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Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, CBS, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Ibanez, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, Winston

If you’re old enough and like whacky guitars, like me, you probably remember the great Guitar Player “Off the Wall” columns by Teisco Del Rey, the nom de plume of journalist Dan Forte. His was the first, and sometimes the only, story I’d read for a long time. Dan was perhaps the first to celebrate guitars whose names didn’t begin with M, G, or F. Dan usually worked the humor angle, but for those of us with an aesthetic eye, the guitars he featured became Holy Grails. One of the holiest of those was the 1968 Teisco May Queen guitar, a rare red version of which you see here!


Squier Affinity Stratocaster has all the same features of the Fender Stratocaster guitar at a highly affordable price. It has a maple neck and an alder body which gives it a snappy Strat tone. It also has three single-coil pickups that can be manipulated by a 5-way switch. A vintage style tremolo system makes it a great choice for those who like that system.

For our purposes, I’ll break pedals down into four overarching categories: 1) Boost, Compression, Distortion, and Fuzz; 2) Modulation; 3) Echo and Delay; and 4) Filtering and EQ-Based effects, and this series will focus on individual types that come within each of those larger categories (for example, Modulation includes many quite different effects, such as chorus, vibrato, phasing, and so on). This is not to say that some manufacturers or other writers couldn’t categorize things differently, and certainly a few examples below could be safely lifted out of the heading I have stuck them in and accurately described by another category. It doesn’t matter all that much. These headings are mainly a means of breaking down the sonic results of the enormously varied range of pedals that exists out there, and taking a brief look at what makes them tick.
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
My impression of the advice offered so far, is that compression on the electric guitar may solve the problem. However, I have found through experimentation and practice that a compressor used on an acoustic can highlight the more fragile aspects of it's sound, which when amplified can better compete with an electric guitar. I advise plenty of trial and experimentation before trying it in public, because compressors used incorrectly can create serious feedback headaches.
If you haven’t heard Colin Hay’s acoustic version of “Overkill” from his solo album ‘Man @ Work’, you haven’t really heard this song. This has been my favorite acoustic guitar song for some time now. I like the mainstream version, but this one blows it away. For a taste, try listening to it as a sample on iTunes or amazon. BTW, if you decide to download it, DO NOT get the much shorter edited version off of the ‘Scrubs’ soundtrack.

I purchased a Lyle model A690 recently from an old man in northern California who had gone blind and developed arthritis and didn't feel like playing anymore. He mentioned in passing that he had found (?) The guitar somewhere. The case was thickly covered in dust and pretty much rusted toast, but the guitar is immaculate, looks brand-new with the exception of the tuners, rusted tight. The serial is #480 so I guess its fairly old, but how old is my question? A weird aside; in the case was a handful of fender-style medium tortoise-shell picks monogrammed Eddie Kramer. Does that ring a bell for anyone? Any and all information would be appreciated! Thanks!
What type of environment are you playing in? This is an important consideration when determining how many watts your amp should have. If you practice in an apartment surrounded by neighbors, a low wattage combo option is going to minimize potential conflicts. If you play live gigs in small club environments, it is possible to get by with as little as 50 watts. Larger venues require a larger amp that can move more air with its speaker. You should also take in to account how many other musicians you are playing with, and if there is a second guitarist, as you will want a tone cuts through the mix as opposed to getting buried.
Reviews of the Boss Katana Head are generally positive, with many users pointing to its versatility as its main selling point. One user described it as a Swiss Army amplifier, which encapsulates what even experts are saying. Art Thompson of Guitar Player had this to say: "I found the quality of the amp and effects sounds to be quite satisfying. There’s good touch responsiveness on the higher gain tones, and these 100-watters are definitely capable of holding their own in a band." The inclusion of a built-in speaker got a lot of thumbs up from users who are happy that they don't have to use a different amp for practice.
Phasers work in a way similar to flangers, but this time the copy of the signal is filtered to bring it slightly out of phase. This creates a sweeping, futuristic sound at cranked-up settings, but dialed down will get a chewy, textured tone that’s even suitable for rhythm playing. Eddie Van Halen is one guitarist well-known for his application of the phaser. Today he employs his own signature effects pedal, but his classic MXR Phase 90 is legendary among guitar tone nerds.
My tak is an amazing sound an unforgiving strong clear medium to deep sound great feel it's a limited edition and kicks my buddies 3800 buck Taylor's ass my guitar was a bit pricey at 2800 but well worth it my 6000 price Martin is not as nice as my takemine maybe I got lucky and the guitar just turned out that way who knows it is the most amazing clean very vibrant and holds the notes so long I have played them all only one guitar has this sound and its this one only for deeper sounds I have my Martin and ovation has unique sounds and the Gibson is softer and Taylor sucks sounds like a osterizer blender if you tried my guitar you would be shocked by its sounds I have played the same model and the other ones sounded the same as each other I don't know why the one I own sounded so much different I guess I lucked out. I also have an old Hagstrom acoustic and it sounds phenomenal better than any Taylor I have ever played it sounds very much like a high end Gibson but not as soft. try a ...more
Mr Swike appears to know what he is talking about, and has undertaken a body of work that is unfortunately for sale while only being 70% complete. Some of the instructions are incomplete (like showing what North polarity looks like on Stew-Macs polarity tester, but not South), and at least one (the Varistor mod) wildly inadvisable. Why not get the book done, checked out by objective professional parties, and then released as a complete reference book?
Comes with hard case.This is the iconic Yamaha apx-6a. Made in the 1990s it has the iconic Yamaha AMF preamp/Eq system. This specimen is in overall faircondition for a guitar that is over 20 years old. It has normal scratches and other sings of wear. Shipping is free. Estimated arrival is 4-8 business days. A signature is usually required at the time of delivery.
Budget, feel and sound! Don't worry about who plays what or brand names. NONE of that matters if the guitar does not FEEL good to you and have the SOUND that you are looking for. Of course, most people have a budget and there is no need in trying $2000 guitars if you can't afford one, except for expanding your education about different types of guitar. That's the short answer.
EQ pedals do exactly what you would think.  They allow you to set the tone of your sound through equalization.  Just like on your radio, they can adjust the bass, mid, and treble frequencies of your tone.  Depending on the type of EQ stompbox you have, you may have different ways of tailoring your tone.  There are two main types: graphic and parametric.
The weapon of choice for today’s modern recording musician, the Axe-Fx is as good as it gets in terms of modeling amps. Used by countless musician both live and in the studio, this machine has proven to deliver for just about every musical style under the sun. Notable users of the Axe Fx include Alex Lifeson, Steve Vai, Misha Mansoor, and many others famous musicians. The Axe-Fx II features a high resolution speaker simulator with 150+ “Factory” models and room for 512 “User” cab locations.  It contains a vast virtual inventory of hundreds of vintage and modern guitar amps, speaker cabinets, guitar stompbox and studio effects, and more. The options are pretty much endless.
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Reverb is a more subtle form of delay that replicates the natural echo effect of various spaces, such as small, medium, or large rooms or concert halls. Many amplifiers have built-in reverb effects, but a lot of guitar players like having a separate reverb pedal for an increased range of programmable options. Some modern reverb stompboxes emulate the sound of vintage reverb devices that used reverberating springs or plates to achieve their effects. Reverb is great tool to add color to a very clean tone, but can quickly make a heavily distorted tone sound muddy.
They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.
Yamaha FG700S: Yamaha makes a lot of guitars that affordable for beginners with decent sound. FG700S is my best-loved. It is a general or versatile guitar, this is very great for beginners who are not very clear what music style they want to learn firstly. The guitar body top is solid Sitka spruce. The solid wood top makes better sound than laminate top. You can check out the price and features of FG700S here.
That’s not an overstatement, as traces of T-Bone’s influence can be heard in the early recordings of Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, Muddy Waters, and especially Chuck Berry, who adopted many of Walker’s signature licks as his own. A sharp-dressed, flamboyant performer who played the guitar behind his head and did the splits without missing a note, Walker helped reposition the guitar player from the sidelines to center stage, inspiring Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to copy his impossible-to-ignore moves.
Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
This is an interesting one - by fitting a MIDI pickup to your guitar you can record your performances as a MIDI track as well as live audio. This can then be assigned to any software or hardware MIDI-triggered instrument to double up or even replace the guitar part. Some DAWs now also allow the extraction of audio to MIDI data from a recorded audio part, but the MIDI pickup route is more accurate where electric guitar is concerned.
Where can you find one? My guess is that FIDELITY was a housebrand (like Holiday or Silvertone), and these might be Valcos or some other maker. But I have since seen 2 or 3 of them on Ebay, not going for too much money. Also, there are several other brands (and no-brands) that look much like these, so keep your eyes peeled, don’t pay too much, and score a little gem that will have other guitar players saying “what the hell is that” and have your significant other shaking his or her head when the UPS/Fedex people come knocking.
Recording? The best amps for recording WON'T be big, 100-watts Marshalls, for instance! On the contrary, small amps are the best choice. We're talking about small valve amps, here. That's because, unlike with bigger, louder amps, you can crank up small valve amps, pushing them to tone heaven. If you did the same with bigger amps, it wouldn't work - you'd sound so loud you wouldn't be able to make a good recording! This technique has been used by many, many top artists. Despite using big & loud marshall amps onstage, Jimmy Page used a small Supro valve amp on the early Led Zeppelin albums. Likewise, the Arctic Monkeys used an old Fender Champ on most of their debut album.
And again. the no-brainer: your guitar just plain sucks.  If your bought your guitar at Wall-Mart for $19.99, PLEASE don't put my pickups in it!!!  Here is EXACTLY what you should do with it: keep it around until you are playing your first big club gig and you need to do something extraordinary to get the crowds attention.  As you thrash away on the final chord of the last song pick up THIS guitar, douse it heavily with lighter-fluid and light that puppy up!  Now that's getting more that 20-bucks worth of wow-factor out of that pile of Chinese dog-dung!
First off, it has three effects loops that let you control pedals (or groups of pedals) right from the MS-3. It can also be used as a foot controller for amplifiers, which allows you to change the channel on your favorite amps and employ effects in the comfort of a single compact box. This makes the MS-3 a very versatile unit, catering to vintage amp/pedal users while adding the comfort of modern digital effects processing and preset control. Since it has its own noise suppressor and global EQ, you can tame noisy pedals and shape their tone a bit more. All of these are on top of the many built-in effects that is already built into the unit, which are Boss quality good by themselves.
We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!
I had a similar problem and went with a similar solution - the Vox Tonelab amp modeler and multi-effects unit. Has a headphone out that works fine for practice. Plus it is working well for gigging as well. I can practice tunes with the exact amp and effects that I'm going to use. When I get in front of the guitar amp, I just need to get a clean sound and give it a little color in the tone. It isn't perfect for gigs, but it is SO easy to practice with and can sound like a Fender, Marshall, Hiwatt, Mesa - whatever. This is starting to sound like an ad, so I'll stop. :-) – Anonymous Jan 18 '11 at 10:47
This is an American Fender Telecaster electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This soundfont has the same presets as the Fender Jaguar above and is also recorded with the volume on the edge of break up on the amp (read the Fender Jaguar above for description of amplifier setting). This guitar is suited to jangly indie sounds or clean country sounds but can be very rocky with more distortion added. This guitar is also a classic that has been used in alot of types of music.
Flanging is the strongest of the standard modulation effects. The feedback control increases the depth of the 'comb filtering' produced when a delayed signal is added back to itself. Because it is such a distinctive effect, it is best used sparingly, though it can also be used to process a reverb send to add a more subtle complexity to the reverbed sound.
Filters are also great for use on drum loops. One trick I like is to send the drums to a modulated resonant filter set up as a send effect, with a narrow band-pass EQ beforehand. This creates a rather bizarre metallic melody that accompanies your drums. It can get fatiguing if over-used, but brought in at a low level in some sections of a song, it can create plenty of interest, particularly if followed by a modulated delay. Matt Houghton
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Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).

There are many answers to your question like Jakedog mentioned. As far as finding a neck that is easy to play on, you'd be wise to go to a guitar shop and grab several different models of various brands and find what fits in your hand, yet allows full control over the fretting with your fingers. Smaller hands seem to like soft v shaped necks, yet I know several people with stubby little claws who play only boat necks...meaning huge round chuncky necks. I'm referring to the back of the neck in this case.
If you had to write a soundtrack for the 20th century, electric guitars would almost certainly be playing the tune. No other instrument defines the angry rebelliousness of the modern age quite like it. Who could forget Chuck Berry, Jimi Hendrix, the Rolling Stones, or Nirvana—some of the greatest exponents of guitar-driven rock? But if you think playing an electric guitar is all about attitude and dexterity, think again: it's actually about the science of electromagnetism. Let's take a closer look a how these amazing instruments turn electricity into sound.
What about the TAB and lyrics on this site? According to U.S. Copyright laws, there are allowable uses of copyright materials, such as extractions for educational purposes. Any TAB, or lyrics, shown on this site are specifically for teaching, using the reader's knowledge of the tempo and sound of a song to facilitate the written material. In addition, I show only excepts from familiar songs, not the entire song. I also encourage readers to obtain full versions of the sheet music from an MPA recognized site. The only exception to this approach is for songs no longer covered by copyright law (songs now in the Public Domain).
Eric Johnson: highly contoured two-piece select alder body finished in a “Thinskin Nitro” lacquer, one-piece quarter-sawn maple neck with a V-shaped profile, 12″ fingerboard radius and 21 polished frets, Fender/Gotoh staggered vintage-style machine heads eliminating the need for a string tree and three special-design custom-wound single-coil pickups with countersunk mounting screws. Other features include a parchment ’57-style pickguard, five-spring vintage tremolo, silver-painted block and ’57-style string recess with no paint between the base plate and the block. Colors include White Blonde, 2-Color Sunburst, Black and Candy Apple Red. Also available as a rosewood neck version with a bound round-laminated 12″-radius rosewood fretboard, a three-ply parchment pickguard, staggered vintage-style tuners, a custom tremolo block and four brand-new finish options (including Dakota Red), three of which (Lucerne Aqua Firemist, Tropical Turquoise and Medium Palomino Metallic) are exclusive to this model.
Hi - Long ago I had a vaguely Mustang like guitar with a Samiel badge. I don't see it listed here, though I assume it was Japanese made. The guitar inspired my (so far) best known song "Sucker For A Cheap Guitar." I traded it off, and have been trying to track it back down, not sure I even have a photo anywhere that shows it. Discovered your page because I just acquired a nice Fender Jazz bass copy that says Eagle on it, but I see there's no information as yet. The guy I got it from is from Brazil, and he may have bought it there, perhaps it's even a Brazilian brand, like the amp (Attack Audio System) that I got with it. I was also happy to learn a little more about Maruha, I had a nice archtop Jazz guitar with that name on it, until trading it off, possibly for the Samiel and an autoharp, I can't remember now! It was back in the '70s. both were probably manufactured in the '60s.
when I started playing, if you wanted distortion, you "cranked up" the volume on the guitar and the amp. my old Gibson amp had reverb and tremolo. I used to play without reverb or tremolo. nowadays, in my old age, I use a little reverb for flavoring. I have pedals, but it's too much hassle to set everything up. so, I just plug into the amp with a little reverb. I'm happy and that's all that really counts. isn't it ?
Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.
The best way to get this sound out of an Octavia is by using the neck pickup on the guitar and by experimenting with the tone knob to get a more pronounced octave effect. Some other famous Hendrix tunes using the Octavia are “Who Knows” and “Machine Gun” from Band of Gypsies. If you want to put together a Jimi Hendrix pedal board, the Octavia is a must. There are many great reissues of this pedal on the market, but if you get a chance, like fuzzes, try a few of them next to each other. Even a few of the same pedal, as they often sound very different. One may have more of an octave effect, or be warmer sounding etc. This is due to the use of the transistors that can often have slightly different values that can make big tonal changes.
"Mangoré, por Amor al Arte" is the title of the 2015 movie, the real life story of Agustín Barrios, an influential and important composer and classical guitarist from Paraguay. Born in Paraguay in 1885 talented Agustín was persuaded in his young adult age to move to Buenos Aires, the cultural hub of South America. In Argentina he began an affair with the beautiful Isabel but,...
Wah-Wah: For swishy, rounded sounds that sort of sound like the guitar is wailing, a wah-wah pedal employs a sweeping filter controlled by a spring-loaded treadle, creating quirky frequency boosts as you work the pedal up and down. A famous version of this pedal is marketed by one manufacturer as the “Crybaby,” in an attempt to describe its tone in one word. The late Jimi Hendrix used one of these pedals to great advantage.

Ultimately, his thesis is shared by every single person interviewed for this article. It simply does not appear that there’s any way to objectively measure what is “good” guitar tone. A major reason for that is the infinitely varied human element of the musician performing and the audience listening. The impossibility of proving anything doesn’t, however, change the fact that so many guitarists revere those early tones. Some argue that’s because the early days were just better. Others point out that we’re simply intransigent.

With over 100 effects, there's really no shortage of virtual stompboxes to play with, while the unit's complex signal routing capabilities allow for a wide variety of effects combination. Add to this Helix' acclaimed amp modeling features, which lets you mix and match 62 amp, 37 cabs and 16 mics. If that's not enough, you can also make adjustments to the amp models to better personalize your sound. To match its complexity, Line 6 designed the interface to be simple yet intuitive, courtesy of its color LCD display and colored LED rings.
• Heavy is as Heavy Does: For low hanging alternate tunings like open D or dropped D, consider a heavy string gauge – at least .11s, although Stevie Ray Vaughan, who kept his instrument turned down just a half-step, employed a set gauged .13 to .58. Thicker strings will maintain their tension better when they’re low-tuned, which makes for less fret noise and other undesirable distortion. Many players feel thicker strings make for better slide playing, too, since the strings resist going slack under the pressure of the slide. But that’s really a matter of feel and learning to control a slide more than a string thing.
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.
The electrified hollow body arch top was created so the guitar could compete with the volume of horns in the big bands of the 1930s. And they’ve evolved considerably since then, growing from fat jazz boxes with necks that meet the body at the 12th fret to nimble, thin-lined instruments with cutaways like the Gibson ES-125 and Epiphone Casino, which are experiencing a renaissance today. From the single blade pickup in Christian’s guitar, modern hollow bodies now sport all types of pickups as standard equipment: humbuckers, single-coils, piezo-electric and so on.
These pedals are different, but are both based on the same idea. Pitch shifters shift the whole pitch of your guitar up or down by a set amount (often an octave), giving you a higher or lower tone than would normally be possible. Jack white uses a Whammy pitch shifter in the solo for Seven Nation Army, which has a foot pedal that rocks back and forth (similar to a wah pedal) allowing you to go up and down a full octave or more smoothly and quickly.
The custom pickup for the AZ was developed in collaboration with Seymour Duncan. The pickups feature a moderate output through Alnico-5 magnets to keep the clarity of the fundamental tone when using a distortion sound, and to deliver a clear pick attack. From treble to bass, and from high-E string to low-E string, the overall tonal balance is evenly adjusted, and works well with various effect pedals.

Bold and brash, the chest-thumping sound of Fender's big-bodied California Series Redondo Player acoustic-electric was designed to inspire you from the moment you pick it up. The exclusive slope-shouldered Redondo body shape has a rich, commanding voice that fills any room. The gloss metallic top, back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-...  Click To Read More About This Product
2. You have me to help you out! I’ve sorted through a bunch of the top acoustic-electric guitars and come up with a list of what I think are five of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000. I’ve been playing for almost 30 years, so I know a little bit about guitars. But just in case you don’t believe me, check around for yourself. Every one of these instruments is highly rated and top quality.
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Unfortunately, a simple pickup with a single coil of wire is just as good at picking up stray electrical energy from power supplies and other interference, so it generates a certain amount of unwanted, background noise. Some guitars solve this problem using what are known as humbucking pickups. These have two coils of wire, arranged so they capture double the signal from the moving guitar strings to produce a richer sound. Each coil is wired up so any stray "hum" it captures from nearby electrical equipment is canceled out by the other coil. Most guitars have two or more pickups, which create a variety of different effects. Typically, there's one pickup under the bridge of the guitar (where the strings are supported) and another one slightly higher up at the bottom of the "neck" (the part of the guitar that sticks out of the main body).
The music that Jimmy Page made was able to transport you so that you got lost in what he was playing. His solos were show-stopping and so innovative when it came to guitar-playing technique at the time. He set himself the challenge of breaking the preconceptions of what a guitar can do, so his style evolved over time. But he was always one of the greats, even when experimenting!
Shreddage 2: Absolute Electric Guitar is our answer to the challenge of total guitar sampling. It is a complete instrument with elegant scripting, intuitive mapping, and incredible depth. This virtual guitar for Kontakt is the ultimate weapon for rock & metal music, built from the ground up for realistic playing in any hi-gain style. All samples were recorded on a 7-string guitar and are provided clean/DI so you can use your own custom amp tone - or use the included Peavey ReValver HPse.
Ask yourself this question right at the beginning. Before buying a guitar you have to make sure of the kind of style you are comfortable in- be it the jazz and blues or be it country, soul or pop. Only once you are sure of the kind of style you are in for, you should move forward to buying your new guitar. Make the wrong choice, and you will have to regret for it later on.

In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.


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Original Martin OMs from approximately 1929 to 1931 are extremely rare and sell for high prices. Many guitarists believe that the OM—a combination of Martin’s modified 14-fret 000 body shape, long scale (25.4″) neck, solid headstock, 1-3/4″ nut width, 4-1/8″ maximum depth at the endwedge, and 2-3/8″ string spread at the bridge—offers the most versatile combination of features available in a steel-string acoustic guitar. Today, many guitar makers (including many small shops and hand-builders) create instruments modeled on the OM pattern.[5]


Guitar amplifiers vary in wattage. If you're playing to a massive audience, you'll want several 100-watt amps; however, for everyday use, that is overkill. If you merely want it for practice, a 10-watt solid state guitar amplifier will do, and if you're playing to a small venue, you'll probably want to consider a 20-watt valve amp. It's surprising how much sound a little amp will produce.
Let me tell you about the vintage look at why it is favored among so many musicians and aestheticians around the world. Well, I won’t be able to tell you much about the vintage look in this short text, but what I can tell you is the fact that some of the best looking items out there, and best sounding, are entirely vintage. Well the Vox MINI3G2CL Battery Powered Modeling Amp is one of the vintage looking but entirely modern technology employing amps that produce a great sound while looking positively scrumptious. This small amp avoids the problem of weak low tones that so many other amp have by incorporating a bass boost technology into its construction. As a result we get a small, portable amp with a handsome look and an incredibly well rounded sound, with expressive lows and expressive high both present. And the price point relative to some of the other options on this list makes it a required purchase, unless something else catches your eye that is.
The Schecter Hellraiser C-1 Electric Guitar features a solid mahogany body that guarantees durability, along with a set-neck having ultra access. There is hardly a guitar which sounds great in regular, single-coil configuration, also in humbucker mode, but that’s what the Schecter does; having excellent sustain. The set of this guitar was great out of the box, while the fingerboard is good, smooth and quick.
Nowadays it is customary to play this repertoire on reproductions of instruments authentically modelled on concepts of musicological research with appropriate adjustments to techniques and overall interpretation. Thus over recent decades we have become accustomed to specialist artists with expertise in the art of vihuela (a 16th-century type of guitar popular in Spain), lute, Baroque guitar, 19th-century guitar, etc.[4]

Because bass amps have to reproduce lower frequencies than an electric guitar amp, and it takes more amplifier power to reproduce bass frequencies, a bass player will typically need three or four times the wattage of the electric guitarist.[16] For example, if an electric guitarist has a 100 watt amp, the bassist in the band should have a 300 to 400 watt bass amp. For electric guitar amps with 50 watts or less of power, a bass player may need an even higher multiple. While an electric guitarist will often find that a 50 watt amp will be adequate for rehearsals and mid-size performance venues, a bass player performing alongside this electric guitarist will typically need at least a 300 watt bass amp, six times the power of the electric guitar amp, to get a good bass volume. "More advanced players who regularly gig in small to medium sized venues...typically [use amps that] produce 300-700 watts of output."[17] Bass players using bass stacks in very large venues (e.g., stadiums, outdoor festivals) may use amp heads that put out 750 to 2000 watts of power. British rock bassist Mo Foster tours with a 1,500 watt bass rig.[18] Somewhat controversially, as there is no clear engineering support, many think that a tube bass amp will sound louder than a solid state bass amp of the same wattage.[19]
Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.
I have a weird Decca guitar that my father-in law gave me. I know nothing about it. It is an acoustic, obviously old and it has 10 strings! The neck is normal and the first 4 strings E,B,G & D are in sets (like a 12 string) and the Low E and A are single. I play guitar and have never run across anything like this. I can't find information on it anywhere! I can't see where anyone customized it. It looks like it was originally made that way. Any thoughts or information you can give me on this?
My current setup is tuner>wah>blues driver>keeley falng/delay/fuzz box>sonic max>looper. The second photo is current setup which sounds way better than original. Problem is now my flanger/phase side of my keeley won’t get loud like it used to and my loop wont let me hear what I’m playing when I lay down a riff, also when I play the loop back I can no longer play over the track.
Electric guitars are full of options, with various pickups, bridges, fret sizes, neck radii, tone woods, tuners and so on all having an impact on how an instrument plays and sounds. But stripping things down to the absolute basics, there are three types of electric guitars: solid bodies, hollow bodies and semi-hollow bodies. And they’re ideally suited for different playing approaches.
The classic setup of three Standard Single-Coil Strat pickups and a five-way pickup selector provide the tonal versatility you’d expect from a Fender guitar, while a ’70s-style headstock and body design look the part. It’s true that the American series is the more “genuine” model, but you won’t be able to tell much difference when compared to the Standard.
On a Les Paul, adjusting the saddle position can be a little tricky while the string is tuned to pitch. Sometimes you can get a screwdriver in there and turn it, but often you need to slacken the string and move it to the side. Also note that sometimes the adjustment screws are at the back of the bridge rather than the front. I prefer adjusting the saddle while the string is slack anyway as there is a lot of stress on both the string and the saddle otherwise.
In 1962 or 63 (possibly as early as 1959) Guyatone guitars began arriving in the U.S.. If you look around the internet you will see that they could be found under a variety of brand names and were sold in drug stores, department stores, even auto parts stores, as well as music stores. There were two lines of Kent guitars: a Standard series and a “Pro-series”. They were made by Teisco and Guyatone. I haven't been able to get my hands on any of these early solidbodies so I don't know if "the Professional Group" guitars are actually worthy of the "professional" designation and slightly higher pricetag or if it was all about marketing.

*We build all of our Custom Shop and Semi-Custom instruments from scratch and on demand - therefore, Custom Shop and Semi-Custom orders are fulfilled in the order in which they were received. These times can vary due to demand and the custom options you choose. Our production/assemble time frame: 20 - 25 working days since our professional Control Team and Supervisor Engineer will ensure that your ordered guitar is top notch considering the fact that this guitar is intricate to assemble and they check very carefully every detail such as the finish, fret work, pickups, strings. And also, they will test the sound quality. We do not rush up the process of manufacturing your guitar since we would like to deliver to you best quality performance.
The old Harmony and Kay guitars were notably inferior in playability and sound to professional-grade instruments by Martin, Gibson and Fender. Typically the necks on the student grade instruments were clumsy in contour compared to a professional-grade instrument, and generally the action was much higher. Neckset angles on student-grade acoustics were often quite poor on Day One such that they were physically hard to play when new. By the time they were ten years old, the neckset angles had often shifted so much that they were virtually unplayable. While today many craftsmen are very adept at resetting necks, in the mid 1960s no one I knew had mastered techniques for doing this. Even companies such as Martin and Gibson did not reset necks if guitars were sent back to them for warranty service. Martin's typical approach at that time was to plane the fingerboard, such that it was virtually paper thin by the nut and full thickness by the body joint, and then refret. Gibson would frequently tackle such a problem by sawing the neck off at the heel joint, chopping the remainder out from the dovetail with a chisel, and installing a new neck. Student-grade instruments with poor necksets frequently were simply thrown away. Truss rods in student grade guitars usually were little more than window dressing. Although many of these guitars bore labels reading "steel reinforced neck" or actually had a truss rod in the neck, these rods usually were not functional. Martin had a steel T-bar in the neck from late 1934 through the 1960s, and Gibson and Fender both had highly functional truss rods, but Harmony, Kay and other makers of student guitars usually installed rods so poorly that any attempt to adjust the rod was simply an exercise in frustration and futility. While Harmony and Kay as well as some other makers turned out many hundreds of thousands of guitars and greatly exceeded the number of instruments produced by Martin, Fender and Gibson combined in those days, a surprisingly small percentage of those instruments have survived over the years, such that good condition original examples are remarkably scarce today. Some of these instruments have become quite collectible and now bring prices exceeding $1,000. Kay hollowbody electrics with the so-called "Kelvinator" peghead, especially the early Barney Kessel models, are now considered to have a considerable "cool factor." Likewise, original Danelectro "longhorn" guitars and basses have a visual flare as well as a funky distinctive sound of their own.
I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.
Dexter Holland (b. 1965) is the rhythm guitarist of punk rock band The Offspring and has played Ibanez guitars for most of the band's existence. He currently uses a custom diamond plate RG with a custom Jägermeister logo on the twelfth fret, as well as DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups, though he used to use a brown and green custom RG and has been seen with a custom Purple RG.
Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."
Every guitar player has their own distinctive sound, and many guitar companies have created artist and signature electric guitar models that were inspired by and/or designed in collaboration with the very best guitar players from the past and the present. Some of the most popular signature electric guitar models we offer here at Sam Ash are the Eric Clapton Strat guitars from both Fender and the Fender Custom Shop, ESP Kirk Hammett guitars, John Petrucci guitars from both Ernie Ball Music Man and Sterling by Music Man, and many more!
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