When you shop the huge selection of combo guitar amps at Musician’s Friend we make it easy to hone in on what you’re looking for. Just select the type ( tube, solid state, or hybrid), brand(s), and price range, and voila—up pops a selection fine tuned to your specs. To really fine-tune the process you can also dial in the wattage, type (combo or stack), and speaker size/configuration.
Made famous by George Harrison in the ‘60s, the jangly Rickenbacker 360/12 12-string electric guitar has become perhaps one of the most iconic 12-string electrics. With a semi-hollow body and thru-body neck, the 360/12 is able to create a unique tone that is difficult to create with other 12-string guitars. Though this model has undergone many changes and seen many iterations through the years, the newer Rick 360/12 models have a slimmer neck and are still highly-sought instruments.

Above here's a blast from the past. The reissue of the 1960's Harmony Stratotone H49 Jupiter. Originally this guitar was manufactured in Japan, but these babies came straight from China many years later. They copied them right down to the T including those Gold Foil Pups. Guitar is hollow body and has a volume, volume, tone, tone, master tone knob, with a really cool 3 way switch. They don't come up on Ebay to often and this ones like brand new but was briefly used. Sold
By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
Scale length describes the length that string has to be stretched on, from the nut to the bridge. Generally speaking, shorter scale length means softer string tension, making the instrument easier to play. Longer scale length allows for more fret space and more string tension which translates to more sustain. Shorter scale length is advisable for beginners, while experienced players ought to look for guitars with similar scale lengths so the playing feel stays the same even when switching between instruments. Nut width measures how wide the nut is, smaller means easier to play for players with smaller fingers, while wider nut widths allow for more space between each string. Finally, neck profile is the shape or curvature of the back of the neck, and the type of profile you want will depend on your preference, be it vintage style U profile with its fatter neck, or the more modern slim profiles.
A half-century later, effects are everywhere. Whether they’re built into your amplifier, a single pedal, multi-effects processor, rack-mounted, or controlled through an iOS device, there’s a vast array of tones at your disposal, ready to add sonic magic to your performances or recordings. Most recording and performing guitarists have come to depend on effects to add flavors both subtle and flagrant to their sound, helping them to carve out the signature tones with which they’re identified.
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.

Small guitars were often looked at as mere travel or couch alternatives, but times have changed and they are making a comeback on big stages. The LX1E Little Martin is at the forefront of this rekindled interest, with artists like Ed Sheeran impressing big crowds with just his humble and small LX1E. Thankfully, its price has remained stable despite the its current worldwide recognition.
OK, so you're ready to try your hand at the electric guitar, but where do you start? A good place to start is with an electric guitar that's specifically geared toward beginners. And although many guitars cost over $1,000, there's no need to shell out that much dough for a student model/novice instrument. To help you sort through all the options, we put together a list of the best beginner electric guitars worth buying right now. So whether you’re looking to become a shredding metalhead, a cool jazz player or an all-American country star, one of these electric guitars will have you well on your way.
After the success of the DD-500, RV-500 and MD-500 units, Boss's GT-1000 is a floorboard combining all three. Sleek and modern, it's a formidably robust beast. To the rear, there’s the usual array of inputs and outputs, including USB recording out and an input for an additional expression pedal plus jacks to insert two mono pedals, or one stereo external pedal and a nifty send for amp channel-switching. In terms of editing, it’s not the most intuitive. For example, when you switch between patches in a bank, you’re not just turning off, say, a ‘Tube Screamer’, but switching to a different chain that doesn’t have a gain block - standard in rack-style processing, but tough for beginners. Sounds-wise, the 32-bit, 96khz sampling finds the GT-1000 punching above its weight, and on the effects side, there’s a wealth of modulations, delays, reverbs and drives. If you run a larger, more traditional pedalboard, perhaps the so-called ‘Bossfecta’ of the MD, RV and DD 500-series units would provide more flexibility, but for most players, the GT-1000 is a highly practical solution. 

At the end of the day, Squier has come a long way in this pas decade. They upped their game in terms of build quality as well as selection. If you are just starting out, Squier is one brand you can trust to give you a perfect tool for the job. If I was starting all over again, I’d go with Squier by Fender Classic Vibe 60’s Stratocaster in a heartbeat.


These 8 free guitar lessons are from Chris Buono’s 60 Electric Guitar Techniques You MUST Know where he’ll describe and demonstrate 65 of the most popular electric guitar techniques found in blues, rock, jazz, metal and other contemporary genres of music. He also shows you how they’re notated in standard notation and tablature to help you get the most out of reading or writing sheet music, tabs, and charts.

Here's a fresh one from the JVG Vault... vintage tone much like an old classic Martin Acoustic has some wear and has the "feel" just feels great in your hands and plays & sounds wonderful. Good volume and rich sounding lows and very nice.. condition rated at a solid 8.5 / 10 or better no cracks no repairs and plays nicely with original nut & saddle still in place , optional change nut & saddle & set up add $80.00. Please SEE MORE FULL SCREEN HIGH RES PICTURES HERE: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sYamahaFG140RedLableLikeFG180?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHmw573kYa6HA#slideshow/5634523767539294722.
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The color black is powerful, mysterious and evokes a sense of potential and possibility. It’s widely regarded as the single most popular color for Rock ‘n’ Roll thanks to rock pioneers such as KISS and AC/DC. Get back in black with these fine offerings from Dean with our vivid take on the classic black electric guitar with a few other shades thrown in for good measure. Plug in and play. Get your wings!


yea, i’ve looked on a lot of websites. The way the 5-way switch is explained here helps a lot. Actually, the Dimarzio site has the closest wiring schematic that I’ve seen. I tried it and I got 2 out of the 5 positions to work. The problem is that all 3 pickups are running on both the working settings, just the bridge is more defined on the one setting and the neck is more defined on the other.
Of all the positions GC interviews for, tech has the highest standards and is arguably more demanding in terms of hours worked and product knowledge required than store manager. The tech for the store I worked at frequently worked 60+ hours a week to keep turn-around time to a week or less and his set-ups were so good and in such high demand that the store got an exception to the chain-wide $35 set-up price to charge $50 in hopes of lightening his load/keeping his overtime down, but he still got just as much work as he did before. If you're unsure about the reputation of your local GC's tech, don't be afraid to call the other stores and ask them who the best tech in their district is, because they'll usually be pretty straight forward with you. Most GC sales people have had their instruments set up by their in-store tech at least once and if their tech isn't very good, they'll tell you who you should go to if you want good work done because it's an absolute pain in the ass dealing with a customer whose instrument wasn't set up right when the tech is gone for the day and having to deal with the tech's fuck-up.
Overdrive distortion is the most well known of all distortions. Although there aren't many electronic differences between a distortion an overdrive, the main audible one is that a distortion does exactly as the name suggests; distorts and clips the signal no matter what volume is going through it, the amount of distortion usually remains relatively the same. This is where an overdrive differs. Most overdrives are built to emulate the sound of a tube amp overdriving and therefore give the player control of the clipping through dynamics. This simply means that the effect gives a clean sound for quieter volumes and a more clipped or distorted sound for louder volumes.
Any guitar luthier will tell you that the choice of wood is the single MOST IMPORTANT factor that will determine the sound of your guitar. My junk guitar had a body that was made of cheap reconstituted wood shavings instead of actual solid wood. Junk material like that means your sound will also be junk. Any note I played didn’t sustain for more than a single second and it didn’t have that boomy lush sound you normally get from acoustics.

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Guitar Center Twin Cities provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Roseville area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Twin Cities can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.

The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.
For a novice like me, hitting those notes is no easy task. On my first brush with "Rocksmith 2014," I tackled Arctic Monkeys' "R U Mine?" This included a lot of missed notes and looking at my hands to find the right frets. But after playing the song a few times, it got easier and easier - even with the inclusion of more notes to master and more frets to find.
I dont know but im looking for a good bass guitar too. Depends on your price range. Personally I realy like Ibanez basses and think they do really good low to mid price range basses. If you are looking at a professional quality basses you should look at Rickenbacker, Musicman (stingray), Fender, Lakland and Shadowsky as they are the main brands for professional basses.
If you are looking for a simple and old school way to spice up your guitar sound, tremolo is a great option. Tremolo lowers the amplitude of your signal at a regular rate. It's like having a machine move your volume knob back and forth rhythmically, and it's one of the first effects that were built into early amplifiers. While simple in concept , tremolo adds a great movement to you tone, in either a subtle or intense way. The choice is yours. On low settings, a pleasant motion effect can add some ear candy to your tone. Set on high, a “stutter” or “chop” effect can add emphasis to a song or riff. Some pedals will even split the repeats in stereo, which adds a genuine vortex to your tone.
Simple and great idea! Ordered it from StewMac and received it in the mail two days later. Mounted it on my Taylor acoustic instantly and played for hours! Haven't put it on an electric yet but have every bit of confidence that it'll work like a charm there as well! Very handy piece to have in your studio....quickly turn any guitar into a slide-playing machine!
The Supro brand name was introduced by the National-Dobro Corporation to sell its less expensive electric instruments. The first Supro Spanish and Hawaiian guitars appeared in 1936, and the brand would thrive until the bankruptcy of Valco in 1968. (The modern Supro line of amps bears no relationship to the original brand name). By the end of the 1930s, a pattern was established that would last for the next 30 years: Supro guitars and amps would generally be more affordable than their closest National counterparts, but built to similar quality and sometimes incorporating features not found in any National. Supro instruments were sold through a much less exclusive network of dealers than National, and as a result they have acquired a name recognition that surpasses their “superior” siblings.
Bass effects that condition the sound, rather than changing its character are called "sound conditioners." Gain booster effects pedals and bass preamplifier pedals increase the gain (or volume) of the bass guitar signal. Bass preamplifiers for double basses are designed to match the impedance of piezoelectric pickups with the input impedance of bass amplifiers. Some double bass preamplifiers may also provide phantom power for powering condenser microphones and anti-feedback features such as a notch filter (see "Filter-based effects" section below).
I've had an Ovation Celebrity for over 5 years. Great action, wonderful sound with or without an amp. Stays in tune. Play anything from classical to rock. The Ovation can do it. The sound is unique, so making it your only guitar may not work if your in a band. If you're a beginner, the string tension is really low so it's easy on your fingers. It is a hollow body accoustic, but it plays like an electric. I've owned and still own several guitars. This is the one I reach for the most.
Choosing guitar strings is like choosing lenses and frames for your glasses.  There is a right strength of lens for you and when you switch frames it may take some adjusting to get used to.  This analogy is referring to the bridge height, nuts, and truss rod tension.  Do take your time to experiment but once you settle it's best to keep using the same gauges so you can dodge the lengthy set-up process from happening again.
I just built this kit, which I ordered directly from Mod DIY. Its the first pedal kit that I have built, although I do have a fair amount of electronics experience. Overall, I was impressed with the kit. All the parts were included, and functioned just fine. The instructions were outstanding, particularly if you use the high-res picture of the inside of a finished model for reference. There was ONE step omitted in the direction, which was to solder a short wire between terminal 3 of the toggle switch to connection 12 on the junction rail. But that was easy to spot.
After all, we each have our own favorites, whether it be a particular player, style or era. However, that doesn’t mean such a list can’t be based on some element of objective reasoning. To some extent, the proof is in all of us: anyone who picks up the instrument borrows at least a handful of techniques and stylistic tendencies that someone else brought to the table. The key is determining which guitarists have had the most impact among the larger number of players—in other words, who has contributed most across the board to the way we approach the instrument.

Mid-to high-priced amps may have other switches (which on some amps are switched on by pulling an existing rotary knob out) that boost or cut some part of the frequency range, such as "bright boost", "deep boost" or "mid scoop" switches. Amps with an onboard audio compressor or limiter, which is used to protect the speakers from sudden peaks in volume and from damage due to power amplifier clipping, may have only an on/off switch to turn on the effect (as with lower- to mid-priced amps), or they may have one or more knobs to control how much compression is applied to the bass tone (typically a ratio and threshold knob or just a single knob). Some 2000s-era amps may have an electronic tuner and a mute button, to mute the sound of tuning during a break between songs without having to change the volume settings. On some amps, vertical sliders may be provided to control a graphic equalizer, which gives the bassist control over a number of frequency bands.
When jazz guitarists play chords underneath a song's melody or another musician's solo improvisations, it is called "comping", short for "accompanying" and for "complementing".[citation needed] The accompanying style in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In many popular styles of music, such as rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist usually performs the chords in rhythmic fashion which sets out the beat or groove of a tune. In contrast, in many modern jazz styles within smaller, the guitarist plays much more sparsely, intermingling periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo, and using periods of silence. Jazz guitarists commonly use a wide variety of inversions when comping, rather than only using standard voicings.[3]
Another cool place I just found was Madison Guitar Repair out of Fridley. I went there a couple weeks ago. It's a little hole in the wall place where they just work on guitars and have tons of parts. Really nice guys that seem like they know their stuff pretty dang well. Never used them but considering that all they do is luthier work I'd give them a shot.
Although most of us who participated in this article have years of experience with guitar amps, none of us was particularly familiar with all the latest beginner models. There are few reliable professional reviews of beginner amps, but I sorted through what we found, searched through music stores and websites, and sampled numerous models at the recent National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Los Angeles. This experience gave me a good idea of what’s available now.
Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.
Even if your favourite musician is predominantly driven by music and is committed to releasing material for their fans, they cannot possibly deny that are a number of incentives for them to do so. A journalist writing for The Economist online explains that songs are ‘complex mixtures of features’, so composers are always trying to find the right mix of ingredients to increase their chances of success. And everyone loves a success story!
The Yamaha's FG series FGX800C is a perfectly machined instrument. If there is one thing Yamaha is known for, it's the quality of their mass-produced acoustic guitars, which people like to pooh-pooh due to the romanticization of extremely expensive handmade guitars. Yamaha has perfected this machining process to a point where you wouldn't really be able to figure out if the instrument was put together by a luthier or if it was made on a factory floor somewhere. This is the case with nearly every accessible guitar these days thanks to machines reducing errors and driving prices down.

Most bass combo amps and bass speaker cabinets are "front-firing"; that is, the speakers and horn, if a horn is present, aim forwards. However, because very low-pitched sounds are omnidirectional, some combos and cabinets have woofers that point down or to the rear. The deep bass tone radiates from the cabinet in all directions, even when it is pointed downward or to the rear. The Acoustic Image combo bass amp has a downward-firing woofer for the deepest pitches, and another forwards-firing speaker for higher-pitched sounds. The vintage Acoustic brand 361 cabinet had a rear-firing 18" woofer, an approach used in a number of home cinema subwoofer cabinets. The rare examples of bass cabinets that use a large folding horn can also use woofers that do not face forward.

Being one of the reputed organizations, operating in this domain, we are engaged in manufacturing and supplying a quality range of Gigmaker Electric Guitar. We only use high grade components and latest technology while designing these guitars. The offered range is widely appreciated all over the nation for its salient attributes. With our quality range, we

Look for lyrics or chord changes. Many songs have guitar parts made up solely (or mostly) of chords. This is especially true for rhythm guitar parts. In this case, the tab may forgo typical tab notation in favor of a simplified list of chord changes. These chords are almost always written in standard chord notation (Amin = A minor, E7 = E dominant 7, etc.) Simply play the chords in the order that they're listed - if it's not noted otherwise, try playing one chord per measure, but if the changes don't sound right, listen to the song for the strumming pattern.


Get a custom drawn guitar or bass wiring diagram designed to your specifications for any type of pickups, switching and controls and options. Just complete the guitar wiring diagram order form with your custom specifications and our designers will do the rest. Our custom diagrams are easy to read, affordable and delivered by email for FREE! To order a custom diagram, select the number of pickups on your instrument below and complete the diagram order form.
Also, if your slide playing includes any fretting at all, FORGET IT. While it certainly raises them well away from the neck, the strings are lifted to a height that makes trying to fret them pull them off pitch well before you reach the fret... and there is NO adjusting it. I used one on a wide neck 12 string strung for six. A neck designed for the tension of 12 strings easily takes the tension of a heavy gauge set in a raised open tuning. The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" is ideal for such an application (if you don't want to even try any fretting) but I doubt Stewey Mac's sells very many of them.
Same woods sounding different? OF COURSE!!! Look, I’ve been a carpenter for over 30 years and can absolutely inform you that there is a marked variation of characteristics of wood in the same species…density, tap tone, characteristics of how the individual piece reacts to being worked with tools…heck for all anybody knows internal stresses (for example as indicated by how a 12″ wide piece of wood reacts to being ripped down the center…many times both pieces end up being bowed and such) might play a big factor in how said piece of wood sounds musically…shrugs shoulders…
New to the music scene, and never one to stand on formality, I had a chance (multiple chances) to visit Grumpy's Guitars and Stuff, and was never anything but treated with respect, courtesy, and professionalism. My purpose for the visits were neither to buy, nor to have repaired, an instrument. It was to have the proprietor take a look at the bass that I had build. To give me his opinion and estimation on how I did. He walked through the process I'd used, for defretting, paint stripping, and then staining and poly sealing. Demonstrated how to adjust the truss rod, and complimented me on the work I'd done. All while setting aside his own work (A gorgeous early era hollow body electric Gibson.) I was charged a grand total of a great conversation for the tutoring and advice... Above and beyond! The selection of instruments was impressive -- and Grumpy's is the ONLY music/stringed instrument store I've entered in Albuquerque with not one, but 3 double basses, including an electric, and 2 classic uprights. Thanks for the great service, and awesome selection! I'll be by to have my '62 Fender Re-Issue pickups ordered through you, and to see about switching to a new brand of flatwound, when I break my next GHS.
I have owned a lot of amps over the years. I am also a dealer in music accessories. Please note that we do not sell these amps, so I am not endorsing and using something my shop sells. I recently have bought a couple of amps in a series (I bought one first and then bought another) and have been really impressed. The Vox AV series. http://www.voxamps.com/AVSeries
Guitar culture was pervasive, whether in movie houses (“Karate Kid” Ralph Macchio outdueling Steve Vai in the 1986 movie “Crossroads”; Michael J. Fox playing a blistering solo in “Back to the Future” and co-starring with Joan Jett in 1987’s rock-band drama “Light of Day”) or on MTV and the older, concert films featuring the Who and Led Zeppelin on seemingly endless repeats.
If magnetic pickups are excellent for traveling guitars, contact pickups are great for amplified acoustic performances. These can capture the sound from the soundboard as well as from the rest of the body. You can also get a guitar that comes with a blended system which combines a pickup with a microphone. A model with a built-in preamp is also becoming the norm these days.

If you want to test the waters, here are the some of the best free guitar effects software packages. Aside from the limited freeware software, there are Lite or Trial versions of commercial programs which you can get for free, but with limited in features. The good thing though is that even when they lack features, they work and sound just as nice.
I can't believe this! Blackstar are designed and built by retired Marshall professionals and they have every last bit of knowledge on tube amps, heads, and combos. I own a Blackstar HT-1R, it is 1w but it feels like 100w just the way the Blackstar team have combined their ideas and structures and balanced it out with tubes. And line 6 is further up the list? You are mistaken bro. Another thing. These are bloody expensive and aren't very well known but Two Rock make probably the GREATEST amps ever made and I would kill to fire one up!
Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
Founded in 1974, Ernie Ball Music Man is an American guitar and bass company that produces high-quality instruments for pros and enthusiasts. Their guitars are on the expensive side. Most of them cost well over $2000. They are, however, extremely well-made. Music Man guitars Music Man guitars are predominantly made in the USA. This is part of the reason they can be so expensive. The sound is bright and lively. They are very versatile and can be used to play any genre. In addition to guitars, they also make bass guitars that are also very high-quality. One aspect of Music Man that is particularly good is their signature models. Their John Petrucci, or JP, models are some of their more well-known models. They also feature signature models for Steve Morse, Albert Lee, and more. If you’re interested in high-quality, signature model guitars, Ernie Ball Music Man guitars could be the kind of guitars for you.
Audio feedback: Audio feedback is an effect produced when amplified sound is picked up by a microphone or guitar pickup and played back through a guitar amplifier, initiating a "feedback loop", which usually consists of high-pitched sound. Feedback that occurs from a vocal mic into a PA system is almost always avoided. However, in some styles of rock music, electric guitar players intentionally create feedback by playing their instrument directly in front of a heavily amplified, distorted guitar amplifier's speaker enclosure. The creative use of feedback effects was pioneered by guitarists such as Jimi Hendrix in the 1960s. This technique creates sustained, high-pitched overtones and unusual sounds not possible through regular playing techniques. Guitar feedback effects can be difficult to perform, because it is difficult to determine the sound volume and guitar position relative to a guitar amp's loudspeaker necessary for achieving the desired feedback sound.[90][91] Guitar feedback effects are used in a number of rock genres, including psychedelic rock, heavy metal music and punk rock.
Echo and delay are created by copying the original signal in some way, then replaying it a short time later. There's no exact natural counterpart, though the strong reflections sometimes heard in valleys or tunnels appear as reasonably distinct echoes. Early echo units were based on tape loops, before analogue charge-coupled devices eliminated the need for moving parts. Today, most delay units are digital, but they often include controls to help them emulate the characteristics of the early tape units, including distortion and low-pass filtering in the delay path and pitch modulation to emulate the wow and flutter of a well-used tape transport.
Many guitar and bass bodies are made from Mahogany. There are 49 types of Mahogany, but many are practically extinct because of the wood’s popularity for furniture and musical instruments, and the types used today are not the same as the Mahogany used in guitars in the 1940s or 1950s. Mahogany gives a warm timbre with a lot of bottom end. Les Paul type guitars often combine a mahogany body with a maple top for a total that is balanced overall.
This is our top pick for the best dreadnought guitar under $500. It has the looks of something you’d see in a honky tonk bar. It is a really cool looking acoustic guitar. It is a classic with it’s sunburst color and decorated hummingbird pick guard. It is the more affordable version of the Gibson Hummingbird. It has a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also has a pickup so you can amplify it for gigs. Owners describe it as having a big sound with great playability. Nice low action will make playing much easier. The tapered neck is great for beginners and makes forming chords less difficult. See more pictures of this guitar here.
As I tried to point out, what is high action is based on personal taste for the most part. Also, Martins traditionally have higher action than many other manufacturers. But unless it is a true defect in the particular guitar, from wood swelling or shrinking, etc. action is easily adjustable, but it is recommended that you have a certified Martin warranty repair person do that, unless you are comfortable with such adjustments.
Besides its classic vibe, the best part about this guitar may be its Broad’Tron pickups. These were designed specifically for the Streamliner, and are known for their throaty midrange, booming lows and sparkly highs. They’re also louder than Gretsch’s other popular pups, the Filter’Tron, so push them hard and they’ll snarl and scream. Dial back the volume knob, however, and you’ll encounter the warmth and rounded tone for which Gretsch hollow-bodies are known.
@Carl – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble. I am not clear on why this would be happening from the info you have provided. Can you please shoot us an email with details on the input and output connections and how each pedal is being powered when you experience this problem? Also, please also include a video that clearly shows this behavior, your connections, and how each pedal is being powered so that we have a better understanding of what you are experiencing. support@strymon.net
The most famous Gibson guitar is the Les Paul, which has been a mainstay in the music world for decades. The Gibson Les Paul is a high-end, made-in-the USA instrument, and it comes in a few different variations. Like Fender, Gibson has remained fairly consistent with their styles and designs. In addition to the Les Paul, other famous Gibson electric guitars include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird. Their classic acoustics include the Hummingbird.
The massive slabs of rock-candy noise that J Mascis heaved from his Fender Jazzmaster in Dinosaur Jr. contained multitudes: Black Sabbath savagery, melodic Neil Young soul, punk-rock pig slop. As his recent solo set, Several Shades of Why, showed, he can get shamelessly pretty with an acoustic, too. "I remember seeing Dinosaur play this soft, plaintive song – and then it was just completely detonated by this ravaging solo that J did," says Sonic Youth's Thurston Moore. "The whole room was incinerated."
Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.
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The Guitar Store is not only the best guitar store in Seattle, but the best guitar store in the WORLD. First of all, the staff are incredibly amazing, lovely, hilarious and helpful. My bandmates and I are not the most knowledgable in terms of gear, and the first time we came in wanting to get our first our ever guitar petals, Blake actually drew a graph of sound to explain how guitar pedals worked. They are the absolute best. Helping us out and going above and beyond what staff should be expected to do. Hands down my favorite guitar store in Seattle, great selection, prices and above all the attention to detail and friendly attitude of the staff. Can't rave enough! Definitely found my guitar store for life! Would recommend for all your guitar needs :)

It’s hard to definitively name the best guitar books. Everyone is working with a different skill set, and you’ve all built up your skills in a different way. However, all of the books below provide enough information to help you improve some aspect of your playing. They may help some of you more than others, but they all have enough helpful tips in them to justify their purchase. Our team read these and many more, and these were the titles we found most inspiring. It turns out we aren't alone in loving these books, since these books get great reviews all around, but these were the ones we found most enlightening. The fact that we were excited to practice and couldn't wait to pick up these books to learn more is ultimately the reason they made this list. We think these books will provide or build a solid foundation for anyone looking to learn the guitar in an efficient way.

You will see numerous inputs and outputs for sound, depending on your computer. You will want to enable the main one (in which all of the sub­devices are listed) and two others: one for input, and one for output. For input, look for something similar to “Line in”. If you only have a microphone jack, enable that instead. For output, look for “Stereo out” or something similar.
The world is full of guys who will zero in on all the details they find inferior about this guitar by noting the rather obvious fact that this is not a Gibson Les Paul Standard costing $3,000.00. There are some people who will complain that this guitar has a bolt on neck. True, the set necks of the more expensive Epiphones and Gibsons are nicer. But, considering the fact that every Fender Stratocaster ever made had a bolt on neck, is this really a big deal? Would Jimi Hendrix have played "Purple Haze" better if his Strat had a set in neck? Probably not.
Imagine a rich, authentic acoustic guitar tone coming from your electric guitar - at the flick of the switch!  Replace your current saddles with Graph Tech's ghost modular pickups and one of our Acousti-Phonic preamp and you'll have instant access to true, acoustic tone from your electric guitar or bass, without altering your electric pickups.  With the ghost Acousti-Phonic system you can play one guitar!  It can be electric AND acoustic, separately, or blended together for an infinite range of new and exciting sounds.
The next step up from a Fender Squier Bullet can be a Fender Squier Standard Strat, but if you can afford 50 dollars more you are the owner of a Fender Deluxe Stratocaster which is a really good guitar for beginners, intermediate and advanced guitar players who don’t want to spend a fortune but do want a good quality guitar which is decent enough to upgrade later on with better pickups and hardware to make it top notch. If you don’t want to spend a 1000 dollars on a real american Fender Stratocaster then this is the best alternative.
SOLD OUT ...Here is yet another GREAT Sounding and PLAYING Nippon Gakki 000 Red Label made in the famous Nippon Gakki plant in Japan. Absolutely surprising Booming tone from a small package who would have guessed these sound so great... This one is in excellent vintage condition that is to say all the important structural components of this guitar are in good shape that is to say that this guitar has GOOD BONES…. NO CRACKs its neck angle alignment is still good to this day its top is for the most part flat and its Bridge is nice and tight to its top … it appears to be a solid two piece center seam Sitka Spruce top and its cross braced like an old Martin , This guitar is over 40+++ years old and has been played and is not mint of course it has its share of superficial dings and drinks but nothing that can deter its ability to play great and sound great and look Fantastic with its Vintage Amber top and lush PATINA its a classic 000 that has THE SOUND!…. When we received it I loved the sound immediately it was pretty deep and rich sounding for such a small guitar with old cruddy strings I was thinking but like many of these Old Yamaha’s the action was too high so I did have to do our full JVGuitars UPGRADE set-up to it so I stripped its old strings off..its cheap plastic nut & saddle and bridge pins tossed to garbage, its fingerboard was remarkably clean and rut free and the pearloid inlays look great vivid with that patina of 40+ years and the frets were not bad with just minimal groves so I adjusted true rod -leveled -dressed & polished the frets, cleaned fingerboard and Lemon oiled the rosewood fingerboard and the bridge which is crack free as well.. all is looking and feeling great now.. Then using hyde glue installed a Martin Bon nut and a compensated bone saddle was fit following up with a quality set of fancy Rosewood bridge pins with Abalone and brass ring they fit sung for optimum tone resonance transfer. This has made a markable improvement in its resonance and its a bit louder now too SWEET sounding now! When we got this one it has a small chip at sound hole just under the fat bass E string looks like an aggressive finger style did the damage and was at the sound hole edge and I have successfully repaired this same sort of spot before so I wasn’t worried this one was nick named “Chip" for this reason I since repaired the spot using the professional woodworking Mohawk system of melting in a resin bar with jot knife that was spruce color then graining the repair and top coating brush tip matching lacquer to the repair spot area to blend…. its not really noticeable anymore now and is a non issue. I did notice that someone changed the tuners for other old Yamaha FG tuners tiny holes didn't line up but this makes no difference in performance what so ever and is not even noticeable they are Yamaha tuners. Overall structurally this guitar is still in top condition players and it really has that beautiful vintage 40+++ year old Martin like Patina aura about it.... i its VINTAGE PATINA and character is absolutely beautiful this is in the eye of the beholder of course but if your vintage lover you’ll appreciate this instrument for what she is. This Old guitar plays like a $ MUCH more expensive guitar any day... People of all walks of life worldwide on the net are comparing the sound of theirs to a Martin it take years for a guitar’s tone to naturally open up like this guitar has set up and plays and sounds amazing and the price is right Questions or to buy it contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.
Several producers like to create larger-than-life recorded sounds by splitting the guitarist's instrument signal to several different amps, which are then recorded simultaneously. Joe Barresi is a devotee of this tactic, and uses a dedicated guitar splitter box, such as the Little Labs PCP Instrument Distro or Systematic Systems Guitar Splitter, for the purpose. "In choosing the amplifiers and speakers, it's important to remember that larger speakers give a more compact, tighter sound. A tiny amp turned all the way up will give a more blown-out sound."
If it’s not self-evident why 2018 Britain needs Liverpool’s Queen Zee and The Sasstones, the comment “shouldn’t be aloud” - left under their BBC Introducing YouTube vid - unintentionally says plenty. The Liverpool punk rockers offer a cauterising, incendiary reaction to a rotten state of affairs. Taylor Brown is the songwriting, guitar-wailing savvy - crafting debauched, distorted rock ’n’ roll solos betwixt the raw expression of band leader Queen Zee’s powerful, Manson-like vocals. Aloud and proud. 

In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.
Revamp the entire company staff from the C.E.O. down to the lowest level managers. Give workers raises. Treat them like human beings. Be nicer and friendlier. Reduce stress levels and not have such a toxic atmosphere. Make the daily numbers actually feasible and actually attainable without having to work 15 hrs. to achieve them. Have accountability on all levels - checks and balances- from C.E.O. down to lower management. Recognize the workers are human, and not robots!
Growing up in the late '80s as a young teenage musician, my friends and I played on many a Japanese guitar. Sure, we thought Japanese guitars were cool and weird looking, but cost was the true deciding factor. You could pick up a Japanese guitar at any pawn shop in our town for under forty bucks. Harmony, Kay, Teisco, Univox, Silvertone, Lotus, and other names I can't recall were always popping up at practices and jam sessions. Nowadays, Japanese guitars from the 1960's and 1970's are increasingly hard to come across, but we are always on the hunt, and we have found some cool and interesting vintage Japanese guitars, amplifiers, and other stringed instruments from the Far East...
The company’s craftsmanship and innovation remain unmatched. Aside from their traditional ranges, Gibson also offers seriously high-tech instruments. This Mashable review of one of the brand's most revered models lauded not only its full-bodied tone but also Gibson’s penchant for taking risks. Its modern-take-on-an-old-icon kind of thinking allows it to constantly raise the bar—and the prices too, unfortunately.
When talking about 1920s Martin guitars, you hear people say this a lot (especially if they are trying to sell you a guitar!) Unfortunately there is no definative way to tell if a 1920s Martin is capable of handling steel strings. The term, "braced for steel strings", though is inaccurate. A better way to put it would be, "built for steel strings". For a 1920s Martin to be built for steel strings there were several small changes - the top, braces and bridge plate are all slightly thicker. Can you see this inside the guitar? For the most part, no, unless you really know what you are looking for (frankly I can't tell). So how do you know if a 1920s Martin is built for steel?

As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.

These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.


Quality replacement pot from Bourns.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  500K, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.
The Takamine GD71CE is a feature packed acoustic-electric guitar, with its solid top construction, visual embellishments and improved electronics. Takamine equipped this guitar with a solid spruce top and rosewood for the back and sides - a nice tonewood combination known for its articulate sound. It also comes with matching aesthetic appointments that include maple binding for the body, neck and headstock, abalone rosette, rosewood headcap, maple dot inlays, gold die-cast tuners with amber buttons, and the body is wrapped in a nice looking gloss finish. In addition to all this, the Takamine GD71CE is equipped with their TK-40D preamp system which gives you more control over your amplified sound with its mid contour switch, 3-band EQ with bypass and notch filter.
It was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902 as “The Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co., Ltd.” in Kalamazoo, Michigan.    Gibson is known for its innovation and supreme quality. Gibson’s Les Paul is very famous Guitar which creates the wildfire in the hearts of million fans. Gibson is always committed to provide the best quality with minimum disorder in all over the world. To enrich your experience the can prefer this wonderful Guitar.
“The bottom line is you get a better dynamic response from the coil. Most people who play a hand-wound pickup say it sounds more ‘open’. It’s easy to make a pickup sound brighter but to have a truly open voice it’s got to be dynamically responsive – and that’s what scatter-winding [intentionally irregular hand-winding of a pickup coil] does. Also, compared to a machine-wound coil, the frequency response is slightly extended. So the sound is bigger and you hear more not just in the high frequencies but also in the depths of the frequency response.”
Anyone who has a Tempest XII probably needs a pick guard. I have a 1966 which was in the case for much of the past forty years. The plastic apparently dried out and "shrunk," causing the two corners to pop off at the screws near the neck. Some guitar repair technicians are good at fabricating pick guards, but most are either woodcrafters or electronics geeks. Please advise how your search has gone. Maybe I'll replace mine, too. RED
Volume Swell Normally guitar has a very fast attack. It is at its loudest just after a not has been picked and there is a definite picked sound. You can get a softer pad style sound be picking with the volume off or very low and then raising the volume as the note/chord plays. This can be done with the guitar's own volume knob, but sometimes it is more convenient to leave your picking hand free and use a rocker pedal. By adding delay and/or reverb you can soften the note's ending also so that it doesn't stop abruptly.

So fun...I like...Let me start off by saying I'm not even a game person I bought this game for my son than watching him play it I took over and couldn't stop playing it I played it non stop until I beat it the content and visuals are great...The only downside was that I was so addicted to this game that I finished it in about one week, but I already am planning on playing it again on a higher difficulty and with a goal of finding more of the hidden treasures that are sprinkled throughout the game.

By the time After The Rain came out, the blues critics created enough of a backlash that it started affecting sales. Muddy must have realized that the records were upsetting his blues fanbase which had been loyal to him for over twenty years. Perhaps he feared he'd lose them forever if he stayed in this direction and that the young fanbase he had now might not stick with him as long. It wasn't until 1970 and after a more normal electric blues record (Fathers and Sons) that Muddy started talking badly about Electric Mud and then only mildly at first. Muddy released some great records in the rest of his lifetime, but he never experimented much with his music again.


Description: Body: Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24" (61cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Natural
Had a seven string Ibanez with loose/worn frets worked on. Steve knew right away that the frets had to be tacked and it could use a fret re-crowning and gave me a quote for 125$. I thought it was a bit high but trusted him because of the good reviews. Came back a couple weeks later and he had re-crowned the frets, tacked all the loose frets, tightened down some more loose hardware and did a set-up for only 100$. I am overall quite satisfied with the quality of the work and the pricing. I will be going back to have my acoustic worked on.
One of my friend's first "good" guitars was a Lotus LP copy with a set neck. Your typical heavy brown 70s with a plain top LP copy but it had binding like a custom and real inlays. I helped him put dimarzios in it and we set it up. It was a pretty good guitar except for the color. His mother bought it new, and it was a medium priced guitar back then (not cheap really, it was $400 or so in the 70s).
By panning the distant mics to the opposite side of the mix from the close mic, you can create interesting panning effects for solos. "If it's a rhythm part, you get this huge sound because the whole thing is spread across the stereo spectrum." When double-tracking lead or rhythm parts, a useful trick is to reverse the panning of the direct and distant mics. "If there were two guitarists in a band, I would record them like that, so you got a wall of sound that had a transparency that would allow the drums and bass to come through."
Epiphone Broadway Electric Guitar Make way for the Broadway, Epiphone’s big, bold and blindingly beautiful hollow body archtop guitar. The Epiphone Broadway has been a jazz club staple since the 1930s and it continues its soulful career with new appointments. The big-bodied Broadway features a laminated maple body with a select spruce top, a hard maple neck, a rosewood fretboard and Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups.
An Octaver is a cool little effect that will tune your original sound several octaves up or down in pitch. This effect can give you the ability to fill up the bass frequencies with your guitar. You can often see Jack White using this effect when he plays live with only one other drummer. He will turn on his octaver at certain points of the song to play bass lines.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
Sawtooth ST-ES Carc is another affordable electric guitar that both beginners and intermediate players can use for practising their skills. It comes with a sycamore body with a black finish and has a pickguard or vanilla cream color. It comes with almost all the accessories needed - tuner, amp, picks, cables and basic online lessons too. You also get a gig bag with it which very few guitars give you and normally you have to buy it separately.
Two-point rocking tremolo or fulcrum vibrato: Features individual string saddles that are adjustable for intonation and height. These are mounted on a bridge that rocks on two bolts mounted on the guitar top. The bridge has a broad perpendicular plate that extends through the body of the guitar. This free-floating plate is attached to the inside of the guitar by springs that match the tension of the strings. Locking tuners, which clamp down on the strings, help keep tuning more stable.

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