Electric Guitars- Vintage, new & used / Second-hand electric guitars by Kay, Teisco Del Rey Ray ET J-1, Univox & Silvertone. Cheesy Japanese, Surf Guitars. Also guitars by Ibanez, Gibson, Fender, Peavey, Martin, Zon, Gretsch, Rickenbacker, Diasonic & More. Les Pauls recording, lap steels / slide guitars, Barney Kessel style, Fender Stratocasters, Telecasters, Squire Bullet series, Peavey Falcon neck Martin Acoustics, bass guitars, Zon Legacy Elite 5 string Bass, Diasonic double single cutaway, Rickenbacker, archtop, Gretsch TW-100T Traveling Wliburys guitar, Hamer Mirage 1, Yamaha sg-2000, Fender Jag-Stang, Gibson Howard Roberts, Ibanez Artist AR-100 to name a few.
Rhythmically I can make Shreddage II sound as authentic as a mock up can get for that instrument (which means, mostly authentic)...through conscientious (more like anal-retentive) programming and manual round robins. But of course it's always a much better idea in this case to just do the mock up and eventually get an actual guitar player yourself to record. It's extremely hard to get that edgy lead thing going, bent up and held vibrato notes.
I have a weird Decca guitar that my father-in law gave me. I know nothing about it. It is an acoustic, obviously old and it has 10 strings! The neck is normal and the first 4 strings E,B,G & D are in sets (like a 12 string) and the Low E and A are single. I play guitar and have never run across anything like this. I can't find information on it anywhere! I can't see where anyone customized it. It looks like it was originally made that way. Any thoughts or information you can give me on this?
: : I own a Decca guitar, it is what I learned to play on many years ago. From what little I have gathered about them they were an order by mail brand, and you could only get them from a catolog such as Sears & Roebuck. I havent been able to find a price for them or any ifo on what catalogs they were from. Mine has a Ernie Ball Musicman-like peghead (4 one side 2 on the other) and has a metal pick guard with 2 giant switches which seem to have no effect on tone. It has a brown & yellow sunburst paint job (ewwww).I thought I possibly had the only one in existence, lol, guess not.
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.
Meanwhile, in Sepulveda, Thomas Organ, after importing JMI's British-made amps for a short period in 1964–65, began to produce a line of mostly solid-state amplifiers in the United States that carried the Vox name and cosmetic stylings. With some assistance from Dick Denney, these amps effectively paralleled JMI's own transistorised amplifiers but were different from the British and Italian made Voxes in sound and reliability. To promote their equipment, Thomas Organ built the Voxmobile, a Ford roadster dressed up to look like a Phantom guitar, complete with a Continental organ and several "Beatle" amplifiers. Despite the huge marketing effort, Thomas Organ's Vox products did much to damage the reputation of Vox in the North American market for many years. By 1968, the company had also marketed a line of Vox drum sets (actually made by a German drum company, known as Trixon), which included a kit that featured a conical-shaped bass (kick) drum, that looked more like a wastepaper basket left on its side, and another with a bass (kick) drum, that looked like a flat tire. Such gimmicks did not help sales, and by the early 1970s Vox's American presence was virtually nonexistent.
When you're in the market for an instrument, whether it's brand new or new-to-you, our impressive selection gives you plenty to choose from and we'll be happy to help you find the right fit. Maybe you need some equipment for a few gigs or a short tour? Our rentals department can hook you up. There are even lessons and free workshops here to discover, so you can always learn more about music no matter your skill level. For all the details, you can drop by to visit us in-person or give us a call.

While this isn't an exhaustive list, I think it covers the main pedals. Although others may disagree, beginners are unlikely to need to know about the others. We've tried to stock some of the most popular pedals in our store. So if you're still not completely sure what to buy, why not try one of those out? The pedals we sell are inexpensive but great sounding alternatives to those mentioned above.
DRILLING THE NECK HOLES ON THE BODY Before you do this you can carve down the back of the neck area if that is something you were going to do. If you are just going to leave it flat then that's ok too. The first step if you are using furreles is to map out where you want to place them and then mark the center of the hole where the screw will go. Then take your forstner bit drill enough to fit the furrele inside. Usually you can tell how deep to go if you drill a little at a time, and place the furrele in it to see if it is just low enough in the hole not to see the top of it if you look at the body horizontally or it is flush with the wood. After doing this you can drill the holes for the screws. Use a bit that has the same circumference as the screw including the threading so when you put the scre into the hole it just passes through with out you having to screw it in. Drill in the indention that was left by the tip of the Forstner bit, keeping the drill as straight as possible.
There are two types of acoustic guitar namely the steel-string acoustic guitar and the classical guitar. Steel-string acoustic guitars produce a metallic sound that is a distinctive component of a wide range of popular genres. Steel-string acoustic guitars are sometimes referred to as flat tops. The word top refers to the face or front of the guitar which is called the table. Classical guitars have a wider neck than steel-string guitars and are strung with nylon strings. They are primarily associated with the playing of the solo classical guitar repertoire. Classical guitars are sometimes referred to as Spanish guitars in recognition of their country of origin.
Some guitars incorporate a “blend” of both magnetic and piezo pickups, and others may have one of these options with an internal mic. All nylon string guitars with the option of pickups will always have piezo pickups and/or a built-in mic because there’s no way to sense vibrations from nylon – a non-magnetic material. But, many acoustic electric guitars have steel strings, so what options can you expect with these?
So there you have five good beginner’s guitars. Bear in mind that while the quality of these instruments is good—it’s a fiercely competitive area—they’re at the bottom of the market. You get what you pay for (as they say). At the same time, “cheap” guitars like these have come a long way in the last ten years and they’re excellent for starting out, before deciding to mortgage your house on that expensive vintage Fender or Les Paul Gibson mentioned earlier.
I was very surprised by your article on acoustic guitars and the ratings given by you. I have been playing acoustic guitars for most of my 62 years and have owned and played all of them. I cannot believe that you put Seagull guitars at the top of your list! I've played as well as owned a Seagull guitar for some time and I have found it to be constructed out of cheap materials with no regard to detail. The guitar's intonation was horrible... could never get the damn thing in tune beyond the fifth fret,which frustrated me very much. Lastly, the lack of a finish on the product lent itself to getting stains on it. With that being said,I just cannot see how you can even be on that list at all.
I think Matts’ advice is good, (old guitar strings can be helpfull for “fishing”) but if you change your p’ups and switching often an accessible control cavity is a great thing, just be sure to drop all pots and such into the body and drill through the potentiometer holes so you know where to place template and assure router bit won’t hit anything dangling in the body.
I have inherited a heater "H300N" acoustic guitar but I can't find any info on it. The most I could find is that it was from the L. D. Heater Music Company that was based out of Beaverton, Oregon. They were best known for being a distributer of Lyle Guitars. Can anyone else offer additional information or where to find it? It's a bueatiful guitar and I want to know more info before I give it to my nephew or sell it.

George Delmetia Beauchamp is just as important as Leo Fender and Les Paul. His name may not ring a bell, but Beauchamp designed the first fully functional guitar pickup and secured a US patent for the electric guitar in 1937. The pickup, which converts string vibrations into amplifiable electrical signals, makes an electric guitar what it is; without one, there is no electric guitar. Beauchamp was also a founder of the popular Rickenbacker guitar brand alongside his friend and business partner Adolph Rickenbacker. Rickenbackers were often seen in use by both John Lennon and Paul McCartney in the era of the Beatles, also a go-to guitar for the classic rock sound of bands including the Who, the Eagles and Steppenwolf.
If there is one body shape out there that everyone will recognize, it is this one. In terms of finish, Fender chose a lacquer clear coat to show off the natural wood instead of their usual choice, and it looks pretty awesome (of course there's a 3 tone sunburst and olympic white too). Made of ash, this particular Strat offers a U-shaped maple neck with a maple fretboard that is bolted onto the body. In terms of pickups, we have a set of three single coils belonging to their vintage line. These come with Alnico magnets, giving you that classic tone we all love so much. The hardware follows the canon as well. Here we have Fender's well known synchronized tremolo bridge paired with a set of F tuners on the headstock.
“I started to get really frustrated, and I said, ‘I know! I’ll fix you!’ I got a single-sided Gillette razorblade and cut round the cone like this [demonstrates slitting from the center to the edge of the cone], so it was all shredded but still on there. I played and I thought it was amazing, really freaky. I felt like an inventor! We just close-miked that in the studio, and also fed the same speaker output into the AC30, which was kind of noisy but sounded good.”
You will come across many people who'll give you different opinions regarding different brands, and also, there are several other reviews on the Internet too. Keep your research simple, experiment, and keep frequenting guitar shops and secondhand musical instrument stores to check out the different kinds of brands. Play as many guitars of different brands as you can, and one day, you will find your 'guitar-soulmate' (sic.), the sight and sound of which will make you go 'wow!' So, if you're new to the guitar world or have recently developed an interest in it, this Melodyful article will surely sort out your doubts. Here is a brief comparison of different guitar brands along with detailed descriptions of the tone and sound. Take a look!
If you are interested in a more a price friendly model, it is recommendable that you give this model produced by Davison Guitars a good look. According to its manufacturer, the unit comes shipped with a handful of useful accessories such as a practice amp, a case, a strap cord and a very practical DVD that is said to help beginners play the instrument in no time.
Guitar amps for newbies aren’t going to sound as good as the professional rigs used by advanced guitarists, but surely you don’t expect that for under $100. However, they should still sound good. In fact, in my opinion a starter amp should be good enough that, once you’ve moved to a better main amplifier, you can still use your first amp for practice.
These bundles usually throw in a gig bag, so you don’t have to spend extra money to safely transport your gear, as well as spare picks, strings, and an instructable DVD that will help you learn some essential guitar techniques quite fast. You might also want a bundle that comes with a clip-on tuner so that you make sure you can keep your guitar well-tuned on the go.
By definition, distortion pedals are designed to adulterate the guitar’s signal in and of themselves. To use a rough analogy to tube amp tone, where overdrives are looking to take you into anywhere from pushed to cranked JTM45 or tweed Bassman, distortions aim to do the Mesa/Boogie Triple Rectifier, Bogner Ecstasy, or six-Laney-full-stacks trick in a 3"x5" box. These pedals unashamedly screw with your sound. They generally filth it up and slap their own notion of the ideal heavy rock or metal EQ all over your tone’s backside. But of course they will also boost the guitar signal as well (depending on the volume/output/level settings), and the sound we associate with them is still some confluence of pedal and amp, not to mention guitar.
This package features an iconic electric guitar—The Les Paul— paired with a great little practice amplifier, the Electar-10, and quality accessories. The Epiphone Les Paul Special II is a versatile guitar that feels comfortable covering most any major style, including rock, blues, punk, classic rock and more. The guitar features a dual humbucker pickup configuration. The package also includes a tuner (very important), guitar picks and free online lessons to get you playing right away. A cable, strap and gig bag complete the package.
You may not have considered Orange Amplifiers before, but they’re a company with a history that dates back to the early days of hard rock. If you watch footage of rock bands from the 1960s you’ll see Orange amplifiers onstage almost as much as Marshalls. The British amp builder has had its ups and downs since those glory days, but today Orange is as strong as ever.
2. Pickup Setup: I'd like to see you add a section on this. Pickups should be lowered out of the way before any setup. If they're too high, the strings could hit them and cause buzzing. After everything all other setup steps are completed, the pickups should be raised to the proper position. One online video claiming to post Gibson specs says that the Low E should be 6/64" above the pickups, and that the High E should be 4/64".

Now, let’s get to the amplifier. If you’re a traditionalist, this means you aren’t using some kind of high fidelity audio reproduction system to expose that weak signal for the anemic, naked thing that your tone really is at this point. You’re like the rest of us, depending on that signal working with a classic tube guitar amp to shape your sound and help you get awesome and loud. Well, that amp has got a host of things going on. The signal hits the high-impedance input and visits the preamplifier. See, the “natural” sound coming straight from our guitars, as big and tough and old school special as we might think think it is, really isn’t strong enough to directly power the power amplifier. It’s depending on a series of fairly intricate pre-amplifer gain stages to give the Popeye signal the spinach it needs before any filtering or equalization (oh, they don’t use them? Really? What do those knobs marked ‘bass’ and ‘treble’ say? Just because someone leaves them at “5” doesn’t mean they aren’t in use). It then may visit a phase inverter before hitting the tube power amp section, which finally gives you the high current signal to cause those speakers to go back and forth.


Another LTD model that is easily on the same level as the standard ESP stuff is the MH-100QMNT. The guitar comes from the very top of LTD’s entry level lineup, and brings a great price to performance ratio. I’ve had a lot of time to play with this guitar, and at first it didn’t sit right with me. As I played it more, I got used to the contour of the neck and the way its body ‘moves’. From that point on, ESP LTD MH-100QMNT grew on me rather quickly.
I work out of my home shop in Idaho Falls, Idaho.  I do repairs for clients and guitar shops all over the United States.  I’d love to help you repair or restore your guitar.  Repair prices are based on a rate of $60 per hour.  These prices apply to guitars in otherwise good working order.  Your repair may vary depending on the condition of your guitar and the specifics of the work needed. Please contact me using the contact page if you have a repair that you would like to discuss.  Consultations are always free.
By the time this Blink-182 hit was recorded, the majority of Enema of the State had already been written. Tom DeLonge wanted to add one more song to the album that was simple, and radio friendly so he got to work. The lyric “She left me roses by the stairs” came about when DeLonge’s girlfriend at the time left him roses on the stairs, and the singer found them late one night after recording. The “na na na” section was also inspired by the next band.
Remember that when buying a guitar, quality usually comes with price tag to match. Consider paying a little more for the right guitar. Often, you can save money in the long run by purchasing a better guitar up front, skipping over the incremental upgrades along the way. A seasoned guitar player will often have a very good idea of what they like. With experience comes a desire to invest in quality. Musician’s Friend offers a stunning selection of Private Reserve Guitars. When gift shopping for a high-end guitar, it’s usually wise to forego the element of surprise and find out exactly what your giftee wants.
I'll be honest .. my Washburn N4 is hands down the best I've ever known. To me, Les Pauls sound amazing but are heavy and play like a log cabin. A buddy of mine's Suhr Strat felt/sounded clinical and small. An old Gibson SG felt like a cigar box jobbie. I remember in the early 90s looking at the Vai Ibanezes and the body was great despite the zany colors but the neck was too thin and whispy. I had the frets leveled and crowned and the action on mine 10 years ago and it just plays and feels like butter .. maybe 2 - 2.5mm at the 12th fret. The neck I sanded with 2000 grit now slighty reflects light so it glides beautifully feeling like 'satin wooden glass'. My aftermarket pickups puts the tone squarely into a modern fusion rock camp of sorts .. Oh yea and I think it's the neck shape of these Davies N4s that might make them so cool. The nut is a wider, more comfortable 1 11/16 inches with a flat fingerboard radius .. so may of the others seem like 1 9/16 with a cramped, rounder fringerboard. I did try a JP6 I didn't care for the feel of .. tl;dr ymmv :)

Thanks for your note, Ed. I try and be terribly clear that there’s no notion of 1 being higher than another. They’re simply completely different, and it’s a matter of preference what you wish. Nothing I’ve ever denote has gotten additional attention than this, thus despite it in all probability being futile, i’m getting to build redo of this with video likewise.

The F-50 was the bottom of the line, a single cutaway with a single DeArmond humbucker pickup, like those on the previous acoustic hybrids, in the neck position. Controls were one volume and one tone control mounted along the edge of the lower treble bout, with black, chrome-topped knobs. This had a trapeze tailpiece with a sort of Cabinet of Dr. Caligari “M” cutout of the center. This was finished in a brown to yellow two-tone sunburst. The first prototype bore the serial number 179828. 1,165 F-50s were built from the middle of 1962 to the spring of 1965.


It's always hard to rate amps when mixing high gain with vintage, boutique amps and the mass produced monsters, but including S.S. and digital technology seems to be a unrealistic stretch. That being said, this manufacturer is making some of the best sounding vintage type tube amps I've heard to date. their lineup of vintage Fender style amps are all excellent, and considerably more affordable and reliable. If you are a fan of the tweed, black and silver faced gems, you have to give Victoria a try. If you prefer something with a unique spin they make their own unique creations as well and they are all serious tone machines. In so far as tube amps go, these guys are definitely in my top five. Speaking of boutique, where is Carr?
Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.
If you’re just getting started playing electric guitar, you’ve definitely come to the right place! Sam Ash is the ultimate destination for all of your electric guitar learning materials! We are proud to offer everything you need to learn how to play electric guitar including instructional guitar books, guitar instructional DVDs, guitar tablature books, guitar music books, guitar reference materials, and even guitar chord charts to assist in your learning! We also carry all the accessories you need to get started, including guitar tuners, guitar picks, electric guitar strings, guitar straps, guitar amps, guitar cables, guitar stands, and much more!
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