As a trained engineer I just don’t see how contemporary luthiers would be able to control only these three parameters in combination in order to make up a specific tone. There is simply no connection between these and the sonic impact they have–again, in combination. Did anyone ever change the shape due to the wood he uses? For instance wood would be lighter by 5%, stiffer by 8% (which would be very much, by the way, but it happens all the time even with the same species) so consequentially make the horn less thick by 3% and trim the tail by 5 mm. A rule like that would be plausible in case wood would affect the tone that much. But luthiers never do. Thy do not even take care of weight and stiffness.
This is basically the same as having an entire studio’s worth of gear under your feet. You have 72 amp models to play with, painstakingly recreated from reference amps such as Vox Ac30 amps, Hiwatt Custom 100, Fender amps and more. There’s 194 effects to choose from ranging from distortion to modulation to delay, compression, wah – basically any effect you can think of! There’s also 37 cabinets that you can choose from which gives each amp model and effect a unique sound as well as 16 microphones which provide unique tonal qualities to your overall sound– we challenge you to get bored of this!

A favored brand of a number of against-the-grain musicians – like Jack White of The White Stripes, Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, and the late great David Bowie – Eastwood is unique in that, alongside their catalog of more traditional guitars, they’ve also taken it upon themselves to bring back a number of more obscure models through the revived Airline brand. For instance, the ’59 Custom 2P pictured above was originally offered by VALCO in a catalog sale through Montgomery Ward from 1958 to 1968. Their vintage style instruments are updated with modern manufacturing techniques, giving players the opportunity to pick up rare offerings at a reasonable cost. But perhaps the coolest thing about this company is their custom shop. Set up almost like a Kickstarter, the shop allows customers to bid on defunct, new, and bizarre guitars and go on to build whichever models meet their funding requirements.


Ah, this is an interesting subject. I could never play a Rick, nor buy back my 1966 Fender XII, so I bought a Dano, then another which I kept and could play (nut width). Then around 2000 I bought a Yamaha Pacifica 12 -the blueburst with gold hardware. I had the nut intonated, like all my other guitars (this was before Earvana which I am about to try out my first "drop in" on a new parts Strat, Epi Night Hawk and a GS Mini on layaway). The Pacifica is good tho again only 1+11/16ths " and I am ready for 1+3/4 or even better 1+7/8ths. I bought a set of Duncan Designed lipsticks for it, thinking I could easily find a neck with 1+7/8ths nut. No joy, yet, tho I have talked to a builder about one and am trying to sort out whether to do that to the Pacifica or use a really nice looking cherry stained strat body that I've had for 31 years.
Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
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