i have an original 12string vox mark XII and i would like some parts (original or replicas) to repair it. For example the neck(is the right word?)has a surious damage and i want to replace it, also i miss the tremolo stick and the circle black plastic stuff fit the back side. i need some connections all around the world but it could be better if i ll find something in europe. please help-mail me and sorry for my english syntax. dimitris from athens greece.
If you've ever opened up a non-digital pedal - for example, a fuzz pedal - there's a good chance you will have seen a dizzying array of tiny components. However overwhelming this looks, however, there's probably only a relatively small number of component types present - and on boutique or older pedals, these should be even more clearly identifiable.
AJL: It’s a brand that specialises in making Gypsy acoustic guitars and archtop jazz box guitars. Each guitar is handmade by master luthier Ari-Jukka Luomaranta from Finland, and when I say he makes it, I literally mean he makes it all alone without any employees. I’m not exactly a classical guitar or jazz box fan but I understand why people love his guitars. He puts extreme attention to even the most minute details while making each of his guitar. Each AJL guitar is like a testimony of his art and dedication. He chooses the best quality woods to work with and by his undying passion for making guitars he creates masterpieces.
12-string acoustic guitars have six string courses, each with two strings that are tuned to produce a chiming, chorus effect. Usually, the string pairs in the bass courses are tuned an octave apart while all treble strings are tuned in unison. Some guitarists prefer tuning the second string in the third course (G) in unison while others opt to tune it an octave higher for bell-like ringing tones.

Although most of this article deals with miking regular guitar amps or using various DI options, there are also some great sounds to be had using very low-power guitar amps — even battery-powered ones. You can see these in music shops, often designed to look like miniature versions of Marshall, Fender or other top-name amplifiers. While some sound pretty grim, others sound surprisingly musical and raunchy. Obviously they don't have a lot of low end, but if you mic them closely to exploit whatever proximity effect your cardioid mic has to offer, and use EQ cut to tame the inevitable mid-range resonance, you can get some really great sounds. Best of all is that these things are cheap, so you can afford to experiment, and they also come in useful for their intended purpose, which is practising, something we all tend to do too little of when we get caught up in recording technology.
Shreddage 2: Absolute Electric Guitar is our answer to the challenge of total guitar sampling. It is a complete instrument with elegant scripting, intuitive mapping, and incredible depth. This virtual guitar for Kontakt is the ultimate weapon for rock & metal music, built from the ground up for realistic playing in any hi-gain style. All samples were recorded on a 7-string guitar and are provided clean/DI so you can use your own custom amp tone - or use the included Peavey ReValver HPse.
We have done hundreds of guitar 'set-ups' / repairs / restorations over the years and know how to do them to a degree that 95% of 'players' will be very satisfied. We're not just changing strings and polishing. We'll check and adjust the neck for correct string height at the 7th fret (should typically be about the thickness of a .010 gauge 'E' string when fretted at the first fret and the 12th fret). We also check for a 'body bump' in the neck as if that can't be addressed to a 'playable' degree, then the balance of the adjustments will be for naught. As we're in a very dry climate, we will check for 'fret overhang' due to neck shrinkage and 're-dress' the frets accordingly. If it's a 'bolt-on' neck, we'll check for neck joint / screw integrity and repair as necessary. We check and adjust for correct intonation using our 'Peterson' strobe tuner and our other 'analog' tuner. Electrics are typically intonated with 'fresh', .010 strings installed (if you want it intonated with a different gauge, just let us know). We inspect and test the electronics, especially looking for any 'aftermarket' re-wiring / mods / incorrect repairs. We inspect the integrity of the tuning machines and repair as necessary. Of course we do all the standard cleaning, adjusting and test playing once the 'basic integrity' of the instrument has been addressed.

Frets on finished fingerboards may be tough to measure accurately when the finish has appreciable thickness (think Rickenbackers, 70s Fenders) as these manufacturers spray the finish over the fretted neck.  I have measured a finish chip from a 70s Fender maple neck refret that was .010” thick – lowering the fret height by .010” (25% in the case of the stock medium wire at the time) from just finish alone.  I recently refretted a 2008 Fender Eric Johnson Strat where the fret height prior to any work was .040”, yet the crown of the fret removed from the fingerboard was .045”.  I personally do not like this feel and so often I will suggest refretting over a finished fingerboard when working with them rather than under the finish.
Hollow-body guitars are best suited for classic jazz, but some musicians have used them in rock, country and blues. If you are a non-jazz guitarist interested in this kind of instrument I’m going to assume you know what you are doing. While these types of guitars can sound great with overdrive in the right hands, they’re probably not the best choice for most rock players.
I am a beginner player and I am a bit disappointed in both Fender and Gibson. Both entry level guitars suck, for beginners like me. Why not they make the fret board neck nut a little more wider so that its easier for learning. In the last 5 years playing both Fender Starcasters and Gibson Maestro, I cann’t play chords properly. I am still looking for entry level guitar for my chord practice without breaking my budget ($700).
Carvin is a guitar company with a different business model than the rest. You won’t find them at your local music store because Carvin only makes custom guitars. Their instruments are based around a handful of templates and each feature components that are individually chosen by the buyer. For this reason, it’s very rare to find two Carvins that are completely identical.
In 1977, Gibson introduced the serial numbering system in use until 2006.[71] An eight-digit number on the back shows the date when the instrument was produced, where it was produced, and its order of production that day (e.g., first instrument stamped that day, second, etc.).[72] As of 2006, the company used seven serial number systems,[71] making it difficult to identify guitars by their serial number alone.[71][72] and as of 1999 the company has used six distinct serial numbering systems.[72] An exception is the year 1994, Gibson's centennial year; many 1994 serial numbers start with "94", followed by a six-digit production number[citation needed]. The Gibson website provides a book to help with serial number deciphering.[72]
WOW! This thing is incredible. One of the nicest instruments we have ever played and we've had, played and sold a few hundred over the past 20 years! Can't say enough about this bass. It's a pre-owned Zon Legacy Elite series 5-string model featuring a beautiful book-matched solid Bubinga wood top over a solid Mahogany wood body. A solid graphite neck / fingerboard utilizing a sculpted body neck joint finishes off the basic construction of the instrument. Huge tone is delivered via 2 active Bartolini pickups that feature controls for volume, bass, midrange, treble and balance. This bass has had the electronics modified by Zon to move the midrange control from the access hole in the back cover to a matching pot located in the control section on the front of the bass. While at Zon to get the custom electronics installed,  the original owner had new frets and a new finish coat added. Figured as long as it was there "what the heck". Tuning is accomplished via the 5 German made Schaller tuning machines in the same gold plate finish as the solid cast bridge. The solid graphite neck features a full 2 octave neck with 24 frets and a 34" long scale. This bass is a dream to play! Just about as good as it gets. There's not a mark on it anywhere. It looks brand new! Rock solid and stays in tune. Set up perfectly! Includes original Zon Soft exterior hard shell case on black Cordura.

If you are buying a guitar for a kid, it might be good to know that there are smaller electric guitars especially for children. If it’s a small child, it might be really difficult to reach on a full-size guitar. The best way of determining what size you need is to try different sizes in a music shop or ask the guitar teacher what he or she recommends. If your kid grows quickly and you can’t be bothered or can’t afford to get a new guitar every year there is always the option of renting a guitar until your kid is big enough to play on a full-size guitar.
Guitar amplifiers generally incorporate at least a few effects, the most basic being tone controls for bass and treble. There may be some form of "overdrive" control, where the preamplifier's output is increased to the point where the amplitude overloads the input of the power amplifier stage, causing clipping. In the 1970s, as effects pedals proliferated, their sounds were combined with tube amp distortion at lower, more controlled volumes by using power attenuators, such as Tom Scholz's Power Soak, as well as re-amplified dummy loads, such as Eddie Van Halen's use of dummy-load power resistor, post-power-tube effects, and a final solid-state amp driving the guitar speakers.

When guitarists sit around and debate tone, they pontificate on the properties of this instrument or that amp. But frequently there’s a factor in the equation that is forgotten. Our templates of what we consider to be great tone are not simply a formula of instrument + amps + musician. Recording studios also play a vital role in the creation of those sounds.
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I’d like to think that I am a little more forgiving of slight finish errors than most, so most of the horror stories surrounding Gibson QC do not bother me too much. After all, one area of the body where the sunburst color doesn't fade at EXACTLY the same point all the way around? That sounds more like middle aged guys trying to save face around their buddies after their wives saw the credit card bill the next month and made them take it back.
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Amp models: 33 | Effects: 42 | Connections: Standard guitar input, minijack stereo aux input, standard main outputs (L/Mono, R), XLR main outputs (L/Mono, R), standard stereo phones output, standard Send (L/Mono, R), standard Return (L/Mono, R), MIDI in, MIDI out/thru, USB, expression pedal | Power requirements: Mains power (IEC lead)

Guitarists love to get loud. I remember when I got my first electric guitar, I took it and my amp out onto my grandmother’s back porch and did my best rendition of The Man Who Sold The World, over and over again — at full blast — for several hours. In suburbia, in the middle of the day, I didn’t receive a lot of complaints. If I tried that today, in my Los Angeles apartment surrounded by grumpy neighbors, I might not be so lucky.
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Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 6 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Pickup Configuration: S-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Five Alarm Red, Desert Sun Yellow, Magenta, Black, White
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The Ibanez Artcore AF75, PRS SE Standard 24 and Schecter PT, for example, are priced below $600 and have been highly rated. They’re not exactly cheap money-wise, but they’re definitely worth a lot more. Getting one of those from the get-go will make playing guitar a lifetime passion. “Cheap” guitars may seem more affordable at first, but many of these are poorly made and can be more costly in the long run because of constant repairs and replacements.
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The Lotus Vantage copy (Washburn Eagle, Aria Pro II Cardinal series, or Ibanez Artist) double cutaway (batwing) guitar with a solid body, 3 per side tuners on headstock, rosewood fingerboard with brass inlays, brass nut and neck-through construction (though there may have been a bolt-on model). This was usually finished in emerald green, polished mahogany or stained blue/white breadboard style and occasionally gloss white with 2 exposed humbucker pickups.
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best electric guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.

Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.




We’re bookending this article with two Epiphone guitars. Why? Because Les Paul was the man. And G-400 Pro was actually a successor Les Paul model from ’61 to ’68, making this guitar a true icon of rock, power, and endless sustain. With a mahogany neck and rosewood fretboard, this guitar has the looks and, with Alnico Classic Pro humbucking pickups, the tonal quality is excellent. 


I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
Now think about all the advances in guitar technology that we’ve witnessed over the decades—how much smarter we are now when it comes to acoustics, electronics and precision manufacturing? Sticking with this metaphor, isn’t it a bit crazy that we place such high value on the early designs that represent the Model T-era of the electric guitar’s evolution? We’re not just talking nostalgia and historic significance here—ask most guitarists to name the most amazing, best-sounding electric guitars ever made, and they’ll go all the way back to early-fifties Broadcasters, late-fifties Les Pauls, and early-sixties Stratocasters. Guitarists cling to the tones produced by what is, essentially, first generation technology.
When B.B. King heard T-Bone Walker, he "thought Jesus Himself had returned to Earth playing electric guitar." Walker invented the guitar solo as we know it, building a new style on fluid phrasing, bluesy bends and vibrato. It was the clear tone and melodic invention of his 1942 single "Mean Old World" that blew everyone's mind, and Walker refined his approach through hits like "Call It Stormy Monday." "I came into this world a little too soon," Walker said. "I'd say that I was about 30 years before my time."

Epiphone's passion has always been about more than just making guitars. It has been about making music. It has been about understanding what is inside every musican that makes them want to, have to, express themselves. And understanding the myriad musical styles, where they are going and how they might develop. For over one hundred and twenty-five years they have continually looked for new and better ways to help players take their music farther.
Barney Kessel, American jazz/blues guitarist/session musician prominent in the 1950s and 1960s. Kessel endorsed the Kay "Jazz Special", "Artist" and "Pro" guitars. As of 2016 the Barney Kessel name has been assigned exclusive manufacturing rights with the Kay Guitar Company. Kay is now reissuing the 1960s signature models (Barney Kessel Pro, Barney Kessel Artist, Barney Kessel Jazz Special). Contrary to some misleading stories, Barney Kessel often played Kay Guitars and can seen on video playing a Kay Jazz Special Guitar on the T.V. series Johnny Staccato, "Television’s Jazz Detective"

Similarly to the previous model, this guitar has a mahogany body as well as a fine looking maple top. What is more, this unit has an elegant metallic gold finish that you might like. Among the features that make it stand out, we feel like it is important that we mention its practical Alnico Classic humbuckers and the fact that it has a Rosewood fretboard. Additionally, it comes supplied with trapezoid inlays.


I then surveyed Amazon, Sweetwater, Musician’s Friend, and other online musical instrument vendors to see what was available. Having found several promising models priced below $200, I decided to set this as our price ceiling. By setting a $200 ceiling, we’re not saying that more-expensive models aren’t worth paying extra for—only that the models we recommend here are more than adequate to get a beginner off to a great start.
the most with a headphone jack. Any suggestions? I am just a bedroom player who sucks and price is well I say depends what it (the amp) is worthy b/c I am on disability and my neurologist said just quit but at 48 years old it (music) is the only area of life besides my dog and mom that keeps me even and she is in worse shape than me (sorry for the soap box). Is the EVH 5150 III though its' combo is 50 watts but it has the headphone jack. Please anyone help???

A question which causes much thought and divide! Catch 22 to a degree: you can't play songs till you've learnt some chords, but just knowing some chords will mean you actually can (though you are not aware of it) play loads of songs. There is a plethora of songs out there with only three chords (some with only two!). Their differences are that the order of chords is slightly different for each - with the exception of the thousands of 12-bar tunes!


You can divide these further into cabinets and combos. A cabinet is simply an amplifier without a head. The head is all the knobs and so on that can be tweaked to produce variations in tone and volume. Combos include the head, so they're often preferred as they're easier to port around. However, if you want a multi-speaker setup, you'll want to opt for cabinets with separate heads.
We're proud to say that our best assets at Guitar Center Forth Worth are our people. When you come in for a visit, you'll find that our staff aren't just friendly folk - they're also experienced musicians. We know our way around all our new and used instruments and accessories, which is why we've earned the trust of Texan guitar slingers from the famous to the casual. If you're into percussion, you'll also love our impressive vintage drum collection here at Cowtown. Drop by for a face-to-face chat about all we can do for you, or feel free to give us a call at 817-423-3800.

The characteristics of your Kingston are very similar to what other owners have reported: occasional scratchy and erratic performance of the electronics, intonation problems, and action that is hard to control (notably due to the lack of a truss rod). Although I can’t verify this, one estimate indicates that over 150,000 Kingston guitars were sold in the U.S. during the 1960s! It’s obvious that quantity trumped quality when it came to producing the guitars, and it isn’t surprising that the electronics have some issues after all these years.
Many arguments can be made for Peej’s gifted lead guitarist (and corn-dogging, cheese-mongering Stevie Ray Vaughan acolyte) Mike McCready, but it’s Gossard whose songwriting and toothsome licks propelled the Seattle grunge icons early, record-setting releases. The winsome chords of both “Daughter” and “Black,” the white-knuckle smash of “Animal” or “Deep” or “Do the Evolution” — all were anchored by Gossard, a quiet type more invested in classic-rock craft than classic-rock showmanship.

Open the case and you will find over 689MB of rich guitar tones ranging from 70 to 130BPM. These sensational loops are neatly arranged into 3 categories comprising of 50+ Ballad Hooks, 50+ Steady Riffs and 50+ Upbeat Jams, all applicable to a vast range of genres! From the clean, delay-drenched chime of Ballad Hook 'Serene' to the upbeat overdrive of Steady Riff 'Perpetual' and the crunchy swagger of Upbeat Jam 'Loose', STUDIO GUITARS redefines quality guitar samples and delivers them in stunning 24-bit high definition.

Usually what a lot of people complain about when they say a small amp has a lack of power, they mean that the lower tones feel a little lacking. Well, picking the right amp, and placing it right, should allow the lead guitar to shine with the high tones, while also being powerful with the low tones. Yes a smaller amp will; forever have issues with low tone, but correct construction, presence of vacuum tubes, and even simply the correct placement can all solve these problems during small gigs.


If you are using the bs-16i or similar app try changing the Rx. Channel for say the first 8 channels all to 1. You will then have 8 easily accessible sounds to play at the touch of the Solo/Mute button. You can then mix for instance piano and pads together. Alternatively you could leave the channels 1 to 16 and use channel select to choose your favorite sounds.  To play two sounds together just put them on the same channel. This is handy for pianos where you can add the level of resonance you prefer. When layering sounds with piano choose the non resonance piano versions (available in all the SoundFonts) to avoid lack of polyphony problems.

While vintage guitars tend to hold a reputation as the best ever made, there are more high-end boutique makers turning out truly magnificent instruments than ever before. Following the wake of trail-blazers like Paul Reed Smith, the current class of boutique guitar makers includes the likes of Knaggs, Kauer, Swope, Fano, Huber, Koll and many many more. Keep an eye on this page for the latest and greatest luthier-made new and used electric guitars to hit the pages of Reverb.
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Finally, you’ll want to make sure you have the accessories you need to get up and playing fast. A strap, spare strings (they do break from time to time), and some plectrums are all essentials – and don’t forget an amplifier! You’ll also want a case (preferably hardshell, but soft and padded will do) to store and transport your guitar, and an electric tuner to keep it sounding good. These can all be picked up from your local guitar store, although if you are starting from scratch, you may want to consider a combo kit, which usually offer good value and convenience.
Anyway, as the Strat-style guitars have three pickups, the selector switch works like this: all the way to the left (relative to the Jimi pic) would limit the guitar’s output to the sound of the neck pickup. One position to the right will blend the neck pickup with the middle pickup. Put the switch in the middle, and you’ll get just the sound of the middle pickup, as you may have guessed. The next position will blend the middle and bridge pickups, and all the way to the right, it’s all bridge pickup.

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In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).
This is a really special, limited edition guitar. Gibson are well known for their premium products, and the J-200 Standard certainly lives up to that billing. What we have here is Gibson’s modern interpretation of the legendary Super Jumbo that has been around in some incarnation since 1937. It’s an enlarged, round body style for big sounds and presence.
The envelope filter is also known as an auto-wah.  It functions sonically like a wah-wah pedal but uses the strength of the signal to control the sweep of the frequency.  Typically, control knobs allows the player to set the amount of wah to interact with picking, so that the guitarist can dynamically control the effect without using a rocker to engage the filtering.
The varying amplified current of the valve is connected through the first coil of wire (primary) and creates a varying magnetic field. The varying magnetic field created by the primary coil, causes electricity to be generated in the second coil of wire, which is wound tightly around the first. Electricity is transferred to the second coil only when the magnetic field is changing, not stationary. The iron core of the transformer keeps the magnetic field contained so little is lost. The transfer is very efficient. The secondary coil is connected directly to the speaker. The reduced secondary voltage is adjusted by the ratio of turns between the 2 coils. Eg 1,000 turns on the primary and 100 turns on the secondary would change the voltage 10:1. Most output transformers have a turn’s ratio of approx 20:1.
Learning the notes on your guitar fretboard is one of the most important things you can do to advance your guitar playing skills. Knowing this information opens up an enormous amount of possibilities and can greatly help ease the learning curve for future guitar exercises. From scales, to soloing, to chord positions / progressions, knowing where each guitar note without having to think about it will put you well ahead of other guitarists who have not mastered this yet. This guide will give you some background information regarding how the notes on your guitar fretboard are laid out and of

Are you a seasoned player looking to upgrade you instrument or a beginner starting to learn the ropes and tricks of playing a guitar? Well, in this article we have prepared a comprehensive guide on how to select the best electric guitar as per you needs and the list of the best electric guitars available in India. The guitar is a complex musical instrument with some basic components, a wide range of features and different constructions, so it is important to have some basic idea about these features so that you can make an informed choice.
Have you ever looked at a hollow or semi-hollow guitar on the wall at your local music store and wondered how the heck they get the electronics in there? The short answer: it’s do-able, but not easy. In fact, it’s widely considered to be one of the most difficult jobs in the wide world of guitar maintenance. My tech charges extra for doing electronics work in a hollow-body, and he’s definitely not the only one.
One notable exception is a pitch shifter or harmonizer, particularly if you plan on using a pitch shift and envelope follower together as the pitch shifter may have greater difficulty accurately tracking an envelope follower-processed signal. Similarly, a standard wah pedal generally sounds best in the very front of the signal chain, but once again I recommend placing pitch shifter/harmonizer effects in front of a wah if you plan on using both together. Also, many players prefer the sound of a wah with a distortion pedal placed in front of it as this configuration can produce a more dramatic or more refined sweep depending on the distortion pedal’s tonal character (See Example 1, below).
Monte Allums Mods – Tweaking the tone of inexpensive stomp boxes is an obsession of Monte Allums. He started modding mainly because he refused to spend $200 to $300 or more to achieve great tone. Monte believes that most expensive boutique pedals are simply clones of inexpensive pedals, but upgraded with higher-quality components. So his mods and kits feature classic designs with better components to deliver superior tone.
Unlike the 60's and 70's, it is almost impossible to buy a poor quality guitar today. There are many hundreds of "brand" name guitars being produced in dozens of factories throughout the world, with these same factories producing instruments for the world's best known brands - and nearly all of these instruments are well made and perfectly playable. Don't worry about the name on the headstock. If you are buying the guitar as a gift, have a guitarist-friend advise you on the suitability of the instrument for the intended recipient. Even the world's best known and respected guitar manufacturers market instruments in a variety of price markets, and while there are differences in materials and tonal qualities, these are usually well beyond the beginner's ability to discern. All are playable; it is up to the player to make them sound good.
James Patrick "Jimmy" Page, OBE is an English musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer who achieved international success as the guitarist and leader of the rock band Led Zeppelin. Page began his career as a studio session musician in London and, by the mid-1960s, he had become the most sought-after session guitarist in England. He was a member of the Yardbirds from 1966 to 1968. In late 1968, he founded Led Zeppelin. Page is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential guitarists of all time. Rolling Stone magazine has described Page as "the pontiff of power riffing" and ranked him number 3 in their list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All ...more on Wikipedia
Across the United States, there are increasing concerns from businesses about the supply of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics trained workers. Although science and math test scores in the US are among the lowest around the world, the US educational system is in the process of revitalizing the “hands on” learning techniques as a way to enhance the participation and success of students. Our project meets the needs of applied learning with the flexibility of being modular in the classroom.

You have to admire a YouTube channel and accompanying website that’s taken one guy on his own over fifteen years to build and offers hundreds of different lessons at all the various levels. The great thing about Justin is he gives off a cool, enthusiastic vibe all the time whether he’s teaching a basic chord for beginners or taking seasoned players through a complex solo.
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Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony Gold - String Instrument Finish: Goldburst, Redburst

Hi Chris. That doesn’t ring any bells I’m afraid. If your customer wants a new scheme I wouldn’t be afraid to replace the stock switch with a standard 5-way and then you know where you are. There’s always a chance that the Vigier switch is doing something funky and it started with slightly different pickup selections so the sound might change with a new standard switch. Obviously make sure you’ve got notes and photos so you can revert back to the stock wiring! Have you tried to buzz out the Vigier switch with a multimeter to see how it works? Alternatively, have you tried touching the pickup magnets with a screwdriver to see which pickups/coils are on in each switch position, that might give you some clues?


Alnico magnets in a humbucker pickup should make you think vintage tone, with said pickups generally lower in output in comparison to their ceramic counterparts. But having proved capable, and indeed at home with rock and metal, it's great to learn that rolling off the gain emphatically proves that the XM-DLX2 is no one-trick pony; the neck pickup easily handles fat, rounded jazz/blues tones with the bridge pickup fluent in Skynyrd-esque raunchy pickin' country.


Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.
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Archtop-wise, the PEs apparently went into the ’62 and sometime in that year were renamed with the EP prefix, but otherwise remained the same. No detailed info on the full line is available, but the ’62 PE-8 had a bound fingerboard, small block or strip inlays, a single rounded cutaway, a rosewood pickguard, two � not one � metal-covered pickups (with one row of exposed poles along the edge), a chicken-beak selector on the upper shoulder, and four controls on the lower bout.
This is a gradual and repetitive change in volume, going up and down. Done slowly and subtly it can be very gentle, but turn up the controls and you get a surf-guitar like shimmer. On extreme settings the signal turns from fully on to fully off sharply and repetitively, giving a robotic sound. Controls are usually rate and depth, with a third control to affect how sharply the volume changes occur – whether they are smooth and gradual or sharp and sudden. Tremolo pedals are often equipped with tap tempo too, allowing you to match the volume changes with the tempo of the song.
Radial Engineering Ltd. is a manufacturer of professional audio products based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The company offers a wide array of products that are sold under brand names such as Radial, Tonebone, Primacoustic, Reamp and Zebracase. These are offered through a network of dealers and distributors that span the globe. Quality construction, exceptional audio performance and superb customer service are the underpins that have served to make Radial one of the most respected and trusted brands in the industry.
At least one company, Audiovox, built and may have offered an electric solid-body as early as 1932. Audiovox electric guitars were built by Paul Tutmarc[1] who is also credited as the co-inventor of the magnetic pickup along with Art Stimpson, and the fretted electric bass guitar. Bob Wisner worked for Paul converting tube radio amplifiers into guitar amplifiers and eventually developing his own amplifier circuits so Paul's instruments could be sold along with their own amplifiers. Paul was unsuccessful at obtaining a patent for his magnetic pickup as it was too similar to the telephone microphone coil sensor device. Audiovox production was handed over to Paul's son, Bud Tutmarc, who continued building these instruments under the brand, "Bud-Electro" until the early 1950s. Bud Tutmarc had been delegated by the senior Tutmarc the task of winding the pickup coils used on his father's and he continued producing them for his own guitars. He used horseshoe magnets in a single-coil and later a hum cancelling dual coil configuration. Bob Wisner was hired by Rickenbacher, later spelled Rickenbacker and may have passed on Tutmarc's magnetic pickup technology and helped them develop the more familiar bar magnet and pole-piece pickup construction still widely used today for their cast aluminum electric guitar, nicknamed The Frying Pan or The Pancake Guitar, beginning in 1933.
Received it right on time. It was a gift for my best friend and it turned out to be a lot more beautiful than expected. The shade of blue looks real classy and different in different lighting ! Yamaha is known for its magical sound and they maintain their name with this piece too! The guitar comes tuned , and sounds absolutely amazing ! Other website reviews say that it's not as loud, I didn't think so. It has a complete resounding sound that is pleasing to the ears ! My friend went in shock at the surprise and I went in shock with the unexpected high quality ! Definitely recommend, as a beginner or a pro, it's an easy to handle guitar that cradles comfortably between your arms and sounds perfect.
Why do these genres not require the use of a tone knob, or sometimes, require a tone knob to be fully open? Well, for metal and hard rock, first of all, most of the tone shaping happens on the amp and/or on the pedals, especially for those who use high gain distortion pedals. The pickups on typical hard rock and metal guitars are humbuckers, which are warmer and have less treble. Couple that with high gain and high output pickups which compress the signal and also take some of the treble away, and keeping the tone knob open becomes that much important so that the tone will not be muddy and keep its cut and punch. For country, well, I guess that’s just *the* sound of the genre, and wide open Telecasters and Stratocasters are the weapons of choice.

Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.
The Takamine brand helps prevent big brand manufacturers from setting their prices too high - by showing them that great guitars can be produced at reasonable prices. On top of their bang per buck reputation, Takamine is considered as the pioneer of installing built-in pickups into acoustics, something that is now a common configuration offered by majority of guitar builders. The Takamine P3NY showcases how impressive tonewoods and electronics can be implemented without ridiculously jacking up the price.

Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. The term “electrics” is not meant to include the company’s many fine acoustic-electric guitars, many sporting top-notch electronics (which ultimately remain acoustic beasts), but rather electric guitars meant for country chicken pickin’ or raunchy rock and roll. However, beginning in the early ’60s, Martin has launched periodic forays into the electric guitar marketplace with some very interesting, if commercially unsuccessful, results (which explains why the Martin name doesn’t come immediately to mind). Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. For this essay, however, let’s take an alternative view and look at the company’s various electric guitars, its thinline hollowbodies and later solidbodies.
Paul Reed Smith Guitars (better known as PRS) is a Maryland-based manufacturer, and relatively new in the world of guitars – founded in 1980, when they began making a series of hand-built guitars. Today they have a wide range of models, which are built in both Asia and America, as well as a full roster of artists playing their guitars; including Mike Oldfield, Dave Navarro, Carlos Santana, and Mark Tremonti.
In the 21st century, European avant garde composers like Richard Barrett, Fausto Romitelli, Peter Ablinger, Bernhard Lang, Claude Ledoux and Karlheinz Essl have used the electric guitar (together with extended playing techniques) in solo pieces or ensemble works. Probably the most ambitious and perhaps significant work to date is Ingwe (2003–2009) by Georges Lentz (written for Australian guitarist Zane Banks), a 60-minute work for solo electric guitar, exploring that composer's existential struggles and taking the instrument into realms previously unknown in a concert music setting.

If you pine for the days when giants scarred the earth with odes to their arena-sized wangs, then Michigan’s Greta Van Fleet are your new jam. Not only do they look like they’ve stumbled out of the pages of 70s Vogue, they also have a preternatural knack for brow-raising classic rock anthems. Guitarist Jake Kiszka is highly capable, combining Page-like pentatonic ping-pong with a bag of lead licks that channel everyone from Jefferson Airplane to Mike Campbell. 

A fuzz pedal is essentially an extreme distortion effect. Because fuzz so radically alters the signal, it is often used sparingly for contrast, rather than as a meat-and-potatoes sound. Since it thickens up the tone so dramatically, fuzz can be fun for intros and solo guitar parts when no other instruments are playing. Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star Spangled Banner" is a classic example of fuzz-infused guitar.
Consider the MusicMan SR5 20th Anniversary basses, with a "mahogany tone block" channeled into an ash body, running from the neck, through the pickups, to the bridge. I've played several of these basses, and the best two of them were really outstanding (I own one of those). Could be any number of reasons they sound as good as they do, but there you have it.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Maple & Mahogany - Figured - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 4 - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Oil
Honeyman-Scott’s solos were concise and economical, getting the point across in only a few measures. His solo on “Kid” is a pop song unto itself that evokes the Beatles’ finest melodic moments, while his three- and four-second bursts on “Tattooed Love Boys” unleash more emotion, fire and style than most guitarists can convey in an extended 15-minute solo.
The Triple Crown TC-50 is a three-channel amp, with independent preamps covering clean, low-gain and high-gain ranges. The front panel packs three identical sets of controls including gain, master volume, bass, mid, treble and presence, together with a two-way toggle switch that changes the channel gain and voice. There’s a small toggle switch for manual channel changing, and a pair of master output level controls, one of which is footswitchable. The feature-rich rear panel includes Mesa’s exceptional CabClone speaker-emulated output, with a balanced XLR, headphones socket and line out. The TC-50 also benefits from a footswitchable effects loop, separate reverb level controls for each channel, and MIDI switching for all the major functions. The Triple Crown’s clean channel is highly versatile, going from butter-sweet clarity through to edgy blues soloing, with a lot of control over that ‘just on the edge’ sweet spot. The Lo Gain channel is where the TC-50’s crunch and classic rock tones live, with a multi-layered overdrive and harmonic overtones that shift with varying degrees of pick attack. Flipping the toggle switch into Drive mode adds a subtle midrange bump, invoking JCM800-approved snarl and a dose of extra gain. The Hi Gain channel adds more of the same - lots more, so much so that in the upper reaches we think this is probably the most gain ever from a Mesa amp. No doubt about it, the Triple Crown has three channels packed full of world-class tone that only a handful of amps can compete with.
Many Sixties rock acts made political statements, but the MC5 were among the first rockers to make a serious commitment to revolution, aligning themselves closely with the White Panther Party (a Black Panther offshoot organization) and effectively serving as the White Panthers’ agitprop machine. Their blue-collar Detroit roots lent a certain gritty gravitas to their stance. These weren’t effete rock stars dabbling in left wing chic but working-class guerrillas with ammo belts strapped across their bare chests and guitars brandished as rifles.
For example, Al Schmitt starts with the traditional SM57 close mic, on axis but a little off the centre of the cone. "Then I'll put a really good mic up — maybe a Neumann U67 or an M50 — for the room... It could be anywhere from 15 to 20 feet away." It's worth noting that the M50 is an omni microphone and, although the omni polar pattern is only very occasionally mentioned for close-miking, it makes a much more sensible choice for capturing natural room ambience.

The 2008 Les Paul Standard debuts Gibson’s newest neck profile—an asymmetrical design that makes it one of the most comfortable and playable necks ever offered on any guitar. The new ergonomically-correct profile is tapered, and designed to be thicker on the bass side, and thinner on the treble side, closely outlining the natural form of the hand as it grips the neck. The 2008 Standard necks are machined in Gibson’s rough mill using wood shapers to make the initial cuts. Once the rosewood fingerboard gets glued on, the rest—including the final sanding—is done by hand. That means there are no two necks with the exact same dimensions. So while it still has the basic characteristics of its respective profile, each neck will be slightly different, with a distinct but traditional feel.


A guitar is not just an instrument but a way to express yourself. Everyone like a good guitar solo whether it be Frank Sinatra or Arijit Singh. The guitar is one of the most famous and the most widely played instrument ever. There are many companies which make guitars and it might be confusing at first to choose from so many options. Here we have curated a list from reputations and reviews of some of the best guitar brands out there for you to choose from. Find the sound you are always looking for and put an end to compromising. So get ready to be showered with some of the hottest deals we could find just for you in this list of the best guitar brands to buy online.
While a high school degree is not necessarily required, it does provide an edge for graduates who wish to become guitar technicians. Students should concentrate on classes such as music, band, English, shop class and mathematics. A major part of any education should include guitar lessons. Techs often need to be able to play by ear and must be able to pick up on any nuances in an instrument's sound and tuning.
Both Kirk and James have a long and fruitful relationship with ESP. KH-2 is just one of many Kirk Hammett signature models which are available. It is also one of the most refined. The guitar is a beast, to put it simply. It has the range, the output and the finesse to push just about any playing style. Although I only briefly played it, the guitar left me in awe. Everything was smooth, easy to reach and just comfortable.
Once again we traverse the extremities of guitar body sizes; from the sleek parlour shapes to the rather obviously named jumbo sized acoustics. If dreadnoughts are the poster-boys, and parlours the waif-like supermodels, then jumbo acoustics are the plus-size, brash, loud ones who just want to have fun. You’ll probably have seen jumbo-sized acoustics in the hands of Noel Gallagher or Bob Dylan, and the benefits here are measured in sheer volume. With all that extra wood, there’s more room for the sound to reverberate around the body, resulting in a big, bold sound which simply can’t be recreated from a smaller bodied guitar.
The American David Schecter founded his company in 1976 in order to produce spare parts for guitars already available (especially Fender and Gibson). But since 1979 the brand has been manufacturing its own guitars. In the beginning they had only Fender-based models but nowadays, Schecter guitars are clearly conceived for hairy players (but not exclusively), with models like the Hellraiser or the Damien. Among their most famous users are Billy Corgan, Eddie Vedder, Pete Townshend, Mark Knopfler, Matthew Bellamy... And the brand also presented its first amps at the latest NAMM show.
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Separate bass amplifiers which do not contain speakers, often called "heads" or "amp heads", are usually integrated units, with a preamplifier, equalizer (bass and treble controls) and a power amplifier combined in a single unit. Some players use separate preamplifier/power amplifier setups, where one or more preamplifiers drive one or more power amplifiers. In the latter example, a bass player can use a bass-specific power amplifier or use a sound reinforcement system power amp. Bass amp heads are available in high-wattage power ratings that are not available in combo units. For example, the Ampeg SVT8-PRO amp head puts out 2,500 watts RMS at 2 ohms, a power level that is high enough for the largest 8x10" cabinets and the largest venues (stadiums, outdoor festivals, etc.).
Unfortunately, there is no single unified format used for Ibanez serial numbers. Ibanez guitar production is outsourced to several companies and facilities through the world and the numbering schemes are different in each region and/or factory. The information on this page is culled from several sources both on-line and off-line and represents a distillation of the available information. It applies primarily to electric guitars, but some information may also be applicable to acoustics.
The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
When two pickups are wired in series, a good portion of the treble frequencies is lost because the long pickup wire works like a resistor. Any resistor in the signal path will suppress the signal. The formula works like this: The longer the wire, the higher the resistance, and the more treble is lost. We all know this from guitar cables: When you use a very long guitar cable, the sound isn’t as detailed and transparent as it is with a shorter cable. A long cable acts as a resistor.
Since 1994 The Music Zoo has been a trusted source for musicians around the world. We've located guitars for Slash, sold guitars for Steve Miller, held performances by major artists like Steve Vai, built thousands of customer relationships, and helped countless enthusiasts find just the right instrument. Today we look forward to finding your next guitar!

Many guitarists have chosen this iconic axe for its versatility and capability to sound great in any genre of music, but the Les Paul is most widely known for its heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll vibe.  A great example of this would be Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin fame.  Once Page began using Les Pauls, he never looked back and helped to give the instrument its indelible place in the history books of music.


This bass guitar amplifier features a 20-watt amplifier and an 8-inch driver. It reproduces frequencies from 70 Hz ~ 10 KHz with a total harmonic distortion of 0.5% (typical). It also has a built-in, switchable active compressor. It features a 3-band EQ, with the bass EQ centered at 100 Hz, mid-range EQ at 800 Hz, and a treble EQ at 6 KHz. It features a 3.5mm line output with an impedance of 1 kilohm, for directing the output signal to a mixer, recorder, or another amp. The 3.5mm stereo headphone output will defeat the internal speaker for quiet practicing.
wonderful feel of a small town, with caring people and the owner is amazing. He'll of a player too! Just got a gorgeous ESPN strat copy from him, he graciously showed me just how well of a strat it is... by playing it through a fender tweed tube amp. He even sang a little for me as he made my strat sing right along with him. Price was excellent, as are all his prices. See More

hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.

TAB uses a series of hyphens to represent the strings. Each string is identified on the far left by the name of the note produced when played open. The high-e (string 1) is at the top; low-E (string 6) is at the bottom. There is no restriction for how long a line of TAB can be, but for readability it should be kept short enough to prevent wrapping on a web-site or printed page.


sorry this has SOLD OUT: Poor mans Authentic Blues Parlor guitar from way back. This is the real deal used over 60 years this is what some poor share cropper genuine American Blues men would have been able to afford back in the day and subsequently used throughout the south by mostly poor Black folks where the berth of the blues was born of course this is from the place where great things happen BORN in USA baby and is widely considered and is acknowledged to be by most all of our greats in US or British Rockers - Jazz players & Country too all these greats players feel that these original US Southland blues is the truest of ART FORM's PURE and RAW ....you feel it in your soul... this original sounds was not overly sophisticated at all it was RAW that was its beauty this sound from this old Stella is Authentic like that and is RAW and its woods are good - solid Burch wood and actually is an excellent tone wood in fact in those days Burch was widely used and my belief is that is a characteristic in the tone of this Original blues... Classic sound to this guitar OK it has it.... I have a few of these Stella's and love them, when you want to record and lay down an authentic REAL old school style rhythm track or play it on your porch swing and sip mint julip from a mason jar to get in the mood you can do it with this guitar its the real deal. This guitar is old did I say at least 60 likely older that being said it plays well it really kinda does... with pretty good action for what it is as good as it was 60+ years ago I recon. Tuners work, body is in good shape it aint goin anywhere its prety well made it has surface cracks and they are there and not a problem they have been there 40 years and have not gotten any worse not in the 15 years I have owned Stella! Like the movie STELLA! I could not resist the reference but I digress, Condition is Vintage good obviously not new or mint but she is 100% cool Authentic bluesman material if you want that old time Mississippi Delta to Chicago raw blues this old vintage American Icon of a Poor mans Parlor guitar, this is a classic threw & threw... I suppose I could have simply said it sounds good.... ahow ow ow ow.
Why We Liked It - As with Gibson’s other premium products, this is not a cheap electric acoustic, but you do get exactly what you pay for. One of the very best and most legendary acoustics with an electric edge. It’s going to be the guitar of choice for real enthusiasts and of course touring professionals who will settle for nothing less than the best. If you are on a budget, try one of these cheaper electric guitars.
The most defining feature has got to be the neck. It’s thicker than the standard Strat neck, which gives extra meat to work with when bending those strings. Even the fretboard was designed around this technique, with its narrow frets and flat fretboard. It’s not the cheapest one out there, but Fender Stevie Ray Vaughan Stratocaster is definitely one of the best Strats around.

Tremolo – Not to be confused with a tremolo bar (which is closer to the Whammy pedal), this effect works on volume. You can think of tremolo pedals as being like strumming a note, and then wiggling the volume knob on the amp while it’s ringing. Usually, the pedal will have controls for speed (equivalent to how fast the volume is “wiggled”) and depth (equivalent to how far the knob would be turned).
I have been playing for two years. I use to play (and still have) a fender squier. Today I bought a Lyle on impuls. I wasn't planning on buying one, i just walked in and it looked so beautiful. I have a feeling it is about 10 years old or so, but the sales man didn't know much other than it was a Lyle and it had new tunning pegs on it. I got it for 150$ and i would REALLY love to know more about it. Thanks.
Of music written originally for guitar, the earliest important composers are from the classical period and include Fernando Sor (b. Spain 1778) and Mauro Giuliani (b. Italy 1781), both of whom wrote in a style strongly influenced by Viennese classicism. In the 19th century guitar composers such as Johann Kaspar Mertz (b. Slovakia, Austria 1806) were strongly influenced by the dominance of the piano. Not until the end of the nineteenth century did the guitar begin to establish its own unique identity. Francisco Tárrega (b. Spain 1852) was central to this, sometimes incorporating stylized aspects of flamenco's Moorish influences into his romantic miniatures. This was part of late 19th century mainstream European musical nationalism. Albéniz and Granados were central to this movement; their evocation of the guitar was so successful that their compositions have been absorbed into standard guitar repertoire.
You might have read our review about the C40 GigMaker kit from Yamaha earlier on. This is a similar guitar, but it’s the C40II, and the black color makes it a limited edition instrument. The inlay is less “traditional” looking. Instead of an ornate “rosette” style, the inlay is a stripe pattern all the way around the sound hole, making the guitar look somewhat “jazzy,” to use a more descriptive term. So if this is the look you prefer, read on for more details.
The Japanese copy juggernaut got off to a fast start, and the second major Univox guitar was the Lucy, a lucite copy of the Ampeg Dan Armstrong, again produced by Arai, introduced in 1970. This guitar had a surprisingly thin bolt-on neck (especially compared to the Ampeg original) and a slightly smaller body. The fingerboard was rosewood with 24 frets and dot inlays. This had a fake rosewood masonite pickguard with volume, tone and three-way select. Like the Ampeg, the Lucy had a Danelectro-style bridge/tailpiece with little rosewood saddle. Unlike the Ampeg – which had Armstrong’s groovy slide-in epoxy-potted pickups – this version had a pair of the chrome/black insert pickups jammed together at the bridge. Other Japanese manufacturers also made copies of the Ampeg lucite guitar, notably carrying the Electra (St. Louis Music) and Ibanez (Elger/Hoshino) brand names, with versions of the slide-in pickups. In ’71, the Univox Lucy (UHS-1) was $275 including case. Just how long the Lucy remained available is unknown, but it probably did not outlive the original and was gone by ’73 or ’74.
ATTACHING AND DRILLING THE NECK For this you will want to use a clamp to hold the neck firmly in place while you dril the holes. Attach the neck to the body and clamp it lightly so you can set it in the right possition before drilling. Make sure you have some protection between the clamp and the body so you don't leave any indentions in the wood. A soft piece of plastic or a soft rag will work nicely. Use a long ruler to allign the neck to the position of the bridge. Do this on both sides of the neck to see that you get it centered. Tighten down the clamp a bit more until the neck doesn't move. Drill the holes as straight as possible with a smaller bit that you used on the body. If you can't reach all of the spots that you need to drill at because the clamp is in the way, take a couple of the furreles and neck screws and screw them into the neck. Once you have done this you can finish drilling the other holes with out the clamp.
While the decision to choose between bridges can be an overwhelming one, to simplify things, it’s better to choose one that’s appropriate for your skill level and your personal taste in music.  One bridge for the heavy metal genre may be absolutely frustrating for a country player.  For those with numerous guitars, you might have a different bridge on each instrument to suit that situation or style of music.
Judging by the tag in the sound hole, headstock logo, and general construction of the guitar I would think it's definite made earler than '86. Mine has a tag identical to this one but the date 16 5 78 is stamped onto it and it also has the name of the person who inspected it stamed on it. Interestingly I did notice your guitar has a different truss rod construction than mine. looks like yours adjusts from the head stock under the cover and mine is an allen adjustment through the sound hole. Don't know if they switched over to your style at a later date... food for thought. I have heard of some poeple reffering to these as Yairi built guitars even though they don't carry the Yairi headstock logo.

Glen Campbell; DJ Ashba, Melissa Etheridge, Nikki Sixx, Mick Thomson; Kaki King, Steve Lukather; Marcel Dadi, Ray Davies,[30] Roy Harper,[31] James Hetfield, Josh Homme, Cyndi Lauper, John Lennon, Country Joe McDonald,John McLaughlin, Yngwie Malmsteen, Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley, Stephen Marley, Roman Miroshnichenko, Maury Muehleisen, Dave Mustaine, Vince Neil, Jimmy Page, Richard Daniel Roman, Shania Twain, Boz Scaggs, Luis Alberto Spinetta, Statler Brothers, Cat Stevens, and Aaron Tippin;[30]


While known primarily for their acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars, Takamine produced a limited run of very high quality solid body electric guitars in the early 1980’s.[1] These are the GX100 (Gibson Explorer body style), GX200 (proprietary type body style similar to a Stratocaster, stop tailpiece bridge), GX200-T or TB, (same as GX200 only with a tremolo bridge) GZ300 (proprietary design) and GZ340 (proprietary design). The GX200 and GZ340 contain factory DiMarzio made pickups.[2]


I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”

A common acoustic body style that makes use of a very large soundboard is the dreadnought. Dreadnoughts are distinctive for their square bouts, wide waists, and 14-fret necks. The first dreadnought was developed in 1916, and it has been gaining in popularity ever since. Dreadnoughts are very popular among bluegrass guitarists due to their powerful, driving sound.

I have an acoustic that I bought from a lady I know who said she has had it since the early 70's. It says 'Maya' on the headstock and the reinforcement rod cover is stamped with 'Takamine'. The sticker inside the sound hole says 'Maya', "We made this guitar for the people who love guitar music", Made by Takamine, Model No. TF1o1S, Japan. On the inside of the sound hole at the top, the wood block there is stamped with 46.6.3. The guitar is only about 3 1/4 inches deep and approx. 15 inches wide at its widest spot. Small guitar with a big beautiful sound.

Third, the amp should be easy to use: If the controls are hard to figure out, they’ll likely frustrate those who’d rather spend their time playing than trying to figure out how their amp works. Also, every guitarist will at some point have to use someone else’s amp, so starting with an amp that has a fairly common control set will help you learn to dial in your sound when using an unfamiliar amp.
Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.

ESP is yet another brand that acquires a notable stance in the history of guitars. Back in the 1980s and 1990s, the company was known for producing high-quality, custom-shop instruments with incredible original designs. Even now, the trend goes on. Today, ESP guitars are among the preferred guitars for most professional musicians around the world. Particularly, the metal and hard rock players mark this brand as their favorite.
A reluctant soloist, Yo La Tengo cofounder Ira Kaplan was credited with “naïve guitar” on the band’s first single in 1985 and didn’t begin taking the spotlight regularly until some two years later. Starting with a bucket of Velvet Underground moves, Kaplan became a consummate inside guitarist, too, a deceptively normal-looking dude folding in space jazz, barbed noise, spare country soul, and — when very occasionally called for — traditional feet-behind-knees rock jumps.
In high school wood shop class, while other kids were building bookshelves that tilted, coffee tables that bowed, and paddles to smack each other with, Crisler was building a guitar. He later attended the Roberto-Venn school of Luthiery in Arizona and became a guitar researcher at Schecter Guitar Research and continued to enhance his knowledge of the guitar. Later, working for places like Guitar Center and Mars Music, which has since closed its doors, Crisler learned the ins and outs of the guitar, how to quick fix problems, and create solutions for unfixable problems. In the '80s, when Van Halen was touring in support of their album 1984, he had the opportunity to go back stage and repair Eddie Van Halen's guitar. "I thought I was so cool," he says. But he'd finally obtain the right to call himself a "guitar master."
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During the NSF grant cycles, the STEM Guitar Project has exceeded initial estimates of faculty impacted by recruiting over 450 STEM educators, with an additional 500 faculty exposed via national education conferences. Thus far, this effort is impacting over 20,000 students nationally over the 8 years because of faculty members adopting or adapting the curriculum developed through the project.
The output transformer sits between the power valves and the speaker, serving to match impedance. When a transformer's ferromagnetic core becomes electromagnetically saturated a loss of inductance takes place, since the back E.M.F. is reliant on a change in flux in the core. As the core reaches saturation,the flux levels off and cannot increase any further. With no change in flux there is no back E.M.F. and hence no reflected impedance. The transformer and valve combination then generate large 3rd order harmonics. So long as the core does not go into saturation, the valves will clip naturally as they drop the available voltage across them. In single ended systems the output harmonics will be largely even ordered due to the valve's relatively non linear characteristics at large signal swings. This is only true however if the magnetic core does NOT saturate.[45]
Great post man. I’ve been playing guitar for close to 15 years and when I was just starting out it was tough to know where to begin when it comes to tone. So many people advised me on getting a bunch of gear and spending money on amps, pedals and other enhancers but for me when I was just starting out it would have been great to read something like this!
Taylor's rise to fame has been relatively quick, thanks to their combination of impressive build quality and tone. Their diverse list of celebrity endorsers also helped, which include artists from different musical styles like Tony Iommi, Jason Mraz and Taylor Swift. Founded in 1974, the company has grown to be a major competitor in the acoustic guitar market, challenging older and well established brands in many price points. The Taylor 110ce is one of their more popular models, a mid-priced acoustic with solid spruce top that makes for a great entry point for intermediate players who want a "branded" workhorse acoustic.
In 1933, Dobro released an electric guitar and amp package. The combo amp had "two 8″ Lansing speakers and a five-tube chassis. Dobro made a two speaker combo amp that was on the market over 12 years before Fender launched its two-speaker "Dual Professional/Super" combo amp. In 1933, Audio-Vox was founded by Paul Tutmarc, the inventor of the first electric bass (Tutmarc's instrument did not achieve market success until Leo Fender's launched the Precision Bass). In 1933, Vega sold a pickup and amplifier set for musicians to use with existing guitars.

I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul
And while he'd heard its calling, Swank didn't move into the field until death arrived at the music shop where he was working. The resident guitar repairman suffered an aortic aneurysm and died. "It was terrible," Swank says. "He was a good friend of mine, but he still had a bunch of stuff in his shop." But Swank was able to step in and finish some of those jobs, and then more jobs began pouring in. The next thing he knew he had built a reputation for himself. "I'm a [guitar] player. I know how I like things to work, how instruments should play."

We specialize in the repair and restoration of stringed instruments and Guitar repair in Nashville, and the surrounding area. Our services provide for stringed instrument repair and maintenance  of all makes and models.  We also sell stringed instrument related accessories. Contact us for all of your repair and restoration needs. We love rescuing injured instruments, and helping them make music again.

The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
Let’s kick things off with one of Schecter’s top tier models. Blackjack Slim Line C-1 FR is by far one of their more refined guitars. It’s slim, lightweight, and brings the kind of thunder that will give you goosebumps. With a set of premium Seymour Duncans, we expected nothing less. My brief encounter with this axe was one of the most enjoyable playing sessions I’ve ever had, and I’ve played many, many guitars.

Yet, there’s still a lot to like about the JS140. First, the use of solid basswood for the body of the guitar is a plus, despite the fact that basswood is plentiful and affordable. While it’s typically used in economy guitars (like this one) its tone is quite good, providing a thick low end with a punchy mid range. As tonewoods go, it’s a decent compromise.


With over 100 effects, there's really no shortage of virtual stompboxes to play with, while the unit's complex signal routing capabilities allow for a wide variety of effects combination. Add to this Helix' acclaimed amp modeling features, which lets you mix and match 62 amp, 37 cabs and 16 mics. If that's not enough, you can also make adjustments to the amp models to better personalize your sound. To match its complexity, Line 6 designed the interface to be simple yet intuitive, courtesy of its color LCD display and colored LED rings.
There's just no getting around the Martin brand when there's talk about good acoustics. And since we're talking about the best of them, it's not surprising to find their name filling up multiple slots in this list. The Martin DRS2 acoustic guitar is special because it gives us a true all-solid wood body Martin acoustic guitar - at a very reasonable price point, in the dreadnought shape that the company themselves developed.
The EG-6N had a similar profile but tuners were mounted on a square-topped head with the buttons facing up. This had a dark square-ended fingerboard with dots and a single chrome-covered pickup with black center insert and exposed poles (same as on the SD-2L/4L), volume and tone control. The EG-8N was similar except for having a light fingerboard with black dots, and two of the chrome/black insert pickups, volume, tone and threeway select. A folding stand to hold the steels was available (this was a standard Teisco product from the mid-’50s on).
Collings Guitars is an Austin, Texas based stringed instrument manufacturer. The company was founded in 1973 by Bill Collings who is “one of the most recognized and respected names amongst aficionados of modern acoustic instruments.”[ Their acoustic guitars have been highly regarded for decades.[2]In addition to acoustic guitars they also make electric guitars, archtop guitars,mandolins, and ukuleles.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: HoneyBurst, Green
"That great Gretsch sound!" is the slogan of the company founded by Friedrich Gretsch in 1883. The company belongs to the oldest electric guitar manufacturers in the world. They created legendary archtop guitars, with or without Bigsby tremolo, like the White Falcon, the Country Club or the 6120 Chet Atkins. The rock 'n' roll boom in the 1950's allowed the brand to become a reference thanks to artists like Eddie Cochran or Bo Diddley. George Harrison ─ who bought a Duo Jet, a Tennessean and a Country Gentleman ─ became the brand's most famous endorser in the 1960's and put the brand under the spotlights once again. In 1967, Fred Gretsch Jr. sold the company to the Baldwin Piano Company and Gretsch started its twilight until it halted all production in 1981. Another Fred Gretsch (the nephew), bought the company back in 1989 and decided to open facilities in Japan and the USA to manufacture expensive products. Brian Setzer and his neo-rockabilly allowed the brand to rise again in popularity in the 1990's until Fender bought the company in 2002. Ever since, the manufacturing quality of the guitars has increased considerably and Gretsch is now back again as a major player in the guitar market.
One of  the most widely used guitars in jazz, the ES-175 is a semi-acoustic, hollow-bodied archtop that comes equipped with two humbucking pickups. The ES-175’s deep body produces the thick, dark sound beloved of jazz guitarists and the thin neck allows for fast chording and soloing. The bridge pickup is capable of producing a less jazzy, thinner sound, and ES-175s can be used in blues and rock.
Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.

If anyone has earned the right to two spots on this list, it’s Fender. Sitting squarely at the top of the guitar and amp game, this Southern California company might be at their peak at this very moment – and that’s a very good thing for you, if you want to get into playing guitar. This Super Champ X2 amp is a hell of a value, boasting the welcome bounce of Fender’s signature sound in a package that wont break the bank. And what’s even cooler about it is that it has 16 different amp modeling selections – meaning you still get the warmth of tube amplification with the right amount of modeling amp versatility. It also comes with two channels that can be controlled via an optional footswitch, and it’s equipped with a USB port for easy and quiet recording.


Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
Watching the short documentary posted above about Joe’s youthful experiences with MXR pedals was a real treat for me and sent me nostalgically back to those childhood days discovering pedals with my friends. I don’t know a whole ton about Joe’s use of particular pedals and such, but I’d definitely love to learn more. I do, however, appreciate how indispensable they are to an electric guitarist, especially a supremely talented one like Joe. Watching Joe’s fingers as he plays is magic, but I definitely need to start paying attention to how he’s playing guitar with his feet.
“The tremolo tail assembly was engineered specifically for the Spectrum ‘5.’ The bridge is an integral part of the whole assembly and is, of course, universally adjustable. The marvel of it all, however, is that the tremolo does not exert any friction (hence no wear and tear) on the strings. The tremolo action causes the whole bridge assembly to move smoothly back and forth.
A combo amplifier is a unit in which both the amp and speaker is integrated. You plug a guitar into one of these, turn it on and you are ready to play. The obvious benefit of a combo is that you have everything you need in one standalone unit, while the sound tends to be optimized by the manufacturer to be the best it can be – there’s no worrying about matching it with a good speaker. Combo amps also tend to be cheaper than heads and, as such, are excellent for beginners. While some are very capable of small to medium-sized performance, the drawback is that combos are limited in power compared to a head. They also tend to be much heavier, which can be a pain when regularly transporting it.
The first electric instrument amplifiers were not designed for use with electric guitars. The earliest examples were portable PA systems, which appeared in the early 1930s when the introduction of electrolytic capacitors and rectifier tubes allowed the production of economical built-in power supplies that could be plugged into wall sockets, instead of heavy multiple battery packs, since rechargeable batteries would not become lightweight until many decades later. While guitar amplifiers from the beginning were used to amplify acoustic guitar, electronic amplification of guitar was first widely popularized by the 1930s and 1940s craze for Hawaiian music, which extensively employed the amplified lap steel Hawaiian guitar.[2]
Entwistle also experimented throughout his career with "bi-amplification," where the higher frequencies of the bass sound are divided from the lower frequencies, with each frequency range sent to separate amplifiers and speakers. This allows for more control over the tone, because each portion of the frequency range can then be modified (e.g., in terms of tone, added overdrive, etc.) individually. The Versatone Pan-O-Flex amplifier used a different approach to bi-amplification, with separate amplifier sections for bass and treble but a single 12-inch speaker. The Versatone was used by well-known bassists such as Jack Casady and Carol Kaye.
I don't need freaky pointy demon guitar graphics or anything like that.....this $249 Agile makes my mouth water. For the price of two cheap pedals or one great pedal it's a guitar that you could work with. Ibanez makes the stylish P90 Jet King for about $375...If I were on a tight budget I'd rather have the basic Agile. Yes I'm aging! Get off my lawn you Jet King kids!!
"Craftsmanship, materials, and dimensional design are combined to make this one of Alvarez' most outstanding models. It has fine projection, sensitive response, and speedy action. The inlaid Tree of Life design on the rosewood fingerboard adds to its graceful distinction. Sides and back of flame grained rosewood are bound with ivoroid. Machine heads are chrome enclosed for longer life. Tuning is fast and precise. Slender mahogany neck with adjustable steel rod reinforcement. The top is select spruce chosen for its acoustic quality."
I was very surprised by your article on acoustic guitars and the ratings given by you. I have been playing acoustic guitars for most of my 62 years and have owned and played all of them. I cannot believe that you put Seagull guitars at the top of your list! I've played as well as owned a Seagull guitar for some time and I have found it to be constructed out of cheap materials with no regard to detail. The guitar's intonation was horrible... could never get the damn thing in tune beyond the fifth fret,which frustrated me very much. Lastly, the lack of a finish on the product lent itself to getting stains on it. With that being said,I just cannot see how you can even be on that list at all.
The humbuckers were smaller than typical, with metal covers and two rows of exposed adjustable polepieces. The pickups and three-way were mounted on a small black/white pickguard, with knobs on the body. Two jacks for mono or stereo output were mounted on the side of the lower bout. The two-octave unbound rosewood fingerboard had dot inlays. Early Preachers had “Preacher” engraved on the lower pickguard and a bridge/tailpiece assembly was similar to that on the Breadwinner/Deacon, with more metal and less plastic. Other versions are seen without the engraving and all-metal bridge/tailpieces, indicating the model evolved. Though no information is currently available on when the transition occurred, based on evidence from later UKs, it happened late, possibly around 1980.
The Univox/Aria Les Paul openly copied its American original, but would never be mistaken for it because it continued many characteristics typical of Japanese production at the time; a bolt-on neck with the usual narrow fingerboard, sitting relatively high on the body, zero frets, block inlays (with rounded corners) and rounded ends. The headstock was a copy of the Gibson open book. And, obviously, it didn’t have Gibson humbuckers, favoring instead a design with 12 adjustable poles in a metal cover with a narrow black insert slit in the middle, sitting on black surrounds. Controls were standard three-way with two volumes and tones. The knobs were those tall, skinny gold kind seen on many early Japanese copies. Hardware was gold-plated. These first Univox Les Paul copies survived into the early ’70s, but were probably gone by around ’74. By ’71, the model was called either the Mother or the R&B Guitar Outfit and was available in either black (U1982) or gold (U1983) finishes. Also by ’71, the Univox logo had changed from the early plastic version to the more common outlined block letter decal.
The “Studio” model was introduced in 1983, and is still in production. The intended market for this guitar was the studio musician; therefore, the design features of the “Les Paul Studio” were centered on optimal sound output. This model retained only the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contributed to tone and playability, including the carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware. However, the Studio design omitted several stock Gibson ornamentations that did not affect sound quality, including the binding on the body and neck. The two notable exceptions to this are the Studio Standard and the Studio Custom. Both models were produced in the mid-1980s, and included body and neck binding, though with dot fingerboard inlays instead of more ornate trapezoids. The first Studios from 83 to 86, except for Studio Standard and Studio Custom, were made with alder bodies rather than mahogany/maple. The current Studios come with a chambered mahogany body with either a maple or mahogany cap. The entry level Les Paul Studio “faded” has a chambered mahogany body and top and a satin finish and is the lowest priced Gibson USA Les Paul.
Discrete models describing the low frequency behavior of stringed instruments have appeared in the technical literature for more than 25 years. These models are very useful in understanding the nature of acoustic-structural interaction, but only when they are correctly tuned to match the measured response of a particular instrument. The tuning process is easiest when FRF measurements are made... [Show full abstract]

hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is  normal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have  installed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it up when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five  way switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds— ignore speeling in previos messege–thankss ean
Those of you familiar with Van William’s former bands Waters and Port O’Brien, will have suspicions about what to expect from the songwriter’s debut solo material: boisterous, vibrant hooks that are easy to swallow but gut you on their way back out.  His latest incarnation represents a bounce back after a period of personal tumult. Two parts power pop bombast, to one part Americana, William’s maturation as a songwriter and guitarist seems to have hit a new high water mark.
As an active musician in Los Angeles, I often hear guitarists marvel at how good the latest Squier by Fender guitars are for the price. The Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat is no exception. A few minor complaints aside, it’s simply a well-made version of a decades-proven design at a very affordable price. All of our panelists felt that it played well, sounded good, and in general felt like a more expensive guitar.

1Note that no signal processing is instantaneous, so every effect adds some small delay. For digital effects, this is the measurable and sometimes notable latency of something millisecond-ish (hopefully not more than a few ms). In simple analogue effects like distortion it's at most in the nanosecond range and basically neglectable. Any equaliser/filter component also introduce phase delay, which can be interpreted as delaying various frequencies by different amounts; but this too is normally not noticeable and works quite differently from a digital delay.
The ultimate in superb workmanship, total versatility. This deluxe 4 pickup electric will be played with pride by the most experienced performer.  Four simulated split pickups make possible virtually unlimited sound combinations. Powerful magnetic pickups are height adjustable. Ultra fast steel reinforced neck. Head and Rosewood fingerboard bound in White. .22 Nickel Silver frets (plus zero fret), 8 “N” shaped pearl position markers, 4 volume controls, 3 position rotary tone control (high-medium-low), Rhythm-Solo-Switch, 4 slide pickup switches.  Advanced type tremolo arm.  Chrome adjustable roller-type bridge.  Highly polished yellow-to-red-to-black sunburst finish.  Size 41″x14″.

The 52-week part is an excellent way to motivate you to practice. The selection of licks is great too with several genres covered well. It provides info for setting your metronome to get the beat right too. They are challenging, especially when you play them at the recommended speed. The wide selection will give you plenty of choices even if you skip a genre.

If you’re just starting out, our new electric guitar for beginners may be more suitable for you. Otherwise, let’s get going on our picks (although it was tough to stick with only 10 models). If you want to practice or perform without wires, you can also look into a wireless system for guitars. Be sure to check out our best acoustic guitars article if you want a companion, or if you need extra gear, we have guides for those as well.


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The Basic Principles: A Valve is an extension of the light bulb. Theoretically inside the valve is a vacuum. The hot filament is called ‘Cathode’ (Let’s not forget a T.V. is a’ Cathode ray tube’ ). Around the outside of the Cathode is a cylindrical metal tube called ‘Anode’. When a +Voltage is placed on the Anode and a -Voltage placed on the Cathode, a large current can flow between them, but not the other way around.
Little data is to be had on Teiscos from the late ’50s, but it’s probably safe to assume the line continued on roughly as before. In 1958 the EP-61 joined the line. This was obviously not numbered for the year of introduction! It’s not known what this guitar was, but shortly thereafter the high-number EPs were fancy full-bodied archtops, so that may have been it.
But how do you find a guitar master? It's not like he's listed in the phone book under "Guitar Master," although you can buy a Guitar Master Certificate for $10,080 from the Berklee College of Music. (Let me know how that goes.) And when you do find one, how do you know he can handle the job, making the right repair in the shortest amount of time? A guitar master must know how to diagnosis the problem when the only explanation he's offered involves slurring through a mouthful of tears, or an, "Oh, my bad, man, do you think you can fix her by tomorrow?"
Tube enthusiasts believe that tube amps produce a "warmer" sound and a more natural "overdrive" sound. Typically, tube amps use one or more dual triodes in the preamplifier section to provide sufficient voltage gain to offset tone control losses and drive the power amplifier section. While tube technology is, in many ways, outdated, tube amps remain popular since many guitarists prefer their sound.[15]
Being relatively new to the ABQ area, I've been checking out the local music shops and finding myself underwhelmed - that is until I walked into Grumpy's. Kevin is probably the last honest guy in the business. His pricing is more than fair - whether you're looking for repairs, custom builds, or gear - and he's more than willing to dispense advice or talk shop (not to mention his sense of humor). To put it succinctly; he knows his shit and doesn't blow smoke up one's ass! Sure, the shop doesn't have the "selection" that a place like GC might have, but Kevin can probably get anything you need. (Besides, what's more important - knowledgeable, down-to-earth customer service at a locally owned shop, or being ignored by douchebag wankers who came of age playing along to Miley Cyrus?!) Go to Grumpy's!

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Yet another acoustic steel guitar for the right handed guitarists. It has 6 strings and mostly comes in tobacco sunburst without a case. The perfect design makes it suitable for use by beginner guitarists. The sides and the back are made of meranti, with a spruce top. It is quite cost effective, with prices ranging from around INR 8,500 depending on available offers. More about Yamaha F310 TBS can be found on the following website link.
In the past, buying an electric guitar wasn’t always as satisfying as it should be. In the days before the internet, you had to rely on the wisdom of your local guitar store, a couple of magazines, and your gut instinct. You may have ended up with something half decent – if you were lucky – but rarely would you have found your ‘dream guitar’. In fact, without the internet, you probably weren’t aware it even existed!
Guitarists love to get loud. I remember when I got my first electric guitar, I took it and my amp out onto my grandmother’s back porch and did my best rendition of The Man Who Sold The World, over and over again — at full blast — for several hours. In suburbia, in the middle of the day, I didn’t receive a lot of complaints. If I tried that today, in my Los Angeles apartment surrounded by grumpy neighbors, I might not be so lucky.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.
So I got this kit last week full of hope yet penssive knowing that these kits from over seas have lots of problems. On first inspection the kit was okay, Nothing, I thought at the time, a little TLC couldn't fix. Here I am getting ready to install the electronic today, level the frets, string it in and play. As I opened the pakage with all of the tone and volume pots I noticed one thing super wrong right away.

The best features of the guitar, are the lovely inlaid pearl blocks on the fretboard, and the colour, a kind of fisheye sunburst, which I had never seen on a guitar before I bought it, and after searching for ages I have still never seen on another guitar. I have had it for a while but is my baby, and there is not so much as a scratch or scuff on it, it's pristene.
The late ’36 Supro Amplifier was a spiffed-up version of the amp seen in the ’36 Bronson catalog, with a leatherette-type covering, leather handle, and enclosed, removable back. It now had an 8″ speaker, which spoke through a round grill with four bolts visible from the front. It’s impossible for me to tell from the illustration available to me, but this may still have had the resonator plate grill. The amp had four tubes and a “…special high fidelity circuit” that was “…rich in tone quality, and superfluous [sic!] in power.”
This is a fantastic tool for acoustic solos artists, worship leaders, session players or an acoustic rig that lacks a lot of control or a preamp source. Moreover, the Venue provides the additional functionality of tuning, feedback control, an effects loop and a built in DI box. Its price is usually on the higher end, though you can check used pricing which often dips significantly below retail. However, buying a preamp, tuner, noise gate and DI box separately would run you a lot more than what the Venue costs.
We all know the sound of this effect: It replicates varying degrees of the sound of playing your guitar in the gym showers, a cathedral, or Mammoth Cave, and it has proved itself one of the most atmospheric aural adulterations available. Since none of those locations is entirely gig friendly, however, our ever-handy techs have bottled the flavor in a reliable, portable form. This category covers both echo and reverb effects, since they are versions of the same thing. The term “echo” was used more often in the early days, and is sometimes used today to refer to the distinct and distant repeats of a signal, while “delay” refers to anything from the same, to the short repeats heard as reverb, to the complex, long, manipulated repeats of an intricate digital delay line. Either way, they are both really the same thing, just used differently.
Epiphone is to Gibson what Squier is to Fender. Meanwhile, the Les Paul is Gibson’s Stratocaster. Probably one of the most famous guitars on the planet, the Les Paul has been played by the likes of Slash, Jimmy Page, and Bob Marley. Epiphone, luckily, has made it available to the world with a price that won’t break the bank. And it’s an excellent guitar for those starting to play rock music.
The Fender Hot Rod Deluxe or its big brother the Deville come to mind. I have a hot Rod Deluxe tube mode 40 watts and it really pumps out the volume. The simple foot switch allows four settings from clean, mean, beyond mean and in your face. It really makes slide guitar sound like a male cat calling to a female in heat. Also, it can be mellow. I have seen many youtube videos with Eric Clapton playing a Tweed Model. I also own a Line 6 Duo Verb, Line 6 DT50, and of course and old US Made Peavey 5150 Eddie Van Halen Signature Model. The Peavey really pumps up the heat and the sustain is as wide as the Grand Canyon.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Hauptfeder Anschlag Tremoloblock Anschlagstab Bei richtig gestimmter Gitarre stellen Sie die Hauptfeder ein, um sicherzustellen, dass Anschlagstab den Tremoloblock und Anschlag berührt. Wenn der Anschlagstab nicht den Tremoloblock und Anschlag berührt, stellen Sie die Hauptfeder- Einstellschraube ein, bis Kontakt hergestellt ist.
FYI, Dave might be backed up due to demand if he is still working, so I'd call those places up and ask them in advance. Twin Town isn't too bad a drive if you've got a car, maybe 15 minutes from Bloomington, but the place up in Fridley is about a 20-25 minute drive. They might be the best at working on short notice though as they're a smaller place. Definitely give them all calls.
As nobody wants to lug around a 50-watt combo when casually travelling, many guitarists rely on portable amplifiers to quench their amp needs while on the road, street corner or beach. Power isn’t particularly important in this category – size and weight are the most crucial aspects. Other factors such as being battery-powered and having a headphone jack are also key features of these amps. One of the most impressive is the Roland Cube Street, which is a street performer’s dream as it offers great portability, a decent 5-watt output, two channels and several on-board effects.

The Takamine F-340 was the cause of a letter from Martin Guitars in the early 1980s because Takamine’s acoustic guitars including the logo design were supposedly nearly identical to Martin Models[citation needed]. According to Chris F. Martin IV, CEO of CF Martin and Company in a speech given to the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum members on August 8, 2005, no lawsuit was ever actually filed, and Takamine did change the appearance of their guitars[citation needed].

I only dealt with them directly on my SX Mahogany Strat w P90s. For $119 I got a really nice beginner guitar. I added cheap grover tuners, I filed a few frets and polished them, shimmed the neck, sanded (more scuffed really) the sticky finish on the back of the neck, and I've got a nice little beater that sounds awesome (to me at least), and has nice low action. I'm a relative newbie, but got some good experience with guitar setup and didn't risk trashing a expensive guitar.
If it helps, Schaller have very accurate drawings of all their hardware on their website. You can also get very good drawings of all Gotoh parts as well, but theirs are harder to find (hidden in the parent company's site and I can't recall the full details). It is worth having a look at those, and pay attention to the way the tuning posts are shaped. That radiused section turned into the post is important , it really helps lock the strings firmly.
First off, what makes the sound in an acoustic guitar? On both an acoustic and acoustic-electric guitar, you have the strings that create vibrations when plucked or strummed. That vibration reverberates across the span of the soundboard (top tonewood surface) and also travels down the strings to the saddle and bridge of the guitar. Those vibrations “move” air within the air cavity called the soundhole. The resonance created in the soundhole depends on its depth/size and the tonewoods used to make the back and sides of the guitar. Voila, you now have sound exiting through the soundhole of the guitar.

The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.
• Don’t always blame the frets: Buzzing doesn’t necessarily mean there’s a fret problem. Some guitar players set their bridges for super-low action in their quest for speed, and that can makes frets buzz. For beginners unfamiliar with how accurately tuned strings sound or more experienced players exploring dropped and open tunings for the first time, buzzing can also be a buzz kill. Low tunings like dropped D and open D and open C may prompt guitars with normal action to buzz due to the slack in the strings unless a guitar is set up properly to accommodate such tunings.
The 1934-’35 Dobro amplifier was a square cabinet covered in imitation leather with a leather suitcase handle, the eight corners protected by metal bumper guards. The grill was curiously covered with a down-sized version of a Dobro resonator plate cover, probably made by Rickenbacker. It had back-mounted controls, five tubes (5Z3 rectifier, 56 and 79 preamps, and two 2A3 power outputs) and a 12″ Utah speaker. This amp was built for Dobro, with the cabinet coming from Bulwin of Los Angeles and the chassis coming from Webster of Racine, Wisconsin.
Read Full Review Here is another superstrat design electric guitar on the list that is well recommended for a budding guitarist. While for veteran player’s out there who is on a hunt of buying an all around electric guitar on a minimum prescribe budget. The ESP LTD M-10 could be that affordable gem of a guitar you’ve been looking for and always wanted.

Input kewords into the searchbox at the top of each page, then click the WHAT'S IT WORTH button. The search engine will find matching pages based on keywords you type into the Search Box. The engine searches all categories of objects, not just this particular category, so you may get some irrelevant items in your search results. Too many results? Be more specific. Not enough results? Be less specific.


DIY Pedal Kits – supplies hand made guitar effect pedal kits from the UK. All you need to complete their kits are a small number of basic tools. These are a soldering iron, screwdriver and wire cutters/strippers. In addition, needle nose pliers make things a LOT easier but they aren’t essential. Included in each kit is a pre-drilled metal enclosure, 3PDT true bypass) switches (if applicable), high-quality quarter inch jacks, all wire, solder, heatshrink, components, etc needed for the build, 2.1mm center npower supply socket and full color build guide.
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I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.


Justin actually has two YouTube channels, one for his guitar lessons and one for teaching particular songs. While his channels are excellent, you’re better off to access them from his website at www.justinguitar.com where you’ll find full, comprehensive menus and links to each video along with explanations of the content. You’ll have no problems of watching a full video, only to discover it doesn’t include what you wanted.
Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
This particular model is a cutaway acoustic-electric hybrid with European spruce top and Indian rosewood back and sides. The electric system is from Fishman-Presys with an onboard tuner. The GK comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high tension strings, and thanks to the low-relief neck, the action itself is easy to handle, making the guitar easier to play. The GK Studio Negra has a deeper, bassier sound than the usual sharp brightness of a “blanca” guitar. Watch the video on the Amazon listing to really get a good idea of what you’ll experience playing this instrument.
Wah-Wah: For swishy, rounded sounds that sort of sound like the guitar is wailing, a wah-wah pedal employs a sweeping filter controlled by a spring-loaded treadle, creating quirky frequency boosts as you work the pedal up and down. A famous version of this pedal is marketed by one manufacturer as the “Crybaby,” in an attempt to describe its tone in one word. The late Jimi Hendrix used one of these pedals to great advantage.

Guitar chords are dramatically simplified by the class of alternative tunings called regular tunings. In each regular tuning, the musical intervals are the same for each pair of consecutive strings. Regular tunings include major-thirds (M3), all-fourths, augmented-fourths, and all-fifths tunings. For each regular tuning, chord patterns may be diagonally shifted down the fretboard, a property that simplifies beginners' learning of chords and that simplifies advanced players' improvisation.[70][71][72] The diagonal shifting of a C major chord in M3 tuning appears in a diagram.

Some guitarists find spectral overtone melodies inside sheets of feedback (see: Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music, Sonic Youth), but British wunderkind James Blackshaw uncovers them in careful stacks of 12-string acoustic guitars and bright orchestrations. Minimal in his attack and classical in his drama, Blackshaw bears the acoustic guitar torch in the 21st century, his pieces unfolding in slow, formal shifts until they beam like a burning light through stained glass.
Peerless hollowbody guitars are excellent at this price range. Both of these brands manufacture from factories in South Korea. PRS SE is made by World Instruments Co. and they have consistently high standards - all brands made in this factory will be exceptional. Peerless is a company which used to manufacture high end guitars for other brands such as Gretsch and Gibson, and then launched their own brand. They are exceptionally good guitars.
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Secondly, I have an Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute that i had PLEKD, which made a big difference to how it plays. However; i have an ongoing issue with it since, the G string always plays muted - i have changed the strings several times since but to no avail, other than that it plays really well in my opinion albeit i am only a learner with little experience. I have gone through the steps in your article but again all to no avail - have you any ideas as to what may be causing the muted tone (that's how i'd describe it anyway) and any thoughts on a possible solution you may have would be welcomed.

Instruments with built-in effects include Hammond organs, electronic organs, electronic pianos and digital synthesizers.[19] Built-in effects for keyboard typically include reverb, chorus and, for Hammond organ, vibrato. Many "clonewheel organs” include an overdrive effect. Occasionally, acoustic-electric and electric guitars will have built-in effects, such as a preamp or equalizer.[20][21]
Once again a British company. It isn't hard for this brand to attract attention thanks to the (would you believe it?!) orange color that envelops most of their products. The first models saw the light of day in the late 1960's with the OR series. Its first renowned users were Fleetwood Mac and later Jimmy Page... The crunch sound and the mid-frequency range are the brand's main attributes. Orange even managed to outclass Marshall in the 1970's thanks to its prestigious endorsers. In the 90's, Noel Gallagher from Oasis was the best-known Orange fan and he even collaborated in the development of the OTR head. At the start of 2011, the brand surprised everyone and launched the OPC, a workstation for musicians — actually a PC and a guitar amp in a single unit.

Many of the Cordobas, such as the C7, come with a gig bag or case, which makes it easier to keep your guitar in great condition, especially if you purchase a humidifier block. If you head over to the Amazon listing for this guitar, you might see that the reviews are the same for this guitar as they are for another Cordoba instrument, so there really isn’t much extra information, unfortunately.​
Unicord, a gear distributor in the early ‘60s working out of New York, was the first iteration of Univox. When it acquired the Amplifier Corporation of America, or ACA, sometime in the early-to-mid ‘60s, it began to market tube amps that carried the name “Univox.” However, there are no reference materials to be found – at least in the annals of the internet – that detail these earliest Univox amps.
1950s: occasional Adirondack red spruce. In 1952 or 1953, rumor has it Martin bought a large supply of Engelmann spruce from government surplus. Though Martin preferred Adirondack Red Spruce, it was no longer available after the mid-1940s because all of the large trees had been decimated. Martin would have liked to switch from Sitka to Engelmann because he felt that Engelmann was closer to Adi Red Spruce than Sitka was. He could not however find anyone who was cutting Engelmann commercially, so they went back to Sitka.
With that in mind, we need to point out something about this piece of content, and others like it that we have written: These recommendations are based on the knowledge and opinion of real musicians. We are not marketers or internet gurus trying to make a buck off Amazon. Now, we do use affiliate programs to support this site and those who run it, but we are not simply throwing pedals up without knowing why we're suggesting them. The point is to provide a proper context for your purchase, which we believe is the best way to make a sale, anyway.
Finally, new by ’41 was the No. 130 Supro Rio Spanish Guitar. This was a slothead Regal roundhole flattop done up in a “radiant blonde hardwood body.” It had an 13″ body and logo plate on the head. In place of the typical acoustic bridge was the same square pickup/control panel found on the Clipper. The cord was permanently attached and sort of snuck out from under the control plate on the top. Cost was $33.
The road toward becoming a better guitarist is paved in… books? It certainly can be, although there are plenty of routes that both beginners and professionals take to improve upon — and bone up on — their craft. The books on this list are about history and technique. They’re books that you’ll pull off the shelf for years to come to look up a vintage guitar you’re curious about or a chord progression or song you’ve been meaning to master. You may find additional inspiration reading the autobiographies of your favorite guitarists, but we decided to leave those off this particular list. If you’re in the market for a good guitar book, read on.
The next step up from a Fender Squier Bullet can be a Fender Squier Standard Strat, but if you can afford 50 dollars more you are the owner of a Fender Deluxe Stratocaster which is a really good guitar for beginners, intermediate and advanced guitar players who don’t want to spend a fortune but do want a good quality guitar which is decent enough to upgrade later on with better pickups and hardware to make it top notch. If you don’t want to spend a 1000 dollars on a real american Fender Stratocaster then this is the best alternative.
After you have the hang of mono and stereo miking, room miking, and air guitar, you may be ready for the final frontier of El Gtr exploration. The time-consuming technique that I call "multisourcing" combines all the aforementioned methods, multiplied by the infinite possibilities created by splitting the guitar output and sending it simultaneously to different amps (using, for example, a Whirlwind Selector splitter box).
Some bass players cannot use a bass combo amp, either due to strict noise and disturbance rules in their apartment, lack of space to store a combo amp (if they live in a small room) or due to the need for a set-up which can amplify multiple types of instruments and/or voice. Alternatives to buying a bass amp for people who have noise or space constraints include a headphone amplifier or a micro-practice amp which includes a headphone jack (on bass amps, connecting headphones to a headphone jack automatically turns off the main loudspeaker). Multi-instrumentalists and bassist-singers can consider a keyboard amplifier, a small PA system, or some models of acoustic instrument amplifiers which include bass as one of the instruments which can be used; all of these options have full-range speakers that can handle the bass range.

Our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod. You may bring your brand new guitar in your Local Guitar Shop for proper setup and adjustment of the truss rod.


This extremely limited Marshall 1936V 2x12 Silver Jubilee Guitar Speaker Cabinet has been created to get the best sound out of your Silver Jubilee heads, most notably the 2555X and 2525H Mini Silver Jubilee tube amp heads. The Silver Jubilee styling looks great on stage and the 2 x 12” Celestion G12 Vintage 30 speakers provide you with all that gorgeous amp tone – perfect for 1980s/1990s hard rock.
The key feature that makes the GT-1000 stand out from the crowd is the inclusion of the ingenious AIRD (Augmented Impulse Response Dynamics) technology which ensures your effects respond correctly with the likes of tube amps and don’t muddy your sound. You can read more about the AIRD technology here, but in a nutshell, it ensures the dynamics of your unique amp are preserved. With other multi effects, you might find have to turn your amp emulations off if you want your effects to respond correctly to YOUR amp, but with the GT-1000 you won’t have to do that as you can select which type of amp you’re playing with and the pedal will respond correctly.

In the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, a growing number of composers (many of them composer-performers who had grown up playing the instrument in rock bands) began writing contemporary classical music for the electric guitar. These include Frank Zappa, Shawn Lane, Steven Mackey, Nick Didkovsky, Scott Johnson, Lois V Vierk, Tim Brady, Tristan Murail, Brian May and Randall Woolf.
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