Gibson guitars have a shorter 24.75-inch scale length, giving them a looser feel and a somewhat warmer tone. They feature resonant tonewoods, typically mahogany for the body and neck. The neck is set in place and glued instead of bolted. Les Paul-style instruments have carved tops made from another tonewood such as maple, but other instruments such as the SG have flat tops like the Strat. If something goes wrong with this kind of guitar you may be able to repair it yourself, but issues like broken necks and headstocks require work done by a professional luthier.
The fretboard wood is used for the part where the frets are installed (front of the neck, where you press on the strings). All our fretboards are built from quality tone woods. If you're just starting out, we recommend you choose the wood that appeals to you most based on its appearance, and don't worry too much about how the type of wood affects the sound or performance of the instrument.
Chorus pedals can provide a nice subtle doubling effect to the guitar or an extreme “watery” effect when maximized. Famous tunes that use chorus is “Come As You Are” (1991) by Nirvana, and “Brass in Pocket” (1979) by The Pretenders. But basically almost any clean guitar sound in the 80’s had some chorus on it! Certain effects are timeless such as overdrive, reverb and delay. Other effects like chorus can evoke certain time periods such as the 80’s so that is something to keep in mind when using an effect.
Jazz guitarists need to learn about a range of different chords, including major 7th, major 6th, minor 7th, minor/major 7th, dominant 7th, diminished, half-diminished, and augmented chords. As well, they need to learn about chord transformations (e.g., altered chords, such as "alt dominant chords" described above), chord substitutions, and re-harmonization techniques. Some jazz guitarists use their knowledge of jazz scales and chords to provide a walking bass-style accompaniment.
Prior to dennis, i had never taken guitar lessons. Always tried to teach myself. I struggled since i had no structure, i would consistantly get lost, which would make me put the guitar down due to frustration. Deciding to hire dennis was a break thru for me, and honestly wish i would have looked into it much sooner. Not only has my skills progressed, which they due weekly at a much faster rate then when i was trying to learn on my own, but my confidence and motivatation has increased greatly. I look forward to meeting with dennis each week and building off of what he taught me the previous week. The amount of patience dennis has is great, and the way he explains different things so that i understand is awsome. Would definetly recommend dennis to anyone, whether they have just purchased their first guitar, or they have tried numerous times to teach themselves, or even if you have alot of the basics down, but looking to take your knowledge and playing to the next level.
The Fender Telecaster was developed by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California in 1950. In the period roughly between 1932 and 1949, several craftsmen and companies experimented with solid-body electric guitars, but none had made a significant impact on the market. Leo Fender’s Telecaster was the design that finally put the solid-body guitar on the map.
1Note that no signal processing is instantaneous, so every effect adds some small delay. For digital effects, this is the measurable and sometimes notable latency of something millisecond-ish (hopefully not more than a few ms). In simple analogue effects like distortion it's at most in the nanosecond range and basically neglectable. Any equaliser/filter component also introduce phase delay, which can be interpreted as delaying various frequencies by different amounts; but this too is normally not noticeable and works quite differently from a digital delay.
The pickup itself consists of a long magnet, or a number of cylindrical magnets in a row, around which is a wire coil. The vibrations of the electric guitar’s strings cause changes in the magnetic field of these magnets, which in turn is able to induce a current in the coiled wire. This current is then passed on to the amplifier, which produces the sound. The stronger the magnets used in the pickups, the more sensitive they are to the string’s vibrations.
3) Had a little fret buzz on the high E but that was probably more my fault than anything else because I changed the light gauge strings to extra lights which sometimes requires the neck adjustment to be loosened. This guitar is set up from the factory with light gauge strings which means if you put on extra lights, the neck will have a tendency to straighten out too much which brings your strings closer to the frets and sometimes results in fret buzz. An easy fix though...just take a straight edge, like an aluminum yardstick, and lay on the neck, or hold down the string on the first and last fret and you should have just a slight space (approx. 1/64" - 1/32") between the frets and strings in the middle of your fret board. In other words, contrary to popular belief the neck is supposed to have an ever-so-slight dip in the middle and IS NOT supposed to be perfectly straight. My guitar required about a 3/4 turn (loosened) on the neck adjustment to fix the fret buzz. And, remember when adjusting the neck don't expect immediate results. Give the neck time to settle-in adjusting a little at a time and then waiting a couple hours or so before checking it again. If you still have fret buzz after adjusting the neck then it most likely will be at the nut because Yamaha keeps their action really low at the nut. If so, just take a piece of paper and put it under the string at the nut which should be an easy fix.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
A 6 stringed guitar, black satin in color. It is gloss finish and comes without a case. The body is made from Mahogany and the neck from the Flamed maple. The guitar consists of tone,volume and 3 way pickup switch. It was introduced alomost 20 years ago and includes all the charm present in its cousins from USA . The device can be acquired with as little as INR 19,755  and more details can be found at:
There are a few ways to save some money on your electric guitar (click for modal analysis). One way is to order online, for example from Amazon, which is usually cheaper than buying from a physical shop. Make sure that you know what the usual price for the guitar you want is, so that you can compare different sites, and in the best of worlds, use a discount code or wait until there’s a sale.
Now, imagine having that same signal but with your guitar’s volume on its half way setting. That same degraded signal comes out even worse as it only had half of the voltage to work with from the get-go. In order to minimize the amount of signal loss, it is always suggested that the guitar’s volume is kept at its max setting and either manually adjust the output level from the amp or better yet, from a dedicated volume pedal, as is the choice for most professional musicians. A volume pedal in an effects chain will control the output volume of everything that is placed before it, so it’s pretty much almost always a good idea to place it at the end of the chain if it’s going to be your main form of overall volume control.
What made him truly special was that, unlike other guitarists of his time who stuck to one style of playing, Jimi combined styles and used strumming alongside licks and other additions to create a fuller and more organic sound. Amazingly, he also used his thumb to do do a moving baseline whilst he was playing chords – he wanted to do what no other guitarists were doing, or were able to do and he succeeded. The way he dressed his chords with so many different sounds and rhythms just shows how naturally talented a guitarist Jimi Hendrix was. His guitar was like an extension of his body, a part of his left hand that had no boundaries.
At this time (and for a while now) the best guitars are made in Japan and Korea. However Japanese guitars carry a premium which you don’t find to the same degree on Korean guitars. So Korean guitars will offer the best value and quality for price. There is a Cort factory in Korea, however 1) The Korean Cort factory also makes entry level guitars and 2) Cort also have other factories in other countries which have much lower standards. There are some good/excellent Cort guitars but there are also many bad ones with shoddy workmanship. So Cort as a brand name isn’t enough to guarantee a well made instrument - you also need to check it’s made in Korea, and also that it’s one of the better models (price will probably be a guide). All the brands made at the largest factory, the World Instrument Co. one (which makes PRS SE and Chapman guitars among others) are built to a very high standard.
The Axe-Fx II is also the world’s most powerful hardware multi-effects. To use it with an amp, just create presets with no AMP or CAB blocks. Some people run separate chains of effects —some before the amp and others in its loop. This is called the “four cable method.” Or better still: match the sound of your amp and send THAT to front of house while you use your amp on stage in all its glory.
In contrast, wiring two pickups in series produces a longer path with increased resistance, adding volume while preventing the highest frequencies from getting through. With series wiring, the output of one pickup goes into the input of another pickup, while with standard parallel wiring, each pickup takes its own path to the output. Besides being noticeably louder, series wiring emphasizes low and midrange tones, and this is a perfect combination to drive any tube amp into saturation without the help of a booster.
Judging by the tag in the sound hole, headstock logo, and general construction of the guitar I would think it's definite made earler than '86. Mine has a tag identical to this one but the date 16 5 78 is stamped onto it and it also has the name of the person who inspected it stamed on it. Interestingly I did notice your guitar has a different truss rod construction than mine. looks like yours adjusts from the head stock under the cover and mine is an allen adjustment through the sound hole. Don't know if they switched over to your style at a later date... food for thought. I have heard of some poeple reffering to these as Yairi built guitars even though they don't carry the Yairi headstock logo.
In the ’66 American Teisco Del Rey Catalog, the small, humble EP-9T was left over from before (formerly EP-9), with the quasi-Gibson style head and triangular control plate. The only thing new was the Bigsby (thus the T). In the ’66 Japanese catalog, the small thinlines were represented by the EP-2L and EP-1L. The EP-2L looks for all the world like the EP-9T, with the large rectangular pickups with black inserts, controls on the triangular lower bout plate, and a long-armed trapeze vibrato with a curved handle. The EP-1L was the same except for having a single metal-covered pickup at the neck.
And its not just about the looks, because this affordable guitar comes with a solid spruce top with mahogany back and sides. This means that you are getting a mid-tier instrument for the price of an entry level guitar, a beginner guitar that will grow with you as your ears become sharper and you learn to play better. Because of its conventional build, this acoustic has a warm and balanced tone that can sound bland to some, but it should make for a great starting point for those who are still discovering their own musical voice.
Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .
Based on Mesa's flagship Mark V, the Mark Five: 25 head is small, perfectly formed and typical of Mesa's superlative design and attention to detail. Two independent channels, each with three very different voice presets, combine with Mesa's iconic five-band graphic EQ for a choice of 12 sounds. You can footswitch between the channels, with the graphic on or off for quasi four-channel operation and preset 25 or 10 watts per channel. One of the best features lives on the back panel: a CabClone speaker-emulated direct output, with a speaker defeat for silent recording or practice, using the built-in headphone socket. Despite the Mark Five: 25's long feature list, it's very easy to use and its tones are sensational. The rhythm channel covers the shimmering clean tones of the modern Boogie and the fatter 'blackface'-inspired midrange of the fabled Mark I, while the Mark V crunch voice is so deep and three-dimensional you could record an entire album with it. The lead channel is equally inspiring, with a perfect rendition of the Mark IIC's overdrive tone (arguably the most coveted Boogie sound), along with more modern distortion effects that sound unbelievably good when tweaked with the graphic. The Mark Five: 25 is one of the best small Boogies we've ever heard, which means it's one of the best small amps there is.
As opposed to the modeling amps and amp profilers already on the market, the Power Head doesn’t just offer a number of pre-set amp settings that would allow you to imitate the styles of famous guitarists (among many other things), but it can also copy the settings of other amps it is connected to, or let you load your own so that any particular style you’ve stumbled upon during a recording session can be re-rendered with crystal-clear accuracy when performing live.
Fender once again has proved itself to be a great name in the guitar industry by introducing this super acoustic model. It’s a full-size guitar and is IDEAL FOR BEGINNERS to start their musical journey as guitarists with it. It’s designed for learners so you must not expect too much from it, but yet, it is capable of producing great sounds in the hands of an advanced player that’s why claimed to be best suited for all styles of music.
A younger, but very high-quality brand that's also a favorite among country artists, Taylor manufactures some truly investment-worthy acoustic guitars—with a sound that only improves over time. Its creator, Bob Taylor, tested the use of exotic tonewoods in excellent guitars, so he used oak recovered from pallet wood to craft the back, sides, and neck of the Pallet Guitar, an important model originally made in 1995. Taylor's roster of tonewoods also includes Indian Rosewood, African Ebony, Blackheart Sassafras, Blackwood, Cocobolo, Figured Walnut, Granadillo, Hawaiian Koa, Maple, Ovangkol, Sapele, Tropical Mahogany, and several others.
In attempting to amplify acoustic guitars, inventors and musicians alike soon discovered an issue that is still problematic for many of today’s acoustic guitarists — feedback. Hence, the evolution of solid body electric guitars, spearheaded by Vivi-Tone in 1934. Rickenbacker followed up by distributing the Electro Spanish in 1935 (Electro Spanish later being shortened to ES by Gibson for their line of hollow body and semi-hollow electric guitars), and the Slingerland Songster 401 was introduced in 1936. But some guitarists — mainly jazz and blues musicians — came to miss the warm, full-bodied tone that can only be generated by the free-space resonance of tops and backs made from quality tonewoods. And so it is that we also have the hybrid design of semi-hollow body electric guitars.
La Niña en la Tienda de Flores / The Girl in the Flower Shop (https://shop.per-olovkindgren.com/?product_tag=la-nina-en-la-tienda-de-flores) is inspired of when I was in a flower shop in Miami for buying red roses for Valentins day. The young girl serving me was a beautiful young "Latina" with a smile I will never forget. She told me my wife/girlfriend was very lucky to receive those...
So essentially if you are looking for a thicker, higher output sound a humbucker will be a better fit for you. If however, you prefer a brighter, twangier tone a single coil will be best. If in doubt consider the guitar tones and styles of music you prefer e.g. Fender or Gibson and go with a similar style of guitar kit or even better grab yourself one of each.
You might initially think that Music Lab is narcissistic for creating a line of guitar VSTs with the word “real” in them. But after you hear the first note, you’ll be kicking yourself for doubting it. There is a lot to cover with the “Real” line, and since they share many of the same features, we will slowly go over the components of these VSTs throughout the reviews for them.  
To make frequency selective networks, we must use capacitors and/or inductors. Unlike resistors, both caps and inductors discriminate against some frequencies in favor of others. Capacitors preferentially pass higher frequencies; inductors pass lower frequencies more easily. Resistors help us set how much gets through, while caps and inductors select which frequencies get through. Inductors are big, heavy and expensive, so almost all tone controls use only caps and resistors.
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
The pitch shifter effect can also be used to detune or “capo” a guitar without the need to actually retune the instrument.  These detuning type pedals have become prominent in the age of dropped tunings and seven string guitars.  The Digitech Whammy Pedal is the most widely known pitch shifter for guitarists and has been used by players like Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead and Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine fame.
Use of a slide or bottleneck. The term slide refers to the motion of the slide against the strings, while bottleneck refers to the material originally used for such slides: the necks of glass bottles. Instead of altering the pitch of a string in the normal manner (by pressing the string against a fret), a slide is placed upon the string to vary its vibrating length and thus its pitch. The slide can be moved along the string without lifting, creating continuous transitions in pitch.
Whereas tube amps are the traditional, solid-state amplifiers represent the modern guitar amplifier (even though they have been around for decades). While some guitarists refuse to consider solid-state amps worthy of their time, models such as the Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus are proof that solid-state amplification is not only capable, but preferable in some cases. This high-end amp offers 120 watts of power, professional-grade tone and awesome versatility. It’s a good reflection of this segment, which offers endless versatility with affordable prices, low maintenance and incredible reliability.

A marvelous acoustic guitar with 6 strings and natural color. it has its body made from mahogany and a spruce top. The fret board is also made from mahogany. It one of the most beautiful guitar producing incredible sound. It is designed to suit the needs of the beginner in guitar playing. The price ranges from around INR 14,760 depending on available offers. To find more product information relating to Epiphone DR-212, click on the link below:
It’s provided as-is with no support, but it’s still well worth checking out if you’re on a PC. According to the developers, it was born inside an academic research project about the modelling of electric devices, and then applied to the musical instrument field as an evolution of the techniques available in commercial units. Its most important feature is the high precision of the simulation.
Regardless of their investment potential or merit compared to Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, the fact remains that clean original Harmony and Kay guitars as well as some of the other interesting student-grade instruments of the 1960s and earlier are quite rare today. Since they were prone to structural problems, many were simply thrown away rather than being repaired. Due to the lack of good repairmen prior to the mid 1970s, attempts to repair such instruments were often as bad or worse than the original problems, further adding to the destruction. Since most of these instruments cost much less than a Martin, Gibson or Fender when new, owners often felt much less of an incentive to take good care of them. Back in the mid 1960s when I was starting out, I saw far more people playing Harmonys, Kays and Danelectos than Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, but for a variety of reasons most of these student instruments have not survived, so that today it is actually a rare occurrence for me to find an original Harmony Sovereign or a good Kay archtop in playable or good cosmetic and structural condition.
First of all we have to make special mention for the build quality of the RP500. It has a cast-metal chassis and vacuum-style footswitches like on an actual stompbox, and it just feels like it’s built better than any Line 6 or Boss multi-effect we’ve tried. On the rear of the RP500 you’ll find a ¼” input for your guitar, stereo output, headphones jack, AUX in, balanced XLR stereo out, and a USB port. A power supply is included, so points for DigiTech over Boss for doing users that courtesy. A look at the front panel layout reveals it’s pretty unique. It doesn’t have the side-by-side stompbox look we love so much in the Zoom G3X, it has fewer knobs than the Boss ME-80, and yet it looks more straightforward to use than the Line 6 POD HD500X. The dimensions and weight are almost exactly the same as the Boss ME-80 (about 20 inches wide, and weighs approximately 8 lbs).

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The pickup itself consists of a long magnet, or a number of cylindrical magnets in a row, around which is a wire coil. The vibrations of the electric guitar’s strings cause changes in the magnetic field of these magnets, which in turn is able to induce a current in the coiled wire. This current is then passed on to the amplifier, which produces the sound. The stronger the magnets used in the pickups, the more sensitive they are to the string’s vibrations.
Acoustic guitars are generally larger than electric guitars. They also tend to use heavier-gauge strings. Heavier-gauge strings will require a bit more finger strength than the lighter-gauge strings found on electric guitars. Getting comfortable holding the guitar and fretting notes is important on both acoustics and electrics, but may be slightly more physically challenging with acoustics versus electrics.
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.

There is no real rule on what fretsize is best – it is purely personal preference.  To find out what size is right for you or for a specific guitar and application, you may have to try similar guitars with different fretsizes.  I have heard many differing opinions on fretsize over the years; some say tall wire is too bumpy for sliding into position or that tall wire causes them to play sharp (from overly pressing down the strings, these players are used to feeling fingerboard surface under their finger tips).  Some say that fretwire below a certain height is difficult to bend on.  Bending and fretting hand slurring techniques are easier when the string can be addressed towards the middle of the ball end of the fingertip so that it may be pushed and pulled from the side rather than fretted from directly on top by the lower part of the fingertip. Some folks like a low fretwire as it feels very smooth to them and they don’t do a lot of slurring techniques.
Since you're a beginner, lighter strings are probably going to be easier for you to play until you get your fretting hand built up with permanent callouses and finger strength. I would advise buying 9-42 gauge strings even if that's not what your guitar came with originally - if it had 10's on it from the factory, the 9's will feel slinkier and more forgiving on your hands.
The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.
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Lest anyone think left-handed guitarists are at a disadvantage compared to their right-handed contemporaries, consider this list of some of the best known lefties: Paul McCartney, Dick Dale, Jimi Hendrix, and Albert King are just a few of the world’s most esteemed left-handed guitar players. In the 1950s and ’60s, though, left-handed guitars were often difficult to come by, especially for guitarists on a budget. This makes left-handed...Continue Reading

So what are acousticelectric guitars? Quite simply, it’s an acoustic guitar with slight modifications that means it can be plugged into a power amp. This means that the sound from the guitar can be made much louder for use live or with a band. It also means that, as the signal becomes electric, it can be altered with effects pedals and other equipment. Sometimes, because of this, electric acoustics are used when recording in a studio, though a microphone is often used too.
On some amps, setting the "gain" or "drive" control above a certain setting causes an overdrive effect, either due to the natural effect of overloading the preamplifier (or the preamp tube on a tube amplifier) and/or due to a distortion effect being turned on. Tube amplifiers typically also have a "standby" switch in addition to an "on/off" switch. Controls are typically mounted on the front of the amplifier near the top of the cabinet; often the knobs are recessed so that they do not project beyond the wooden cabinet, to protect the knobs during transportation. On amplifier "heads", protective metal U-shaped protrusions may be used to protect the knobs during transportation. On some amps, notably Roland models, the knobs and switches may be on top of the amplifier, at the rear of the top surface. Again, the knobs are usually recessed below the top of the wooden cabinet to protect them.
The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?

It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
Moreover, it can hand a wide range of musical styles and techniques. In most cases they're more popular with classic rock and blues fans, perhaps the Stevie Ray Vaughan or Eric Clapton enthusiast. However, there have been players over the years who have used Stratocasters in much heavier styles of music. Billy Corgan and Jim Root are just a couple that come to mind.

That’s why it’s incredibly important that once you work through your first method book you should start seriously considering finding a teacher to further your education. A teacher can help give you the tools that you’ll need to continually advance on your instrument, which in turn will ensure that it will be a lifelong source of entertainment and enrichment.
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As early as 1924 or so, Lloyd Loar had experimented with amplifying acoustic instruments, though it would not be until the ’30s that his efforts would pan out (without great commercial success). He was undoubtedly ahead of his time. The only amplifier technology available to Loar was primitive radio amplification, hardly adequate for cutting through the horn section. As the ’20s progressed, Hollywood invented “talkies,” and huge valve amplifiers were developed to fill theaters (the music trade press at the time repeatedly published essays assuring musician readers that talkies would have absolutely no effect on the jobs of theater organists!). Part of this technological development included the invention of more and more tubes and the improvement of older designs, which increased the possibilities for instrumental amplification.
RARE Epiphone Vintage FT-150 Bard Lefty Conversion with bone saddle. Spruce top, rosewood back and sides. Medium to low action. Beautiful sounding and playing guitar. Superb projection. Rivals guitars costing thousands.In excellent cosmetic condition with normal fretwear for a guitar it's age, and tiny dings here and there but nothing that stands out and looks gorgeous. Includes original right-handed, adjustable bridge. Includes hard shell case and original right-hand adjustable bridge if you wanna convert it back to a righty!

On paper it looks fantastic for the money, but having Google'd it I found some people were less than happy with the fit & finish. But I value the opinions of my fellow MLP'ers a bit more than those found on some other forums so I'd like to hear what you all think. Aside from the electronics, which I'd replace, how is the quality of this instrument? Is it as good as the singlecut models?
The D-55 is Guild's dreadnought, very similar in shape to the all-conquering 14-fret Martin on which it's based. However, if your used to a handful in the neck, the D-55 dreadnought makes for quite the contrast: a gloss neck, and slimmer nut accentuating the neck's overall thinness; more a D than a C profile, to invite comfortable first-position chords, aided by an impressively low action. That Adirondack bracing is doing its job, too, because string separation, definition and dynamic range are all notable and it feels loud, alive and resonant when playing soft or hard. If this guitar is anything to go by, the latest Traditional models are absolutely up there with the other big American names, offering superb quality craftsmanship and world-class tone. The D-55 is a potentially serious workhorse that has every likelihood of outlasting and outperforming any one of us as long as we can keep on picking - a sumptuous strummer.

Dive bomb is a guitar technique in which the tremolo bar is used to rapidly lower the pitch of a note, creating a sound considered to be similar to a bomb dropping. One of the most recognized pioneers of this technique is Jimi Hendrix. Other notable musicians who are widely known for using this technique are Eddie Van Halen and Joe Satriani. - winner333


Hmm… you still want to buy an electric guitar first up? Okay, but again spend extra money on a guitar that plays well, will keep its value and feels perfect in your hands. In other words, don’t focus too much on paying for extras like custom pick-ups, locking nuts and electronics you don’t need just yet. At the moment it’s all about fingers and hands, not foot-pedals.


My sound is pretty clean with no overdrives or distortion. Besides a tuner and a volume pedal, I use a delay and a reverb pedal (TC Electronics) and I have a freeze pedal as well (EH Superego). I’m never sure if the freeze pedal should come before or after the delay and reverb. By trying both options I can’t really hear a difference in the overall sound which I guess is fine. Any thoughts or recommendations are welcome.
The device can be mounted on and removed quickly from almost any flat-backed acoustic guitar, using a system of magnetic rails. The ToneWood-Amp is designed for guitars with either a magnetic or piezo pickup (bridge or soundhole), but the team behind the device say they're also putting together a “Technician-Free” pickup bundle for those guitars without a pickup.

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What? I have an early 90s pe and I've recorded with it and its one of the best guitars I've ever played. Beutifull clean lp tone and ballsy as when you dirty it up. I also have a pro 2 fullarton which with the fender lace sensor pups I put in it, plays and sounds as good as any strat I've played in thirty years. Check the new arias comming out of the states at the moment and they are really awesome looking guitars. There is also a reason the early ones are known as lawsuit guitars as Gibson though they were so good they had to sue them!
As nobody wants to lug around a 50-watt combo when casually travelling, many guitarists rely on portable amplifiers to quench their amp needs while on the road, street corner or beach. Power isn’t particularly important in this category – size and weight are the most crucial aspects. Other factors such as being battery-powered and having a headphone jack are also key features of these amps. One of the most impressive is the Roland Cube Street, which is a street performer’s dream as it offers great portability, a decent 5-watt output, two channels and several on-board effects.
All electric guitars have this switch but it varies from guitar to guitar. it is called the pickup selector switch. It is used for deciding on which pickup to use on the guitar. On a les paul style guitar it can be used to select the neck (traditionally rythm pickup), bridge (traditionally used for lead) and both pickups together.\n. \n===\n. \nThat's what it is on a normal Gibson Les Paul. But on a Gibson Les Paul BFG, that is a "kill" switch that turns the guitar off completely. On many Gretsches, the toggle switch is a tone switch flipping between bassier and more trebly sounds. On most Fenders, that switch is down on the lower bout by the volume/tone controls (but on a Telecaster Deluxe, the switch is where it'd be on a Les Paul). Then there are oddities like the Italia Rimini, which has no pickup selector switch -- just individual volume controls for the two pickups.\n. \nEvery guitar has a different design. You'd have to look into every model.
Installing pickups and wiring mods can be complicated, but learning to do common pot and jack repairs is almost more important, as they can save you time, money and frustration, especially before or even during a gig. That said, it can be daunting to know what to buy when jumping into the world of soldering, but for less than $80, you can have tools that will last for years.

• Lighten Up: Typically, heavier strings project more natural sound when struck, but for most live performers it’s practical to have an acoustic guitar with a pick-up for plug-and-play situations. Having a pickup in an acoustic guitar allows for the use of lighter gauge strings. Some acoustic guitars even respond well to slinky electric sets, like .10s, providing electric-guitar-like playability without sacrificing the chime of acoustic tones.
More information on Ovation can be obtained from Walter Carter’s book, The History of the Ovation Guitar (Hal Leonard, ’96), although solidbody electrics are not the primary focus, and some inconsistencies exist between the text and the model tables (when in doubt, the text seems to be more reliable). Except for using Carter’s book to confirm some dates and a few details, most of the information presented here was gathered independently prior to publication of that book.
Sometimes, I find the way that they progress songs odd, and that it actually makes them more difficult by causing you to use screwy timings, use easy and incorrect finger movements that you have to completely change when new notes are added, or when it would be simpler to just use cords (for example, in higher ground there is a part where you first play through and have a G and then an A on the 6th string. A beginner will probably play the G with the index finger and then the A with the ring finger. But later these turn to power cords and this no longer works as you have to slide your hand down. I've found that type of issue common, particularly with this song - I've only played about 6 songs so far in the game). Likewise, the strategy of playing is not always the best, for example they'l play a 2, 3, and 6 on the 6th string and maybe an open 5th string and the 2nd fret of the 5th string. Much easier and more efficient to convert the 6th fret on the E string to the 1st on the 5 string to keep everything within a reasonable reach(cheating by moving the note does work since the game is based on tone, but is not something a beginner would know)
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.
Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.
Fingerboards vary as much as necks. The fingerboard surface usually has a cross-sectional radius that is optimized to accommodate finger movement for different playing techniques. Fingerboard radius typically ranges from nearly flat (a very large radius) to radically arched (a small radius). The vintage Fender Telecaster, for example, has a typical small radius of approximately 7.25 inches (18.4 cm). Some manufacturers have experimented with fret profile and material, fret layout, number of frets, and modifications of the fingerboard surface for various reasons. Some innovations were intended to improve playability by ergonomic means, such as Warmoth Guitars' compound radius fingerboard. Scalloped fingerboards added enhanced microtonality during fast legato runs. Fanned frets intend to provide each string with an optimal playing tension and enhanced musicality. Some guitars have no frets—and others, like the Gittler guitar, have no neck in the traditional sense.

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Most often, you will see effect pedals housed in small metal boxes on the floor at a guitarist’s feet. They are often called stompboxes because stepping on a metal button turns them on and off. Many effects boxes also include a foot pedal allowing the player to modulate the effect’s intensity or volume. Sometimes you will see a larger floor unit with multiple buttons and pedals. These are called multi-effects pedals or processors. They usually have a wide variety of different effects that can be engaged simultaneously. Multi-effects processors have grown enormously in popularity as their sounds and functionality have improved.

The XB-40, (short for Extreme bending-40 reeds), is unlike any other diatonic made. Released in 2003, it was specifically designed by harmonica specialist Rick Epping to simplify proficient bending of the notes. To make this possible, the XB-40 uses forty reeds as opposed to the usual twenty found in most ten-hole diatonics. With these bending capabilities, the XB-40 gives access to all the notes on the chromatic scale through bending the natural tones of each hole. This model was discontinued in 2013. Shortly before production officially ceased, Suzuki Music released a similar model the SUB-30.[28]
Pedaldoc – is a company specialized in the production of kits to convert standard guitar effect pedals into boutique sounding pedal stomp boxes. They carry “do it yourself” kits to modify many topselling Boss pedals, Electro harmonix stompboxes, Vox 847´s wah pedals and more. The only thing needed to perform one of their mods in is about an hour of your time and a soldering iron. Their kits are designed for guitar and bass players who may not have any knowledge of electronics and all the components that need to be substituted are clearly market on a picture of the pcb board of the pedal.
However, you don͛t need to fork out over $10k for this version, as it comes with a respectable sub-$1,000 price tag. Sporting a familiar Strat style basswood body, this model is available in three iconic EVH-approved colors. Playability – as you͛d expect – is top-notch, with a reinforced quatersawn maple neck and a compound radius rosewood fretboard.
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Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”
The basic function of the volume knob is to change the level of your guitar’s volume output in a smooth and even way. But there’s more to it than that. Some players use the volume knob as a means of boosting their signal to make solos pop out. For example, if you keep your volume dialed in at seven or eight and perhaps lean on your amp a little more for output, you’ve got two or three more notches to ride your loudness up via the knob when it’s really time to burn. No need to spend money on a volume pedal, and unlike distortion or overdrive pedals this doesn’t change your sound much.

With the advent of belly bridges in 1931, Martin started to compensate their saddle placement. What this does is make for better string intonation. However early pyramid bridge have straight saddles, mounted 1/8" back from the front edge of the bridge. (with the center of the pin holes 3/8" from the back of the saddle.) The 1931 to 1933 belly bridges have a compensated saddle placed 1/8" from the front of the bridge on the treble side, and 3/16" from the bass side. Then on belly bridges in the mid 1930s Martin moved the bass end of the saddle back to 1/4" from the front of the bridge.
Octave effects take the input signal and produce synthesized tones that are one or more octaves above or below it. They can be blended in with the input signal to harmonize with it in real time. The effect can be synthesized by monitoring the waveform of the input and multiplying or dividing the observed frequency by, for example, 2 (to go up or down an octave) or 4 (to go up or down two octaves). This takes advantage of the fact that tones that are an octave apart have a 2:1 frequency relationship; the frequency of the tone one octave higher than a root tone is always double the frequency of the root tone.
The V40 expands the elusive low-to-medium gain range, putting a wide spectrum of subtly shifting overdrive textures under your fingers. There are rotary controls for gain, EQ and master volume. The real fun starts with a two-position voice switch, which subtly changes the V40's character. Voice 1 is centred more on the early 60s 'blackface' tone; Voice 2 is edgier and a touch more aggressive, evoking the tweed amps of the 1950s. A small toggle switch called 'mid kick' adds a touch of extra gain in the midrange, not least to give weedy single coils a lift for solos. There's also a digital reverb with a front-panel level control and on/off switch. Then there's the standby switch, which has two 'on' positions for high power (approximately 40 watts) and low power (seven watts). This switch also works in the V40's single-ended mode, offering a choice of around 1.5 watts in the high-power position and 0.5 watts in the low-power setting. The V40's sonic palette made us sit up and take notice. By reducing the gain, all the mildly overdriven and chime effects normally squeezed into a fraction of the gain knob's travel now occupy the whole range. The V40 Duchess is a unique design - many of its competitors feature high-gain lead channels, teamed with high headroom and often uninspiring clean channels. By focusing on those often-overlooked but highly effective low-to-medium overdrive sounds, the V40 has effectively carved out its own niche, and looks set to become popular for blues, roots, jazz and country players.
i like ‘The Final Word’ statement, my first recording use Yamaha Shen-Shen FG-50 guitar (i don’t know that original production of Yamaha affiliate or not, but i feel the fingerboard bigger than standart), with electric guitar strings (9|42), etc, getting the course prior to learn more chord but jamming in the gig give more experiences….apologies me if there wrong word, best wishes
Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970s guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.

The iconic helmet and armor. The legendary story. The heart-racing combat. Halo has defined a generation of action-packed gaming and online multiplayer gameplay for more than a decade. Now, you can re-experience the thrills, adrenaline and immersive storylines of the Halo franchise, remastered and revamped for the Xbox One. With The Master Chief Collection, you'll not only receive stunning visuals, white-knuckle adventures and deep, rich storylines, you'll have a chance to honor the iconic hero who has been central to so many of your gaming conquests. Featuring a remastered Halo 2: Anniversary, Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary, Halo 3 and Halo 4, Halo: The Master Chief Collection lets you experience the legendary story of the iconic hero with the full Xbox One treatment. A total of 45 campaign missions and more than 100 multiplayer and Spartan Ops maps await you, as well as an all-new live-action digital series and access to the Halo 5: Guardians beta. Dive into the adventure with Master Chief in Halo 2: Anniversary, which celebrates the 10-year anniversary of the classic game. Lock and load for a fully remastered campaign, or switch between that and the original 2004 version with the Classic mode. Use all-new skills to blast through the campaign, and get ready for the 23 original multiplayer maps, as well as six re-imagined ones, for a thrilling online combat experience. Take advantage of the all-new Master Menu, which lets you play through all four unlocked campaigns, start to finish, or seamlessly jump around as you choose. Be one of the first to experience the next generation of Halo multiplayer with the Halo 5: Guardians beta access. Then, kick back and relax with a thrilling new live-action adventure featuring elite UNSC operatives exploring a strange and treacherous world in the Halo: Nightfall digital series, brought to life by 343 Industries, director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan and Executive Producers, Ridley Scott and Scott Free TV President, David Zucker. Get ready to experience the future — by fully understanding your past.


Mr. Bojangles,Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver, City of New Orleans,Steve Goodman, Alice’s Restaurant & Motorcycle song, Arlo Guthrie, Bobby McGee, Janis Joplin, Taxi, Harry Chapin, Please Come To Boston, Dave Loggins, Lady, Little River Band, Sailing, Christopher Cross, Lookin’ Out My Back Door, Credence Clear Water Revival.
The intervals between the notes of a chromatic scale are listed in a table, in which only the emboldened intervals are discussed in this article's section on fundamental chords; those intervals and other seventh-intervals are discussed in the section on intermediate chords. The unison and octave intervals have perfect consonance. Octave intervals were popularized by the jazz playing of Wes Montgomery. The perfect-fifth interval is highly consonant, which means that the successive playing of the two notes from the perfect fifth sounds harmonious.
I don't think its objective that sweep picking is better than tapping. I mean all of these techniques are great. One could say that vibrato is the best technique. But for me both tapping and sweep picking are great. Tapping kinda sounds like emotional/crying to me. While sweep picking kinda sounds like some fighting/running, I mean fast paced. - zxm
Launch price: $779 / £849 | Body: Mahogany with maple top | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 24 | Pickups: 2x 85/15 'S' humbuckers | Controls: Volume, tone (with push-pull coil-split), 3-way selector | Hardware: PRS vibrato, PRS SE tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Fire Red Burst, Tobacco Sunburst, Trampas Green, Whale Blue
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite.

Speaking of session guys, we have Joe Messina, but where are his partners Robert White and Eddie Willis? Or Dennis Coffey? There’s a whole slew of great musicians whose names get forgotten but whose playing we all instantly recognise – alongside the Funk Brothers, there are the likes of Buddy Emmons and Grady Martin from the A Team, and then there’s the Wrecking Crew and the whole LA scene. Someone has already remembered Glen Campbell but how about Howard Roberts and Ted Greene? Whoa! How can you guys have neglected Barney Kessel, truly a top ten contender?


Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.

“Perhaps the weakest block, and the only one I spend time trying to dial in a decent tone. Lots of high gain fizz options with loss of body and character. Boost is decent, Tscreamer isn't, but for me the Blues choice with drive=1pm, tone=noon and output=11am gave a nice breakup tone without losing bottom end. If you have an overdrive pedal you like..you may still be using it.”
   These prices reflect the opinion/perception of the editor of guitarrepairshop.com. while these are prices one could expect from a quality repair shop, repair rates can vary. A full time repairman can have as much training time and investment in tools as any mechanic. Shop overhead costs are on par with those of any other profession, so if you take your instrument to a professional shop, expect to pay professional rates. And expect professional work. While this list reflects prices one would expect to pay at a professional shop, rates will vary. Expect to pay by the hour for some extensive restoration jobs. Rates based on an hourly charge of $60.00 p/hour. Shop minimum labor charge - $60.00 Prices updated January 2014
The SD is a classic. This had a more exaggerated Jazzmaster shape than the T-60. It had a dramatically swept back lower horn, and an offset pair of waists, looking as though it’s been slightly melted. These had bolt-on necks with the elongated Strat-style head, with round logo stickers. A rectangular plastic control panel was mounted above the strings, with large thumbwheel controls and on/off rocker switches, while a large-ish pickguard was mounted under the strings. The controls on the SD-4L were especially interesting, taking their cue from the Italians, no doubt. The thumbwheels were for volume and tone, while there were a total of six rocker switches. Four of these were on/off for each of the four pickups, but in between were two more. Their function is unknown, but a good guess would be phase reversal between the front and back pairs of pickups. Both models had the rectangular fingerboard edge inlays. With “L” designations, both had vibratos. These consisted of a fairly simple bar for string attachment with a series of springs behind it, all covered with a hinged metal cover. The handle was extremely long. Pickups were the beefy tall rectangular type with metal cases and black plastic center tops with exposed pole pieces (these could be screws or squares). The SD-4L had four pickups, in two pairs, while the SD-2L had two. If I couldn’t have a Spectrum 5, I’d be looking for one of these (I am!).
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar company that started out making outstanding copies of classic guitars, and has gone on to be one of the most revered guitar builders in the world. This is one of the top brands of heavy rock, and Ibanez instruments are known for the thin, fast necks and outstanding build quality. They’ve also led the way when it comes to 7-string guitars.
Finally, vintage gear tends to display more variation from unit to unit relative to modern gear. Fifty years ago the technician winding pickups might have been distracted and left the pickup on the winding machine a little longer then normal, resulting in a coil with extra windings of wire and a hotter output. Modern standardization is usually a good thing-you’re less likely to encounter unwanted surprises. On the other hand, the relatively casual standards of the past sometimes resulted in happy accidents.
The shadows are his home and keeping Gotham's citizens safe is his sustenance. Darkness envelops his every move and his legend lives in the whispers of each passerby. Known by many names — the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, Batman — this man lives to protect. But by pitting himself against the criminals of a city, he has only made his laundry list of powerful enemies grow. One after another, a new and nefarious threat has risen up and one after another Batman succeeded in bringing them down. But what happens when those menacing masterminds join forces? Who will rescue Gotham when a deadly roster of depraved lunatics gangs up on the shadowed warrior? Who will save us all? The finale to the legendary Arkham series explodes onto your screen in the most adrenaline-pumping storyline yet. The Scarecrow has returned to Gotham City and he has united a terrifying team of super villains, including Penguin, Two-Face and Harley Quinn. For the first time in the franchise, you get to step behind the wheel of the iconic Batmobile as you harness the power of Batman and scramble to outwit the wicked gang after your blood. Tear through the streets and soar across the skyline in heart-pounding gameplay that will suck you in and force you to ask yourself if you have what it takes to save Gotham. Do you have it within you to be the hero the city needs? Or will the villains of Gotham overtake the Dark Knight once and for all?
Now, for most players, deciding what should go where on a signal chain simply came through trial and error along with a good dose of common knowledge. And while a player’s signal chain should be his or her own, those of you out there new to creating a solid signal chain can benefit from some of the general 'rule of thumb' type of advice that can get you started in the right direction.

High-end solid-state amplifiers are less common, since many professional guitarists favor vacuum tubes.[citation needed] Some[who?] jazz guitarists favor the "cleaner" sound of solid-state amplifiers. Only a few solid-state amps have enduring attraction, such as the Roland Jazz Chorus.[15][16][17] Solid-state amplifiers vary in output power, functionality, size, price, and sound quality in a wide range, from practice amplifiers to combos suitable for gigging to professional models intended for session musicians who do studio recording work.
Though not much is known about the production of the Hi-Flier after about 1977, it clearly came to an end — and clearly has had an impact on players in the vintage market. Used by guitarists like Cobain and Lee Ranaldo of Sonic Youth, as well as many others in a variety of bands, the Hi-Flier gained notoriety as a unique guitar with a sound as striking as its looks.

The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
Guitar Center added a replica of the “Black Beauty” Les Paul Custom, with three pickups, that Peter Frampton used as his main guitar from his days in Humble Pie through his early solo career, photographed playing the instrument on the front jackets of his albums Frampton and Frampton Comes Alive. It has all the same qualities such as the three uncovered humbucking pickups and missing pickguard. The Black Beauty was not issued until 1957; however, the one given to Frampton by a fan named Mark Mariana was a 1954 model that had been routed out for a middle pickup.
When the tone pot is set to its maximum resistance (e.g. 250kΩ), all of the frequencies (low and high) have a relatively high path of resistance to ground. As we reduce the resistance of the tone pot to 0Ω, the impedance of the capacitor has more of an impact and we gradually lose more high frequencies to ground through the tone circuit. If we use a higher value capacitor, we lose more high frequencies and get a darker, fatter sound than if we use a lower value.
If you love the sound of both acoustic and electric guitars, but you want to play both at the same time without draping one of each over your shoulder, then an Acoustic simulator pedal is ideal. These pedals take your guitar signal – regardless of what electric guitar you’re playing and make it sound like it’s an acoustic. These are often used by guitarists on stage who want to switch between an acoustic and electric guitar sound during a set or even the same song. The Boss AC-3 Acoustic Simulator is a great option.

The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
Many people "re-amp" direct guitar tracks recorded to a DAW using amp-modeling software, with good results. Plug-ins are wonderfully suited to the virtual  recording environment, allowing for fast access to a plethora of modeling amplifier and speaker cabinet combinations, hence tones, effectively replacing a roomful of amps, cabs and microphones. Programming the virtual amplifier is the same as tweaking the knobs on the real thing, and the same is true for programming software dynamics and effects processors in relation to their hardware equivalents. As the realism and sophistication of modeling technology continue to develop, so does the viability of virtual re-amping as a production technique.
One of the best and most affordable gigging amps I have ever played. Blackstar accommodates all styles and budgets and should be in place of line 6. Too many people want traditional tone, but Blackstar brings a new edge to the table and builds extremely reliable tough as nails amps with new ideas like the ID series amps, I own an ht40 and am extremely impressed. Get one.
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As has already become apparent, the resonator instruments which made both the National and Dobro names in the late ’20s and ’30s were not the only effort underway to increase the volume of the guitar. The ampliphonics found immediate acceptance among Hawaiian players, notably Sol Hoopii, the very first to record with them when he used a prototype in his first session for Columbia on October 18, 1926. This was used on “Farewell Blues.” But they still didn’t satisfy the desire of orchestra guitarists to get out of the rhythm section. In addition to metal resonator cones, electricity was waiting in the wings, and National, Dobro and National Dobro would play a significant role, both directly and indirectly, in that ultimately triumphant development.

The fretboard (also called the fingerboard) is a piece of wood embedded with metal frets that constitutes the top of the neck. It is flat or slightly curved. The curvature of the fretboard is measured by the fretboard radius, which is the radius of a hypothetical circle of which the fretboard's surface constitutes a segment. The smaller the fretboard radius, the more noticeably curved the fretboard is. Fretboards are most commonly made of ebony, but may also be made of rosewood or of phenolic composite ("micarta").


Maple is a very hard type of wood with good tonal qualities and good sustain. Guitar necks are traditionally made from maple, in part because of its strength, and in part because the material can highlight and amplify the wood in the body. Maple is also often used as a top for the guitar body, partly because it is beautiful (think flame, or quilted maple tops), and partly because it can brighten a sound that would otherwise be murky.

I can give my own story as why I decided to go direct at shows when the band I am in uses our own PA. In a 5 piece band, with dense guitar, a busy keyboardist/organist, a 5 string bass, 3 vocalists and a cymbal-happy drummer, things were getting loud onstage. Our singer would have the monitors close to feedback all night (and it would feedback several times in the night). Live recordings, both in the room, or miked on TV or radio were a mess of frequencies, since setup times were quick, and we hoped for the best. My amp, a Mesa/Boogie with 6v6s & EL84s sounded amazing. But everyone said they couldn’t hear the vocals. When we listened back, we heard what everyone else (didn’t hear). We were a sonic mess. We tried clearing it up with EQs and amp placement. It sounded clearer onstage, but microphone leakage and feedback were still a problem, and the band had internal ‘volume wars’ with each other. Truth is, we didn’t always have a great soundperson. We were carrying a lot of gear. The venues we played and the sizes of the stages and audiences varied wildly. After several poor sounding gigs that left my ears ringing (even with earplugs), I started investigating. The first decision was to go with IEMs. This would eliminate the bulky monitors (with 1 poorly placed handle, mind you) and stop the feedback problems. It would free up stage space. The next problem was realizing that the amps onstage easily could overpower the IEMs that were directed right in our ears. So I came to the conclusion that the only way past this problem was to get rid of all of the amps. 
Guitar chords songs refers to songs that sound great when played using nothing but chords, whether on acoustic guitar, electric guitar, or both. These songs range from simple arrangements of rock, pop, and country favorites to more songs using more complex guitar chords. The arrangements you decide to play will probably be determined by how advanced your knowledge of chords is.
The Gibson ES-335 certainly had an alluring appeal in the mid 1900’s, and it’s easy to see why. With a beautiful Arched top, lovely smooth curves and a tone that can knock your socks off, and a beautiful white binding, these truly are beautiful guitars. Whether you want to play some classic blues, or dip into some catchy jazz, this guitar is sure to impress.
O.K. These are my first impressions of this guitar kit, my first, right out of the box. About me: I own about a dozen guitars, both acoustic and electric, including 6 string and basses. I know a little about construction, as I have been studying, and have been wanting to build my own guitar for some time now. Building from scratch seemed a little optimistic so I elected to go with this kit after studying the Internet for days. I wanted a chance for a great result with my mediocre woodworking skills. Kit arrived quickly and undamaged, good packaging and the components were bagged nicely.
Oh and you play really great sounding exercises in blues, rock and country that encourage you to noodle around and find your own riffs and leads to play over the tracks which is something that I had never really been inspired to do before with any other book. The author doesn't just throw a bunch of tired, boring, public domain yankee doodles and scarborough fairs because he is too cheap to pay royalties or some crappy tunes that a kindergardener could write but actual original pro sounding tunes and riffs. Yes, I HAVE been around my fair share of crappy guitar lesson books, thanks for asking!
Adherence to the Past While acknowledging the impossibility of scientifically proving tone, many guitar players will still argue vehemently for a classic Les Paul crunch, or they’ll get ready to throw down if you claim solid-state amps sound better than valve amplifiers. They will concede the point intellectually, but on a more deeply rooted, emotional level, they can’t get beyond their own perspectives. It’s almost like observing fire-walkers at the circus. Your brain may understand how the technique works and how it can be safe. But your heart and nerves won’t let you take the chance of barbecuing your feet.
An octave generator is a simplified form of pitch shifting. This effect will allow you to add an octave—usually below—the fundamental note. Units that add a lower octave exclusively are referred to as sub-octave generators. They can add a lot of depth to the guitarist’s sound. Many bass players also use sub-octave generators to significantly fatten up their sound.
Boogex is a guitar amplifier plug-in with a variety of sound shaping features.  With Boogex it is possible to get heavy distorted sound as well as slight distortion sound.  Boogex is also able to apply any speaker cabinet impulse response (selection of built-in impulses is available).  Processing latency is very modest - 96 samples (2.1 ms at 44.1kHz).  Boogex comes with several example factory presets.

Providing all of the necessary features expected in a quality electric guitar at a budget-friendly price, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is perfect for those just beginning their musical journey or the seasoned guitarist looking for an everyday guitar for practice. The 650R humbucker pickups combined with the open coil design deliver strong and sustained tones. As seen on all Epiphone guitars, the Special II has over 500K potentiometer for both tone and volume, and a toggle selector with a 3-way pickup to focus in on the clarity of the sound and decreased excess humming. The body and neck are made with mahogany, while the fretboard has dot inlays within the rosewood design. String changing is also made easier due to the stopbar tailpiece, which helps to add more sustain in sound when combined with the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge. With all of these features at such a reasonable price point, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a strong contender included on this list.
But the avant-garde din of Velvet Underground rave-ups seemed a genteel curtain raiser compared with the full-bore cacophony of Lou’s 1975 solo opus Metal Machine Music. The noise-guitar side of Lou’s legacy set the stage for cutting-edge genres like industrial, art damage, dream pop, grunge and present-day noise exponents, like Wolf Eyes and Yellow Swans.

Now, imagine having that same signal but with your guitar’s volume on its half way setting. That same degraded signal comes out even worse as it only had half of the voltage to work with from the get-go. In order to minimize the amount of signal loss, it is always suggested that the guitar’s volume is kept at its max setting and either manually adjust the output level from the amp or better yet, from a dedicated volume pedal, as is the choice for most professional musicians. A volume pedal in an effects chain will control the output volume of everything that is placed before it, so it’s pretty much almost always a good idea to place it at the end of the chain if it’s going to be your main form of overall volume control.

Another name that is usually associated with PRS is Carlos Santana. He has a number of guitars that bear his name, and this one is probably the most popular one. It’s affordable, sounds great and plays like a dream. After mere hours playing it, I’ve realized just how expressive you can be with it. It impressed me enough to take a high place on my list of guitars that I have to get. Needless to say, it didn’t take me long to make one a part of my collection.
For subtle modulation just set every knob at about 11 o'clock. You'll get a thin, shimmering layer over your acoustic guitar's tone that doesn't drown out the natural resonance of the instrument. The pedal doesn't boost your signal or add any kind of volume. All you'll hear is a clear, simple effect. Additionally, the CH-1's two stereo outputs allow you to easily split your signal between two amplification sources. Simply plug your primary source into output A (mono) and the secondary source into output B.
My 10 year old was getting bored with his previous instructor's teaching methods and had been begging us to drop guitar lessons. We thought we would try a different instructor. We've had only one meeting, but I saw a light reappear in my son's eyes and he is excited to start lessons with Jon. The video lessons and use of newer computer technology and has my son excited and motivated to keep learning to play.
This guitar has an interesting makeup of tone wood. First, the body is Mahogany just like the Iron Label model. The top of the guitar is Poplar Burl, where a burl is actually a type of growth on a tree in which the grain has become somewhat deformed. It sounds bizarre but, Burl is highly prized for its rarity and beauty and is often sought after by wood sculptors and luthiers alike.
"Craftsmanship, materials, and dimensional design are combined to make this one of Alvarez' most outstanding models. It has fine projection, sensitive response, and speedy action. The inlaid Tree of Life design on the rosewood fingerboard adds to its graceful distinction. Sides and back of flame grained rosewood are bound with ivoroid. Machine heads are chrome enclosed for longer life. Tuning is fast and precise. Slender mahogany neck with adjustable steel rod reinforcement. The top is select spruce chosen for its acoustic quality."

It is a German company that manufactures bass guitars. Making a really good bass guitar is a difficult task. However, Warwick bass guitars have really mastered this daunting task. The growl of the bass, and its hollow and beautiful resonating tone is a striking feature of the bass. The company employs stringent quality control methods in wood seasoning, cutting, and resonance engineering. It is highly regarded among bassists and has attracted many notable artists like Robert Trujillo (Metallica) and Adam Clayton (U2). One of the greatest things about Warwick is that they manufacture guitars for everyone, from amateur hobbyists to professional players. If you are new into electric bass guitars, then Rockbass Corvette Basic and Streamer Standard Electric Bass guitars are great options for a rocking start.
* P A W N S H O P * G U I T A R S * Serving The World With Quality Vintage and Used Gear!- Up for sale is a 1960'S Norma Guitar Japanese Vintage Project As Is!- Good Japanese project- missing nut, bridge, knobs, electronics need work, but pickup is ok- very noisy- lots of body checking and neck needs work- truss barely turns- missing tuner ferrules- head stock logo is loose- even if I forgot something this item is sold as is with no returns!- this is definitely a worthy project- from the MIJ Hay... more

Audiffex Guitar Pedals was one of the first professional guitar software packages, with its original version released more than a decade ago. It has since been upgraded but continues its legacy of providing stompbox effects in software form. The latest version is an all in one guitar effects software package - which includes 36 plug-ins that also works for bass, vocals and other instruments. Features include consistent interface with all effects having similar controls, modular plug-in configuration for easier and flexible routing and intuitive preset management. Current retail price: $49
I'm a beginning player and have felt intimidated in guitar shops. That changed after walking into Grumpy's on Saturday. I didn't feel uncomfortable at all, quite the opposite. Kevin did a complete se...tup on my electric guitar while explaining the process to me. Looked at my other two guitars and (surprisingly) let me know that they didn't need anything. Such honesty is rare these days and I greatly appreciate it. I'll be back for all my guitar needs in the future. PS My son is a professional musician and has nothing but good to say about Grumpy's as well. He's a drummer but he loves the shop as well. See More
alright dude, i think this an awesome list. i hate looking things like this and seeing people put crap like slash at number 1 or something. this shows u obviously have great taste in music, but theres just a few things that struck me as odd. 1, no chuck berry. 2, really? john mayer? i admit he has technical skill, but saying hes one of the 10 best guitarists thats ever lived? thats just false. i mean what happened to jeff beck, santana, , eric clapton, harvey mandel, kurt cobain, and even trey anastasio(if that is how its spelled lol). they are all much much better then mayer could hope to be, both musically and technically,.
When most people think about electric guitars, chances are they’re thinking rock ‘n’ roll. However, stringed instrumentalists had been attempting to amplify violins and banjos since the 1910s using internally mounted telephone transducers — and indeed, the first electrically amplified guitar was designed in 1931 by George Beauchamp of the National Guitar Corporation. Charlie Christian’s 1936 Gibson ES-150 was heard on landmark recordings with Benny Goodman and Lester Young, influencing other jazz guitarists to follow suit. Clearly, the electric guitar is not a product of rock ‘n’ roll; rather, it was driven by the need for guitarists to be heard over the drums and horn sections of big bands.
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