Schecter Guitar Research Company was founded by David Schecter in1976. This manufacturing company produces large number of electric guitars, bass guitars, and steel-string acoustic guitars, as well as offering hand-built custom instruments and a small line of guitar amplifiers. The schecter known for its schecter “c” shape body. This brand is known for its better quality of wood and handsome finishing.

The next most important review criteria for any electric guitar, is its sound. Please allow me to be very clear here that this guitar is mostly suited for heavy rock tones, aggressive higher leads and chugging, crazy distortions. If you are more interested in a crisp, jazzy tone, maybe you should opt for a beginner’s Stratocaster electric guitar like Squier by Fender, instead. Having said that, this instrument sounds great in its genre, and also remains in tune for long periods, so you don’t have to worry about manually tuning it. Yes, the string tension is higher as compared to a 24.75” Stratocaster or XX Les Paul, but in a way this challenges electric guitar novices to acquire greater mastery over their notes!
Fretwire can vary from some makers as it is shaped by extrusion thru a series of roller dies and the dies wear.  I have observed actual Dunlop 6105 in my shop varying from .088” to .090” wide and from .052” to .055” tall.  Due to the inconsistent size and tang formation, I generally do not use Dunlop fretwire these days, instead preferring the more accurate German made Jescar or the Japanese made Stewart McDonald fretwires.  Both Jescar and SM have very well formed tangs and barbs and are very consistent. I will refer to the Dunlop numbers below but only for very general description – always verify actual sizes!
Music man make the best regular production (i.E. non custom shop) guitars on the planet. Nobody else comes close. This is the quality that everybody else should be reaching for. The fit and finish and playing comfort are second to none. And the oil finish on the necks is to die for! These guys don't just churn out minor variations on the same 60-year old theme, they actually innovate, they challenge, they dare. Wonderful new designs, made for real players. The results are outstanding. Roasted maple and all-rosewood necks, new chambering and tonewood construction ideas. They are so far ahead of the game it makes you wonder why the rest of the industry stays so stagnant. Music Man are the only guitars I will buy now. I'm so proud to support them!
Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.

For something like the application you suggest, getting a used prior generation Line 6 pedalboard like, say, an HD500, might be more cost-effective than trying to patch your laptop into the effects loop of an amp. You can fine tune the Line 6 and add downloaded patches to it with your laptop via a USB cable, but still be able to hook the Line 6 up to your amp with standard 1/4″ TRS plug instrument and patch cables like you use with stomp boxes. Your total outlay would be maybe $250, possibly even less, and that particular model is giggable, versatile, includes a looper, and sounds about 99.5% as good as Line 6’s current stuff. Even the POD X3 Live I have lying sounds pretty darned convincing on many of its models, and it’s like three generations long in the tooth.
Acoustic guitars vary by type. Some are designed for beginners, while others are customized for professional guitar players. Most of the major acoustic guitar brands are available in a variety of different styles, each designed to best suit a customers' specific playing needs. Ease and sound are certainly big factors to consider when choosing a new acoustic guitar.

This preamp can also offer a gain control. Essentially, it’s what drives the power levels of the signals to the amp, but it can also boost volume. If the preamp doesn’t have a gain control, it can be assumed that it’s already factory-set to a certain level of gain. One way around the lack of a gain control is to use the volume control on the main amp. Either way, it’s very helpful when you find you need to compete in a multi-instrument band when you feel like you’re being drowned out or you’re experiencing unwanted feedback when you do try to vie for being heard.
How it sounds: Ex. 1a demonstrates the treble-cut control—nothing surprising here. Ex. 1b features the bass-cut. With a clean tone like this, it’s a bit subtle, though you can hear the difference if you focus on the low notes. But Ex. 1c adds a vintage-style germanium Fuzz Face with the gain and volume maxed. With the guitar’s tone control wide-open, the signal easily overpowers my vintage Fender brownface—your typical Fuzz Face fart. As I gradually trim bass via the guitar, the tone acquires greater punch and clarity. I remain on the neck pickup throughout—the only thing changing is the guitar’s bass pot setting. The extreme-cut settings near the end of the clip may sound harsh in isolation, but they can be perfect in a band context. At the end of the clip I max the bass pot again to underscore how much the tone has changed. It ain’t subtle.
The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable."
It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings, because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. But nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
First off, what makes the sound in an acoustic guitar? On both an acoustic and acoustic-electric guitar, you have the strings that create vibrations when plucked or strummed. That vibration reverberates across the span of the soundboard (top tonewood surface) and also travels down the strings to the saddle and bridge of the guitar. Those vibrations “move” air within the air cavity called the soundhole. The resonance created in the soundhole depends on its depth/size and the tonewoods used to make the back and sides of the guitar. Voila, you now have sound exiting through the soundhole of the guitar.
In the 2010s, virtually all of the sound reaching the audience in large venues comes from the PA system or sound reinforcement system, the huge speaker systems pointed at the audience. As well, in the 2010s on-stage instrument amplifiers are more likely to be kept at a low volume, because when band members have their onstage amps "cranked" to high volume levels on stage, this makes it harder for the audio engineer to control the sound mix and blend. For example, if a heavy metal bassist had two 8x10" cabinets and several 1x18" subwoofer cabinets and several thousand watts of bass amplifier heads, and these amps are set to a very high volume level, this bass player will be creating very significant onstage bass volume. If the sound engineer wished to turn down the bass in the PA/sound reinforcement system, this bassist's loud onstage volume would make it hard for this engineer to control and/or reduce the volume of bass in the FOH (Front of House) sound mix. Another issue that can develop with bass players who have very high onstage volume is that it can be hard for the audio engineer to produce a clean sound through the PA/sound reinforcement system. For example, if a bassist was driving her bass amp speaker stacks into clipping to create a fuzz bass tone, if the audio engineer wished to have a "clean" bass sound, this could pose a challenge.
To make it simple, we chose a four-chord song: The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop." At first run-through, the game asked Andrew to play only one note every few seconds. As he successfully hit those, it added more and more until he was playing almost every note. On the next run through, the AI suddenly threw in two-note power chords. Once he mastered those, the game leveled up again, asking him to play every chord of the real guitar track that Johnny Ramone would have played. Finally, we unlocked Master Mode, which challenged us to play the song from memory. Only the measures appeared on the screen—no notes.
The sound quality is pretty excellent. Relative to the Zoom, Line 6, and Boss multi-effect pedals, the distortion on the DigiTech is surprisingly nice. The reverbs are absolutely gorgeous, which is no surprise given they are Lexicon algorithms. Chorus and delay also sounds great, and the effects’ parameters are easy to set up and adjust using the row of knobs below the display. We also find the noise gate works extremely well at taming any unruly noise issues caused by dirt effects. Overall, we’re impressed at how the RP500 replicates a lot of the “classics.” A quick note on the presets - they are less than stellar, so don’t judge this pedal by them. You’ll have to play with them a little bit to arrive at better, more usable sounds.

Plug one in, and you'll understand what an acoustic instrument is supposed to sound like while playing live. Unplugged they sound great as well, especially the deep bowl models. I hear from my friends that they think those rounded backs feel awkward to play while sitting down. I have a deep contour bowl, that is way more comfy playing relaxed in my couch than even my little 000-martin.
The objects connected to the red and purple wires are a capacitor and resistor in series. The round brown object is a capacitor, typically around .001 microfarads. The rectangular brown object is a resistor, typically around 150K ohms. Increasing the value of the capacitor will expand the treble range you're preserving. Too large a value, end you'll be preserving midrange, too. Too small a value and you'll only be preserving the highest treble frequencies.
Few guitarists play slide guitar with more raw emotion or feeling than blues legend Muddy Waters. There’s perhaps nobody more important to the electric blues idiom, of which Waters became the primary spokesman. His playing was raw, dirty, raunchy, and everything else that makes the blues as great as it is. He undoubtedly inspired every great blues guitar player that came after him.
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This product was not working and parts were defect. I don't know how some people made it works. The instruction was terrible and seller's wires description photos are more worse. I did not expect much for this little toy. Just piece of the junk. I was tried to return, but the seller said that I had to pay return shipping and he gave me a fake return shipping address.

Adding effects at the mixing stage gives the engineer greater creative flexibility, but if the guitarist needs to hear the effects to play, then you may get a better artistic performance by recording them with the take. All I'd say on this point is that editing is much more difficult if the sound is recorded with delay or reverb, so an alternative is not to record these effects initially, but still add them to the monitor mix for the player's benefit during performance. Effects like chorus and wah-wah can be recorded straight off, if required, as they don't affect the ease with which a part can be edited. Ultimately, the performance is what really counts, so compromise in favour of the player's artistic needs rather than your technical needs where a choice has to be made.


The four fingers of the left hand (which stop the strings) are designated 1 = index, 2 = major, 3 = ring finger, 4 = little finger; 0 designates an open string, that is a string that is not stopped by a finger of the left hand and whose full length thus vibrates when plucked. On the classical guitar thumb of the left hand is never used to stop strings from above (as is done on the electric guitar): the neck of a classical guitar is too wide and the normal position of the thumb used in classical guitar technique do not make that possible.
Hi Torch, appreciate the work gone into this , fantastically informative piece. Good to see such a following as well , too many Gibson / Fender fanatics out there that dismiss Jap / Asian guitars as inferior. Having played god knows how many guitars over 50 years I've had good and bad in both top and lesser known brands. Started off at 15 years old with a Tiesco ( cost me £15 S/H at the time. lol ). Admittedly it was a piece of junk, but hey it got me started. Just picked up a Strat copy made in China for £10 ( as new condition) Branded Excell , out plays my Aria by a country mile. I have an old acoustic here about 40 years old, cost £62.50 at the time. No place of origin , serial No or anything. Imported by Rose Morris with the brand Avon on the head stock. This baby out plays any acoustic I've ever played, including a couple of Martins, As any guitarist should know a guitar is how it feels and plays not it's name. Nothing wrong with Jap / Asian guitars , could be made in Iceland for all I care it's the guitar that counts. Keep up the good work. Regards and thanks.
I began taking guitar lessons from Kenneth when I was 14, and right away, I noticed his ability to mold the lesson into an experience that fit 𝘮𝘺 musical interests and what I wanted to learn. Whether I wanted to learn theory, practice a certain technique or rudiment, or just have fun learning a song, Kenneth could always adapt and make the lesson interesting and enriching. This is a quality that many music teachers lack, and it’s the aspect of his teaching that kept me enticed for so long. In addition to being a great teacher, Kenneth is a passionate music fan of many different genres, and through taking lessons with him, I was exposed to many new musical concepts that opened my eyes to the world of music I was yet to discover. Though I no longer take lessons, I can say for sure that my time with Kenneth has made me a much more skilled, receptive and well rounded musician, and I am very thankful for all the things I learned.
However much you swap your guitar’s pickups, strings, and wiring configuration, tweak your amp, or revamp your pedalboard, you will never achieve the golden tone that rings in your head if you don’t take one tip to heart: it all starts with the wood. Sure, these are electric guitars, and all the electronic components in the sound chain will affect what comes out of the speaker, but they are acoustic machines first and foremost. Hit the strings with your guitar unplugged, and it still rings and resonates, and the sound you hear—even with no electronic devices attached—still defines the core of your tone. And to make sure this is the right tone for you, or to avoid fighting a tone with endless component tweaks that never seem to satisfy, you need to understand a little bit about how all that wood sounds.
If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.
Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
The Fender Bassbreaker 15 Amplifier Head presents a budget friendly option for those in need of great tone. You have 15 watts of pure power to channel here as well as a studio friendly Power Amp Mute so you can record straight into a desk - a great feature for those in need of a powerful stage and studio amplifier. This is a professional grade amplifier head that features 3 very unique tonal options and overdrive levels to provide you with a whole host of lush fender tones that range from glass like cleans to vintage overdrive. Perfectly paired with the Fender Bassbreaker 212 Guitar Cab.
Stop tailpieces are usually paired with two types of bridges. The most basic is simply a wooden or metal bar with grooves that strings pass through. Most Gibson guitars come with another of the company’s early electric era innovations, the tune-o-matic bridge. Tune-o-matics have adjustable individual saddles for each string and are therefore more desirable for most players looking to control their instrument’s action and intonation.
Pyle Pro’s PEGKT15SB package is the next step up. This guitar has more of a vintage feel thanks to its sunburst finish. Like the Silvertone above, it features 3 single coil pickups, two tone knobs, a tremolo bridge system, and a full-scale neck complete with a 22nd fret. Also included in the package is a Pyle Pro gig bag, a small 10-watt amp with cable, 3 guitar picks, a strap, and extra strings.
SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
No, could it be!? Finally we see a brand that does not come from England nor the US, but from Germany. ENGL specializes in tube amps for high-gain and heavy-metal. Its most famous users are Ritchie Blackmore and Steve Morse (Deep Purple), Alexi Laiho (Children of Bodom) and Chris Broderick (Megadeth). Both past and present Deep Purple members even have their own signature model. And there's also the standard Powerball, Fireball, Classic, and Invader series.
Basswood comes from Linden trees, and it is soft and easy to work with. A side effect of being soft is that it also dents easy. Because it doesn’t have much of a grain or color, it’s most commonly used on instruments that have an opaque paint-job, though this isn’t always the case (as in the photo above). Basswood has a warm, balanced sound with great mid range and good sustain.
Fuzz boxes and other heavy distortions can produce unwanted dissonances when playing chords. To get around this, guitar players (and keyboard players) using these effects may restrict their playing to single notes and simple "power chords" (root, fifth, and octave). Indeed, with the most extreme fuzz pedals, players may choose to play mostly single notes, because the fuzz can make even single notes sound very thick and heavy. Heavy distortion also tends to limit the player's control of dynamics (loudness and softness) - similar to the limitations imposed on a Hammond organ player (Hammond organ does not produce louder or softer sounds depending on how hard or soft the performer plays the keys; however, the performer can still control the volume with drawbars and the expression pedal). Heavy metal music has evolved around these restrictions, using complex rhythms and timing for expression and excitement. Lighter distortions and overdrives can be used with triadic chords and seventh chords; as well, lighter overdrive allows more control of dynamics.[citation needed]

If you’re a guitarist, chances are you’ve either owned or at least played on a Zoom multi-effects pedal. It’s basically an unwritten law! They have always and continue to make some of the best multi effects pedals known to the musical world, so naturally we had to include the Zoom G3n Multi-Effects Processor (as well as a handful of other Zoom models) in this list.
In the Popular Mechanics lab, we played the Xbox 360 version of Rocksmith 2014 with a pair of Epiphone guitars: The Les Paul Junior that comes with the game bundle, and a $1000 Les Paul Custom that the company sent us for testing, and which, sadly, we have to send back. The thing that sets Rocksmith apart from other rhythm games is the "Hercules" adapter. It's a cable that plugs into the output jack of any guitar or bass and connects it to your console via the USB port. You use the ordinary console controller to navigate menus.
Hi - I am looking for a new amp for small to medium venues. I quite fancied the Marshall Mini Silver Jubilee combo, but then noticed several companies selling JVM 50 watt combos in the same price range. It seems that the JVM's are a Swiss Army knife whereas the MSJ seems to be capturing a small version of a classic amp and is more of a one trick pony . Any way you could help me make the right decision. On the other hand , how reliable are the JVM's considering their sophistication?
All the effects that were created up through the early 1980s were based on analog circuitry. That is, they operated by directly modifying an actual sound signal. Starting in the ‘80s, the digital revolution invaded the realm of guitar and bass effects with digital signal processing. Digital effects convert the instrument’s output to a digital bitstream that is then modified by digital circuitry before being translated back to analog sound signals for output. The first digital effects were all modeled on existing effects, but devices that followed such as pitch-shifting effects, delays, and harmony processors only became practical with the advent of digital signal manipulation.
Ovation Instruments is a Division of Kaman Corporation, a major supplier to the United States government of military helicopters, rescue equipment, electronic components and other aerospace products. There are eight divisions of Kaman, participating in such diverse industries as commercial transportation, nuclear sciences, space medicine, education and social sciences, oceanography and, most recently, recreation.
This guitar manufacturer started out as a parts supplier in the early 1970s. Atlansia didn't begin production of guitars under their badge until infamous engineer and designer Nobuaki Hayashi of Matsumoku fame became the company's president and chief designer in the late 1970s. Since then, Atlansia has continued to produce cutting-edge guitar designs in Nagano, Japan. The company did not make any other badged guitars other than namesake Atlansia.
If magnetic pickups are excellent for traveling guitars, contact pickups are great for amplified acoustic performances. These can capture the sound from the soundboard as well as from the rest of the body. You can also get a guitar that comes with a blended system which combines a pickup with a microphone. A model with a built-in preamp is also becoming the norm these days.
Buy a Kay online at our main web site, call our store or visit our Chicago guitar shop in person and check out the new Kay Vintage Reissues. We're not one of those guitar super stores, you will find we're friendly, knowledgeable and easy to work with.  We sell guitars world wide and we want to earn your business so please don't hesitate to contact us for our best Kay prices.  We ship Kay Basses and Guitars to Canada, Australia, UK, Europe, Japan and other locations.
Struggling to get your guitar sounding sweet and creamy? Don't fret! STUDIO GUITARS is here to warm up your sound with a selection of certified studio-fresh guitar loops recorded by Prime Loops' own professional master of the strings! Using some of the most classic equipment around, we've covered every curve of this awesome instrument's sound with an incredible collection of acoustic and electric guitar samples.
Yes, but not by a guitar center tech who realistically knows fuck all about anything he is adjusting. Find a luthier out independent repair person in your area. Even if it's an hour drive, the difference in the setup will be well worth it. You will also have established a relationship with someone who will know the right way to fix it if and when something breaks.
Reverb sits at the other end of the tonal kaleidoscope, serving usually to add warmth and depth to a clean tone. Practically speaking, reverb simulates the sound of your guitar being played in a larger physical space. Imagine shouting at the top of your voice in a cloakroom. Then imagine doing the same thing in a church and you’re somewhere near there. Ok, that’s an extreme example, but approximating the sound as it reverberates around is quite a seductive thing when applied to a guitar. There are plenty of good examples of it being used to add a bit of life to an otherwise sterile clean tone.
Wouldn't it be great if you could determine what price constitutes a "fair deal" before you made a deal? We think so. That's why we've created iGuide's Real Market Data (RMD) pricing, our proprietary system that does the research for you. It's a guide that gives you updated information on what you should pay for an item or what you should expect to receive - without having to spend hours researching. iGuide's Real Market Data pricing system is the internet's best guide to market value pricing and the only pricing system designed with the consumer in mind. Our exclusive RMD pricing is based on real sales data, gathered from auction sites in near real-time. This ensures you get the most accurate pricing available, as quickly as possible!
Chrome trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Our first recommendation in this list is the epic Les Paul model by Epiphone. The Special II model of Epiphone is specially made for beginners. If you are just starting to play the guitar and looking for a good quality one from the trusted band, you can buy this one. This one is very low cost and offers a lot more features than other Gibson guitars.
Very well cared for electric guitar.  Very light with a good tone provided by the maple neck and mahogany body. The S520EX features a thin, sculpted mahogany body bolted to a maple Wizard II neck with a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard with binding and claw scratch inlays only at the twelfth fret. Components include a pair of Ibanez Infinity covered humbucking pickups and a ZR ball-bearing pivot double locking tremolo bridge with a ZPS2 tuning stabilizer.

Yamaha is known for focusing, in modern years, on band instruments. But at one point in their tenure in the early 90s, they owned a good share of the student model market with their beautiful Pacifica line. Thankfully, in the past few years, they’ve reintroduced mass runs of this guitar, and it is a great option for a first-time guitar player. Why? Well if you ask any older player who once started on a Pacifica, most of them will tell you that they still have it in their collection somewhere, both for sentimental value, and because it’s built like a tank and plays well.

The 1952 Les Paul featured two P-90 single coil pickups, and a one-piece, ‘trapeze’-style bridge and tailpiece, with strings that were fitted under (instead of over) a steel stop-bar.[note 3] The weight and the tonal characteristics of the Les Paul were largely due to the mahogany and maple construction: maple is a hard and quite heavy wood, but was restricted to a cap over somewhat lighter mahogany, to keep weight under control.[note 4] In addition, the early 1952 Les Pauls were never issued serial numbers, did not have bound bodies, and are considered by some as “LP Model prototypes”. However, the later 1952 Les Pauls were issued serial numbers and also came with bound bodies. Interestingly, the design scheme of some of these early models varied. For instance, some of the Les Pauls of this issue were fitted with black covered P90 pickups instead of the cream-colored plastic covers that are associated with this guitar, even today. Of note, these early models, nicknamed “Goldtops”, have begun to gain the interest of collectors, and subsequently, the associated nostalgic value of this instrument is increasing.[note 5]
To THIS DAY, In My Life of being a Guitar-Player, I am Constantly STUNNED By The fact that SO many people-playing-guitar, know 'Diddly-Squat' about STRINGS.---When I Meet a New SOUL, Who Claims They are a Guitar-Player, Then When Asked 'What-Kind-of-Strings' do you Use,----I Get This 'Blank-Stare', which tells me Straight away They Don't even Know What-Size Shoe they Ware.----Very Strange.
Tremolo can be a subtle effect, as heard in “Born on the Bayou”by Creedence Clearwater Revival and Gimme Shelter by The Rolling Stones, or more distinct as heard in “Crimson and Clover” by Tommy James and the Shondells and “Bones”by Radiohead. Tremolo has been around since the earliest days of the rock era, and was popular with rockabilly and surf guitarists.

They began as an independent musical instrument company in 1873, in part of the Ottoman Empire which is now part of modern day Turkey, making stringed instruments such as lutes and fiddles - they relocated to the United States in 1903.. The founder's eldest son, Epaminondas Stathopoulos took over the company after his father passed away and later renamed the business to Epiphone Banjo Company in 1928 to rebrand the company and emphasize the fact theat they had changed to making more popular stringed instruments - the same year they first began making guitars. The name comes from 'Epi' which was Epaminondas' nickname, and the Greek word 'phone' meaning sound.


With a 25.5” scale length, the 314ce features a Grand Auditorium body shape with a playability-enhancing Venetian cutaway, allowing good access to the highest of the 20 frets. The top of the body is made from solid Sitka spruce, along with solid sapele back and sides, leading to a beautifully rich and powerful tone that’s well balanced between warm and bright.
There are many variations on the solid-body guitar theme. Companies such as Ibanez, Yamaha, PRS, Jackson and many others make solid-bodied guitars. Generally you get what you pay for, but provided you avoid the very cheapest models, and stick with reputable brands (such as those mentioned above) you can spend a relatively small amount of money and get a guitar that will last you long into your playing career.
If you’ve been playing for a while, chances are pretty good that you’ve probably already built up a collection of four, five or 10 stomp boxes, which now leaves you with the question of how to hook them all up and use them in your rig. Or perhaps you’ve hooked everything up and wondered why you get howling feedback, excess white noise, hum or silence whenever you engage two or more pedals at once.

Inspired by the Fuzz-Tone’s ability to add an aggressive swagger to any guitar melody, the mid-60s saw an explosion of copycat fuzz stompboxes. Most of the imitations were atrocious, but some became infamous. A few deliberately tried to combat the limitations of guitars themselves, like Gary Hurst’s 1965 Sola Sound Tone Bender MKI, which reused the three-transistor circuit of the Fuzz Tone. For the MKI, Hurst tweaked certain resistor values, which extended, or sustained, the guitar notes for longer. A two-transistor version of the tone bender (the MKI.5) morphed into Jimi Hendrix’s favorite stompbox, the simple and durable Arbiter Fuzz Face. The later model, the MKII, was at the heart of Jimmy Page’s secret sound in early Led Zeppelin recordings, When the Fuzz Face was released in 1966, it set a precedent for Hendrix imitators (“I Don’t Live Today” being the most frenetic extension of the Fuzz Face’s limits). With a keen ear for experimentation, Hendrix would often prefer the Fuzz Face’s tone when the battery was half-charged, in large part because germanium transistors fluctuate according to voltage. Guitarists would often have to wade through different batteries in order to find their own tone.
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Green
Just In: another great from Japan at Yamaha Nippon Gakki and wow this model was a good surprise by the big sound it projects I know why Martin made this shape guitar now they weigh nothing and put out a big sound I hardly believed it when I first heard one of these well that was years ago and I have had quite a few of these but non sounded any better than this baby. its in very good - excellent vintage condition no structural issues or cracks or even finish checking its neck alignment is excellent and its top is flat and bridge is tight its action is within Martin specs medium low and it plays excellently all throughout the fingerboard no weird buzzes its fun to play and sound is recording worthy, well taken care of over 40 years old and well maintained has resulted in a better than average survivor. Big sound and a pleasure to play with Martin like tone for a fraction. Questions or to buy contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
In 1966 Vox introduced the revolutionary but problematic GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. The instrument's trigger mechanism required a specially-wired plectrum that completed circuit connections to each fret, resulting in a very wide and unwieldy neck. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, though this never panned out. According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative. The instrument never became popular, but it was a precursor to the modern guitar synthesizer.
Eric Clapton: select alder body with a special soft V-shaped maple neck/fretboard, 22 vintage-style frets, three Vintage Noiseless pickups, 25dB active mid-boost circuit and a “blocked” original vintage synchronized tremolo. Available in olympic white, pewter, candy green, torino red (Artist Series), Antigua burst, gold leaf, EC grey, daphne blue, graffiti canvas, mercedes blue, black and midnight blue (Custom Artist), as well in olympic white, torino red and pewter with a “Thinskin” nitrocellulose lacquer finish (Custom Thinskin Nitro).
I own some 13 or so, high end American, Canadian and/or Japanese 6 strings 7 basses and a full studip of gear and if my opinion means FA then I can't help but not mention my Washburn Custom Shop WV548! It has Parker guitars (famous for the FLY) patented composite glass carbon fiber fretboard, EMG active PU's (81, 85) and a real Floyd with the Buzz Feiten system and it is bar none, the fastest, smoothest, and by far the nicest playing (and sounding for that matter) guitar I own or have played in my some 30 odd years plus, playing electrics.
• Why frets come loose: Wear from string contact, fretboard drying and jarring mid-gig or during transportation can cause frets to pop loose. And if binding loses moisture, that can cause the ends of frets to rise or be exposed. These all create troubles that can wrongly be blamed on the more typical problem of fretwear, but in these cases dressing or replacement isn’t necessarily the answer. If there’s enough fret wire left, a loose fret can be reseated in its slot along the fingerboard, and a skilled luthier can often fill the gaps between the binding and the fret ends.
My husband was looking forward to checking this place out. When we entered a guy wearing glasses asked if he could help us with anything and my husband said "oh just browsing." So we walked around some more. When we got to the electric guitar section, my husband saw a $2,000+ guitar he wanted to try. He took off his jacket so as not to scratch the guitar and SLOWLY picked the guitar from the wall hanger. The same guy earlier suddenly came up to my husband and said "You can't just pull it out like that!" My husband was surprised and had to ask what he just said?! I was as surprised. The clerk said "You can't just take it unless you are buying it." Really?! My husband said then you should have told me earlier when we first came in. We did not see any signs nor there's any lock on the guitar hanger. Why would you buy without trying it first?! That clerk probably thinks my husband don't have the money. They just lost a customer and a bunch of my husband's musician friends.

Besides the guitar just being fantastically sampled and recorded, Silk owes a lot of its realism to the controls in the upper right-hand corner on the main screen. Swing, Timing, Feel, and Variance can all be effortlessly adjusted and do a fantastic job of recreating that natural human touch or really the human flaw.  Timing is my favorite because the ebb and flow of the tempo between individually picked notes really reminds me of my own fingerpicking technique (or lack thereof).
Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.
Bell's journey to become a guitar master began with a car running over him as a child. He was an aspiring baseball player just shy of his 13 birthday and left with a fractured skull that ended his future career. So he picked up the guitar and fell in love. He's been building and repairing guitars since 1975. Today, he's running Bell's Custom Guitars on the side and repairing guitars at Murphy's Music in Irving.
Sorry This guitar has SOLD OUT! Here is a wonderfully crafted in Japan 000-18 type acoustic guitar by the great Takamine in the prime time of the lawsuit copys made with Pride in Japan long gone these have been discontinued decades ago over the copyrights to this Headstock design and also the logo looks identical to the Old 50s early 60s Martin from a few feet away looks exactly the same, that said this example is like owning a fairly new Vintage it has aged near 40 years yet is still near mint condition w/ nice OHSC.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory
Scale Length – Scale length of a guitar refers to the length of the strings and it is measured from the nut to the bridge. Guitars with longer scale length have tighter string tension with a brighter tone and well-defined low end. Guitars with shorter scale length have less string tension which allows easier bending of the strings and it offers warmer tones.
Higher strings can potentially induce some drawbacks that you will need to minimize. Before settling on your new action, you want to determine that strings don’t go out of tune in any fretting positions up and down the neck. You also need to ensure that using a capo, if you ever play with one, doesn’t throw all strings out of pitch too badly. Also note that if this experimentation results in raising your strings considerably from their previous position — and your guitar remains playable after doing so — you might also need to adjust your pickup height slightly. But, note that lowering the pickups further from the strings can often also help the strings to vibrate more freely (as discussed way back in Gibson Tone Tips #1), so leaving the pickups lower might be adding a double bonus to your new playing set up. Play with the options and see what works for you, and that will yield the “best right answer” for each individual player — and once you have achieved it for you, be sure to check and change your intonation, as necessary. If low action floats your boat, great, but it’s worth knowing that there’s a wealth of tone hiding in that thin slice of air between string and fingerboard.
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