Slightly ahead of the curve, in 1980 Ibanez revived its Destroyer as the Destroyer II Series. Indeed, the Destroyer’s “goosebeak” headstock shape would soon become the company’s trademark head. These first Destroyer IIs came in a variety of options and included bolt- and set-neck models that evolved over the next four years. The set-neck models had bound flamed maple tops over mahogany bodies and are exceptionally fine guitars. In ’84, the series introduced the high-end set-neck DT-555 Phil Collen Model, named for the fiery Def Leppard lead guitarist and modeled a little more after the Dean ML that had debuted in ’78, a kind of hybrid of the Explorer and Flying V shapes – basically an Explorer with a V notch in the butt.
Kaman and his technicians began by building traditional square-backed guitars, but by the sixth prototype were using oscilloscopes to develop the now familiar bowl-backed shape, its spherical shape being self-reinforcing, thus eliminating the need for bracing. After some experimentation, the carved, round-crowned Ovation three-and-three headstock was developed. The modern Ovation guitar with a Lyracord back was born.
The early rock bands of the 1960s used the PA system only for vocals. The electric guitarist and electric bassist had to produce their sound for the hall, club or other venue with their own amplifiers and speaker cabinets. As a result, bass players from the 1960s often used large, powerful amplifiers and large speaker cabinets. Some bass players would even use multiple bass amplifiers, with the signal from one bass amp being sent to one or more "slave" amps. In the mid-1960s John Entwistle, the bassist for The Who, was one of the first major players to make use of Marshall stacks. At a time when most bands used 50 to 100-watt amplifiers with single cabinets, Entwistle used twin stacks with new experimental prototype 200-watt amplifiers. This, in turn, also had a strong influence on the band's contemporaries at the time, with Jack Bruce of Cream and Noel Redding of the Jimi Hendrix Experience both following suit.
A giant when it comes to the British amplification companies, Vox is always in the conversation when talking about great guitar gear. And that’s no different when the conversation is about amps for beginners. As far as bang-for-your-buck options are concerned, the Valvetronix VT20X definitely ranks at the top – and with good reason: it features tube amp sounds, but with the versatility of a modeling amp (which it is). This impressive hybrid boasts 11 onboard models, 13 effects, and 33 preset programs – allowing you an astonishingly wide range of produceable sounds. And you can control the whole thing from your smartphone, making it easier than ever before. Excellent work, Vox.
THE CONTROL CAVITY Routing the control cavity is just as important as the neck pocket but with a couple more steps. The best thing to do is to cut out the plastic cover. Trace the pattern that you came up with for it on the plastic then cut it out with a jig saw. Use a fine tooth blade to prevent the plastic from chipping and will also yeild a smoother cut. Once this is done, take your template and reverse it, trace the patern on the back side of the body. Next set your router to a depth that is the same as the thickness of the plastic plate and rout the cavity working out to the line you drew. I do this free hand since the first cut is too shallow for a template. Be careful when you do this and test fit the plate you cut to make sure you get a goo fit. Then you will draw another line about 1/4" along the inside of the cavity you routed out, leaving extra room in areas for the screws you will use later on to secure the control plate. Rout this area out in the same way, working out to the line you drew. When you start to get close to the half way point in the wood start to think about how much wood you need to leave at the bottom. Usualy 1/4" is good but make sure you are careful! I miscalculated once and ended up going all the way through the body. Bad experience.
X-Series: Back and sides constructed from compressed wood fibers (high-pressure laminate or “HPL“) and solid Sitka spruce or HPL top. Due to this construction these guitars are more environmentally-friendly.[citation needed] Models include: DX1, DX1-R, DXM, DCX1E, DCX1R3, 000CXE Black, and 000X1. Some earlier models used ‘Ebonite’ (black Micarta) fretboards, later models use koa or striped ebony. Necks on all models are constructed from Stratabond, a laminated wood product used for decades in gun stocks and hunting bows. Some of the more recent models are made in Mexico.
In some modern valve effects, the "dirty" or "gritty" tone is actually achieved not by high voltage, but by running the circuit at voltages that are too low for the circuit components, resulting in greater non-linearity and distortion. These designs are referred to as "starved plate" configurations, and result in an "amp death" sound.[citation needed]
For the last tip/technique, I’m going to shift gears and talk about recording acoustic—upright—bass. This may seem more daunting, but many of the same techniques apply—I’ll mention a few quick items that would be specific to the big box. While the dynamic mics I mentioned above might work fine (especially on stage), a good large-diaphragm condenser would be appropriate in the studio, to capture the high end and air of the acoustic instrument as well as the lows. On stage, the relatively low acoustic volume of the instrument may preclude more distant mic positioning, but you can wedge a small (pencil-type) mic into the bridge, with appropriate foam padding, and this, surprisingly, can often provide excellent sound and much better isolation. 
Practice makes perfect. While this might be a trite statement that your teacher used to say as you rolled your eyes in annoyance it could not be closer to the truth. Practice is especially vital with music. No matter what you plan on playing or already play unless you practice you’re not going to get anywhere even with the best guitar. So we have figured out so fat that practice is vital to reaching the level you want but that is not the end of it. A good guitar is just as important. And I don’t mean a great guitar that you will have to shell out your entire savings on. No, I mean a quality guitar that will help you out in your practice rather than hinder you. (If you still have not got a guitar but plan on doing so we have an entire catalog of the best guitars under $100, best guitars under $300 and so forth). You thought that’s where we would end the list of what you need to learn how to play? Nope. You need a good amplifier. As much as this equipment is often overlooked because it seems too had to choose, it is vital for practice.  Without further ado, let’s get into some of the best guitar practice amps.
I inherited a guitar and am looking for any information I can about it. It is a Kent model 533 Videocaster. I have no idea when they were made or what this one might be worth. It is a solid body, but I know next to nothing about guitars so I am not sure what other info might be needed. It needs to be tuned/serviced and possibly needs a little restoration, but otherwise it works and is not in horrible shape. Any info would be appreciated.

The Kay Guitar Company has been the major producer of guitars since 1890. Most players do not realize that in 1928, Kay was the first company to start production of electric guitars in the USA. From 1952 through 1964, The Kay Guitar Company excelled at producing quality professional electric guitars with unique designs and features. The Kay Gold Line professional series became synonymous with that rich gutsy Blues/Jazz sound that eventually became known as Rock and Roll. This unique Blues sound was not available from any other guitar of that time. For the past decade, vintage Kay instruments have been fetching high prices and have had increasing interest from collectors and players because of the cool look and unique Blues/Jazz sound. Part of this special Blues sound came from the triple chamber design and the hand-wound blade pickups on the Kay K161V Thin Twin and the Kay K162V Electronic "Pro Bass" Guitar.
The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.
In many studios, the guitarist can play in the control room while the amp is mic’d up in the live room. It feels less natural at first, but this way, you can more accurately monitor how your guitar sits in the mix through the studio monitors while you track. Some players prefer to be in the same room as their amp for reasons of feel and response, but if you are using a hollowbody or pickups that are succeptible to microphony, separating the guitar and amp can help. Of course, if feedback is desirable, you are better off in the room with the amp.
Since 1971 Hoffman Guitars has provided a full range of services to guitar players nationwide.   We have always worked to provide the finest in instrument repair services and handcrafted guitars.  We provide a full range of repair services, including factory authorized warranty service for C.F. Martin, Gibson, Guild, Fender, Taylor, Jim Olson and others.  I (Charlie Hoffman) have built over 600 individually handcrafted guitars, which are (or have been) played by such players as Leo Kottke, Tim Sparks,  Dakota Dave Hull, Ann Reed, Jerry Rau, Charlie Maguire and others.  In addition, we carry a fairly complete range of accessories for guitar players (strings, picks, capos, pickups, cases, etc, etc.).  In this day and age it may seem a bit anachronistic but we really believe in customer service and strive to provide the very best.
Being relatively new to the ABQ area, I've been checking out the local music shops and finding myself underwhelmed - that is until I walked into Grumpy's. Kevin is probably the last honest guy in the business. His pricing is more than fair - whether you're looking for repairs, custom builds, or gear - and he's more than willing to dispense advice or talk shop (not to mention his sense of humor). To put it succinctly; he knows his shit and doesn't blow smoke up one's ass! Sure, the shop doesn't have the "selection" that a place like GC might have, but Kevin can probably get anything you need. (Besides, what's more important - knowledgeable, down-to-earth customer service at a locally owned shop, or being ignored by douchebag wankers who came of age playing along to Miley Cyrus?!) Go to Grumpy's!
Among the most common rookie amp buyer mistakes is buying a big amp that's too heavy to gig with, or going the opposite and buying one that's too small. If you're gigging at different places and you don't have a roadie, then consider going with a smaller amp that has DI output so you can go straight to PA with your tone intact. In big venues where big amps are a must, some opt for amp heads because the separated head and speaker cabinet are lighter on their own, although you'll have to move more pieces.
While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.
What started as an aftermarket parts company has grown into a real giant. ESP is a brand that is currently building some of the best guitars in the mid range segment of the market. Even though they are often associated with metal scene, ESP offers a wide variety of models. In all honesty, you will rarely find the same bang for the buck that ESP is capable of delivering. On top of that, their guitars are good looking as well.
In recent years, convolution reverbs have become both affordable and commonplace. These differ from synthetic reverbs insomuch as they work from impulse responses (or IRs), recorded in real spaces to faithfully recreate the ambience at the microphone's position when the IR was made. Sometimes these are referred to as sampling reverbs but there's no sampling involved as such, even though the process seems akin to sampling the sonic signature of a room, hall or other space.
Chabot Guitars - Paul Chabot used to offer quality hand made Classical guitars (Colorado, USA) "Paul first apprenticed und er guitar maker / repairman Robert Buchanan, where he became familiar with the aspects of guitar repair, and guitar refinishing. Furthering his ability and knowledge, Paul attended Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery where he learned the basics of wood, instrument design and guitar making. Not long after graduating from Roberto-Venn, Paul was fortunate enough to apprentice under world renowned Master guitar maker Augustino Lo Prinzi. Through Augustino Lo Prinzi, Paul was able to learn some of the most proven methods and advanced techni ques of fine guitar making."
• Them Changes: Since the strings on acoustic guitars play a much more important role in projecting volume and clarity than strings on an amplified electric guitar, considering changing acoustic guitar strings often to keep an instrument sounding its best. Remember to wipe down the strings after playing and check for string damaging fret wear. Both can prematurely end a guitar string’s life.
The body and neck are also slimmer than other Spanish guitar models, as well, so if you’re used to a steel-string, but gearing up to try a classical guitar, the Kremona Sofia is one to put on your list to try. The strings are Royal Classic Sonata strings, made in Spain, so add this to the guitar body’s manufacturing origins, and you will have a sound that is worthy of a professional, but affordable for just about everyone.
DISCLAIMER: Hoshino owns the copyright to all of the catalogs scanned in here. This website has NO RELATIONSHIP with the Hoshino Gakki Group and makes no claims to ownership of the linked scans. These catalog scans are provided solely for personal academic/research purposes, so that collectors and others who own one or more of these fantastic guitars can properly identify the model and year of manufacture.
Spanish-style electrics, which you could sling in front of you while standing and singing, proved to be much more versatile for many different musical genres. Gibson’s 1936 ES-150 (E for Electric and S for Spanish) had a sleek bar-shaped electronic pickup that was mounted into the guitar’s hollow body for a more streamlined look. The pickup earned the nickname “the Charlie Christian” thanks to the jazz virtuoso who is generally credited with introducing the electric guitar solo. In 1939, Christian stepped out in front of Benny Goodman’s band and performed long, complicated passages imitating the style of horn playing. He explained, “Guitar players have long needed a champion, someone to explain to the world that a guitarist is something more than a robot pluckin’ on a gadget to keep the rhythm going.”
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ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
The Epiphone Joe Pass Emperor II is the signature guitar of one of jazz music’s great guitarists. Joe Pass played on records with Ella Fitzgerald, and his influence has cemented his name among the greats of the genre. The guitar which bears his name is a fine example of a guitar geared precisely towards one genre. It won’t win any awards for versatility, but it is a fantastic instrument for jazz fans of any skill level. Featuring the classic hollow body arch top design of old but with two high quality Burstbucker pickups for a range of silky tones.
the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….
The other switches you might find on a guitar can change the wiring of the pickups from being in series or parallel , or to switch the phase so the pickups are in phase, or out of phase. All the switches are there to allow you to change the tone of the guitar.  Those switches can be toggle switches, or push-pull switches built into the volume or tone control knobs.
Unlike most new wave guitarists at the dawn of the Eighties, Honeyman-Scott had impeccable fashion sense. He always maintained a timeless detached rocker look, and his aviator shades, medium-length shag haircut, suit jacket and jeans attire never really went out of style, unlike the geometric haircuts and DayGlo suits that many of his contemporaries wore. He always played the coolest guitars onstage as well, from classic Gibson Les Pauls and Firebirds to custom-made Hamers and Zemaitis metal-front guitars.
Needing a more compact logo suitable for the guitars’ headstock, the founders decided to change the name to “Taylor” as it sounded more American than “Listug” and because as Kurt Listug put it, “Bob was the real guitar-maker.”[3]Listug became the businessman of the partnership while Taylor was responsible on design and production. In 1976, the company decided to begin selling their guitars through retailers. In 1981, facing financial difficulties, Taylor Guitars took out a bank loan to purchase equipment.[4][5]

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A direct user interface can give far more musically rewarding results than dozens of parameters, menus and alpha dials. Often, even a panel of knobs isn't anywhere near as natural to play as, say, a Korg Kaoss Pad. Here's something Kaoss Pad 3 owners can try at home: choose effect DL2 (Smooth Delay) in which the pad controls delay time on the X-axis and depth on the Y-axis. Next route your favourite solo patch through it and set the FX depth to about 12 o'clock. Solo wildly whilst simultaneously stroking the top right-hand corner of the Kaoss Pad with short, circular motions. With practice, you should be able to produce delicate pitch sweeps as the delay shifts in time. As you control depth by vertical motion, practise diagonal upwards sweeps followed by vertical downward ones to smoothly dampen the effect. Hey, it takes years to master the violin, so a few evenings spent waggling your finger over flashing LEDs shouldn't be too arduous. Next try the same technique with lush solo pads: simple yet devastatingly effective! Paul Nagle
At this point you should have the pots, switch, and jack out of the guitar with the pickup wires still connected. You can either de-solder the pickup wires or use wire cutters to clip them off. If you’re replacing the pickups as part of your re-wiring, you can do this now (I did not in the example photographed here). Just feed the leads of the new pickups back through the holes in the pickup cavities.

In my own (first) project guitar, I did not know quite what to expect, so I built it with HSH pickups and two complete signal paths. The humbucking path uses 500k pots and an 0.047 cap; the single coil path uses 250K pots and a 0.022 cap. I did this with stacked, concentric CTS 250K/500K pots and an on/on toggle switch, all within the minimal confines of a standard Telecaster control plate. I created a custom 5-way selector switch to isolate the single-coil wiring from the humbucking combinations, but in the end when I flip the switch I opted for just the stand-alone single coil for the warmest sound. As I said above, the tapped humbuckers just didn't compare. This project is a work in progress; I hope this helps you find your own path.

i just started using this book never having played before and am finding it totally easy to follow. the friendly narrative guides the reader through every step, explaining the most simple of terms and concepts clearly and concisely. and yes, the CD is funky and you can play along with it more or less straight away AND sound good, which keeps you motivated.
Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy
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Beyond shaping and body design, there are a number of characteristics that distinguish the Gibson Les Paul line from other electric guitars. For example, in a fashion similar to Gibson’s hollow-body instruments, the strings of Les Paul guitars are always mounted on the top of the guitar body, rather than through the guitar body, as seen in competitor Fender’s designs. The Gibson also features a variety of colors, such as Wine Red, Ebony, Classic White, Fire Burst, and Alpine White. In addition, the Les Paul models offered a variety of finishes and decorative levels, a diversity of hardware options, and an innovative array of electric pick-up options, some of which significantly impacted the sound of electric music. For instance, in 1957, Gibson introduced the humbucker (PAF), which revolutionized the sound of the electric guitar, and eliminated the mains hum, which had previously plagued guitars with single coilmagnetic pickups.
The PRS SE range has offered solid, well-built, great-sounding guitars for years now, and the PRS SE Custom 24 2018 is a perfect example. This Korean-built mass of maple, mahogany and rosewood is a classy-looking guitar. It’s a wonderful instrument to play too - PRS's expertise making eye-wateringly expensive guitars is evident from the moment you pick it up. The bridge, for example, has a noticeably low profile. This makes palm-muting a much more pleasant experience, especially if you’re used to chugging away on a Floyd Rose-style bridge. A lot has been made of the SE Custom’s pickups; 2017 models added Korean-made versions of the 85/15 pups used on the more expensive American Core line, dubbed “the perfect pickup” by Paul Reed Smith himself. Largely, they live up to that promise; the bridge pickup is capable of some serious chunky metal tones, which retain definition and clarity even at absurd levels of gain. Spend some time with the SE Custom 24 and you’ll come to realise that there is no stereotype that fits. And therein lies its beauty. It’s not a guitar or a brand that concerns itself with cultivating a popular image; PRS has always favoured more obvious metrics like quality manufacturing, great sounds and classic looks.
Of course, as guitar players we still want to remain open to a number of tonal aspects that happen after the front end of the initial attack. These elements aren’t necessarily in the front part of the very beginning of a guitar tone, nor are they delegated to the trail of lingering sustain. “The reason why people sound a certain way is because of little nuances, those little pull offs, those hammer ons, those plucking [dynamics]— the sequence of those things. Think of it as a sonic palette. That sequence is what makes the artist sound like himself.”
An excerpt: “First let us dispel the popular, but completely wrong belief that ‘any guitar will do for learning to play.’ Your first guitar should be carefully chosen to be fairly easy to play and tune. It should also be versatile enough for you to be able to play different kinds of music on it. For this reason, and to avoid the complications and expense of an amplifier, an ‘acoustic’ (un-amplified) guitar is recommended.”

Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep, fully hollow bodies and are often capable of being played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar, and therefore of being used unplugged at intimate gigs. The instrument originated during the jazz age of the 1920s and 1930s, and is still considered the classic jazz guitar, nicknamed the “jazzbox.” Like semi-hollow guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes. Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavily, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation (popular in country and rockabilly) with single-coil pickups and sometimes a Bigsby tremolo has a distinctly more twangy, biting, tone than the classic jazzbox.
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