ah, nice amp! Did they know that amp has one more gain stage than that amp over there? If I plug into that one while they play theirs, did I make them less real or genuine, or did I become SUPER-real? Are they going to start fading like Marty McFly when the outcome is in doubt at the end of Back To The Future? Will they spring back to life and start playing “Earth Angel” properly once I unplug?
But here’s the thing: every single useful DAW is available for a 30-day demo or so. So you can at the very least try before you buy. The only downside is that some of these are only available in their full “pro” versions, so if you’re on a budget, you can get the 30 day (or more : REAPER has a 60 day demo and only costs $60 if you keep it, but I don’t know if you’d do live stuff with it… some of the fun will be figuring out all the tech).
If anyone has earned the right to two spots on this list, it’s Fender. Sitting squarely at the top of the guitar and amp game, this Southern California company might be at their peak at this very moment – and that’s a very good thing for you, if you want to get into playing guitar. This Super Champ X2 amp is a hell of a value, boasting the welcome bounce of Fender’s signature sound in a package that wont break the bank. And what’s even cooler about it is that it has 16 different amp modeling selections – meaning you still get the warmth of tube amplification with the right amount of modeling amp versatility. It also comes with two channels that can be controlled via an optional footswitch, and it’s equipped with a USB port for easy and quiet recording.
PRS SE Standard 24 Electric Guitar The PRS SE Standard 24 is a great first or backup electric guitar. This is a reliable workhorse that more than delivers in design, build, playing comfort and overall sonic performance. It can also be your only electric guitar, but chances are you’ll want another one along the way and give in to another model - or another SE Standard 24.
The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.
What is it about the Japanese and the Ventures? I mean, I cut my teeth with the Ventures. They were the perfect band to learn guitar from. The Ventures took songs with often complex harmonic structures—like the wonderful Johnny Smith classic—and stripped them down to their basic melodies, gave them a simple rock groove, and played them clean. I had the sheet music to Smith’s song, but there was no way in you know where I was gong to play off that. But follow along with the Ventures’ single? You bet!
I have many acoustic guitars in the collection including Gibson, Taylor, Fender and Washburn. That said none of these guitars come close to the richness in sound of a Maton. I'm assuming this is due to the quality of the Australian timbers and workmanship. Although a little expensive I highly recommend you at least play one in a shop as a treat and hope a dead relative leaves you some money to give you an opportunity of taking one home.
The design goal of these hybrid micro heads was to provide usable power from a compact digital power amp section combined with a real analogue preamplifier in a very small and light metal chassis. The amps each weigh about 1.1 lbs, and fit in one hand (Dimensions (W x D x H): 135mm x 100mm x 75mm/5.31” x 3.94” x 2.95”). These amps are advertised as 50 watt heads, so the power section is a special Class D design as might be expected. What is unexpected is the preamp design that includes a new type of vacuum tube (valve) called the Nutube 6P1, which is the result of Korg working with Japanese vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) company Noritake Itron Corp.(Ise Electronics Corp). As such, the Nutube is a dual-triode vacuum tube packaged similarly to a VFD "chip" which makes it mountable on a circuit board using holes and pads not unlike a DIP. The miniaturised flat package topography, low power consumption, and low heat, long life attributes of the Nutube are key contributors to deploying an analogue tube preamp in such a small, lightweight footprint. Power consumption is only 3.43 Amps which is provided by a DC19VAC adapter, but Vox rates the MV50 power output at 50 Watts. However, note the 50W rating is for a 4Ω load; power output specs are as follows: Max 50W RMS at 4 Ohms, 25W RMS at 8 Ohms, 12.5W RMS at 16 Ohms.
Many Sixties rock acts made political statements, but the MC5 were among the first rockers to make a serious commitment to revolution, aligning themselves closely with the White Panther Party (a Black Panther offshoot organization) and effectively serving as the White Panthers’ agitprop machine. Their blue-collar Detroit roots lent a certain gritty gravitas to their stance. These weren’t effete rock stars dabbling in left wing chic but working-class guerrillas with ammo belts strapped across their bare chests and guitars brandished as rifles.
Left Handed 1968 Fender Strat with an insanely rare Blonde Custom Color! This had to have been a special order guitar – has “Blond” written in the neck pickup cavity(see pic). I think I’ve seen one other factory left-handed Blonde Strat, but certainly not from the Hendrix era(both the white Woodstock and black Band of Gypsies Strats were from 1968).
A Customer brought this guitar into us in horrible shape. He had stored this guitar in the basement for a number of years with no issues, however in the fall of 2007 a large flood swept through our area filling his basement, and in turn his guitar, with water for almost a week. Needless to say, by the time he was able to get the guitar out it had been heavily damaged. When he brought this guitar into us it was completely covered in mud and river residue, the electroics were completely shot, and the hardware had begun to oxidize. We began by completely taking apart the guitar. We thoroughly cleaned each part of the guitar, inside and out. Once completed we were actually able to save all the original hardware from the guitar and the finish had withstood the flood. The electronics had to be completely replaced however. Staying true to the guitar we used as much era specific parts as we could find. As you can see, by the time we were done with the guitar you could hardly tell anything had happened to it!
To quote the super-helpful legendarytones.com, "The Hiwatt DR103 is notably louder and can also run much cleaner than 100-watt Marshalls when needed, and they also have tremendous headroom available. Playing a Hiwatt at a loud volume is, well, an experience." The site adds, "The Hiwatt DR103 design is based around the use of four EL-34 power tubes and four 12AX7 preamp tubes. The transformers are set up so that the amp can be used with various line voltages around the world and speaker impedance can also be set to 4, 8, or 16 ohms with two speaker outputs wired in parallel."
This Fender Modern Electric guitar features an apine body and mini-toggle-coil-split-switch with modern humbucker pickups. It comes with a C-shaped maple neck, a maple fretboard with 9.5-inch radius consisting of 22 jumbo frets. It has a Stratocaster middle pickup, a three-ply pickup guide and a five-way pickup switching for maximum sound control and sustains.
From a perfectionist/engineering standpoint, there is a lot wrong with this circuit. The controls are complexly interactive. There is no really flat setting, as there is a residual midrange scoop unless the Treble and Bass controls are fully down. The action of the Bass control is very uneven for normal taper controls. While the Mid control appears to affect only the mids, it is actually a form of volume control that affects all frequencies, but is the only control that also affects mids. Although it has several imperfections, this tone stack actually helps some of the quirks of guitar, so it works well.
Whatever budget you’re on, you will always be able to find a suitable guitar. Even in the $100 price range you can find some models that play nicely. However, in that super-budget market there is a lot of garbage, so be careful. There’s a difference between ‘affordable’ and ‘cheap’, so do your research before buying something that may offer no value.
Collectors grade 1964 Harmony H-59 Rocket near mint condition. These guitars are so hard to find in this excellent condition. This one is a 9 out of 10. Great action, straight neck, Gold Foil Pickups, and that rocket look too. She has a few very small edge nicks on rear of headstock, a few slight tiny cracks on center of back in grain, and one small edge ding. Also some very slight age checking but this guitar looks great! All are nothing to be alarmed about and not obvious when looking at guitar. This is the finest example of an H-59 we ever came across. Guitar is completely original with great color and grain. Comes with chipboard period case. Just reduced to $1,299.99 complete.
Some bass amps have two inputs. One some amps, one is a high gain input and the other is a low gain input. On other amps, the two inputs may be intended so that two basses can be plugged in at the same time. On these amps, there may be a separate volume control for each input; this is done to enable a bass player to switch between two instruments on different songs (e.g., a fretted and fretless bass) without having to unplug and plug in jacks. For example, the vintage Traynor Bass Master tube head has two inputs, each with its own volume control. Some bass amps have an auxiliary in jack, for plugging in a drum machine, keyboard bass or synthesizer. Some bass amps also have an external speaker out jack. While this jack is also 1/4", a speaker cable must be used with this jack, rather than a patch cord, because it sends a powered signal out to an external speaker cabinet. Higher-powered and more expensive amps may have Speakon output jacks.
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.
Grover Jackson became a partner with Wayne Charvel in the Charvel's Guitar Repair shop in California in the 1970s then Grover Jackson took over the entire business in 1978 and at that time they were making guitars under the name Charvel. Their guitars were tailored to the heavy metal and hard rock genre's of the day. Then a relatively unknown Randy Rhoads, who had just joined Ozzy Osbourne’s new band, contacted them in 1980 with the idea to create a highly customized guitar. That guitar, a new take on the Flying V called 'Concorde' became the first guitar to carry the Jackson brand and the company has been popular with shredders ever since.
You should have been making all the above adjustments with the preferred gauge of strings, but since you have probably loosened and tightened the strings a number of times over the course of this process, you should now put on a fresh set and do a final check of all the settings Neck adjustments in particular can tend to settle in over the a couple hours after they have been done, so I find it best to then let the guitar sit overnight and do a final check the next day. The bottom line in ending up with a quality set-up is making each of the important adjustments in the correct order: Neck- then Nut- then Bridge saddles.
This technique is only possible with 4-conductor pickups or pickups that already have coil-tap lead instead of all four leads. Coil tap is a connection between two coils in a humbucker and is sometimes referred to as “series link”. Vintage style pickups have their coil tap enclosed in the pickup which means that we can’t play with it. Having coil tap gives us a couple of wiring options:
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The palm mute is a playing technique for guitar and bass guitar, executed by placing the side of the picking hand below the little finger across the strings to be plucked, very close to the bridge, and then plucking the strings while the damping is in effect. This produces a muted sound. It was popularized by Black Sabbath in the song "Paranoid". - winner333
A bass stack may use a single speaker cabinet (e.g., the huge 8x10" cabinets widely used by hard rock and metal bassists). The 8x10" cabinet is often provided as "backline" equipment at music festivals; this way, all the bassists from the different bands can use the same amplifier and speaker cabinet. This reduces the transition time between bands, because the roadies do not have to remove the previous band's bass stack and bring in the subsequent band's stack. Using one 8x10" as backline gear for an entire music festival also makes the transition easier for the audio engineer, because she can have an XLR cable plugged into the amp head's DI unit output (to get the bass amp's signal so that it can be mixed into the sound reinforcement system mix) and have a mic set up in front of the cabinet, to capture the amp and speaker cabinet's distinctive tone. The 8x10" cabinet is widely used by heavy metal music, hardcore punk and psychobilly bassists, as these genres use a loud onstage volume. Some metal bassists, such the bass player for death metal band Cannibal Corpse, use two 8x10" cabinets for large concerts in stadiums or outdoor festivals.
Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).
• I like to insert a compressor after this, to add some sustain and even out the guitar's dynamics, for a more consistent distortion sound. So for the second insert slot, choose Dynamics/Vintage Compressor, then click on the insert's Edit button to see the compressor's interface, and set up the parameter values as desired. A good starting point would be Input at 17 and Attack at 8.9, with Punch and Auto set to On. You'll probably need to adjust the Input (effectively the Threshold in this case) according to the level of signal coming into the plug‑in. Set the Output to a level that's as high as possible, but doesn't approach clipping.
Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: 3-Color Sunburst
Of course, for the guitar string vibrations to have an effect on the magnetic field of the pickups, they too need to contain a ferromagnetic metal; this can be either iron, cobalt, or nickel. There are a large number of different string compositions, but often they will consist of steel, a combination of iron, carbon, and sometimes chromium. The chromium can help prevent corrosion, as it forms a layer of chromium oxide which prevents the string from further attack by oxygen in the air. Additionally, the strings can sometimes be coated with various polymer additives to help inhibit corrosion. However, these additives can sometimes have a negative effect on the tone of the guitar.
For metal there are few better performers than this menacing guitar from Schecter; the signature model of Avenged Sevenfolds lead guitarist Synyster Gates. From the pinstripe double-cutaway mahogany body emerges a hugely-playable thin C-shaped mahogany set neck with ebony fretboard, 24 extra-jumbo frets, and Schecters Ultra-Access construction to allow unhindered access to the highest of frets.
Synonymous in the electric guitar industry, the Gibson brand continues to produce some of the best electric guitars on the market, including the Les Paul Studio. Designed with a classic look that maintains the appearance of a vintage quality, this electric guitar comes with a neck that is slimmer than most traditional models, allowing for ease and smooth transitions when switching between notes. The guitar utilizes an upgraded version of humbucker PAF to cancel out any outside interference that detracts from the quality of the sound, while maple and mahogany wood are combined to deliver both definition and sustainability. Other features include traditional tuners that can be manually altered, a Graph Tech Nut for precise spacing between strings, and a neck heel with the class Les Paul design. Well reviewed and great for the price, the Les Paul Studio is one of the best electric guitars available if your cash flow allows.
With this high availability I can immediately check back with the program if I am unsure whether I am getting it right when practicing. I can play along to the backing track while practicing and I can continue with new material if I feel that I am ready to do so. All of this is simply not possible with a local instructor on a 30 minute per week basis.
All electric guitars have this switch but it varies from guitar to guitar. it is called the pickup selector switch. It is used for deciding on which pickup to use on the guitar. On a les paul style guitar it can be used to select the neck (traditionally rythm pickup), bridge (traditionally used for lead) and both pickups together.\n. \n===\n. \nThat's what it is on a normal Gibson Les Paul. But on a Gibson Les Paul BFG, that is a "kill" switch that turns the guitar off completely. On many Gretsches, the toggle switch is a tone switch flipping between bassier and more trebly sounds. On most Fenders, that switch is down on the lower bout by the volume/tone controls (but on a Telecaster Deluxe, the switch is where it'd be on a Les Paul). Then there are oddities like the Italia Rimini, which has no pickup selector switch -- just individual volume controls for the two pickups.\n. \nEvery guitar has a different design. You'd have to look into every model.
Although the G&L Legacy electric guitar was released one year after the passing of Leo Fender, it is designed to the specifications of the original Stratocaster but with a few modern features specific to G&L instruments. The Legacy included, for instance, G&L's Dual Fulcrum vibrato and Schaller tuners and was available in a combination of different tonewoods. Even if the G&L guitars from before Leo Fender's death are more collectable, the Legacy electric guitar is still considered a high-quality instrument.
The separation between Briefel and Unicord must not have been entirely unamicable, probably more a matter of direction than anything else. In any case, in 1978, following the demise of the Univox brand (when the Westbury brand was debuted) three Westbury Baroque acoustics were offered, all made by Giannini. These included one “folk” dreadnought with a tapered Westbury head, the stylized “W” Westbury logo, block inlays and a very Martin-esque pickguard. The “classic” was our old friend, the CraViola, with a new head shape. The 12-string was another CraViola. These probably only lasted a year or so; in any case, the Westbury name was dead by 1981.
I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar. I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best. You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment. You get treated like a valued customer. Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars. They have a great variety of quality instruments. Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars. A place like this is so rare nowadays.

Everyone has an opinion on Crate amplifiers. Some guitarists are strong supporters, if for no other reason than a fond recollection of a Crate as one of their first amps. Others aren’t as impressed. While it’s true that many Crate models are geared toward beginners and intermediate guitarists, they also have plenty of pro-quality gear in their lineup.
But there are more questions – are you a beginner, or do you have 20 years playing experience under your belt? Are you on a tight budget, or is money no object? Do you prefer funk, or are you a full-on metalhead? Somewhere the perfect guitar is waiting for you, and – with hundreds of reviews on this site – chances are we have featured it on these pages!

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I've been asked why it took so long to make this record. Well, it didn't really take too long to make this record. It took six months to make it. What I'd been doing before that was hopefully a journey I can continue. I guess what we play is still indie or alternative, I don't know all the different terms these days -- I've kind of lost track about what label I'm supposed to be these days. But it's still the kind of music I started playing when I was a kid, really. I'm fronting a band I could have fronted at fifteen or sixteen, so that's quite cool.
Harmony was the largest US guitar manufacturer between the 1930s and late 1960s. At the height of the guitar boom in the mid-1960s, Harmony was building more than 1000 instruments per day. Not only were they producing Harmony-branded guitars, there was a time when the Chicago-based factory was making guitars for 57 different brand names and trademarks. At one point, Harmony was selling 40 percent of their guitars through Sears & Roebuck under the Silvertone brand.
On a Les Paul, adjusting the saddle position can be a little tricky while the string is tuned to pitch. Sometimes you can get a screwdriver in there and turn it, but often you need to slacken the string and move it to the side. Also note that sometimes the adjustment screws are at the back of the bridge rather than the front. I prefer adjusting the saddle while the string is slack anyway as there is a lot of stress on both the string and the saddle otherwise.
The main benefit with tube amps is the tone. They offer what is often described as a pure, natural, creamy or fluid guitar tone, which is incredibly responsive to the player’s dynamics. When pushed hard enough, they overload and produce natural overdrive (which is how overdrive first came to be). While their tone is hard to beat for all styles of music, tube amps tend to be expensive, harder to maintain and heavier than other amps. For more on tube amps, check out our dedicated tube amp page.
For those who like that 1950s style Gretsch sound, you’ll appreciate the Gretsch Dual-Coil humbuckers which can go from glass like cleans to smooth low growls to all out riff worthy dirt when you add some distortion to your amp. The single cutaway design and maple neck with gloss polyester finish make it extremely comfortable to play too. A guitar beginners and professional musicians alike, can enjoy.
While recording AC/DC's Back In Black, Tony Platt used a pair of condenser mics to pick up different speaker cones and give a wider sound to each guitar: "I developed a technique for recording guitars with two microphones roughly pointing at different speakers, which can be spread out in the stereo mix so it's not just a series of mono point sources. It makes for a more open-sounding guitar. That sound suited their particular technique, which involved Angus and Malcolm playing the same chords but with different inversions to get a very big unison guitar sound."
Compared to an acoustic guitar, which has a hollow body, electric guitars make much less audible sound when their strings are plucked, so electric guitars are normally plugged into a guitar amplifier and speaker. When an electric guitar is played, string movement produces a signal by generating (i.e., inducing) a small electric current in the magnetic pickups, which are magnets wound with coils of very fine wire. The signal passes through the tone and volume circuits to the output jack, and through a cable to an amplifier.[22] The current induced is proportional to such factors as string density and the amount of movement over the pickups.
3,000 to 8,000 Hz - Brilliance and Presence: This is the range that can add shimmer or allow a guitar to cut through a mix when boosted. It can also be where you make cuts to keep a guitar from conflicting with a vocal. If making boosts in this range, keep an eye (ear?) out for noise, as any noise present from distortion/effects pedals will very quickly be accentuated as well
Engl has to be the most underrated amplifiers on the market. I have an engl gigmaster 15 and it is pure awesomeness. No fender cleans but if you want fender cleans buy a fender. The gain section is where this thing shines. I haven't used any kind of distortion pedal since getting this amp. More gain on tap than any Marshall I've ever owned or played. Getting ready to upgrade to the ironball and can't wait. If you like metal, hardcore, punk, grunge, sludge, doom you should look at an engl. This thing will even do blues extremely well without a ts9. It will take pedals very well as this is a 15 watt amp with an effects loop. Wow, right. Won't get that with a tiny terror. Plus these are German designed and built unlike the terror series built in China.
Join the "Cigar Box Revolution"! This La Vox Cigar Box Electric Guitar is built from a decidedly uptown-looking round box. Neck-through construction means it is heavier than most cigar boxes, and it performs more like a standard electric guitar. Play some raw, smokin' blues, back-alley funk, or whatever else wells up from deep down inside.  More details...
What if you could get a wide variety of sounds from your acoustic guitar, including complex effects and virtual (MIDI) instruments, without having to use an external amp? That would certainly be a game-changer, as it could essentially turn your guitar into an all new instrument, and by adding to your available 'soundscapes' without needing to be tethered to a plug, it could also convert acoustic performances into rockin' ones.
Rock ’n’ roll is an industry that’s continually pushing musical, social, and cultural boundaries, and the electric guitar is its iconic instrument. The acoustic version has been around since at least the 16th century. So when I first started working with co-curator Gary Sturm on an exhibition about the invention of the electric guitar at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, our driving question was: Why electrify this centuries-old instrument? The simplest answer: Guitarists wanted more volume.

If you’re trying to find one of the affordable acoustic electric guitars from Ibanez, then the PF15 is just what you’re looking for. This guitar has a dreadnought full-size body, a stylish cutaway design, as well as other features which will allow you to enjoy every minute of playing. You also get an attractive Transparent Blue Burst finish to impress your audience.


Our first impression of this guitar was that something must be wrong. Surely this guitar is way more expensive than we thought? We doublechecked and the truth is that it’s just incredible value for money. Both the design and the sound are wonderfully good and we understand why Schecter describe their Schecter Hellraiser guitars as having “raised the bar on sight, sound, quality and affordability”- we totally agree!
For the guitarist who's frequently on the road or often plays out, the pedalboard is an indispensable aid. Many pedalboards include custom-fitted travel cases or gig bags. With your effects already mounted on the pedalboard, performance setups are fast: just unpack the already-configured board, plug in your guitar and amplifier, and you're ready to play.

NOTE: In these diagrams, the volume and tone controls are viewed from the rear. The volume and tone controls are variable resistors, also known as potentiometers (or "pots" for short). In electric guitars, the values for either of these usually is about 250K to 1 megohm. The capacitor in the circuit is for the tone control and these values usually are from .02 to .047 mfd (short for microfarad).
It was Berry’s songs from the late Fifties with cut boogie patterns—like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Johnny B. Goode” and “Carol”—that realized electrically the guitar ambitions first dreamt by Robert Johnson. Berry’s tone—courtesy of a hollow-body Gibson through a tweed Fender amp—was raw and loud. This, along with his duckwalk, ringing double-stops and songs about cars and girls, grabbed the youth market. Tall and handsome, he brought the guitar as the “cool” instruments to a ready audience via appearances on TV and in movies, in a way that the Beatles would repeat in the early Sixties.

Forget Risky Business (remember the famous scene of Tom Cruise rockin' out in his boxers?); this technique, which I consider real air guitar, is serious business. It entails capturing the airy, percussive sound of the plectrum strumming or picking the electric guitar's strings-either in acoustic isolation or combined with the ambient sound from the amp-and then mixing this sound with the recorded amplifier sound. The addition of just a little percussive plucking can enhance the presence wonderfully for any style of guitar playing. In my opinion, it's the greatest studio-recording innovation since John Bonham's distinctive drum sound.

This is an American Gibson Les Paul electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This soundfont has the same presets as the Fender Jaguar above (except it does not include the slaps and slides preset) and is also recorded with the volume on the edge of break up on the amp (read the Fender Jaguar above for description of amplifier setting). This guitar is suited to jazz and blues but can easily be used for rock if used with more distortion. It has a very full rounded sound with good sustain and when played harder has a bite to the attack. This guitar is a classic that has been used in alot of types of music.


Electric guitar strings are thinner than acoustic guitar strings and closer to the neck and therefore less force is needed to press them down. The ease with which you can bend strings, clear access to the twelfth position, the use of a whammy bar and the manipulation of pots and switches whilst playing has led to the development of a lead guitar style that is unique to the instrument. Fret-tapping is a guitar technique for creating chords and melody lines that are not possible using the standard technique of left-hand fretting and right-hand strumming. The sustain, sensitive pick-ups, low action and thin strings of the electric guitar make it an ideal instrument for fret-tapping.


I'm seeking a guitar to elicit the rich fat heavy sound. So as I understand a guitar with the H humbucker (double coil) pickup is what I need for that. But there is a wide range of layouts for the guitars. Some of them have S single (single coil) pickup, for example H-S-H layout. Where single coil pickup is mostly used for blues, funk and jazz guitars. And these H-S-H guitars are also recommended for heavy rock (because of the humbuckers).

So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.
Get it tuned up and play it in the store. Some people may find this uncomfortable, being a newbie and all. If you don't want to play it, just start bending strings, up and down, using the whammy bar; think of it as 'guitar stretching'. Then see how well it stays in tune. If this guitar has no locking nuts on the head, and it still stays in tune, it's a winner. But if you have to re-tune more than a little, and almost all the strings, pass on it. You will grow frustrated by it very quickly.
Sharlee D'Angelo (b. 1973) is the bassist for the metal band Arch Enemy, as well as the classic rock/AOR band The Night Flight Orchestra, the stoner metal band Spiritual Beggars and the blackened thrash/speed metal band Witchery. D'Angelo has also been in various bands in the past, either as a studio session player or full member. These include Mercyful Fate, Dismember and King Diamond. He switched to Ibanez in 2005. Ibanez now produces the Sharlee D'Angelo signature basses, called the SDB2 and SDB3,[11] which is tuned to D'Angelo's preferred C standard[12] (Low to High – C,F,Bb,Eb).
Phaser – A frequency-based effect that makes a swirling, swooshing filtered guitar tone. Phasers use the principle of “phase” cancellation in which a filter passes over your guitar tone flipping the waveform at specific frequencies. This signal is then combined with your original guitar tone to give the iconic phaser effect used in songs by Van Halen, Pink Floyd and Smashing Pumpkins to name a few.
Resonator guitars are distinctive for not having a regular sound hole instead they have a large circular perforated cover plate which conceals a resonator cone. The cone is made from spun aluminum and resembles a loudspeaker. The bridge is connected to either the center or edge of the cone by an aluminum spring called the spider. The vibrations from the spider are projected by the cone through the perforated cover plate. The most common resonator guitars have a single cone although the original model patented in 1927 by John Dopyera had three and was called a tricone resophonic guitar. Resonator guitars are loud and bright. They are popular with blues and country guitarists and can be played with a slide or conventionally.
I had this guitar handed down to me. It is in pretty rough shape. I think it is in good enough shape to restore to good condition/used shape. Before I attempt such a thing I would like to know more about the guitar itself. I know the history of Lyle and "Lawsuit" guitars so that part is done. The body has a cherry red finish with 2 "f" openings. The neck has had some stress on it, enough to have the wood lift a little on its grain pattern about 2 inches long from the nut to the fret board. I am not sure if injecting glue into this will keep the neck from breaking in the future. The fret board is loose at the nut but I believe I can glue it again. This is not the first restoration I have done. I have restored a flute and a grenadilla wood clarinet. Any comments regarding how to or if I am wasting my time will be welcome.
This guitar continues to rake in good reviews and recommendations, even from experienced players who are looking for a compact couch guitar. This says much about its build-quality, tone and production consistency. If you are just starting out and you are not sure what to get, or you're simply looking for an affordable grab-and-go guitar, then checkout the Yamaha JR1.
After covering the Top 5 Guitar Plugins You Need To Know and 5 Best Multi Effects for Beginner Guitar Players and 5 Guitar Stomp Box Pedals Every Guitarist Needs let’s face it: probably half of our sound comes from our amplifiers. That makes them kind of important… and with so many little things to consider, from size and reliability to power output and built-in effects, you might appreciate some suggestions. So without further ado, here are my Top 10 recommendations (in no particular order) for beginner Guitar Amps to get you started.
That’s not all modeling processors can do. In addition to offering guitar and amp models, most guitar modeling processors have libraries of the kinds of effects you would get from individual pedals—reverb, echo, chorus, overdrive, distortion, fuzz, etc., as well as integrated drum machines with scores of preset rhythm patterns to help your practice. You can run several effects simultaneously, combining them to create your own unique tonal palette. Most modeling processors now have USB connectivity, some even with two-way audio streaming, for use as interfaces in direct computer recording.
The guitar’s ‘shoulders’ – where the body meets the neck joint – will usually be slightly more sloped than you’d see in a classic dreadnought acoustic, while the base of the body will also be narrower than larger sized guitars. All of which makes for a more comfortable and less physically intrusive playing experience. Another obvious benefit of this is the portability of parlour guitars. Their relatively smaller form factor means they lend themselves well to being slung in a case and carted off to gigs with less hassle than, for example, a jumbo-sized acoustic.

As well, even though some bass guitar players in metal and punk bands intentionally use fuzz bass to distort their bass sound, in other genres of music, such as pop, big band jazz and traditional country music, bass players typically seek an undistorted bass sound. To obtain a clear, undistorted bass sound, professional bass players in these genres use high-powered amplifiers with a lot of "headroom" and they may also use audio compressors to prevent sudden volume peaks from causing distortion. In many cases, musicians playing stage pianos or synthesizers use keyboard amplifiers that are designed to reproduce the audio signal with as little distortion as possible. The exceptions with keyboards are the Hammond organ as used in blues and the Fender Rhodes as used in rock music; with these instruments and genres, keyboardists often purposely overdrive a tube amplifier to get a natural overdrive sound. Another example of instrument amplification where as little distortion as possible is sought is with acoustic instrument amplifiers, designed for musicians playing instruments such as the mandolin or fiddle in a folk or bluegrass style.
The guitar is built of full, all-solid maple that gives a nice clean tone and helps to avert some of the feedback prone to other fully hollow guitars. There’s a mahogany set neck to both help with longer sustain and to give you the premium fit and finish usually reserved for more expensive hollow-body instruments. The two ACH-ST humbuckers aren’t ultra-heavy metal pickups, so you won’t get a ton of snarling distortion out of the AF55, but you can push an overdrive sound to the next level if you want to. It all adds up to a sound that’s perfect for a player who’s looking to go for the jazz/blues vibe, or someone who’s looking to go for a singer/songwriter roots project. The trapezoid tailpiece also gives you a nice nod to vintage axes, too.
Pitch correction/vocal effects: Pitch correction effects use signal-processing algorithms to re-tune faulty intonation in a vocalist's performance [96] or create unusual vocoder-type vocal effects. One of the best known examples of this is Autotune, a software program and effect unit which can be used to both correct pitch (it moves a pitch to the nearest semitone), and add vocal effects. Some stompbox-style vocal pedals contain multiple effects, such as reverb and pitch correction.

The transparent overdrive is the most natural sounding overdrive. Unlike the most commonly used multi-processing type overdrives, the transparent overdrive does not alter the tone of the input signal. The transparent overdrive's output signal will sound exactly the same to that of the input signal tone wise, just with added drive and boosted signal (dependent on the users settings). Which means there is no tone loss for more natural sounding drive. The transparent overdrive is typically priced higher due to it having nothing but the purest of sound and smooth drive.
Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II, Aria Diamond, Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Cimar, Cortez (electrics only), Columbus, Conrad, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage,V entura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn, Westbury, Westminster, Westone
"The library has a huge amount of great samples covering every nook & cranny of the electric guitar, and it really is of the highest quality... I could tell that they must have put in a gigantic effort into the scripting, sampling, and design... It’s easy to use, has extensive options for articulations, sounds even better with its effects, and yet it can have a pristine, clean sound as well. I highly recommend it... When they say 'Absolute Electric Guitar' on their website, those words are a lot to live up to [and] they achieved this with a brilliant product and awesome sound." Rob Mitchell (SoundBytes Magazine)
Effects pedals, or stompboxes, are effects units designed to sit on the floor or a pedal board and be turned on and off with the user's feet. Typically, effects pedals house a single effect. The simplest stompbox pedals have a single footswitch, one to three potentiometers (knobs) for controlling the effect, gain or tone, and a single LED display to indicate whether the effect is on or not. More complex stompbox pedals have multiple footswitches, numerous knobs, additional switches and an alphanumeric display screen that indicates the status of which effect is activated. An effects chain, or signal chain, may be formed by connecting two or more effects pedals together.
Laminate guitars are not made with solid pieces of wood. Instead, a laminate guitar is made with layered pieces of wood, like a veneer, to create the body of the guitar. Despite its reputation among music snobs, laminate guitars can be top-selling, high-performing instruments. Just check out the Fender CD-60CE Acoustic Electric Guitar for proof of a beautiful, all-laminate, highly-popular instrument!
Despite the numerous different analog devices, it is very rare for them to be able to duplicate all aspects of a Leslie speaker. Thus, Rotary Speaker Simulator are always going to be digital, utilizing modelling algorithms to model the relations between the rotating horns and bass baffle. And how the sound bounce around the cabinet. As Leslie also have an amplifier section, most of these typically have overdrives to simulate that aspect. Some of these pedals can even accept keyboard's input.
Other ways to reduce feedback include: playing with the bass amp's speaker cabinets in front of, rather than behind, the instrument; reducing the onstage volume; moving the bass away from other loud instruments, such as the drum kit (low toms can trigger feedback on some basses) or the rhythm guitar player's amp); signal phase reversing; using a parametric equalizer or "notch filter" EQ to turn down the frequency that is feeding back; or using "feedback eliminators", which are basically automatic notch filters that find and turn down the frequency that is "howling". Some other ways to reduce feedback are to use a plywood laminate bass rather than a carved wood bass, use a solid - body electric upright bass and/or use magnetic or optical pickups. Many of the methods used to reduce feedback (notch filters, filling the f-holes with foam) have effects on the tone of the instrument. However, these drawbacks need to be considered against the significant problems for the audience's experience caused by unwanted feedback.
the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….
He embodies the stylish sideman identity forged by guitar greats like George Harrison and Keith Richards: a neatly trimmed pudding-basin haircut, and a stage presence that never upstages the frontman. Yet, he is intriguing in his own right. Marr’s post-Smiths career has been stellar. He’s worked with everyone from New Order’s Bernard Sumner (in Electronic) to Oasis to John Frusciante, and has been quite active recently with both Modest Mouse and the Cribs. He has an uncanny knack for being around whenever cool music is happening.
Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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