There are lots of adjustment points built into modern electric guitars. And unless you know what you're doing (and why), these adjustments can tempt you to mess around with your guitar and make things worse instead of better. With this book, you can avoid that trap. You'll find step-by-step instructions for setting up your guitar, replacing strings, changing string gauges, dealing with common electronics problems, and more.
ESP started life in Japan in 1975 as Electric Sound Products – a single store that provided replacements parts for guitars. These days they are a huge guitar manufacturer and a big name in heavy metal, having supplied guitars for Metallica, Megadeth, and Slayer, among others. ESP also own the subsidiary LTD, who produce low priced, entry-level versions of their guitars.

There are a few things to look for in modestly priced amplifiers: at least a 3-band equalizer or EQ ( low, mid, and high), a clean channel and an "overdrive" channel, reverb, and possibly some sort of "presence" control. There are two types of amplifiers: tube and transistor. Many playes prefer tube-style amps, but they can be problematic technically. Just be aware of that.


The two mini Les Pauls are also illustrated in ’60s Bizarre Guitars. These were the J-1 and TG-54, slab-bodied solidbody electrics with bolt-on necks. Both had typical Teisco three-and-three headstocks, with a point or hump in the center not unlike Kay guitars, but slightly more rounded. They had rosewood ‘boards with large white dots, except for two small dots at the octave.
I string up the guitar and tune it to standard pitch. Put the guitar in playing position and capo the first fret. I hold the 6th string down at the last fret as that is where the neck joins the body. Then I turn truss rod right (clockwise) until there is no relief hardly if any bounce at the 7th and 9th frets using the 6th string as straight edge, don't go too far just maybe a slight tiny bounce because you don't want to backbow the neck. Then I simply turn the truss rod left counterclockwise 1/4 of a turn for relief and that's it. Take capo off and set action at 12th fret with 6th string 5/64 and 1st string 3/64.
The most underutilized sonic tool that electric guitarists have is built right into their instruments: the volume and tone dials. Most players tend to leave their guitar’s volume up full and set the tone knobs in one place and work from there, but with a little practice it’s easy to get used to using these potentiometers or pots — which are contacts that control voltage — to sculpt interesting sounds.
The Ibanez Gio GRGM21 Mikro in Black Night proves that guitars don’t have to be super expensive to sound great. This is a fantastic cheap electric guitar that doesn’t suck, often picked up by beginner guitarists who are into metal and hard rock and those who like a shorter scale guitar. Featuring an iconic shape, a specially designed GRG neck made of maple, rosewood fretboard and 2 x Infinity R humbucker pickups that can be used separately or in unison via the 3-way pickup selector, you have a comfortable and great sounding powerhouse of a guitar at your disposal. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars that sounds amazing when you throw some distortion at it! Available in different finishes here.
The Model EP-17-T was a regular-sized thinline with a single round cutaway, bolt-on neck, non-dipped three-and-three head, dots, three pickups, adjustable bridge, plain trapeze tail, elevated guard, three rocker switches plate-mounted on the upper shoulder, and controls on a rectangular strip on the lower bout. All three were offered in shaded mahogany finish.

Martin also periodically offers special models. Many of these have a limited production run, or begin as a limited-production guitar that sells well enough to become regularly produced. Many of these special models are designed with, endorsed by, and named after well-known guitarists such as Eric Clapton,Clarence White, Merle Haggard, Stephen Stills, Paul Simon, Arlo Guthrie andJohnny Cash. In 1997, Martin launched its “Women in Music” series, which was followed in 1998 by the Joan Baez Signature guitar, a replica of the 0-45 Baez began her career with.


Fender Pro Series Stratocaster and Telecaster Case   New from$119.99In Stockor 4 payments of $30 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone E519 Hardshell Case for 335-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Epiphone Hardshell Case for Les Paul-Style Guitars   New from$129.00In Stockor 4 payments of $32.25 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Fender Deluxe Molded Case for Stratocaster or Telecaster   New from$149.99In Stockor 4 payments of $37.50 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitar Cases
Gibson Les Paul and Fender electric guitars can retail for several thousands of pounds, but electric guitars for beginners are available for less than £100. One example of a cheap electric guitar is the LA Electric Guitar + Amp Pack, which features everything a beginner needs to start playing the guitar right away for under £90.00. It includes a 15 watt guitar amp with 6.5" speaker for practising, a guitar lead, a strap, a padded gig bag, a set of spare strings, a pick and a 2-year warranty. The electric guitar itself has a neck made from maple - the most common type of wood used in necks - which helps to expand on the treble sounds of a guitar due to its hardness. The guitar is capable of producing a wide variety sounds, thanks in part to its 3x single coil pickups with a reverse wound middle pickup, which enables users to experiment with playing different styles of music.
I tried very hard to work with this book. And I think the author went to a lot of trouble to make the information presentable and understandable. But it didn't work for me. Today I made a second run at the book to see if I could make sense of it. I remain very disappointed. I am an electrical engineer, and perhaps that is my problem. The author must have created his own wiring diagram and components system which he understands well. But I don't. The basic problem is that he uses shades of gray (in lieu of color) to illustrate the circuitry and components. In the book it talks about colors, but all is shades of gray.
A while back I bought a GuitarPort, a product from Line6 that was one of the earliest guitar-to-PC interfaces. It cost me $99. It connects through USB and I could plug the guitar into it. I could play amp models and effects through my PC and the sound would come out of the computer speakers. (Headphones are of course an option through the PC speakers)

Modulation stompboxes like our BF-3 Flanger should be after the tone-producing effects like distortion, wah, etc. so they can process and modify the tone built by the pedals before it. If you put it before the distortion, then you are distorting the sound of the flanger. Maybe that’s what you’re after, but in general, put the BF-3 and other modulation effects after the tone-shaping (and noise–producing) pedals. And then there are the ambience effects: delay and reverb. As we discussed earlier, reverb—and sometimes delay, depending on the space—is the last thing that happens before the sound reaches your ears in a physical space, so these go last. Delaying reverb can sound muddy, so it’s usually better to have the reverb after the delay.


Launch price: $799 / £679 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/pau ferro (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x Vintage Noiseless Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, 6-position V6 rotary tone switch, tone, 5-way pickup selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized Tremolo, Deluxe locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Mystic Ice Blue, Classic Copper & 3-Color Sunburst
The simplest way to explain modulation effects is that they make a copy of the original signal, modify the copy in some way, and then mix the original and the copy back together. The result is sort of like a pitch-shift taken to the next level, where instead of simply adding new notes or varying the fundamental, they can create entirely new sounds altogether. Here are the usual suspects of modulation effects:
The amplifier includes buttons for four different amplifier simulations: Clean, Crunch (a typical rock/blues sound), Metal (self-explanatory), and Insane (a version of Metal that our panelists found so distorted as to be nearly unusable). Like the Champion 20, it has a gain control (which is labeled Drive), and it adds a midrange control to its bass and treble controls.

Without the rhythmic pummel of the Slits, there would be no riot grrl, no Rapture, no Yeah Yeah Yeahs; and without Viv Albertine — who played guitar for this groundbreaking U.K. punk band, and wrote the bulk of their early material — there would be no Slits. Albertine’s unrepentantly unpolished guitar stylings eschewed the high velocities and power-chord assaults of her male contemporaries in favor of trebly, dissonant stabs. It all meshed perfectly with the band’s cheeky, confrontational songs, ultimately turning jagged rhythms into something as provocative and primal as anything punk produced.
So the actual vibrating length of the string should be the same in all cases, and if that's all that affects the magnetic field then none of the other things mentioned above should affect that signal. Do a simple test protocol such as plucking each string with the identical pick, record the waveform, overlay them and look for differences in the waveform.
Who created the first distorted electric guitar sound in history? I’ll tell you: the first adventurous player to plug a hollowbody guitar into a tube amplifier way back in the 1930s, that’s who. We might have forgotten his name, or maybe there was no one there to witness the event, but you can bet he lifted up that guitar, checked out his new amp, saw that the loudness control went to 10, and cranked it up to hear just what it could do.
Finally, we come to our time-based (and space-based) effects group. This includes reverb and delay. Both are forms of the same effect with reverb being a much faster version of delay. All they do is take the input and "smear it out" while reducing the volume over time. Not only does this create an extremely complicated signal that other effects won't react to well, but the variances in volumes these create would further confuse the previous pedals.
[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
Learning guitar with no source material to work with will require many different resources, overlapped to fill the blindspots of each. Most people take lessons, but you’ll be at the mercy and pace of your teacher, with little room for your own interpretation. These days, there are apps and online lessons which have their advantages, certainly. They also come with monthly fees, though these will likely be cheaper than a live local instructor.
ARM-SAITENLAGE Die Tremoloarm-Saitenlage kann eingestellt werden, indem 3,0 mm großer Inbusschlüssel an der Schraube (B) an der Tremoloschraube verwendet wird. FEIN-TUNING Auch nach dem Verriegeln der Verriegelungsmutter können Sie die Fein-Tuner verwenden, um Feinabstimmungen zur Stimmung jeder Saite vorzunehmen. Sie müssen alle Fein-Tuner (C) auf Mittenposition des Einstellbereichs stellen, bevor Sie die Verriegelungsmutter festziehen.
The long chord progression can be very intimidating, especially if you’re a beginning musician. Technically, you’re only dealing with four different chords, which are, A – G – D – A – F – G – A. Looking at it, it looks really scary, but if you listen to the chord changes on a piano or someone else playing a cover of the song, it seems less intimidating.
Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
There were precedents for the palm-muted, ultra-percussive chug James Hetfield gave Metallica (Judas Priest, Motörhead), but he made it the gold standard of Eighties metal. He's never been a monochromatic headbanger, though, delving early on into the delicate picking of "Fade to Black" and later embracing the more nuanced hard rock of the Black Album. "I wonder if James Hetfield knows how to play the drums," Dave Grohl once said. "Because basically he's taking care of the percussion and melody of Metallica's songs with his guitar. And it's great."
By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more
Not many classical guitar concertos were written through the guitar history. Nevertheless, some guitar concertos are nowadays wide known and popular, especially Joaquín Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez (with the famous theme from 2nd movement) and Fantasía para un gentilhombre. Composers, who also wrote famous guitar concertos are: Antonio Vivaldi (originally for mandolin or lute), Mauro Giuliani, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Manuel Ponce, Leo Brouwer, Lennox Berkeley... Nowadays, more and more contemporary composers decide to write a guitar concerto.
Guitars by José Romanillos, Robert Bouchet, Daniel Friederich, Hermann Hauser I, Hermann Hauser II, David José Rubio, Dominique Field, Francisco Simplicio, Enrique Garcia, Pascual Viudes, Enrique Coll, Santos Hernandez, Domingo Esteso, Ignacio Fleta, Marcelo Barbero, Arcangel Fernandez, Hernandez y Aguado, Manuel Reyes, Enrico Bottelli and 1950's Ramirez.
What about the TAB and lyrics on this site? According to U.S. Copyright laws, there are allowable uses of copyright materials, such as extractions for educational purposes. Any TAB, or lyrics, shown on this site are specifically for teaching, using the reader's knowledge of the tempo and sound of a song to facilitate the written material. In addition, I show only excepts from familiar songs, not the entire song. I also encourage readers to obtain full versions of the sheet music from an MPA recognized site. The only exception to this approach is for songs no longer covered by copyright law (songs now in the Public Domain).
One thing that is worth trying is combining different delays with different reverb effects. You can get some seriously beautiful sounds with a reverb and delay effect that sound good together. Some manufacturers have even gone so far as to create reverb and delay combo pedals. It is truly a perfect combination of effects, kind of like peanut butter and jelly.
It comes in lots of different colors, has a great quality at a bargain price. The HSS combination of this guitar is capable of playing a wide range of tones and sounds. It has a solid body and is quite comfortable to play. It has a Tremolo Bridge, which is not the best in the market but works quite well. Then there are tuners, which are also good enough. 
With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place. The core learning systems for beginners, for blues rock and country, the songs, the genre specific exercises, an active user forum and a series of tools. I specifically like the Jam Station tool. It includes a number of backing tracks in different keys and tempos for most of the genres being taught on the Guitar Tricks platform. With Guitar Tricks I get everything I need in one place.Other useful tools included are a scale finder, a metronome, a chord finder and a fingerboard trainer. Guitar tricks is continually improving. A new interface has just been added that makes it look more modern and very attractive. The core learning system lessons are also updated on an ongoing basis. This allows them to incorporate the latest teaching methods and keep the lessons modern and relevant.
We've already shown you one of Epiphone's Les Pauls. However, that guitar and this model we're looking at here are simply not comparable. Les Paul Standard features a much better set of pickups as well as hardware. Each of the four available finishes on this thing is superb and includes a number of subtle details which really add to the beauty. Most importantly, Epiphone's Les Paul Standard will give you a true taste of what a legit Gibson Les Paul tastes like without breaking the bank.
The Guitar Chords: Easy-to-Use, Easy-to-Carry, One Chord on Every Page does one thing extremely well: it is spiral bound. It’s more of a reference than anything else, but one that musicians of all levels will appreciate. It covers the gamut of chords with not just one but two variations of each one. Of course, many have more than that, but it’s good information just the same.
The list of musicians who are (or who have been) in love with their vintage Fender Bassman amps—especially the 4x10 tweed variety made between 1957 and 1960—is pretty much endless. Just for starters (past and present), there's Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy, Mike Campbell, Mike Bloomfield, Jimmie Vaughan, John Fogerty, Josh Homme, Brian Setzer, the guy up the street from me... . Again, this is just the tip of the iceberg, people. After all, many professional music industry analysts have heralded Fifties 4×10 Bassman amps as the greatest amps—ever.

Specs for combos were as follows: Checkmate 10 (6 watts, 6″ speaker, two inputs, striped grillcloth); Checkmate 12 (9 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs); Checkmate 14 (14 watts, 8″ speaker, three inputs, tremolo); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, tremolo, reverb); Checkmate 16 bass amp (20 watts, 10″ speaker, volume, tone); Checkmate 17 (20 watts, 10″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 18 (30 watts, two 10″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and Checkmate 20 (40 watts, 12″ speaker, reverb, tremolo). Piggyback amps included the Checkmate 25 (50 watts, 15″ speaker, reverb, tremolo); Checkmate 50 (two-channels, 100 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo, “E tuner”); Checkmate 100C (two channels, voice input, 200 watts, two 15″ speakers, reverb, tremolo); and the big hugger-mugger Checkmate Infinite (200 watts, two 15″ speakers, stereo/mono preamp section, reverb, tremolo and a bunch of other switches). The one shown in the catalog actually has a block Teisco logo and carried the Japanese-marketed name – King – in the lower corner.


Echo is a naturally occurring effect. Since the first days of recording, men have attempted to create an artificial method of duplicating this effect. The first attempt were echo chambers (or rooms) that created a “natural” echo. These rooms still exist at some recording studios. Tape echo effects came next, offering portability and variable rates of echo. These units were often noisy, but are still favored for their warm echo tone. Analog delays solved the problems inherent with tape (bad tubes, noisy tape, and misaligned or worn out tape heads) but had limitations in the length of their delay. Finally, digital delays appeared in the 1980s and offered more delay time and added features, but also came with a more sterile sounding tone. Many digital delays now simulate tape, analog, and digital delays
Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.

Welcome to Lefty Vintage Guitars, a site specializing in buying, selling, trading, and consigning high-end lefty guitars. I have been collecting vintage guitars for over 20 years, including Fender and Gibson electrics and acoustics primarily from the 1950s, and 1960s. I also collect high-end modern era lefty guitars, including Gibson Historics and Fender Custom Shop guitars. The rarer, the better! Please browse the Sold Gallery and Showcase Instruments to get an idea of the wonderful guitars I have acquired and sold to happy clients!
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!
There are some guitarists who place the compressor last, though, to boost their signal just before it hits the preamp of their amplifier. The drawback to this approach is that any hum or hiss introduced by other effects will be increased by the compressor's output gain. Sometimes you can remedy this by placing a noise gate before the compressor, however, the noise reduction can have an effect on the tone quality. A best-of-both-worlds approach might be to put your compressor first and use a signal booster just before your amplifier. Some guitarists also like the sound of putting their wah or envelope filter before the compressor to give it a wider frequency range to affect. Experimentation is always encouraged, but putting the compressor first is recommended.
Of course the most talented and creative guitarist in the World. Guitarists like Slash can give stunts but cannot be such creative like Gilmour. I don't know why people cannot understand and like silly stunts rather than real talent. A layman can listen to the guitar solos of Echoes, Dogs, Coming BAck to Life, Comfortably Numb, Time... Of Pink Floyd and they will easily know his vast talent. Gilmour must be ranked higher.
There are many different kinds of pickup selectors. The most common forms of pickup selectors are 3-way and 5-way switches. Obviously, a 5-way switch gives you more pickup combinations than a 3-way switch. Below are some diagrams of what 3-way and 5-way pickup selectors can do. In choosing a pickup selector, I suggest that you try to replace your pickup selector with the same kind of selector. Refer to the manufacturers website and wiring diagram to get the right specifications. Notice I said to get the same “kind” — not the same one. It would make no sense to replace a cheap selector with another cheap selector. Find out the specs on the old selector and buy a nice one.
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In 1974 Martin Sigma electrics included two SGs, a Tele and a Fender bass. The SBG2-6 was pretty much a straightforward SG copy with a bolt-on neck, center-peaked three-and-three head, block inlays, large pickguard, twin humbuckers, finetune bridge, and stop tailpiece, in cherry. The SBG2-9 was pretty cool, with a natural-finished plywood body, white pickguard, rosewood fingerboard with white block inlays, gold hardware and Bigsby. The SBF2-6 was a Tele with rosewood fingerboard, three-and-three head, block inlays, neck humbucker and bridge single-coil. The SBB2-8 was the bass, with natural finished body, three-and-three head, rosewood ‘board, block inlays, white ‘guard, and two humbucking pickups.
These are hybrid tube and transistor amps. They are not emulators like a line 6 or other amps. They have 8 different analog amp circuits based on various amps, they don’t call them what they are but they are similar to Fender, Vox AC15, Vox Ac30, Dumble, Marshall and I think an Orange ( CLEAN1, CLEAN2, CRUNCH1, CRUNCH2, OD1, OD2, H.GAIN1, H.GAIN2). I don’t use the higher gain ones much - they are very heavy metal sounding. They also have very nice modulation effects - Chorus, Delay, and Reverb. I no longer use a separate chorus or reverb in my signal chain. The amp uses a 12AX7 tube pre-amp and the power amp which gives the tube overtones to the analog circuit you choose. Plus, you can bias the tubes to bright and power in both the pre-amp and post amp.
You will see numerous inputs and outputs for sound, depending on your computer. You will want to enable the main one (in which all of the sub­devices are listed) and two others: one for input, and one for output. For input, look for something similar to “Line in”. If you only have a microphone jack, enable that instead. For output, look for “Stereo out” or something similar.

For many guitarists, the only thing better than a Gibson Les Paul is a vintage Gibson Les Paul. From stunning museum-quality pieces from the '50s to road warrior axes from the Norlin era of Gibson production in the '70s, there are fresh Les Pauls added to this page every day including Les Paul Standards, Customs, Juniors, and more. Whether you're a veteran Gibson collector or a new inductee to the ranks of Les Paul fandom, you can find your next vintage LP here.


While it’s not as popular as the two previous brands we have mentioned, PRS is on a level of their own. American owned and made, these guitars are an epitome of quality and great sound. They have a completely unique appearance and offer a tone which has a distinctive color. Best thing about this brand is the balance price and performance. You get a lot more than you pay for with PRS.

This is a really special, limited edition guitar. Gibson are well known for their premium products, and the J-200 Standard certainly lives up to that billing. What we have here is Gibson’s modern interpretation of the legendary Super Jumbo that has been around in some incarnation since 1937. It’s an enlarged, round body style for big sounds and presence.
I am a guitar teacher of 15 years and a tech junkie, so I prefer to steer people towards online video lessons. I believe that with the multimedia technologies of the 21st century, beginner video lessons are the most efficient way of learning guitar from home, and are most advantageous from a pricing point of view as well. I'll add some recommendations for video lessons after the book reviews, in case you want to see that side of learning guitar as well.

Although much less common, the second trick I have in store for you shouldn't be taken lightly. The idea is to double a more or less distorted guitar part with an acoustic recording of the strings of your electric guitar recorded simultaneously as the distorted part. As preposterous as it sounds at first, considering that the sound of an electric guitar without an amp is certainly not the most pleasant one, the overall result can be truly amazing! Indeed, well managed, this screeching sound has the particularity of adding a bit more dynamic relief to "trashy" sounds, providing the performance a more "organic" aspect, especially due to the accents produced by the pick. But just like with the first trick, you need to sub-mix this take wisely so that the listener doesn't end up discovering the trick.
I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!
Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.

Categories: Gibson Guitar CorporationBanjo manufacturing companiesBass guitar manufacturing companiesGuitar amplifier manufacturersAmerican companies established in 1902Manufacturing companies established in 19021902 establishments in MichiganCompanies based in Kalamazoo, MichiganManufacturing companies based in Michigan1902 in musicCompanies that filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2018


Due to the ever rising popularity of reverb, it didn’t take long for companies to figure out how to recreate the effect in early guitar amps. Have you ever heard of Spring Reverb or Plate Reverb? While to you these are just labels on a knob, back then these were real analog devices built into amplifiers. Needless to say, we have come a long way from using complex mechanical contraptions to create decent reverb.

The Orange Crush is all about style and portability. It’s distictive look is due to the Orange basket weave Tolex, woven speaker grille, beading and legendary hieroglyphs (PiX) and of course the Orange signature ‘picture frame’ edging. It’s not as feature rich as other models, but that’s the point. It’s simple, portable and just a good basic combo amp. It’s also available in black (why?) and retails for around $99.
In addition to choosing between laminate and solid wood, you also have to consider the type of the tonewood. Of particular importance is the choice of top wood, because it greatly affects the resulting sound. Spruce is popularly used for the tops of acoustics because of its punchy and bright tone. Mahogany tops on the other hand is preferred for its warm tone, with more emphasis on the lower mid frequencies. There are other types of wood that fall between the two, each one bringing a subtly different flavor to the resulting sound.
Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Casino Coupe™ Ltd. Ed. AJ-100 Acoustic Guitar PRO-1 Spanish Classic PRO-1 Classic 3/4-Size Epiphone Masterbilt® Olympic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith Classic™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® Zenith™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Classic Acoustic/Electric Guitar Epiphone Masterbilt® De Luxe™ Acoustic/Electric Guitar Ltd. Ed. EL-00 PRO Mahogany Epiphone Les Paul SL™ Electric Guitar PRO-1 Acoustic PRO-1 Classic Acoustic Epiphone SG-Special VE™ Electric Guitar PR-150 Ltd. Ed. DR-100 Wine Red DR-100 Les Paul Express Les Paul Ukulele Outfit PRO-1 Plus Acoustic Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Special-II Wine Red Epiphone Les Paul Special VE™ electric guitar Les Paul Studio LT™ Electric Guitar Les Paul Special II Epiphone AJ-210CE Acoustic/Electric Outfit SG Special AJ-220S PRO-1 Ultra Acoustic/Electric AJ-100CE MM-30S Ltd. Ed. 1963 J-45 Ltd. Ed. 2014 Hummingbird Artist Toby Standard IV MB-100 Les Paul Player Pack PR-4E Acoustic/Electric Player Pack DR-212 EB-0 Slash "AFD" Les Paul Special-II Outfit Masterbilt DR-400MCE Epiphone Embassy PRO Bass Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Studio Ltd. Ed. EJ-160E Acoustic/Electric G-310 (LH) G-310 Ltd Ed "1964" Caballero Electar Inspired by "1939" Century Lap Steel Outfit Ltd. Ed. EJ-200 Artist AJ-220SCE Toby Deluxe IV Les Paul 100 Slash "AFD" Les Paul Performance Pack Toby Bass Performance Pack Ltd. Ed. Hummingbird PRO Jeff Waters "Annihilation-II™" Flying-V Worn G-400 Dot Studio PR-5E Toby Deluxe-V Hummingbird PRO Dove PRO EL-00 PRO PRO-1 Explorer Performance Pack PRO-1 Les Paul Jr. Performance Pack Goth Les Paul Studio Thunderbird-IV Goth Thunderbird-IV EB-3 G-400 PRO Les Paul Studio G-400 PRO (LH) Viola ES-335 PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 Nighthawk Custom Quilt Ltd. Ed. ES-339 P90 PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 Wildkat Wine Red 75th Anniversary Century Amplifier Les Paul Standard Dot EJ-200SCE Inspired by 1964 Texan (LH) EJ-200SCE (LH) Inspired by 1964 Texan Dobro Hound Dog Round Neck Wildkat Allen Woody Rumblekat Goth '58 Explorer Ltd. Ed. 2014 Les Paul Traditional PRO Ltd. Ed. 2014 LP Standard Red Royale Les Paul Standard (LH) Casino Coupe ES-339 PRO Ltd. Ed. James Bay Signature "1966" Century Outfit Les Paul Custom 100th Anniversary Ltd. Ed. Björn Gelotte Les Paul Custom 2015 Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard Epiphone Les Paul Traditional PRO-II™ Wildkat Royale Ltd. Ed. Riviera Custom P93 Red Royale 1956 Les Paul Standard PRO Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Tamio Okuda Elitist Coronet™ Outfit Tom Delonge ES-333 Riviera Custom P93 Wilshire Phant-o-matic Thunderbird PRO-IV Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO Blueshawk Deluxe Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Explorer Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Flying-V Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Korina Explorer Bass Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO (LH) Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Johnny A. Custom Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia Explorer Custom Artisan Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia RD Custom Artisan Outfit Masterbilt® De Luxe Classic™ 4-String Acoustic/Electric Bass Guitar Les Paul Custom PRO Dobro Hound Dog Del. Square Neck Dobro Hound Dog Del. Round Neck Casino Epiphone Stagebird™ 6-String Electric Banjo Epiphone Les Paul ES PRO™ Epiphone Inspired by “1966” Century Archtop Mayfair™ 5-String Banjo Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Joe Bonamassa "Treasure" Firebird™-I Ltd. Ed. ES-295 Premium Ltd. Ed. Emperor Swingster Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Standard Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Riviera Custom P93 Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Blue Royale Allen Woody Rumblekat™ Blue Royale Ltd. Ed. Jack Casady Blue Royale Bass Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Wildkat KOA Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Les Paul Custom PRO KOA Ltd. Ed. LP Custom Blackback PRO Ltd. Ed. LP Standard Florentine PRO Les Paul Classic-T FT-350SCE Ltd. Ed. Wildkat Red Royale Ltd. Ed. Brent Hinds Flying-V Custom “MayDay Monster” Les Paul Standard Ltd. Ed. Brendon Small Snow Falcon® Outfit Les Paul Custom PRO (LH) Masterbilt DR-500MCE Masterbilt 2015 AJ-45ME Dave Navarro "Jane" MM-50E Professional Dobro Hound Dog M-14 Metalbody Zakk Wylde Custom Plus Bullseye Joe Bonamassa Les Paul Standard PE Ltd Ed Jack Casady Signature Bass Tommy Thayer "White Lightning" Epiphone Sheraton™-II PRO Joe Pass Emperor-II PRO Les Paul Custom Classic PRO Masterbilt® MM-40L Mandolin 1984 Explorer EX B. B. King Lucille Emperor Swingster Les Paul Tribute Plus Outfit Les Paul Ultra-III Prophecy Les Paul Custom Plus EX Prophecy Les Paul Custom Plus GX Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom Les Paul Black Beauty 3 Epiphone Ltd. Ed. 20th Anniversary Jack Casady Bass Outfit Emperor Swingster Royale Broadway Jack Casady Signature Bass Masterbilt EF-500RCCE Matt Heafy Les Paul Custom-7 Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Inspired by "1955" Les Paul Custom™ Outfit 2014 Tak Matsumoto DC Custom Ltd. Ed. Masterbilt AJ-500RCE Ltd. Ed. Lee Malia Les Paul Custom Ltd. Ed. Tony Iommi SG Custom Ltd. Ed. Tony Iommi SG Custom (LH) Gary Clark Jr "Blak & Blu" Casino Gary Clark Jr "Blak & Blu" Casino Bigsby Ltd. Ed. Union Jack Sheraton ES-175 Premium Ltd. Ed. G-1275 Doubleneck Slash "Rosso Corsa" Les Paul Standard Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1965" Casino Vintage Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1966" Custom Riviera Ltd. Ed. Elitist "1964" Texan Elitist Casino Epiphone FT-100 Player Pack Epiphone FT-100 Acoustic Epiphone Ltd. Ed. "1961" G-400 PRO Epiphone SG-Junior Electric Guiter Player Package FT-100CE Ltd. Ed. Tommy Thayer "White Lightning" Explorer Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Matt Heafy "Snøfall" Les Paul Custom Outfit (7-string) Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Matt Heafy "Snøfall" Les Paul Custom Outfit (6-string) Ltd. Ed. Björn Gelotte "Jotun" Les Paul Custom Outfit Ltd. Ed. Richie Faulkner Flying-V Custom Outfit Ltd. Ed. Joe Bonamassa 1958 "Amos" Korina Flying-V Outfit Ltd. Ed. Slash Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Ltd. Ed. Slash Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Premium Outfit Thunderbird Vintage PRO Bass Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Jason Hook "M-4" Explorer Outfit Epiphone Ltd. Ed. Dot Deluxe CE Coupe (Nylon String) SST Coupe (Steel String) Hummingbird Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele Les Paul® Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton "1964" Texan Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton "1964" Texan Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton Les Paul Custom PRO Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. Peter Frampton Les Paul Custom PRO Ltd. Ed. Slash Firebird Ltd. Ed. Slash Firebird Premium Outfit Ltd. Ed. John Lee Hooker 100th Anniversary Zephyr Outfit Ltd. Ed. "Mayday Monster" EJ-200SCE Outfit
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The BOSS ME-80 multi effects pedal is an excellent entry point into effects as it contains just about every type of effect you can think of. The ME-80 allows you to chain eight effect groups together in one patch with 36 preset patches allowing you to seamlessly switch from rock to funk to jazz at the push of a footswitch. There are also 36 user patches so you can create your own tone.


Looks awesome. Great tone. Had A LOT of fret buzz out of the box (EADG strings from 7th-11th fret). Got it set up to try to eliminate buzzing...only way the guitar tech could seem to get rid of it was by raising the action quite a bit, so now it's much higher than I like...bummer. No buzzing and sounds great, but the playability is definitely not what I was hoping for considering the price.
Alongside the Stratocaster, Les Pauls have defined rock ’n’ roll. Everyone from Jimmy Page to Slash to Zakk Wylde has wielded one of these, and the guitar’s fat, creamy tone with near-endless sustain is instantly recognizable. Not everyone can afford a bona fide Gibson, though, but the Epiphone Les Paul Standard makes those sounds accessible to most of us.
It has great quality hardware and amazing sound because of the pickups. There are no flaws or nicks in the finish of the body. It needs to be set up though which can be difficult initially. Once you set up, you will be able to see its performance in action. The great thing about this guitar is that even though it is the cheapest electric guitar, it looks quite expensive to an observer.

A common theme with these models is the capability to easily access the highest notes of the instrument, alongside dual humbuckers and massive sustaining bodies.  The Explorer, much like the V, is now a very common electric guitar shape in the heavy rock and metal genres, but was widely used in other styles as well.  This is evidenced by one of the most famous Gibson Explorer players, Allen Collins of Lynyrd Skynyrd.
Her dad was Broadway star John Raitt, but Bonnie's artistic parents were blues giants like Howlin' Wolf and Mississippi Fred McDowell, whom she met and performed with early in her career. She learned fast: Starting with her acoustic slide workout on 1971's "Walking Blues," Raitt rolled out a fearsome repertoire of blues licks, fingerpicking with the best and wielding a slide like an old master. Most of all, she set a crucial precedent: When guitar was still considered a man's game by many, Raitt busted down that barrier through sheer verve and skill.
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
Effects on the Spider Classic 15 are a little easier to handle than those on the Champion 20. One knob accesses the chorus, flanger, phaser, and tremolo effects, while a separate knob accesses the reverb and echo effects. This arrangement makes it easy to blend different types of effects and makes the Spider Classic 15 a little more versatile than the Champion 20 if you are interested in coloring your sound more.
Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
If a love of flamenco and salsa music sung by the Gipsy Kings brought you to the best classical guitar, then you are going to want to read this review. The Cordoba company, as you can now see, has quite the reputation for quality guitars, and their GK Studio Negra left-handed model—a Gipsy Kings signature instrument—could easily be the right one for you (no pun intended).

The “best” here is subjective. Again, what is best for me may not be best for me might not be best for you and vice versa. In general here are my recommendations for buying a guitar from the best brand of electric guitars for beginners at every level. There are several brands available in the market that claim to offer the best quality electric guitars for the beginners and for the seasoned guitarists as well. But some of them are really up to the mark if you are looking for the best guitar, you can go with them certainly. 
I played power cords and picked blues sounds 15- 18 years ago and started back playing but decided to learn actual cords I never actually learned anything about strings back then my girlfriend at the time had three awesome guitars so I was able to read tabs and just play so what's a good set of strings for someone who can pick the blues but is a beginner in ways at learning actual cords I was told the guitar I have is four years old and never been restung
In standard Boss fashion, you get a set of four no-nonsense controls and a footswitch that is as durable as the case it’s installed in. However, none of this means anything if the reverb effect isn’t up to the expected level. Fortunately for us, Boss didn’t disappoint with this one. You get a reverb effect that is in that sweet spot when it comes to versatility and quality.
Another popular value pack comes courtesy of one of the greatest rock'n'roll guitarists of all time. For those who have an appetite for destruction, look no further than the Slash AFD Les Paul Guitar Outfit. Endorsed by the Guns N' Roses shredder himself, this pack comes with the killer AFD Special-II guitar that's equipped with new Ceramic Plus humbucking pickups, and a built-in Shadow pickup ring E-tuner. Additionally, this pack also contains a custom gig bag with the Slash "Snakepit" logo, Slash signature Dunlop Tortex picks, and much more.
Pristine and hi-fidelity are two words that many use to describe the Fractal Audio FX8's sound. Even experts are amazed, like how Guitar Interactive Magazine praised the unit by saying: "it’s easy to say that the FX8 is the most fully featured and best sounding multi effects unit on the market right now". The quality of its reverb and delay got a lot of thumbs up, while other users found its drive and modulation effects to be inspiring.
A 5 way selector is commonly found on guitars with 3 pickups , a humbucker in the bridge , single coil in the middle and a humbucker in the neck. So the 5 way selectors job is to select only one or more pickups at a time to offer different sounds on the guitar. The way the selector is pointed will tell you which pickup is selected and this is common on guitars from all brands. The bottom position is your bridge pickup which is closest to where the strings begin , the middle position is all 3 pickups and the top position closest to the neck is your ....you guessed it neck pickup. The bridge pickup will offer heavier sounds if you play the right notes and the neck for soloing as the output (intensity) of the neck pickup isn't as powerful as the neck for a reason. The more you play the more you'll see uses for switching pickups on the selector. The tone knob on the other hand it depends on how you use it I know a lot of guys who are endorsed and so forth who never touch the tone knob or have guitars built without it , but used properly it can do a lot of stuff from Eric Clapton to Carlos Santana type stuff. you will also see a 5 way selector on guitars with two humbuckers this feature is called a mega or super switch depending on brand. It makes the pickups do different stuff but this feature is usually found on expensive guitars and keep in mind a 3 way blade switch looks like one but only goes in three positions. Bridge , middle and neck.

We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .010 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!), cleaning and polishing. One of the best things about this guitar is the modification to a factory flaw that most TW's we've seen have. The finger board is too long from the nut to the first fret, thus most all of these we have seen will not intonate, thus not play in tune. We had a compensated nut, modified and installed on this one (see photo collage). I don't know where they acquired it, but it worked like a charm. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 "Round-wound" strings. Guitar looks near new and plays great. No case.
Like 39% of the people said, they are simply the worst. The first guitar I owned was the Ibanez Gio, I thought it was amazing. I play it every now and then, but not too much anymore. For its price, I think it is the best starter guitar, 10 times better than any first act. I owned a first act, it was the worst guitar of all time. Me finger killed after playing it because the strings are so hard to push down, the frets don't even stay attached to the guitar. All beginner guitarist, don't get first act.

Kay/Valco went out of business soon afterwards, and in 1969 its assets were auctioned off. Syl Weindling and Barry Hornstein of W.M.I. (the main importer of Teisco Del Rey products) purchased the Kay brand name during this time. As a result of this, the names "Teisco" and "Kay" were used on Teisco Del Rey guitars for a while in the early 70's. In 1980 the Kay Guitar Company was purchased by Tony Blair and is currently active selling Kay brand and Santa Rosa brand guitars, Chicago Blues harmonicas and accessories and of course the Kay Vintage Reissue line of professional guitars and basses.
peavey marshall bass tc electronic ampeg svt bass guitar laney ashdown mag ashdown cab carlsbro ashdown abm bass amp head marshall fender bass amp behringer peaveybassamp ashdown bass 4x10 bass cab sale sales roland bass amp speakers for bass amp combo peavey for sale guitar bass practice carlsbro amp fender ashdown head amplifier ampeg bass carlsbro bass bass guitar amplifier
From beginners to seasoned professionals, most guitar players will experiment with effects at some point in their musical journey. While learning to play your instrument well should be a top priority, messing around with effects can be a fun way to engage with your instrument and start learning its sound possibilities without a lot of hard practice. There's a huge variety of stompboxes out there, many with very low price tags that make great gifts and can add a new dimension of fun for beginning players.

I've been a lazy person in terms of writing product reviews, but had to chime in on the Epiphone LP purchase. First of all, I did research on new guitar options at the local Guitar Center website and settled on this instrument. They had it for $199, so for kicks I looked on Amazon two nights before I had planned to test and buy at our GC on a Sat. Amazon had it for $159 and $199 for lots of extras. I already had a case and nice Marshall Amp, so only needed the guitar. The best part, it arrived on Sat about the same time I would have purchased locally. The reviews were so good, I was not worried about testing live before purchase and it was a great choice.
Featuring the Wilkinson WTB Bridge this classic 3-saddle design has been around for over 50 years and is still regarded as the ultimate tone machine. Staggered brass saddles offer individual string intonation never before available in a design of this type. The baseplate itself is a faithful reproduction of the original, made from steel, very important in a bridge of this style due to the tonal effect it has on the magnetic field of the pickup mounted in it.

Anyone who wants a guitar that can handle both the expected twang and bluesy yield of a traditional Tele, along with the hard rock and punch of humbucking pickups will find a rather ideal companion in this guitar. I like it for studio guitarists in particular since it gets you a professional brand along with a wide range of tone capability that can help you be more accommodating to clients.


Rarely have we come across a redesign of a classic instrument that is so thorough… yet still adheres so closely to the original! Neck shape, body contouring, hardware, pickups and electronics have all been under the microscope of Marr and his design cohorts in redesigning this short-scale offset classic. The new bridge design swaps the threaded rod saddles of the Jaguar for the bigger, solid, non-height adjustable Mustang saddles that sit flush on the bridge tray. The saddles just have a centre-placed string groove but this increased width means there's very little gap between the low E and the outer edge of the fingerboard the further up the neck you go. Marr has also ditched the traditional dual rhythm/lead concept. This Jag has just one circuit: standard volume and tone controls and a four-position lever switch mounted on the smaller of the three chromed plates. In position one, it offers just the bridge pickup; position two, bridge and neck pickups (in parallel); position three, neck pickup; and lastly position four, neck and bridge pickups (in series). We still have the slide-switch style of the original Jaguar to engage not one, but two, of the original's high-pass filters. The top switch is the master filter (up engages the cut); the lower switch, mounted at a right angle, only works on position four where forward is on (ie, it introduces the cut). Both these switches stick up less than the standard slide switches too, and are slightly more comfortable: typical of the thought and detail that has gone into this guitar. There's Fender-aplenty in the sounds but, as Marr says, Gretsch and Rickenbacker spring to mind, especially with a little tone roll-off. Above all though, the clarity, and the musical sweetness of the tones allow for complex chord voicings for jazzier rhythms or simpler soul and funk styles. The Johnny Marr Jaguar is a thorough redesign from the perspective of a very busy working guitarist. Aside from the low E being rather too close to the fingerboard edge in higher positions, it's faultlessly built for purpose, addresses five decades of 'Jaguar-ness' and puts a decidedly leftfield design squarely back in the mainstream.
Ironically, the sound of certain synthetic reverbs is now such an established part of music history that most convolution reverbs come with some IRs taken from existing hardware reverb units or from old mechanical reverb plates. Also, if you have a convolution reverb, it is worth checking the manufacturer's site, as additional IRs are frequently available for download.
If you want to combine the dynamics of a well-recorded drum kit with the pumping excitement you get from heavy compression, send either the overheads only or the entire kit to a buss and insert a nice-sounding compressor there. Set the compressor to a high ratio and low threshold and mix in some of this with the song. You may need to adjust the attack and release controls to get the effect you're after, but you don't need to blend in much of the compressed sound to really add punch and weight to a drum track. Nicholas Rowland
Add a maple top to the mahogany body, as do a great many Les Paul models, and a blend of characteristics comes forward. The mahogany’s depth and richness remain, but the maple provides added snap, clarity, and definition. It also tightens up the lows and adds more cut to the highs. For many players this sonic evolution is highly desirable, whereas others might prefer the smoothness of the pure-mahogany design.
The AC10 was one of the first amplifiers to bear the VOX name and has long been adored for its ability to achieve rich, articulate tube tone at very manageable volumes. For this reason, the AC10 has become a highly coveted piece of VOX history since its discontinuation in 1965. It was re-introduced in 2015 as model AC10C1 and has proven to be very popular as a quality option to the Fender Blues Jr. and Fender Princeton.
For punchy tones and a clear, high tone, you might want to consider the EMG JH James Hetfield Humbucker Set. Designed specifically for Metallica's front man, this set features both a neck and bridge pickup that can be used together or separately. If screaming highs and bluesy lows are what you're after, the Seymour Duncan SH-1 1959 Model Electric Guitar Pickup is a solid choice. Its enameled wire, nickel plated studs and balanced coil windings produce great sustain, making this neck pickup a great addition to your Gibson or Les Paul. For an electric guitar pickup that offers great range for different genres, a Gibson '57 Classic Plus Pickup can help you make your musical mark. This bridge pickup delivers a slightly higher output without sacrificing the rich, vintage tone of your instrument. The Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 Pearly Gates Pickup is another great choice if you want some kick combined with a well-rounded sound. Your choice for an electric guitar pickup really comes down to personal preference and what kind of sound you're looking for. Whether you're jamming in the garage, recording live in the studio or taking centre stage every night, you're sure to find the electric guitar pickup that best suits your needs.
The desire for innovative sounds has intrigued musicians in every culture since the dawn of time. Oscillating the volume of a note is an ancient technique — we’ve been able to do it with our voices as long as we’ve been capable of singing. Any musician playing a stringed instrument can create tremolo effect — they simply move the bow or finger back and forth while sustaining a note, as violinists and cellists do. But what about other sounds? How has the addition of mechanical and digital devices changed our music?
This is a very general question, but I will attempt to answer. I'll not get into brands, buy what "feels" right and has a good tone. If, a beginner, a good acoustic can be bought new for $200.00 - $300.00. If, you are an experienced or professional player, "The Sky is the Limit" only limited by how much you want to spend. My first guitar was used, and I paid $50.00. Now, I play a Gibson Song Writer, $3500.00. Hope this helps.
While there's nothing necessarily wrong with plonking your mic right at the centre of the speaker cone if it gets what you're after, a lot of producers take the time to experiment with different positionings off axis, where the sound is typically warmer. Mike Hedges: "Depending on where you have [the mic] — outer speaker or inner speaker — you get the difference in tone from the edge of the speaker and the centre of the cone." In fact, Mike Clink also tries small changes in position even when working with basically on-axis sounds. "I'll point [the SM57] exactly dead on, though I might move it an inch or two to get the right sound."
This is a guitar that we’ve featured before as our top pick for those who are looking for an electric acoustic for less than $500, so there’s no surprise that it’s back as one of the very best prospects at any price at all. Epiphone might be Gibson’s more affordable brand, but that certainly doesn’t mean you aren’t getting very high quality when you choose the Dove Pro.
 You will not grow here or learn anything that will be useful in any other company unless they employ 1950's management techniques. Maybe a screenwriter for "Madmen" would find some material here but as someone trying to grow their career you won't learn anything useful. The pay will be no better than your last job minus your previous bonus and 401k match which to my knowledge they do not contribute. So next question, your not making any more money and probably less, not learning anything useful and will need to explain why you left after 6 months, how are you going to position this to beat the competition going after your next job?
Without a doubt, Instant Guitar is a bit messy when it comes to sound quality, and from the looks of it on the web, others agree. First, there are incredible tones here; Cathedral mode is angelic and the low chord hits are drool worthy, to put it lightly. The problem is that the more you shape your guitar to sound like an actual guitar, the worst the sound quality becomes.

As these same makers ramped up for digital production, digital choruses naturally joined the team. The effect as produced digitally might sound broadly similar, but it is done differently than in the analog circuits. Digital chorus pedals double a signal and add delay and pitch modulation to one path, the latter wobbling below and above the pitch of the unadulterated signal, which produces an audible out-of-tuneness when the paths are blended back together. It’s hard to fault the power and range of control that digital technology affords, and this version of the effect has been hugely successful, but many guitarists still prefer the subtle, watery shimmer of the analog version. Conversely, the same ears often find the digital variety makes them a little queasy.
When you dream of playing guitar, how does it all happen in your mind’s eye? Perhaps using a guitar app like Uberchord (click to download) to learn? Or are you shredding an awesome heavy metal guitar solo, sliding on your knees across a vast stage in front of thousands of adoring fans? Do you imagine a more intimate setting, jazzing up a storm in some exclusive New York nightclub? Is it amazing the crowd with your brilliant finger-picking at the Newport Folk Festival?
Entitled Fine Electric Instruments, the 1964 1965 Fender catalogue was circulated from mid 1964, and despite being just eight pages long, contained a large number of guitars, amplifiers and other instruments. This was the first catalogue to show the new Fender Mustang guitar, which was available in normal or 3/4 scale at that time. This catalogue was included in the 1964 annual guitar issue of Down Beat magazine (July), massively increasing the potential readership, both in America and worldwide.

The entry point for guitar pedal self-assembly is the effects pedal kit. A lot of the work such as designing and manufacturing the circuit board, drilling the enclosure, and selecting suitable parts has already been done for you. With a little care and careful following of the instructions, there’s no reason not to have a first time success with a pedal kit.


The Octavia was created by Roger Mayer for Jimi Hendrix in 1967. It’s musical debut can be heard on “Purple Haze” on the Are You Experienced record. One of the many ground breaking sounds on this recording. The pedal produces a doubling effect an octave above the fundamental note. The octave is similar to a ring modulator in that it is kind of dirty and strange sounding.


Stay tuned for the second part of our series/parallel discussion next month. We’ll pick up the soldering iron and explore some sweet parallel/ series switching options for our Strats. This will also close out our run of Stratocaster mod columns. When we finish the series/parallel discussion, we’ll switch over to Telecaster and Esquire mods. Until next time, keep on modding!
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).
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Reverb – The best analogy for reverb effects would be playing your guitar inside a pipe. That’s an extreme level of reverb, of course, and these pedals will allow you to go from there all the way back to subtler effects like the natural reverberation of a concert hall. This effect sounds great with a clean tone, but beware of using it with heavy distortion or else you might lose too much definition from your sound.
Harmony pedals are often used to generate vocal harmonies, but can also do wonders for bass and guitar sounds. Some vocal harmony processors use the signal from your guitar to create two- or three-part vocal harmonies. Most harmony effects let you specify precisely how much higher or lower you want the accompanying note to be. Modern artists such as Steve Vai and Robert Fripp have created interesting music using a purely pitch-shifted signal with none of the original signal mixed in.
But alongside Davy Graham and Jim Hall, the other musician I really wanted to remind you about was Martin Taylor. Astonishing technique – enough to make the shredders weep with envy, coupled with an exquisite feel for melodic line. Martin is one of the few guys (or gals) whose playing brings tears to my eyes regularly. When one of his albums gets into my CD player it stays there for weeks. In many ways, a natural successor to Django Reinhardt, truly a master of music as well as the guitar art and DR’s principal competitor for a top ten place in my list.

While I’m on the subject of guitar myths... Many sellers of vintage Japanese guitars have been throwing around the term “lawsuit guitar”, although not usually in reference to Kents. In 1977 the Norlin Company, which owned Gibson at the time, sued Elger Guitars, which was the U.S. distributing arm of Hoshino Gakki of Japan. The suit claimed that Hoshino-made Ibanez guitars too-closely copied the headstock design of Gibson. Just the headstock. By the time the suit was brought out, Hoshino had already changed to a headstock more closely resembling what was on Guild guitars of the time. So it was pretty easy for Elger Guitars/Hoshino to promise not to copy the Gibson headstock anymore.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Hauptfeder Anschlag Tremoloblock Anschlagstab Bei richtig gestimmter Gitarre stellen Sie die Hauptfeder ein, um sicherzustellen, dass Anschlagstab den Tremoloblock und Anschlag berührt. Wenn der Anschlagstab nicht den Tremoloblock und Anschlag berührt, stellen Sie die Hauptfeder- Einstellschraube ein, bis Kontakt hergestellt ist.
The amps are interesting and also pretty much impossible to I.D. These were, of course, tube amps. Their basic cosmetics consist of two-tone tolex or vinyl covering � contrasting dark and light � arranged vertically with a wide band in the middle, just slightly narrower than the grillcloth. Cabinets had rounded edges, and, in fact, sort of look like ’50s TVs. One was a small practice amp, with two medium sized amps about 15″ or so high, and one humongous amp, complete with six 8″ speakers (which looks like the later HG-8).
Some emulator designs include switchable filters, enabling them to simulate open or closed-backed speaker cabinets, and can come very close to the sound of a close-miked amp, while ambience can be simulated using a reverb processor or plug-in. Even if the amp has a good spring reverb, a little additional digital ambience (mainly early reflections) will help create the illusion of the amplifier being recorded in a room.

Guitar amp and FX plug-ins are very advanced nowadays to the point that you can actually record “clean” by plugging your guitar straight into a mixer or interface, and add a plugin like Guitar Rig, Amplitube or Waves GTR as an insert. You will hear this effect as you play but without any risk of feedback, since no mics are live in the room. This approach also means you can tweak and change any aspect of the sound post-recording since the raw recording is actually completely dry.
A typical modern guitar tube amp has both a preamp stage and a master power amp output stage. The preamp section will be supplied with a set of smaller tubes (frequently 12AX7 or the lower-gain/lower noise 12AU7), and the power amp section has a set of large tubes (EL34, EL84, 6L6, etc.). The preamp controls input gain and typically provides treble, midrange and bass tone controls.
If you play an acoustic guitar but don’t own an amp and prefer not to (perhaps because you almost always play into a PA system) then this preamp is ideal for your situation. Not only does it give you the added control over your tone but, it also eliminates the need for an acoustic amplifier entirely, similar to the Venue DI. It’s also much cheaper than an amp.
They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.

The Ovation Guitar Company, a holding ofKaman Music Corporation, which itself is owned byFender Musical Instruments Corporation, is a guitarmanufacturing company based in New Hartford, Connecticut. Ovation primarily manufactures steel-string acoustic guitars. They have been credited with “by far the most significant developments in the design and construction of acoustic guitars” from the 1960s through the 1980s.[
The company was within three months of going out of business before it was bought by Henry E. Juszkiewicz, David H. Berryman, and Gary A. Zebrowski in January 1986.[18] Gibson's wholesale shipments in 1993 were an estimated $70 million, up from $50 million in 1992. When Juszkiewicz and Berryman took over in 1986, sales were below $10 million.[19] New production plants were opened in Memphis, Tennessee, as well as Bozeman, Montana. The Memphis facility is used for semi-hollow and custom shop instruments, while the Bozeman facility is dedicated to acoustic instruments.[20]
When people ask "What are the guitar string sizes?" they really want to know about the gauges, the term referring to the diameter of the string.  The answer is... that's not quite how it works.  Yes there are standard gauges but in several standard sizes like light, medium, and heavy.  Each, when properly tuned, will exert a different tension on the guitar's neck and if you jump to another size you'll probably need to adjust the truss rod and get used to the new action of the fingerboard.
I estimate that fewer than one in a thousand of all Axe-Fx units in the word today are used on world-class stages with great PAs. In fact, MOST players probably don’t use a P.A. at all, or rely on one to bring their personal sound to the venue (with the same caveats they’d have when mic’ing a traditional amp). These players use personal stage monitors, power amp and speakers, or a traditional guitar amp. And all of the things I’ve just mentioned should also be placed next to the many guitarists who are not playing on stage at all, ever. Studio monitors—whether they are modest to magnificent—give you a really satisfying new way to play.

Besides, what about Eric Clapton, Duane Allman, Lenny Breau, Jeff Beck, Billy Gibbons, Albert King, Freddie King, Albert Collins, Buddy Guy, Chet Atkins, Hubert Sumlin, Eddie Van Halen, Wes Montgomery, Eric Johnson, Joe Satriani, Tal Farlow, or Joe Pass? I dare any guitarist to consider shredding "hard" after attempting to learn even a slowly paced Joe Pass tune.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
The EB-18 was supplied with a quality hard flight case. The EB-18 body fits into the shaped recess and the case takes account of the oddly shaped ‘lizard-looking head and large tuning lugs. There is a pair of compartments inside forcables and other items. The inside is lined with a soft, burnt orange color, fur-like material. The case is closed with four toggle latches and has a centrally placed carrying handle.

Once the old selector is removed, screw the new selector in place. Follow your wiring notes from the old pickup selector, strip the wires with a pair of wire strippers, and solder the wires to the correct lugs. After everything is soldered in place, reattached the cavity cover or pickguard. For more information about how to solder wiring, see the soldering page.
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The musical theory of chords is reviewed, to provide terminology for a discussion of guitar chords. Three kinds of chords, which are emphasized in introductions to guitar-playing,[10][11] are discussed. These basic chords arise in chord-triples that are conventional in Western music, triples that are called three-chord progressions. After each type of chord is introduced, its role in three-chord progressions is noted.

I was a guitarist for almost 18 years now I am a session musician. For me choosing the best string gauge is one of the most important things a guitarist should know. During those early years our band tends to play on Heavy metal music and if you are using those lighter string gauge its ineffective for those kind of genres. So at that point I have been using .011 or .013 string gauges to gain fat tones and huge sustain. But however as years goes by we tend to play lighter music so I am using .09 and .010 string gauges. For me using those heavier strings for a long time will cause damage in your wrist, after acquiring a carpal tunnel syndrome I have used lighter strings in my guitar.
“Well, the legends didn’t use pedals.” Whenever somebody says something like this, and you ask them to whom they are referring, they’re often misinformed and factually wrong. “Jimmy Page”. Uh, ever see him use a Tone Bender Mk II? “Jimi Hendrix.” Please feel free to complete a Harry Potter novel while I finish laughing. “Stevie Ray Vaughan.” Ibanez and Maxon should retire a green Tube Screamer colored banner with his name hanging from their company rafters. This list goes on and on. Yes, there are lots of cool dudes back in the old times who didn’t use pedals to help them create some classic tones, but once they had the chance, they chose to.
We would suggest that you don’t check price tags too much when choosing your guitar. If you try a few out in a music shop you can ask them to suggest a few different guitars within your price range and then try them out only thinking about sound, looks and feeling. This way you won’t be fooled by a cheap price tag to think that a guitar can’t be any good, or the opposite, be tricked into thinking that just because a guitar is expensive it has got to be the best.

This specific review is for the full-size guitar, which is 40”, so if you read all the reviews on Amazon, many of them are for the ½ and ¾ size. If you’re an adult with smaller hands, purchasing the smaller sizes may be a better bet than trying to wrestle with a full-size instrument. Size doesn’t necessarily have to do with this guitar model’s tone, which many reviewers say is quite good for the price.
The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).
Great Martin Copy from the later 60's This example is a Well Crafted in Japan model with the "orange lable" Nippon Gakki highly collectable now as a great player Martin like player. Great wood...just see the pics WoW! Sitka Soruce Top, Premium AAA Grade Mahogany neck - sides & back...Made by serious craftsmen high degree of skill and well balanced. Nice big Tone as a Martin same type X bracing and is a proven performer. Nicely aged wood and is a wonderful playing 7 sounding vintage guitar equal to many more expensive builders like Martin. This one has a slight stable old top crack as glued and is not an issue anymore...Plays like butta...You will love the sound! .
The desire for innovative sounds has intrigued musicians in every culture since the dawn of time. Oscillating the volume of a note is an ancient technique — we’ve been able to do it with our voices as long as we’ve been capable of singing. Any musician playing a stringed instrument can create tremolo effect — they simply move the bow or finger back and forth while sustaining a note, as violinists and cellists do. But what about other sounds? How has the addition of mechanical and digital devices changed our music?
A low latency audio card will allow to run your guitar signal (via an adapter cable or a mixer) into the PC and through the Amp Sims, (the M-Audio 2469 is a good card for this and reasonably priced), this will allow you to drive/crank the simulators as loud as you'd like to get the tone you want; and control the overall volume with your PC, good speakers/monitors are a must for this.

Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.


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