THE BODY This is where your guitar starts to take shape. After you have finnished your design you will need to trace it onto the wood that you are going to use for the template or body. A solid blank of tonewood that you can get from online retailers like Catalina Guitars can run anywhere in the price range of $70 to $250 depending on what wood you use. Some people will tell you that different wood will produce a different tone. While this is true in some cases like the crisper higher pitch tone of Mapel and the warmer fuller tones of Mahogany, you probably won't be able to tell the differnce between using a lower grade wood versus a higher grade more expensive wood. The only time that I would splurge and buy expinsive wood is if I was going to use a clear finish on the body and all the other parts of the guitar were going to be high end quality parts. For my project I didn't have a lot of money, much less the expensive tools to work with to produce a result that I would want to break the bank on.
PLOTTING OUT THE PEICES Once you have drawn out the shape of the body you can then locate and draw the cavaties that the pickups and electronics will go and set you bridge placement. It is good to know wher the center of the guitars boy is so you can make sure that the pickups and bridge are in good alignment with the neck pocket. I like to take a piece of poster board and trace the fretboard of the neck on it and cut it out, that way I can properly place my bridge according to my scale length.
Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.
If you just want one or two instruments from a large SoundFont then follow this procedure.  Open the large multi-instrument SoundFont in Polyphone, then select File, New, Name the new SoundFont.  Go to the Presets of the original SoundFont, Left-Click the Preset you want and then holding down the Left mouse button then drag it to the Presets of the new SoundFont and let go of the button (the preset is now inside your new SoundFont).  Right-Click on the main heading of the original SoundFont and choose Close File.  Now simply choose File, Save (or Save As), Close.
FeaturesThe Gibson LogoAngled HeadstockAdjustable Truss RodNew Asymmetrical Neck Profile22-Fret Rosewood FingerboardAlloy Fret WireTrapezoid Inlays Set-Neck ConstructionPlus Maple TopChambered Mahogany BodyPickups: Gibson Burstbucker ProsTonePros Locking Tune-o-matic Bridge and Locking Stopbar TailpieceNitrocellulose FinishBody BindingCustom-Made PotentiometersLocking Neutrik JackLocking Grover TunersRevolutionary Plek Set UpNew Enlarged Neck Tenon
If your interests are on the jazz side of things, the Ibanez Artcore series is worth a close look. These economical hollow-body guitars are perfect for players at any level who want a well-crafted instrument that won't break the bank. They come with a well-deserved reputation for solid stone and sustain and they hold tuning reliably, making the Artcore guitars a good choice to get the most bang for your buck.
Other high-quality specifications include a bone nut, a molded metal jack plate that is curved and makes plugging and unplugging a guitar cable hassle-free, retooled knobs, fretwire that is slightly smaller than what you’d find on most PRS electric guitars, and PRS’s double action truss rod (accessible from the front of the headstock for ease of use).
Played by people such as Paul Simon and Richie Havens, Guild has been a top-of-the-line Acoustic guitar manufacturer since 1952. While they originally stuck to archtops, they branched off into more complicated builds. They also make solidbody electric guitars and even some semi-hollowbodies. Guild is known for their commitment to quality and tone. They were bought by Cordoba recently, but the general consensus is that the buyout is a good thing. When owned by Fender, their electric lineup was neglected and now they’re making a comeback. An additional aspect of Guild guitars is their durability. They have a very solid build and can easily shrug off some wear and tear while still sounding like it was when it was brand new.
Soundwise, it still packs the same AudioDNA2 processor but somehow sounds 'better', I think John Johnson (founder of Digitech before it was sold to Harman re-hired to work on this RP) had a lot to do with the improvements. I think they have made this with it being used/abused in mind, from the rigid metal chasis, to the USB connectivity, line-in jack to play along backing tracks, headphone input, stereo out, built-in looper (40 seconds) and the awesome Stompbox and SoundCheck features.
Tube Is Probably Not The Way To Go – Don’t get me wrong, I am a fan of tube amps. There are a lot of great things about them, but in most cases, tube amps are a lot more expensive than solid-state amps. They are also harder to maintain and keep working. While you might want the tone of a tube amplifier, a chance is you can’t afford it as a beginner and neither do you have to afford it. As a beginner, at least I, did not have enough skills to make full use of tube amps so why spend money on a model that you cannot fully make use of? Apart from that, solid-state, especially practice ones are renowned for their durability. Whether you play it for hours on end or have a small accident you probably won’t damage it (unless you really try).

From a perfectionist/engineering standpoint, there is a lot wrong with this circuit. The controls are complexly interactive. There is no really flat setting, as there is a residual midrange scoop unless the Treble and Bass controls are fully down. The action of the Bass control is very uneven for normal taper controls. While the Mid control appears to affect only the mids, it is actually a form of volume control that affects all frequencies, but is the only control that also affects mids. Although it has several imperfections, this tone stack actually helps some of the quirks of guitar, so it works well.
Input kewords into the searchbox at the top of each page, then click the WHAT'S IT WORTH button. The search engine will find matching pages based on keywords you type into the Search Box. The engine searches all categories of objects, not just this particular category, so you may get some irrelevant items in your search results. Too many results? Be more specific. Not enough results? Be less specific.
In this example I used the "Sub Engineer Bass" patch included in the Kontakt 5 bass collection. But there are no rules in this regard: a simple sine oscillator can do the trick just fine. Back in the '60s and '70s it was not unusual to use a Rhodes to achieve the same effect, and Roland's famous JUNO-106 was also used on countless occasions with the same goal in the '80s. Just give it a go with whatever you have at hand!
In 1978 the Les Paul Pro Deluxe was introduced. This guitar featured P-90 pickups instead of the “mini-humbuckers” of the Deluxe model, an ebony fingerboard, maple neck, mahogany body and chrome hardware. It came in Ebony, Cherry Sunburst, Tobacco Sunburst or Gold finishes. Interestingly, it was first launched in Europe, rather than the US. It was discontinued in 1983.
FX or no FX? Again, it's almost a question of valve or solid state, here. Most valve amps don't come with any effects other than tremolo and reverb, at most. Solid State amps often come with a wide range of features such as digital FX and amp modelling. If you're an have lots of fx pedals, you don't really need a modelling unit, but if you're new to guitar playing, buying an amp with modeling FX might be a good way to get familiar with all those sounds.

One of the most over looked and shockingly good guitars I have ever played in my 23 years of chopping wood. In their rich history there have been little misses, but over all Aria guitars are supreme to their competitor especially at the price point. My 1977 Aria les paul copy has at leased twice the balls as my buddy's 6 year old Gibson and tons more playability. Forget about comparing to epiphone, seriously. eBay yourself a Aria electric and you WILL be pleasantly surprised. Aria acoustics; If your reaching for a nylon, Aria makes some of the best classical guitars with a history of employing some of the most well noted artisans of the craft, such as Ryoji Matsuoka. Fine craftsmanship all around, built with quality woods and have a tendency to get better with age, laminated or not. As for steal strings, I've only played one to be honest, but this Martin 'lawsuit' was a work of art. Thank you.
If you are inexperienced, it is only recommended that you attempt to setup a guitar that is of little value to you, both financially and sentimentally. If you don’t have one that fits these requirements, then it is best to pay the cost of a guitar setup as performed by a professional. The primary risk while setting up the instrument is over adjustment. Working any part of the bridge too much will cause wear and tear, and irreparable damage to the neck is often the result of improperly adjusting the truss rod. It is always hard to justify ruining a perfectly good instrument in order to avoid guitar setup cost.
PICK GUARD - KRAMER 450 - LO GIBSON - GOLDTOP - GIBSON SG CUSTOM SHOP - THUNDER JET - TAKAMINE - GIBSON 1959 - 450 12 - 66 ES-330 - 1972 - HAGSTROM F-300 RED LEFTHANDED - GIANNINI - BALLADEER - WHITE LES PAUL - HAGSTROM BRIDGE - CONRAD - LES PAUL 1953 - PROJECT - WASHBURN EA27 - KALAMAZOO KG - FRAMUS BASS - BASS VI - 1967 - ES-330 - HOLLOW - 1981 LES - BALDWIN BABY BISON - STELLA ACUOSTIC - MARTIN N-20 - VAN EPS - LES PAUL RECORDING - PIG - MARLBORO - HAGSTROM F12-S - FENDER STRATOCASTER 63 - LS 6 - HARMONY - J-45 - UNIVOX BASS
Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.
@Umberto – Thanks for supporting Strymon! 🙂 The best place for the Lex is where it sounds best to you. If you like how it sounds in front of your drive pedals, I recommend using it in that location. I also want to note that turning up the PREAMP DRIVE on the Lex can lead to lower effect output volume and recommend using the pedals on-board boost (up to +6dB of boost) to counter this loss of volume.
Note that most (but not all) tabs don't display the rhythm with which you should play the notes in the tab. They may break the tab into measures (usually signified by vertical lines in the tab between measures, but they won't tell you the rhythm of the notes within the measures. In this case, it's best to listen to the song while you read the tab to find the beat.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black

Like in the overall best-selling list, there are a few amps on this list which have been discontinued but continue to sell very well on the used market. Part of the reason these amps rank so high on our lists is that Reverb is one of the only places these models are still being sold, meaning that our sales likely account for a sizable chunk of the entire used market for these particular amps.

Ovation are relative newcomers to the world of vintage guitars, only launching their range at the 1967 NAMM show in Chicago. Ovation started as an off-shoot of founder Charles Kamen's work in the aviation field, studying vibration and resonances in helicopter blades. Whilst other respected American manufacturers relied heavily of quality nautral products and the artistry of their master luthiers, Ovation came very much from a science and engineering perspective: they used oscillographs to test existing instruments, and came up with the famous Ovation rounded back design, and suggested the use of a synthetic material, Lyrachord, claiming it to be more resonant that any wood.

When two sine waves with frequencies A and B are ring-modulated, the output will also contain the frequencies A+B and B-A. If frequency B is not a multiple of A, these additional frequencies are inharmonic; e.g. ring-modulating sine waves at 1000Hz and 1250Hz will add the frequency 2250Hz, which is neither a multiple of 1000Hz, nor of 1250Hz. When more complex sounds are ring-modulated, sums and differences of all the harmonic frequencies are added.


Maple is the most common wood used to make guitar necks. It is very hard and dense, and often has attractively detailed grain patterns referred to as figuring. Maple also has a very bright overall tone. Due to it’s figuring and its tonal characteristics maple is often used for a veneer or top laminate on more expensive solid body guitars. It is also used as a top wood in some archtop guitars, where it is usually laminated. Its hardness brings out the trebles in a guitar's sound. It is also often used for the fretboard where it adds definition to the sound. 

SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.

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There's no denying the popularity of the Stratocaster, thanks to it being the weapon of choice for a long list of iconic players that include Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck to name a few. The American Professional Stratocaster is the latest iteration of this classic, carrying over much of the look and feel of the original, but more reliable and road worthy.

Inspiring, light, and upbeat corporate background music with motivational and optimistic energy. Positive and sunny tune for technology and business presentations, travel inspirational Youtube videos, success stories, an unforgettable journey, slideshow. This optimistic and festive track can perfectly fit for any corporate media projects. Featuring muted electric guitar, electric guitar, piano, synth pads, acoustic guitar, drums, bass guitar, piano.
Ultimately, if you’re mostly playing rock, heavier blues, or any shred or metal styles, you might prefer jumbo or medium-jumbo frets. However, for country, rockabilly, surf, or old-school ’50s rock and roll, narrow frets could be the way to go. In any case, though, if your frets are in good condition and your guitar is set up right, the size of that wire in and of itself shouldn’t stop you from sounding great on whatever you play.
In general, this measurement is taken by measuring the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the 6th fret while holding the string down at the 12th fret and the first fret. This is where the capo comes in handy - put it on the first fret so your hand is free to take the measurement. Using a feeler gauge of the desired height, in this example, 0.010, hold the low E string down at the 12th fret (with the capo on the first fret), and measure the distance between the top of the 6th fret and the bottom of the low E string. If the distance is greater than the desired relief, then you need to turn the truss rod clockwise (towards your right) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. If the distance is less than the desired amount, then you need to turn the truss rod counter-clockwise (towards your left) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. The basic rule is:
It is also believed that 'Terada Musical Instrument Co., Ltd. of Japan also made some guitars for Ibanez during this period.' It's thought that 'these would be mostly hollow-body guitars, but may also included some solid-body Artist series models.' There is no proof whatsoever for either of these assumptions. It's most likely that this is a big misunderstanding caused by an over generalization in the database of the "Guitar Dater Project" website, which is not able to assign the right factory to a vintage Ibanez guitar based on its serial number. The false information this website generates has been propogated in numerous advertisements of sellers of vintage Ibanez guitars. There is no proof whatsoever of any solid body Ibanez guitar produced by Terada. On the contrary: the fact that the production of solid body Ibanez Artist guitars shifted to Iida Gakki 1987, while hollow-body and semi-hollow Artist guitars became Artstar labels with H serial numbers, shows that the original production before 1987 came all from the FujiGen Gakki factory, which was experiencing capacity problems during that time period caused by their commitment to produce guitars for Fender Japan. If Terada had produced AR models already, they would have continued doing so. The AR and AS models shared the same necks under the Artist flag. Splitting the production up from a situation in which they were already both made in the Terada factory wouldn't be efficient, so it is highly unlikely that pre-1987 AR and AS models were ever made there.

I feel that most of the bad reviews are due to inexperience with electronics. Frustration caused by not knowing what the parts are or how they work. Missing parts is never a good thing, so I guess I was lucky that my kit came with everything. If you do buy this kit and did not manage to get it working please understand that you have probably made a simple mistake.
One user summarizes market sentiment nicely by saying that the Yamaha THR10C is a phenomenal amplifier. Many of the commendations point to its great balance of sonic versatility and portability as its main strength, while others are pleased with its sound quality. Even experts are amazed by how it sounds, including Nick Guppy of Music Radar who commends it by saying: "While there are many small modelling amps around today, few of them look or sound as good as the THR." Build quality, USB recording convenience and the ability to run on batteries are also well received.

Nickel trapeze tailpiece with a diamond. For Gibson guitars including the following models- L-50, L48, ES-125, ES-330, etc. Please make sure to check the specs to see if they match your instrument to verify it is the correct replacement. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 4 5/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 19/64 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge. Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
Since 1996, ESP’s subsidiary LTD has been creating quality guitars at very affordable prices. The EC-256, for example, is a great guitar if you’re looking to spend around $400. With extra-jumbo frets and a thin-U neck, this guitar is super comfortable to play. These guitars are known for their reliability and excellent build quality. And with a lightweight body, they make for great gigging guitars.
Kaman and his technicians began by building traditional square-backed guitars, but by the sixth prototype were using oscilloscopes to develop the now familiar bowl-backed shape, its spherical shape being self-reinforcing, thus eliminating the need for bracing. After some experimentation, the carved, round-crowned Ovation three-and-three headstock was developed. The modern Ovation guitar with a Lyracord back was born.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 22, Jumbo - Inlay: Pearl - Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.6" (62.5cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Pickup Configuration: H-S-H - String Instrument Finish: Emerald Green - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case - Made In: America - # Produced: 150
You may hear many guitarists or repairman talk about pots. What are pots? The word “pot” is short for potentiometer. A potentiometer is a simple electronic device that adjusts the flow of electric current. Most pots are basically glorified resistors. There are two outer lugs that carry the voltage to and from the pickups. The middle lug is a “swipe” lug that resists the voltage. When the knob is turned, the swipe resists more or less voltage allowing the volume to decrease or increase. Both volume and tone knobs are pots. The only difference between these two pots is that the tone pot has a capacitor soldered to the ground lug. The capacitor short-circuits the high frequencies disallowing them from reaching the output jack and eventually the amp. Your guitar will sound less trebly the smaller the resistance of the tone pot before the capacitor. For a more technical description of a capacitor, see the electric guitar capacitor page.

: : "Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired
Ever since Christmas Day 1967,I have been trying to find out who made my MIJ guitar I got as a gift that year.Today I found out who made my little Dover when your excellent book came in the mail.I was always puzzled I’ve never seen another Dover and despite many inquiries to guitar mags-nobody else had heard of the brand either.Back in 2009 I sent several pix of my whole collection to Vintage Guitar Mag-they only printed on pic,and that was the one with the Dover-even though there were several others that I thought were more historically significant.The guitar looks like a 3/4 size attempt of making a Jazzmaster copy as it had the strange Meito plastic pickups with the 6 little chrome triangles where the pole pieces usually go.I noticed that Sakai Mokko also made Sears guitars and that really clicked with me as my mother worked at Sears in Toronto at the time and that’s where she bought my Dover.I will try to send some pix your way.
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black

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