hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.
The best acoustic electric guitars solve the inconveniences of playing a traditional acoustic in a very preferable way. No longer do we need to play a guitar size and shape we don't enjoy in order to project more volume. We don't have to strum and pick harder. We don't need the nuisance of setting up and staying positioned behind a mic to be heard through the loud speakers. Today we look at how this is achieved and share our top recommendations for every budget...
On 2007’s self-titled effort and the new Nightmare, Avenged Sevenfold have continued to expand their sonic template, leaving Vengeance and Gates plenty of space to explore a range of different styles. At the end of the day, however, metal is metal, and at its essence that means killer riffs and shredding solos, which the duo unleash in abundance. A7X staples like “Bat Country,” “Almost Easy” and the latest single, “Nightmare,” are chock full of blistering rhythms and finger-twisting, speed-of-light leads, while they tread that sweet spot between catchy melodicism and all-out aggression.
Right-handed players use the fingers of the right hand to pluck the strings, with the thumb plucking from the top of a string downwards (downstroke) and the other fingers plucking from the bottom of string upwards (upstroke). The little finger in classical technique as it evolved in the 20th century is used only to ride along with the ring finger without striking the strings and to thus physiologically facilitate the ring finger's motion.
B.C. Rich manufactured a ten-string six-course electric guitar, the Bich, whose radical shape positioned the machine heads for the four secondary strings onto the body, avoiding the head-heaviness of many electric twelve-string guitars. However, many players bought it for the body shape or electrics and simply removed the extra strings. The company recognized this and released six-string models of the Bich, a shape now generally incorporated into their standard Warlock.

Even though Ibanez is thought of as a modern guitar brand, we have decades of accumulated knowledge and a history of pushing the boundaries. The AZ series carries with it all of the hallmarks of these tried and tested Ibanez qualities: the smooth oval neck grip, the well balanced asymmetrical body shape, and the neck heel allowing unrivaled playability.

With the new Shreddage 2X update released in July 2014, S2 is better than ever. Enjoy a brand-new user interface and totally rewritten engine, with intelligent string / fret selection, new features and options, even more customizable mapping, and new samples like powerchord slides and staccatos. You can also use new built-in effects pedals and save/load your own custom presets to use across multiple projects.
Many inexpensive starter guitars are built with laminate tops, made from several layers of wood pressed together. While laminate is durable and can be quite attractive, it will not produce as pleasing tones as solid wood. To a lesser extent, this is also true of the guitar’s back and sides—solid woods will produce better tone. When reading guitar specs, if you see terms such as “select spruce top,” that indicates the top is made of laminated woods with a spruce-like grain pattern imprinted on it.
While some Supros were more or less re-branded Nationals, many represented totally unique designs in the Valco line. When the Supro equivalent to the National Grand Console was introduced in 1958, it featured a radically different body design. In place of the National’s conventional all-wood construction, the Supro 1475B Console Sixteen featured two wooden necks connected by three chromed metal rods that ran all the way through each neck. It’s not obvious why this design was chosen; it doesn’t have any advantages other than its unique aesthetics, and I don’t believe it could have made construction any cheaper. The Supro was cheaper than the National – $175 vs $235 – but the difference was likely due entirely to the more “exclusive” name on the National.
Started in 1997 by Steve Suhr and Steve Smith, this Lake Elsinore, California-based guitar-building brand is the finest in a relatively new wave of manufacturers. They do not have a line of guitars, per se. Instead, they make every single guitar to order. This high-end boutique style manufacturing in a large-scale format was all but unheard of until the internet changed the world. Now, this brand can offer dozens of shapes, pickup combinations, finishes, etc. reasonably. But don’t let the fact that their guitar shapes seem like knock-offs of other long-standing brands fool you. Any Suhr guitar you’ll encounter is going to be of the utmost in quality of construction and sound. There simply is not a better custom brand out there with the same vast catalog of offerings. There are literally thousands of possible combinations, so if you are looking for a unique and superb instrument and are willing to pay for it, it’s hard to say there’s anything better.
Take a guitar playing friend with you, decide on a price range and try out all the guitars you can afford. Then go to another shop and do the same. Include used instruments too, and don't worry too much about the appearance. The important thing is how it sounds and how well it plays. A guitar with a nice low action which sounds reasonably good will help a great deal toward helping you stick with it. A guitar with a high action that sounds horrible will make you give up before your fingertips have time to harden!
If the wood is the foundation of the structure, of course it will contribute to how the guitar sounds. Most people who argue that wood doesn’t affect the tone say that the string cant be affected by the wood because it is suspended between the metal parts of the guitar. If this were entirely true, you wouldn’t feel vibration in the guitar body. If the body of the guitar is vibrating, then it is going to affect the vibration of the string. The foundation of a structure will affect how it reacts to vibration.
Many players use more than one effect – in this case, they place them next to each other on the floor, joining the output of one pedal to the input of the next using a small guitar lead called a “patch lead”. This allows them to use more than one effect at a time and toggle and combine them as they wish. Most players with multiple effects pedals attach them to a board, imaginatively called a… “pedal board”. This makes the pedals easier to transport and carry around. They set up and plug together all the pedals on the board, so when the user gets to a gig they can just plug in and play without having to set everything up again.
This article was tremendously helpful! My daughter is entering college for music therapy, and she is already an accomplished pianist but needed a more portable instrument to see patients. We have been scouting out guitars for some time and are looking to get a quality instrument without breaking the bank. Thank you so much for this well-researched article.

Hi - I am looking for a new amp for small to medium venues. I quite fancied the Marshall Mini Silver Jubilee combo, but then noticed several companies selling JVM 50 watt combos in the same price range. It seems that the JVM's are a Swiss Army knife whereas the MSJ seems to be capturing a small version of a classic amp and is more of a one trick pony . Any way you could help me make the right decision. On the other hand , how reliable are the JVM's considering their sophistication?


Most commonly associated with classic rock, the Les Paul lives up to its reputation as a rock ‘n’ roll machine. However, the guitar is actually capable of a lot more. Something many don’t recognize about the Les Paul is that in the right situations it actually has a gorgeous clean tone. Les Paul, the famed inventor and namesake of the Gibson Les Paul, used the Les Paul extensively in his career. The famed jazz guitarist did go on to use a highly modified version of the Gibson Les Paul, but he did use the original variant of the instrument when it was initially released. Bob Marley also used a Les Paul to great effect.
Tuning Instabily: Problems with tuning stability are almost always cuased by improper tuning technique (always tune UP to the note) or a binding nut. (There are RARE occasions where the string isn't seating correctly at the bridge, and we're not considering problems with set up regarding a tremolo) Even the cheapest geared tuners don't "slip" as a rule. If a geared tuner is failing it will make a "poping" type of sound as the gear jumps teeth. If the gears are loose, it is possible to pull a string flat with extensive (excessive?) use of a tremolo. If notes are going sharp it is due to the nut binding. What happens is excessive tension builds up between the tuner and the nut in order to overcome the binding. Then as you play the vibration of the string allows it to wiggle through the slot equalizing the tension, and making the string sharp. See above for info on a binding nut. If a fretted note is sharp it is an indication that the nut slots are not deep enough (or excessive presure with high frets/ scalloped or worn fretboard). If a string is going flat, it is always bridge related. Either a problem with the string seating fully (common w/ trapeeze tailpieces and ball ends in vintage tremolos (the reason they came up w/ bullet ends)) or binding on a rough saddle/ the edge of the trem block. Again, it is possible to cause a tuner to back off with extream tremolo, but rare.
Many distortion pedals can also be used as overdrive pedals simply by reducing the gain, so once again we see how these terms are a little loose. In high gain amps like a Mesa rectifier the amp is taking advantage of gain staging, many pedals do this as well. Gain staging is simply putting one overdriven tone into another and cascading them to produce even more gain or distortion. So in a Mesa, one preamp tube is being run into another to bump up the level of distortion, there can be any number of gain stages. We can also do this by stacking pedals as well, as we will see in the gain staging pedal chain section. Dialing in a good distorted tone can take some time and slight EQ changes can make a big difference.

The Blues Harp has been around since the early 1970s. Until the 1990s, it was functionally identical to the Marine Band, the only differences being the cover plates and the varnish on the front of the wood comb, and the Blues Harp's profile was thinner as well. At one point, Johnny Cash promoted the Blues Harp.[20] In the 1990s, Hohner made the Blues Harp part of its Modular System (MS) line. This new Blues Harp lost its uniqueness, and is interchangeable with the other models in the MS line, but it currently remains the standby of many players who use MS harps.

Rhythmically I can make Shreddage II sound as authentic as a mock up can get for that instrument (which means, mostly authentic)...through conscientious (more like anal-retentive) programming and manual round robins. But of course it's always a much better idea in this case to just do the mock up and eventually get an actual guitar player yourself to record. It's extremely hard to get that edgy lead thing going, bent up and held vibrato notes.
“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.
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Bob, 66 is not too late to start playing. I play classical guitar, my preference and I -also play steel string scoustic guitar. I own a Taylor because it lends itself nicely to finger style picking (carried over from my classical guitar. I play with a harpest who did not begin playing until she was 73. She is now 86 and plays someplace almost every day of the week. It's never too late to begin. Go for it I'm 69 and playing more gigs than ever.


Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.
By the late twenties, the idea for electrified string instruments had been around for some time, and experimental banjo, violin and guitar pickups had been developed. George Beauchamp had himself been experimenting with electric amplification as early as 1925, but his early efforts involving microphones did not produce the effects he desired. Along the way Beauchamp also built a one-string test guitar made out of a 2X4 piece of lumber and an electric phonograph pickup. As the problems at National became more apparent, Beauchamp’s home experiments took on a more rigorous shape, and he began to attend night classes in electronics as well as collaborating with fellow National employee Paul Barth.[1] When the prototype electric pickup they were developing finally worked to his satisfaction, Beauchamp asked former National shop craftsman Harry Watson to make a wooden neck and body to which the electronics could be attached. It was nicknamed the frying pan because of its shape, though Adolph Rickenbacker liked to call it the pancake.[6] The final design Beauchamp and Barth developed was an electric pickup consisting of a pair of horseshoe-shaped magnets that enclosed the pickup coil and completely surrounded the strings.[1]
Without going into technical details, the amp's power rating is directly correlated to its loudness. This means that the higher the power rating is, the louder the amp can go. But loud is not always better, especially when considering space and noise level restrictions, this is why even those with big wall of amps have a humble practice amp to play quietly with. Low power amps also let you crank the gain at lower volumes, so you can get to your amp's sweet spot without being a noise nuisance. Thankfully, some big amps now come with built-in power attenuators, which give you the option to lower the power rating when needed. Also note that many tube amps are louder than similarly rated solid-state amplifiers.

Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
Since affordable guitars are designed for students, manufacturers know that playability is of utmost priority. This is the reason why many of these budget-friendly guitars don't stray from familiar neck and body measurements. This ensures that they feel as close to premium guitars as possible, albeit utilizing more cost effective materials and production methods.
As stated previously, the closer 2 coils are to one another, the greater the cancelations will be when they go "out of phase". So, wiring a humbucker out of phase with itself is going to produce a lot of cancelations, a huge reduction in volume and a very thin sound. If that's not enough, the pickup will not be humbucking either. Still there are some people that like this kind of sound. The best way to put a humbucker out of phase with itself is to wire the coils out of phase in series. (see below)
The guitar pedal community is enormous. From the big name brands like Boss and Electro-Harmonix, to the lesser-known boutique effect pedal brands, such as Big Ear N.Y.C and Adventure Audio (the creators of the Fuzz Peaks pedal). This vast sea of guitar pedal manufacturers makes sure that if there is a tone or sound you are looking for – you can probably find a guitar pedal to do the job. However, sometimes you need something done your way, and that is where building DIY guitar pedals comes in.
Strongly influenced by Stevie Ray Vaughn, Albert King, and Johnny Winter, Garrett is also a longtime fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Allen Collins. Following the path that led Collins to his biting, cutting tone, Bo plays the same type of guitar as the Skynyrd legend, and gets tremendous versatility from his Gibson Firebirds. Incidentally, Winters and King are also notorious Firebird pickers. Bo says that his Firebirds (one of which is a rare collectible) allow him to go from nasty drive flavors to cleaner, Strat-like tones when he needs them.
The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?
In 1958, Gibson updated the Les Paul yet again. The new model retained most of the specifications of the 1957 Goldtop, including PAF humbucker pickups, maple top, tune-o-matic bridge with a stop tailpiece or Bigsby vibrato tailpiece. The most significant change in the new models was the finish. The Goldtop color used since 1952 was replaced by the Sunburst finish already being used on Gibson’s archtop acoustic and hollow electric guitars, such as the J-45 model. To differentiate from the earlier Goldtop model, the new Les Paul was referred to as The Les Paul Standard. Original production of the standards lasted from 1958 to 1960. Only 1,700 of these early models were made and have subsequently become highly collectible.[note 6] Original production ended when, in 1961, Gibson redesigned the Les Paul to feature a “double cutaway” body, which has subsequently become the Gibson SG. Due to high demand, Gibson resumed production of Les Paul Standards in 1968. Today, the Gibson Les Paul Standard has BurstBucker pickups on the Vintage Original Spec models and Burstbucker Pro on the lower end models bearing the ‘Standard’ name.
To answer your question directly, yes, but only from a strictly physical point of view. According to guitar enthusiasts, electric units are easier to handle than their counterparts. The main motif for this has to do with the fact that the acoustic models come equipped with what many describe as heavier gauge strings. Because of this feature, their strings are more difficult to pick and press down.

Recently while cruising around EBay I was able to find pretty strong evidence that the 700 and 800-series Kents were made by Kawai. Or maybe... the necks of the 700 and 800-series Kents and the Kawais were made by the same manufacturer. I don’t know if Kawai kept the factory that made Teisco operating after it was acquired. It appears that Kawai had more experience building hollow-bodied guitars than Teisco. So I call the 700 and 800-series Kents Made by Kawai. You can call them Made by Teisco if you want. Of course, the possibility exists that they were both made by an entirely different company. Who knows? The 1960’s were like a ‘wild west’ period of Japanese guitar making.

An acoustic-electric guitar has an electronic pickup that’s usually built into its bridge. This pickup is used to capture the sounds produced by the top’s vibrations. This is then transmitted via an onboard preamplifier to an external acoustic guitar amplifier or PA system. But plugging-in is strictly optional. Unplugged, an acoustic-electric guitar typically sounds just like a fully-acoustic guitar.
I would like to start off the list of the best small guitar amps by talking about one of the best small guitar amps out there, which unfortunately dedicated the entirety of its existence to being used for the purposes of laying acoustic guitars. Unfortunately, because I would love to have one of these to work with my electric guitars. On the other hand, the fact that the amp works with acoustic guitars best, means that those of you looking for a mini amp for your acoustic guitar are in luck. The amp does a great job of amplifying the sound of an acoustic guitar, keeping it clean and clear of any kind of electric distortion, so that if there was no increase in volume, nobody would understand the point of the pick up. While small, the pick up is still on the larger side as compared to the rest on the list. The design is vintage and cool, so that the guitar is enjoyable to look at for everyone.
Flanging is the strongest of the standard modulation effects. The feedback control increases the depth of the 'comb filtering' produced when a delayed signal is added back to itself. Because it is such a distinctive effect, it is best used sparingly, though it can also be used to process a reverb send to add a more subtle complexity to the reverbed sound.
These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.
All the effects that were created up through the early 1980s were based on analog circuitry. That is, they operated by directly modifying an actual sound signal. Starting in the ‘80s, the digital revolution invaded the realm of guitar and bass effects with digital signal processing. Digital effects convert the instrument’s output to a digital bitstream that is then modified by digital circuitry before being translated back to analog sound signals for output. The first digital effects were all modeled on existing effects, but devices that followed such as pitch-shifting effects, delays, and harmony processors only became practical with the advent of digital signal manipulation.
Fender Hot Rod Series Pro Junior III 15W 1x10 Combo - This tube-driven guitar combo with a 10” Eminence vintage-cone speaker reproduces the harmonically complex output and sensitivity to playing synamics that vintage Fender tone hounds love. Dual 12AX7 preamp and EL84 power amp tubes crank out the same celebrated midrange as vintage combos. Fender has updated the Pro Junior III with an external speaker jack, a more legible control panel, and internal tweaks.

Ring modulation: In the context of signal reshaping, the ring modulator takes the signal from the instrument and adds a second signal from a local oscillator or signal source. The two signals are combined to produce the sum and difference frequencies, which are then the output of the device. This scheme was used in the electronic music of the 1950's. The output frequencies track the input signal frequencies, but do not equal them, so there is a shift from the original pitches. The ring modulator has been produced as a footpedal, and ring modulator type effects are included in some modern electronic effects boxes.


However, in the October, 2018 issue of Premier Guitar (at least the online edition) Frank Meyers, who runs the website Drowning in Guitars, says the Kent 700s were made by a small factory called Hayashi Mokko. Frank is a true expert in vintage Japanese Guitars, so I am inclined to believe him. This is another important piece of the Kent Guitars story.
The first great thing about this guitar is its amazing look. It has a Paulownia body with the metallic blue finish and a bolt-on construction. It comes with a dean vintage tremolo bridge which works quite well compared to others. One more advantage of this product is its cost. It is one of the most affordable electric guitars out there. It has a three-way toggle dual dean humbuckers which give you great volume and tone controls.
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet. In 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp that added metal corner protectors to keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
Capacitors are typically used as filters to control tone. In most cases, they are used to filter out very high frequencies before being sent to ground (the output jack) which controls the warmth of your guitar’s tone. Capacitors vary greatly and come in a range of materials from ceramic, film, paper and electrolytic (mainly used with active pickups).
Two of the strongest reasons to buy an acoustic guitar are user-friendliness and price. Some musical instruments are prohibitively expensive for beginners, and they’re difficult to learn, too. Not the acoustic guitar. Acoustic guitars are easy to learn, easy to carry, easy on the ears. And you can buy an acoustic guitar for an affordable price. The most difficult challenge in purchasing an acoustic guitar is finding the ideal fit for you. In this shopping guide, we will discuss some important elements to consider when browsing the acoustic guitar market.
For those other performances, we run into limits of computer memory, computer processing power and computer programmers' time (and talent). With increasing processing power available in the consumer market, simulations are in some cases surpassing storage intensive sample libraries in terms of acoustic similarity and perceptive preferences. In guitar world, though, there seem to be no VST players of the simulation variety contending for top honors against leading sample libraries - of which amplesound.net seems to be the leading collection (unless you like something Vienna Symphonic Libraries has to offer)
You might initially think that Music Lab is narcissistic for creating a line of guitar VSTs with the word “real” in them. But after you hear the first note, you’ll be kicking yourself for doubting it. There is a lot to cover with the “Real” line, and since they share many of the same features, we will slowly go over the components of these VSTs throughout the reviews for them.  
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The Epiphone brand scores another spot in this list with the Hummingbird Pro, a stylized take on the popular dreadnought shape. This guitar is the affordable version of the original Gibson Hummingbird, as seen in the hands of big name artists like Keith Richards, Noel Gallagher, Sheryl Crow and many more. It is a modern and more cost effective take on the guitar that Keith used on many of The Rolling Stones' popular tracks, including "Play with Fire" and "Satisfaction".
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.
Unfortunately, a few years prior, we were playing in a festival where there were many bands. THAT soundman flat out refused to use a direct signal and insisted on mic’ing my cabinet. I had spend MONTHS designing and programming my TWO preamps, one for the stage and the other for the board… certain effects were sent to one and not the other… My whole sound was based on two pre-amps running at the same time. This is about as close as I’ve come to physically punching anyone. I told him to plug in to the XLR output right “there.” He wouldn’t… made excuses as to not knowing which channel on the snake ithe other end was plugged into. (That made no sense at all… wouldn’t he know which channel the MIC was in? All he had to do is remove the mic, plug that end of the cable into the output of my unit.) Weeks later, people in the audience commented to me that they remembered that I played and sang the gig “fuming” over something. Half of my sound wasn’t there AT ALL.

I went to work for Southland Musical Merchandise Corporation on August 1, 1972. The company had been formerly owned by a very honest man named Harry Greenberg. Earlier in 1972 he sold out to Onsite Energy Systems and everything changed from "let's make the best product at the best price" to "let's see how high we can make our profit margin - to hell with quality".
For most applications, all you really need is a guitar input, and an output that you can plug to an amplifier or PA system. Still, it doesn't hurt to have extra input/output options, like a mic XLR input (for vocalists who play guitar), an aux input (for practicing with your favorite tracks), headphones out (for quiet practice and tweaking), stereo output, and many more.

The RG (Roadstar) is one of the most famous Superstrat guitars on the market and remains a hugely popular model in all price categories. However, they also produce other collections such as the streamlined S Series (standing for ‘Saber’) and the relaxed Talman collection. Also look out for the Iceman – an edgy original Ibanez design, famously used by Paul Stanley from Kiss.
Originally the Stratocaster was offered in a 2-color sunburst finish on a solid, deeply contoured ash body, a 21-fret one-piece maple neck with black dot inlays and Kluson tuning heads. In 1956 Fender began issuing solid Stratocasters with alder bodies.[4] In 1960 the available custom colors were standardized, many of which were automobile lacquer colors from DuPont available at an additional 5% cost. The unique single-ply, 8-screw hole white pickguard held all electronic components except the recessed jack plate—facilitating easy assembly. Despite many subsequent Stratocaster models (including copies and the Superstrat), vintage Fender models are highly valued by collectors for their investment potential and players who prefer the timbre of older models.
Note: Youpi Choupi's answer calls my answer below into question by pointing out that classical and flamenco guitars are acoustic guitars. He is correct in this of course, they are all types of acoustic guitar. However, most of the time when someone says they play "acoustic guitar," they mean the commonly used steel-stringed acoustic that most rock, folk, country and other artists play, and I believe this was the intent of the OP when they asked the question. Hence, an answer simply pointing out that Spanish guitar and acoustic guitar are both acoustic guitars would not have been a helpful answer.
Practical - These sessions will involve exercising your fingers. For example, fingering chords would fall under this category, as the focus will be on getting physically comfortable with positioning and changing between chords, or experimenting with new strumming patterns. With lead guitar, the physical side covers techniques such as legato (you'll learn what that means soon enough!), string bends, speed drills and anything that involves the physical side of playing guitar.

Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.

Designed by Todd Langner (who also engineered the ADA MP-1), the Langner DCP-1 possesses somewhat of an infamous reputation. Very few know about it, but everyone who does, swears by it’s greatness. Built with much of the same blueprint as the Bogner Fish, the Langner features two independent channels with fully adjustable boost functions. Using five 12ax7a tubes, it’ll produce the glassiest cleans to the highest of high gain tones. Presets can be front panel selected or footswitched. If you’re into rare gear, this is the amp for you. Good luck finding one!


The dual-DSP-powered Helix combines amp and effects models in a large, rugged floor pedal. There are a massive 1,024 preset locations onboard the Helix, organised into eight setlists that contain 32 banks with four presets each. Each preset can have up to four stereo signal paths, each made up of eight blocks populated with amps and effects. With the current count of 41 modelled amps, seven bass amps, 30 cabs, 16 mics, 80 effects and the option of loading speaker impulse responses, there's great potential for sound creation. Line 6 has implemented an easy editing system, complete with a joystick, and - get this - touch-sensitive footswitches offering a shortcut to parameter adjustment; you can even use these with your feet to select a parameter before adjusting it with the pedal treadle! There are some great sounds here, especially when you get beyond the factory presets and shape things to your own taste. The Helix's advantage lies in its comprehensive input/output and signal routing ability, which can facilitate just about any guitar-related studio or onstage task you can think of. However, if you don't need all that connectivity, and want to save a bit of cash, there's also the Line 6 Helix LT.
Scale length describes the length that string has to be stretched on, from the nut to the bridge. Generally speaking, shorter scale length means softer string tension, making the instrument easier to play. Longer scale length allows for more fret space and more string tension which translates to more sustain. Shorter scale length is advisable for beginners, while experienced players ought to look for guitars with similar scale lengths so the playing feel stays the same even when switching between instruments. Nut width measures how wide the nut is, smaller means easier to play for players with smaller fingers, while wider nut widths allow for more space between each string. Finally, neck profile is the shape or curvature of the back of the neck, and the type of profile you want will depend on your preference, be it vintage style U profile with its fatter neck, or the more modern slim profiles.
A tabletop unit is a type of multi-effects device that sits on a desk and is controlled manually. One such example is the Pod guitar amplifier modeler. Digital effects designed for DJs are often sold in tabletop models, so that the units can be placed alongside a DJ mixer, turntables and CD scratching gear.[17] For a DJ, a pedal located on the floor would not be practical because she/he would find it hard to adjust the knobs.
Jazz guitarists integrate the basic building blocks of scales and arpeggio patterns into balanced rhythmic and melodic phrases that make up a cohesive solo. Jazz guitarists often try to imbue their melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by horn players such as saxophone players. As well, a jazz guitarists' solo improvisations have to have a rhythmic drive and "timefeel" that creates a sense of "swing" and "groove." The most experienced jazz guitarists learn to play with different "timefeels" such as playing "ahead of the beat" or "behind the beat," to create or release tension.
We think the reason this book is so good is because of its readability. That is, it starts very slowly in theory, and Tom does an excellent job of explaining the constructs of music theory in simple and understandable terms. From there, the concepts are set up in such a way that is easy to follow and very thorough. Mr. Kolb did a great job of laying out the sequence of the topics to make them understandable to someone picking up a guide to music theory for the first time.
One type of "effect" I've thought would be useful to have in a multi-pedal, though I've not seen it, would be to have a configurable automatic gain control (level compression) which would be applied before a distortion effect, followed by a gain adjustment after the distortion which would undo some or all of the effect of the previous AGC. For example, things might be set up so that playing at a level of -20dBm would boost the signal by 21dB (clipping slightly) and then reduce volume by 20dB, while playing at -10dBm would boost by 12dB (clipping a bit more) and then reduce by 12dB. – supercat Apr 30 '13 at 22:01

The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]

In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]
As nobody wants to lug around a 50-watt combo when casually travelling, many guitarists rely on portable amplifiers to quench their amp needs while on the road, street corner or beach. Power isn’t particularly important in this category – size and weight are the most crucial aspects. Other factors such as being battery-powered and having a headphone jack are also key features of these amps. One of the most impressive is the Roland Cube Street, which is a street performer’s dream as it offers great portability, a decent 5-watt output, two channels and several on-board effects.
Epiphone offers one for every guitarist out there and has a product lineage featuring electric, acoustic and other options. One of its famed options among the acoustic line is the Les Paul Ukulele, a true vintage piece. The guitar has been termed as the market leader in the acoustic guitar field. It comes with mahogany body facilitated by top laminated, rosewood fingerboard and maple top. The tone of the same is truly resonating.
A variation of the wah pedal is the auto wah. Not to be confused with a city in Canada, auto-wah effects do the same things a wah does, but without the foot treadle. Usually, you can adjust the attack time (how fast the tone shifts toward the treble) and the depth of the cycle. Some auto-wahs also let you set a constant up and down motion that's not triggered by the note. You’ll find auto-wahs included in many multi-effects processors. One of the newer developments in this area is the Talking Pedal from Electro-Harmonix. While eliminating the moving parts of traditional wahs, it produces amazing male-vocal and vowel-sound effects that harmonize with your guitar’s notes. A fuzz circuit lets you dial in more growl and grit.
ESP is a Japanese company, which focused on the production of electric guitars and basses. This brand was established in 1975 in Tokyo. They produce instruments under the label of “ESP Custom Shop”, “Navigator”, “Grassroots”, “ESP Standard”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” etc. Available price is Rs. 9,270/- onwards (approx). For more information, visit Espguitars.com (Global) or Espguitars.co.jp (Japan).

This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.


Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.

Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
John Mayer: features a select alder body, a thick C-shape maple neck with African rosewood fingerboard and 21 Jim Dunlop 6105 narrow-jumbo frets, American Vintage hardware and a trio of “Big Dipper” single-coils with a special “Scooped” midrange voicing and 5-way pickup switching. Available in a variety of finishes, including black with 3-ply mint green pickguard and gold hardware, 3-tone sunburst and olympic white with brown shell pickguard and as a limited-edition version with a cypress mica finish, white vintage amp knobs and a 3-ply parchment pickguard. In 2010, Fender also released a limited 500 run of John’s personal BLACK1 strat.
The first edition of the Telecaster Custom was produced between 1959-1968, and featured a double-bound body. While the guitar was known as the Telecaster Custom, the decal on the headstock read “Custom Telecaster”. Later editions of the Tele Custom were popularized by Rolling Stones‘ guitarist and composer Keith Richards, featuring a Fender Wide Range humbucker in the neck position and a single-coil pickup in the bridge. The market generally refers to the guitar as the “1972 Custom”, indicating the year this model was originally released.
Even if your favourite musician is predominantly driven by music and is committed to releasing material for their fans, they cannot possibly deny that are a number of incentives for them to do so. A journalist writing for The Economist online explains that songs are ‘complex mixtures of features’, so composers are always trying to find the right mix of ingredients to increase their chances of success. And everyone loves a success story!
Want to visit our guitar shop? We electric and acoustic guitars in a comfortable laid back environment steps away from the Damen Brown Line, 81 and 50 CTA bus. The guitars we carry are more than just used guitars. Each guitar has a story - whether it’s where it was played, when it was built or how it was treated. Our guitar shop specializes in guitars for players and collectors. Vintage guitars and used guitars are inspected and set up by our Luthier before leaving our shop. Stop by our showroom often as our inventory changes frequently.
As far as using the tone knob, it’s all about personal preference, and the quality of the electronics in the guitar (and the amp). Players of less expensive guitars often find that the tone of the guitar becomes “muddy” or “stuffy” very quickly as they turn down tone (or volume), and so they keep the guitar “wide open” with all knobs on their “10” setting. At the least, many players avoid going below “5” on the tone dial, keeping the majority of the midrange frequencies that define the real character of the guitar’s tone.
Mr. Bojangles,Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver, City of New Orleans,Steve Goodman, Alice’s Restaurant & Motorcycle song, Arlo Guthrie, Bobby McGee, Janis Joplin, Taxi, Harry Chapin, Please Come To Boston, Dave Loggins, Lady, Little River Band, Sailing, Christopher Cross, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Credence Clear Water Revival.
In the late 70’s digital technology boomed and made its way into the guitar community. It first entered in the form as rack units which were expensive and relatively large. As costs came down and the technology shrank, digital delay pedals were introduced into the market by Boss in 1984 with the Boss DD-2. Since then as technology advanced, delay pedals now offer many features in a very small box such as tape echo, analog, reverse delay, modulated delay, and loopers.
Despite starting life in Turkey in 1873, Epiphone is actually one of America’s oldest and best-loved musical instrument producers, having moved to this side of the Atlantic in 1903. Although the brand had been making acoustic guitars since 1928, Epiphone was acquired by Gibson in 1957 and soon began producing wallet-friendly versions of Gibson’s most famous models.
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One reviewer mentioned that anyone wanting to purchase the C40 will need to change the strings to get the best sound out of this model. Another reviewer uses the C40 as their main guitar for composing, and it works quite well for the job. So, overall, if you feel the need to be cost-conscious at this point in time, but want a quality instrument, the C40 should be on your list of models for proper comparison shopping.
Starting from the body, we see the standard Les Paul shape. The tonewood of choice is mahogany, as expected, but this time it comes with a maple top. The top of the guitar arches slightly just like the original Les Paul does. In terms of details, we see a white binding around the top section that really stands out on the dark matte finish.  It's something to behold.
Despite racial laws still in place at the time, the youngsters knew that they were buying African American music and it didn’t stop them. The shallow radio pop music no longer appealed to them and they found blues music expressed many of the emotions and views. The kids felt a connection to the music, they felt frustrated and wanted a voice and culture of their own.
I have a Les Paul Gold Top copy I bought new in the mid 70's. It has no brand name anywhere on it. I have done all the research I can and have found no conclusive results.I'm at a loss. It plays great! I do have pics. if that will help. Thanks for any help' It was bought in Montgomery Al. Clarence Carter's guitar player bought one while I was in the store so I figured ...must be a okay guitar. So I bought it. On the little square plate on the back it is hand engraved #0059. Thanks

Now, imagine having that same signal but with your guitar’s volume on its half way setting. That same degraded signal comes out even worse as it only had half of the voltage to work with from the get-go. In order to minimize the amount of signal loss, it is always suggested that the guitar’s volume is kept at its max setting and either manually adjust the output level from the amp or better yet, from a dedicated volume pedal, as is the choice for most professional musicians. A volume pedal in an effects chain will control the output volume of everything that is placed before it, so it’s pretty much almost always a good idea to place it at the end of the chain if it’s going to be your main form of overall volume control.
Solid state and modeling amps are great amps to use for practice sessions. As well to bring it for small gigs and recordings that require their services. That is the reason why it is really hard to tell which one is above and try to suggest that a particular amplifier is better than the other. Having an own thing is what really is important here, and besides if you really sound good. The gears you will be playing with will equally sound as great.
I have been playing guitar, banjo, bass and harmonica for 46 years - and I don't find a $4,300 Martin D 41 to be affordable (Guitar Center price). I play a Taylor 402ce and a dozen other instruments. I believe Taylor is the best instrument for the price..Alvarez Yairi guitars are very good too. Martin and Gibson make fine guitars but they are overpriced. I have a Chinese Maple Guild that sounds fine but the fretwork is amateurish. A Chinese Takamine New Yorker is very well constructed and sounds great.

Jazz – Does no-one listen to Eddie Lang’s recordings? Or that master of comping, Freddie Green? To Charlie Christian? MarleyIII gets special credit as the only one naming the marvellous Jim Hall, who really should be up there in one of those ten spots. Like Marley, I really like the work of John Abercrombie, although I can’t put hand on heart and suggest him for the top ten. If you like John A, let me put in a plug for the work of London session-man John Parricelli. (Which reminds me that the very different “Johnny A” is no slouch either!)
Filters can also be sweeping filters controlled by a wah-wah pedal. Wah-wah pedals are a foot controlled pedal that kind of looks like a car’s gas pedal. As you press the pedal forward, the filter moves to the lower end of the the sound spectrum, leaving the mid- and high-end sounding more pronounced. As you bring the pedal back, the high end is filtered, leaving a muffled sounding guitar tone.
Welcome to The Guitar Store, an owner operated store with big box selection and pro services. Offering expert amp and guitar repair. Do you like effect pedals? We have 9 cases full of over 400 different pedals to choose from. The largest stock of PRS, Fender, Mesa Boogie, Gretsch, Breedlove, Earthquaker, EVH, Strymon, Reverend and other guitar and amplifier brands in the northwest! We not only offer a diverse selection of high quality new and used guitars, but you can learn to play a ukulele, banjo, or mandolin here too. We have 5 teaching rooms with lessons daily. Check us out on social media outlets to find out about upcoming workshops and live in-store visits by local or national touring acts. We love what we do and it shows. Come on in today and get the help from professionals. You deserve it.
The next most important review criteria for any electric guitar, is its sound. Please allow me to be very clear here that this guitar is mostly suited for heavy rock tones, aggressive higher leads and chugging, crazy distortions. If you are more interested in a crisp, jazzy tone, maybe you should opt for a beginner’s Stratocaster electric guitar like Squier by Fender, instead. Having said that, this instrument sounds great in its genre, and also remains in tune for long periods, so you don’t have to worry about manually tuning it. Yes, the string tension is higher as compared to a 24.75” Stratocaster or XX Les Paul, but in a way this challenges electric guitar novices to acquire greater mastery over their notes!
The original  Owner purchased this guitar new at Ideal Music in Atlanta and loved her for the last 50 years. Vintage 1967 Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins Nashville model,factory bigsby replaced "kill switch" tip (the white one) I have an original tip now, to lazy to take new pictures...and reproduction armature inside body for string mute / Muffler system...SEE MORE HERE...
Now lets talk amps. I have always felt like you could hand me a great guitar played through a bad amp and I would get a bad tone. However, I can make a bad guitar sound decent through a good amp. The amp, in my opinion is the most crucial part of your tone. I always prefer tube amps that deliver a much warmer, natural sound then the solid state counterparts. However if you are play jazz or something that requires a clean crisp sound, a solid state amp good be great. All the great rock legends used tube amps such as Marshall Plexi’s, Vox AC30, Hi Watt, Fender Twins, Fender Bassmans etc. Now days they make all kinds of boutique amps that are modeled after these classic amps. Matchless is my amp of choice which is loosely modeled after the Vox AC30.
Aside from the stereo effect of doubling up the same part and panning it to opposite ends of the stereo spectrum, some guitarists use stereo rigs in conjunction with stereo effects. Traditionally, this involves using two amp cabinets, although single cabs that operate in stereo are available. To achieve a good, even stereo image, it’s best to mic each cab identically, ideally with the same type of mic. Invert the polarity of one of the channels to avoid any out-of-phase issues, and pan them hard left and right. Stereo effects such as reverb, delay and room ambience, can be added to mono guitar signals at the mixing stage.

An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 


Around ’77 or so (since the new shape was similar to the Magnum basses), with sales embarrassingly bad, Ovation took some Deacon bodies and added new contours, carving a dip into the top curve and adding angles. It didn’t help. The Breadwinner was officially axed in ’79, with the Breadwinner loosing its head in ’80, although the market had long passed them by.
Dissatisfaction with vintage units of this type usually centers around their limited gain, and their inability to sound truly fierce with Drive cranked up to full. The more exemplary users of this type of pedal, however—such as Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Johnson, who were both masters of early Tube Screamers—usually kept the Drive control in the lower part of its range, where the sound remains more natural and, yet again, serves as an excellent pre-boost to drive a good tube amp into distortion when the Level control is set high enough. Some players also find older pedals built to this design to have a distinct midrange hump, a slightly wooly tonality, and/or a lack of low end (as ever, depending upon the ears of the player you talk to). Consequently, a lot of newer makers have accounted for these in their redesigns. Visual Sound’s Route 66 pedal has a Bass Boost switch, Ibanez’s own recent-era TS9DX Turbo Tube Screamer has a Mode control that takes you from classic sounds to settings with more distortion and more low end, and plenty of other makers address both in their variations on the circuit.

Scott Walker began tinkering with electronics at an early age. In his early teens he began playing guitar and experimenting with pickups. In the Spring of 2001 he attended the Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery.  Following graduation he accepted a job with luthier Richard Hoover, of Santa Cruz Guitar Company. At Santa Cruz Guitar Company his specialty became hand-carving necks, and he also began to take on other responsibilities, including the position of shop foreman. At this time he began developing an electric guitar for the ‘21st century.’ After meeting musician Barry Sless, he began to develop an instrument that had the broadest tonal range available. After five years of R&D he began offering his guitars to the public. During his pursuit to develop an electronic package to incorporate into these instruments, he began working with electronic wizards Peter Miller and John Cutler. This collaboration resulted in the current design now found on all ‘Walker Guitars.’  For more information please visit:  www.scottwalkerguitars.com
Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.
Growing popularity of the guitar in the early 1900s, fueled by the growing popularity of folk music and country and western music, led to a demand for louder and more percussive guitars. In response, many companies began to use metal strings instead of catgut. These became known as steel-string guitars. By 1921, Martin had focused production towards this type of guitar.
The valvetronix XL-series builds on the success of the original valvetronix digital amplifier. A range of tube-powered modelling amplifiers, with hi-gain sounds designed to span the entire range of heavy rock music. The XL-series uses VOX's patented Valve Reactor technology, producing the sound and feel of an all-tube amp. Models: AD15VT-XL 15-watt 1×10" speaker, AD30VT-XL 30-watt 1×12" speaker, AD50VT-XL 50-watt 2×12" speakers, AD100VT-XL 100-watt 2×12" speakers.

Both Brian May from Queen and Ritchie Blackmore did use treble boosters for sure in their rigs to get more gain out of their amps. Germanium transistors are very inconsistent and are subject to temperature changes so they can be finicky. They also certainly color your tone to a large extent, which is something you may want. Clean boosts that use silicon transistors are much more common and reliable, they can also boost your signal without effecting your tone too much. For a general clean boost I would go for a modern one. If you want an old school sound, I’d check out a germanium based unit. Or like me, I’d get both.

Granular Guitars is the second exclusive VST Sound Instrument Set created by sound designer, composer and multi-instrumentalist Simon Stockhausen. Adding to the sound libraries of Padshop and Padshop Pro Granular Guitars spans nearly three gigabytes worth of studio-grade recorded samples, covering various acoustic and electric guitars as well as providing more exotic instruments like psaltery, celtic harp and oud played in traditional styles, plus experimental ways of treating the guitar. With 260 presets, Granular Guitars includes big cinematic soundscapes, beds and pads, beautiful fragile textures, plucked string sounds morphed into alien noises, heavy metal sounds and overdriven guitar screams clashed with divine New Age sounds.
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Unlike the other brands so far, Martin focuses more on the acoustic side of the world of guitars. They offer both acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars. The quality in the wood of a Martin strongly depends on the model you purchase. Their higher-priced guitars feature extremely high-quality wood, but even the lower end models are made of a decent material. Surprisingly, you can even find their lower-end models sporting Rosewood necks. Rosewood is known as one of the best materials to use for guitar necks. When it comes to resonators, on the other hand, Martin has that one in the bag. Most of the top-quality resonators in other high-end guitars are actually made by Martin. That, alone, should be proof enough of the quality of Martin’s resonators. Overall, Martins are excellent quality and are great for honing finger-picking skills. They are known for a warm, sustained tone and a very bright sound.

The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar's sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.
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