Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic Bass - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Sitka Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Tortoise - Frets: 22 - # of Strings: 4 - Scale Length: 32" (81cm) - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Pickups: Fishman Sonicore - EQ/Preamp: Ibanez AEQ-SP2 - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural
Another great book by Nicolas, this one shows you exactly how to create your own personal tone using amplifiers, effects and your guitar itself. Any beginner will benefit from this clearly written guide including everything from a breakdown of all the different ways to individualize your guitar playing technique, to information about virtual effects.
Chord CG-10Classically styled guitar combo in a vinyl covered cabinet with metal corner protectors and basket-weave style grille cloth. Front control panel is recessed with retro "chicken-head" control knobs and additional features for Gain, EQ and outputs. Custom solid-state circuitry is voiced to produce authentic vintage-style clean and driven tones.•Headphone output for practice•Switchable clean and drive channels•Classic styling•Power supply; 230Vac, 50Hz (IEC)•Model: CG-10•Output: 10Wrms•Speaker; 165mm (6.5")•Controls: Gain, drive switch, volume, treble, middle, bass•Connections: Guitar input, headphones out (6.3mm jack)•Dimensions; 290 x 280 x 150mm•Weight: 4.0kg
Flat tops from 1945 to 1969 are considered good quality and have good sound, although they are not as collectible as the 1920's to 1944 steel string models. This is largely due to the change in bracing and materials Martin started using in 1945. Rosewood models of Brazilian rosewood are most collectible from this era. This is because Brazilian rosewood was basically unavailable since 1970 due to export problems. Because of this, these models are considered more collectible.
The Limited Edition Slash Firebird Premium Outfit also features Epiphone's rock solid nickel hardware including a classic Epiphone LockTone ABR Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece, Kluson Reissue Firebird Banjo-style machine heads with a 12:1 ratio, a Switchcraft 1/4" output jack, and Epiphone Straplocks. A standard Epiphone hard case is also available.

So when you plugged your guitar in and tried to play it electrified, you couldn't get any bass tone out of the guitar-the bass strings didn't go over the polepieces of the pickups! When you tried to fret notes along the low E string, your fingers would fall off of the fretboard. That one error turned an otherwise beautiful, comfortable and very functional instrument into something that played and sounded like crap.


I have no idea what the set measurement is for the Authentics, and if it is any different than other guitars. Probably not. But guitars settle during their initial acclimation period and the exact bow of the neck and arch of the top can change. Actually it is almost certain to change some. There have been reports of all sorts of Martins with action reaching up near or over the maximum height within spec. But the same holds rue from brand of guitar that uses organic materials like solid wood.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black

The first impressive thing about the Zoom G3X is its build quality. This unit is solid, which puts our fears to rest that Zoom may have sacrificed build quality since the G3X is more on the budget side of the price spectrum. In the reviews and recommendations we read, several owners make it a point to comment that it feels like a serious piece of equipment that could withstand some abuse because of its sturdy metal construction. The G3X can be powered with a 9V adapter (which is conveniently included), or four AA batteries. Zoom claims about 6 hours of battery life, but in our experience manufacturers tend to exaggerate battery life a bit. Still, battery power is very convenient if you’re traveling with the G3X and want to do some on-the-go playing, or just taking it from room to room in your house (to save some money in the long run we recommend rechargeable batteries).
A distortion box produces what we call hard clipping, as opposed to an overdrive pedal that produces soft clipping. What does that mean? If we were to look at a note on an oscilloscope we would see a wave (hence the term sound wave) with a nice rounded top and bottom. When we overdrive or distort a note the top and bottom of the sound wave flattens out, or clips. The more clipping of the wave the more distorted the note. A fuzz pedal produces so much clipping it is seen as a square wave, completely flat on the top and bottom of the wave. There are many excellent distortion boxes on the market but some classic industry standards are the Rat distortion box, the Boss Super Overdrive (a bit more of a distortion box really), MXR Distortion +, Boss Distortion, and the Boss Heavy Metal Pedal.
As the name implies, TheFretWire DIY 175 kit is based on the popular ES-175 hollow body guitar, following its shape and configuration, but using more cost effective materials. More importantly, it lets you customize your own archtop as you prefer - you can make it into a classic jazz box, or add some cool paint jobs to turn it into a rockabilly style instrument.
A distortion box produces what we call hard clipping, as opposed to an overdrive pedal that produces soft clipping. What does that mean? If we were to look at a note on an oscilloscope we would see a wave (hence the term sound wave) with a nice rounded top and bottom. When we overdrive or distort a note the top and bottom of the sound wave flattens out, or clips. The more clipping of the wave the more distorted the note. A fuzz pedal produces so much clipping it is seen as a square wave, completely flat on the top and bottom of the wave. There are many excellent distortion boxes on the market but some classic industry standards are the Rat distortion box, the Boss Super Overdrive (a bit more of a distortion box really), MXR Distortion +, Boss Distortion, and the Boss Heavy Metal Pedal.
Different types of guitars have different sound aesthetics, e.g. different colour-spectrum characteristics (the way the sound energy is spread in the fundamental frequency and the overtones), different response, etc. These differences are due to differences in construction; for example modern classical guitars usually use a different bracing (fan-bracing) from that used in earlier guitars (they had ladder-bracing); and a different voicing was used by the luthier.
Launch price: $999 / £899 | Body: Basswood | Neck: 5-piece maple/walnut | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Ibanez V8 humbucker (bridge), S1 single coil (middle), V7 neck humbucker | Controls: Volume, tone, 5-way selector | Hardware: Edge locking vibrato | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Desert Sun Yellow, Road Flare Red, Purple Neon, White
Heat-treated Maple is used for the AZ's neck construction. Its use increases the wood's stability, durability, water resistance and tolerance of temperature changes. After extensive prototyping and trials, we concluded that 20.5mm thickness at the 1st fret to 22.5mm at the 12th fret is the optimal neck thickness for this process. The neck is sealed with an oil finish (sealer coat) which feels similar to a comfortable well-played guitar neck.
Mention the subject of American acoustic guitars and one of the first names that will undoubtedly pop into your head will be C.F. Martin. Not that there aren’t many other estimable names, but Martin, by virtue of its longevity � since 1833 � and incredible quality remains the standard by which almost all steel-stringed acoustics are judged. A pretty impressive achievement.
By the 1960s and 1970s, semiconductor transistor-based amplifiers (also called "solid state") began to become popular. This was in large part because for a given wattage level and feature level, solid state amplifiers are less expensive, lighter weight, and require less maintenance than tube amplifiers. As well, transistor amplifiers are more reliable and less fragile than tube amps. In some cases, tube and solid state technologies are used together, usually with a tube preamplifier driving a solid state power amplifier. There are also an increasing range of products that use digital signal processing (DSP) and digital modeling technology to simulate many different combinations of amp and cabinets.

After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:
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After lowering the bridge (usually in a failed attempt at getting lower string action), the owner will eventually realize this is not the best solution. When this happens and a neck reset is preformed, the original bridge will now be *useless* (because it is too low!) The repair guy won't reset the neck to a low bridge, so a new replacement bridge will be installed. At this point the originality of the instrument is compromised.
Speaking of session guys, we have Joe Messina, but where are his partners Robert White and Eddie Willis? Or Dennis Coffey? There’s a whole slew of great musicians whose names get forgotten but whose playing we all instantly recognise – alongside the Funk Brothers, there are the likes of Buddy Emmons and Grady Martin from the A Team, and then there’s the Wrecking Crew and the whole LA scene. Someone has already remembered Glen Campbell but how about Howard Roberts and Ted Greene? Whoa! How can you guys have neglected Barney Kessel, truly a top ten contender?
These soundfonts were started by converting some presets from the gig files using cdextract demo and then altered using Viena, Swami and SF2Comp. The gig files are better as they contain more samples and a better variety of presets that were not possible in the soundfont format. For instance, I could not include the Fender reverb samples as the release samples would all play at the same volume no matter where in the envolope the key was released. So, if you have a chance you would be better off to use the gigasamples. They can be used in LinuxSampler of which is free and runs on windows and linux. Some people need samples in sound font format though, so I have created these samples out of the same samples that I used for the giga samples. I also have an impulse response of the Fender Reverb that I made with voxengo for download on the Other Stuff page so you can use that if you want to get the reverb sound with the soundfonts. At the moment I use Freeverb3 for realtime impulse in windows and Jconv in linux.

Better known simply as an acoustic guitar, the “steel” strings (they come in all kinds of construction, not just steel) are louder and brighter, and a much more versatile instrument to play. Folk, rock, jazz — acoustic guitars have it all covered. Those steel strings also chew the ends off your fingers until eventually you develop hard calluses on the tips — very handy for plucking boiled eggs out of the saucepan.
You might be wondering: “Why the glossy finish?” Having a gloss finish can mean the difference between your guitar cracking—or not--in extreme temperature changes.Of course, like all Cordobas, there is a truss rod with which you can change the string relief, so you’re not having to press the strings down so hard, making it easier for beginners to learn.

Overdrive pedals are very different to distortion pedals, and without getting too technical, they drive/push your guitar signal harder rather than changing the sound completely like a distortion pedal does. An overdrive pedal retains a lot of the original sound of your guitar and amp but pushes the amplifier harder to give it a heavier, thicker signal. They’re ideally used with valve/tube amps as they push the tubes to their limit and allow them to bring out the more natural distortion that tube amps are so renowned for. Incidentally, we wrote about the best tube amps for home use here, but if you wanted some great practice amps, we also wrote about them here too!
Standard versions and collectable versions of the 4003 have included the 4003s (special)(discontinued 1995) a 4003 similar to the 4001s with dot neck markers, no body binding based loosely upon the original Rickenbacker basses and fitted with 4001 pick ups. 1985-2002 versions of 4003 and 4003s were available with black hardware option and black binding. Other later special editions have included 4003 Blue Boy, 4003 CS (Chris Squire) similar to 4001 CS Limited edition specials include the Blackstar, the Shadow Bass, the Tuxedo and 4003 Redneck.
The other guitarish plugins that contribute to the best most real guitar VST include amp emulators to get that warm, liquid sound of tube amps, along with VSTs for almost any other effect ever hauled on stage. Those amp-and-effects VSTs might be used by actual guitarists as well, in various straight-to-computer workflow setups - either through a DAW host or otherwise maybe straight through some standalone VSTs to amp, headphones, recording device or onboard speakers.
the most with a headphone jack. Any suggestions? I am just a bedroom player who sucks and price is well I say depends what it (the amp) is worthy b/c I am on disability and my neurologist said just quit but at 48 years old it (music) is the only area of life besides my dog and mom that keeps me even and she is in worse shape than me (sorry for the soap box). Is the EVH 5150 III though its' combo is 50 watts but it has the headphone jack. Please anyone help???
Choosing guitar strings is like choosing lenses and frames for your glasses.  There is a right strength of lens for you and when you switch frames it may take some adjusting to get used to.  This analogy is referring to the bridge height, nuts, and truss rod tension.  Do take your time to experiment but once you settle it's best to keep using the same gauges so you can dodge the lengthy set-up process from happening again.

This is because sound in an acoustic is dependent upon the bridge, saddle, and soundboard’s (top) ability to transfer string vibration through the sound hole of the body. The top (soundboard), back, and sides makes the body of the guitar where the sound hole is designed and cut. Knowing this, you’ll not only need wood that’s strong, but wood that can offer unique acoustic properties that emphasize its ability to project differing sounds at various frequencies. Of course, your choice of strings also lends to the harmonic ranges of a guitar.
Getting the right amp for your acoustic electric guitar is definitely something you want to think about. You can have a guitar that sounds stunning when plugged in, but not so much when playing acoustically. Reversely, you can also have a guitar that sounds absolutely beautiful acoustically, but sounds like a tin can when plugged in. Sometimes, this is just due to plugging into the wrong amp.
TAB uses a series of hyphens to represent the strings. Each string is identified on the far left by the name of the note produced when played open. The high-e (string 1) is at the top; low-E (string 6) is at the bottom. There is no restriction for how long a line of TAB can be, but for readability it should be kept short enough to prevent wrapping on a web-site or printed page.

MusicMan is the story of two former Fender employees who decided to create their own company in 1971. In the beginning it was called Tri-Sonix, before they changed the name to MusicMan in 1974. While the first product of the brand was a tube/solid-state hybrid amp ─ the Sixty Five, developed with the help of a certain Leo Fender ─ the company became famous for its guitars and basses. The introduction of the mythical StingRay guitars and basses in 1976 is a milestone in the company's history. The guitar is an average seller (rock players find it too "clean"), but the bass and its active Tom Walker preamp that allows to boost certain frequencies is a huge success. After severe conflicts within the team, MusicMan was sold to Ernie Ball in 1984. The brand then started to endorse famous artists like Albert Lee, Steve Lukather (Toto), John Petrucci (Dream Theater), and Eddie Van Halen (Axis), and developed signature models for every one of them.
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If your audio track suffers from a lot of spill, or includes chords, the pitch correction may not work correctly. Where spill is loud enough to be audible, you'll hear this being modulated in pitch alongside the wanted part of the audio as it is corrected. As a rule, chords are ignored, so guitar solos, bowed stringed instruments and bass parts (including fretless) can be processed, and only single notes will be corrected.
No way can this list be accurate simply for the fact that there are so many styles out there with such important players, having a list of greatest guitar players with BB King and Tom Morello on it is ridiculous. Both are great in their own right but it’s like comparing apples and oranges. There should probably be separate lists for separate genres. Having said that, I think a good start for a top 10 ROCK list, in no particular order, would be: Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, Kirk Hammett, Dimebag Darrell, Steve Vai, Eric Johnson, Slash, Jerry Cantrell, Joe Perry, and Angus Young.
Though Dennis Hartnett took good care of his ViVi-Tone instruments (mandola NMM 10809, mandocello NMM 10810, and this guitar), all three show signs of extensive use. Indentations on the bar-armature and wear to the screw-ends of the posts on the guitar pickup indicate that Hartnett also used the instrument for electric-only amplification, in addition to the electric/acoustic set up in which he left it. Hartnett's guitar is preserved with an amplifier (NMM 10812) by Webster Electric Company of Racine, Wisconsin, and an accompanying foot pedal.

I had a Soundgear 5 string bass when they first came out and it was one of the worst basses I have ever owned. Crappy electronics, uncomfortable neck and the list goes on. I used it as a back up when I was touring 100+ shows per year and luckily my Tobias Killer B5 never had issues other than the occasional broken string. The best thing I can say about it is I lent it to a "colleague" and he ended up stealing it. Good riddance!


Compressor: Compressors make loud sounds quieter and quiet sounds louder by decreasing or "compressing" the dynamic range of an audio signal.[60] A compressor is often used to stabilize volume and smooth a note's "attack" by dampening its onset and amplifying its sustain. A compressor can also function as a limiter with extreme settings of its controls.[61]
I could not afford an American or European guitar when I was 12, but Sam Ash sported a Japanese stratoslabber, with 1, 2, 3, or 4 pickups. Each extra pick up was another eight dollars! I bought the 2 pick up model for $24 and brought it home. What a square slab. The wood had the aspects of cardboard, it was probably what is called basswood. The pickups were single coil, chrome covered, and no better than a deArmond harp mike. My brother returned it, and bought a better looking tele style Japanese guitar I believe by Kent, with tin foil inserts in the pick ups. It went from Kandy apple red, to natural, to white, and finally to trunk-splatter grey with Seymour Duncan pickups and Grover tuners. I finally sold it in 2009.
Yea um John Mayers way misunderunstood and under rated, watch the 'where the light is live in LA' DVD(and actually watch it before you think of posting a reply) and tell me he aint an amazing guitarist, im not saying hes a god but hes definetly an amzing guitarist n i rekon he deserves a spot just for the fact that hes one of the few guitarists of this generation with some talent.

My first Custom was a Charvel/Jackson Star body with a custom white paint with bullet holes and dripping blood from the holes ! My friend and Guitar teacher Randy Rhoads helped me get started on the right track in 1980 ,before I was playing in clubs and headlining shows later in the 80s and 90s,I was set with the perfect guitar! Gibson is just a brand name,Epiphones are better then Gibsons ,your just paying for a name,same with Fender! Remember,one of the greatest guitars was made for less then $300,so you should never really spend more then that unless it is a custom ,then you can do what you have to!


: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory
The final pillar in the temple of electric guitar production is the semi-hollow guitar. Just as the name suggests, these guitars do have some chambering in the body, but they aren’t completely hollow. In an ideal world, a semi-hollow guitar will have the biting, singing tone of a solid body guitar, but can also achieve the same smooth fullness of a solid body. However, that simply isn’t the reality for many semi-hollow bodies.
However, amplifiers can also be quite loud. Maybe you’ve got a fancy one, big enough to make everyone in a bar cover their ears. Or maybe you don’t have one at all, and have been playing on acoustic guitar. Either way, you may not have known that you can simulate the trademark sounds of famous amplifiers using something you probably already have: a computer. Using your computer as an amp isn’t too complicated, and it opens up a world of possibilities that the analog audio world can’t deliver on a budget. Some newer practice amplifiers have headphone jacks so you can play without making a racket, but those are only starting to become widespread and the majority of hobbyist electric guitar players would rather spend big money on a good stage-ready amplifier than a mediocre one to accompany their practice amp. If you’re an electric guitar player looking for a way to practice quietly or with headphones, this is the tutorial for you. You will need: An electric guitar A computer running Windows XP or better (Windows 7 or newer preferred) An instrument cable (both sides quarter-inch and mono, same cable used to plug guitars into amps) A ¼-inch to ⅛-inch mono adapter
In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.
By the late 1970s, costs of manufacture in Japan had risen to such an extent that it was difficult to make student-grade guitars over there. It was far less expensive to manufacture instruments in Korea. Numerous factories were built, and existing facilities in Korea were expanded. Samick built a factory capable of producing one million instruments a year. Japanese companies invested heavily in Korea so that they would be able to produce their low-end models in Korea and high-end models under the same brand names in Japan. The early Korean-made instruments were not as good as the Japanese ones, but it did not take nearly as long for Korean quality to improve as it did for the Japanese to go from making crude low-end models to sophisticated instruments suitable for professional use. The Koreas had the benefit of all of the Japanese experience especially in the cases of factories with Japanese ownership or management.
Compression/Sustain – a dynamic effect that smooths out the highest and lowest volume levels of your guitar signal to a more consistent level. A compressor also has the side effect of increasing the sustain of your guitar signal. Compression boosts the overall level of your guitar while clamping down on the volume of the loudest parts to prevent clipping. Compressors usually have an attack knob that allows you to control how fast it takes the compressor to start effecting the tone and a threshold knob that sets the volume level that the compressor starts clamping down on peaks.
Next models is another semi-hollow design, only this time we are looking at a bit more neutral guitar. I wouldn’t go so far as to say that it’s somewhere between a solid body and a semi-hollow. That would simply be wrong, but it does have a harder tone for a model of this type. It didn’t take me long to find the right setup, and off we went. Sound, playability – everything is on point.

This guitar master is actually a custom guitar builder. He started building guitars in 1993. "I've been doing this a long time," Paul says. "It's just really natural to me. I'm weird. I just look at stuff and know how to fix it." When he younger, Paul was good at woodworking, and besides picking up the guitar at 14, he needed another hobby. But learning the craft of guitar repair didn't require a master, simply a book. "Imagine that, great book." He then converted his garage into a shop, and in two years, his custom guitars became commercially viable. "It's the real deal, all high-end neck set stuff." Today, Brian Paul's Guitars are some of the finest guitars on the market. Some of his clients include Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, Jim Suhler, Warren Haynes and Texas Slim. Even Dallas blues legend Bugs Henderson owned one of his guitars.
TASTING NOTES: A straight-on mic always provides the strongest impact and widest frequency range. An angled mic can soften a speaker’s harsh edge while adding interesting texture. In a multi-speaker cabinet, the off-axis mic tends to pick up more sound from the non-miked speakers, adding additional texture via phase cancellation. And while you only hear two mic positions here (straight on and angled), there are multiple off-axis options, from a barely off-center mic to one pointed toward the speaker’s outermost edge. Aim at the center for maximum punch and intensity. Aim toward the edge for slightly softer, more nuanced tones.
Artists have been converging on this sound for more than a decade before Davies used it. In 1951, “Rocket 88” by Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm took advantage of a distorted amplifier that had been damaged in transport. The same thing happened to the Johnny Burnette Trio in 1956, when Paul Burlison pulled out a vacuum tube from his amplifier after it fell off the top of the band’s car. He loved the sound so much he used it to record “The Train Kept a-rollin,” which inspired a whole raft of British musicians:
Having lived in an apartment when learning guitar, it was painful. Using headphones works, but most days you just want to hear it from an amp like it was meant to be. Your only real solution is to try out some of those tiny lunchbox amps and see if they can fill that void. Another option is to start saving for a house, or find a friend who has one to jam out in.

A compressor acts as an automatic volume control, progressively decreasing the output level as the incoming signal gets louder, and vice versa. It preserves the note's attack rather than silencing it as with an Envelope Volume pedal. This adjustment of the volume for the attack and tail of a note evens out the overall volume of an instrument. Compressors can also change the behaviour of other effects, especially distortion. when applied toward the guitar, it can provide a uniformed sustained note; when applied to instruments with a normally short attack, such as drums or harpsichord, compression can drastically change the resulting sound. Another kind of compressor is the optical compressor which uses a light source (LED or lamp) to compress the signal.


This is easily the best multi effects pedal for metal, especially if you need an easy to use option with just the essentials packed in. Within the Valeton Dapper Dark Effect Strip, you have a built-in tuner, Higain effect designed for brutal distortion sounds, a lush Chorus to bring out those riffs and add more weight to your sound as well as a Delay effect with tap tempo to allow you to add everything from slap-back delay to long, drawn out echoes. Best of all you have a Boost pedal which throws in +12 dB of gain so you can stand out from the mix when you kick in to a solo or need a certain riff to really jump out.
These guys are the best in town! I had my Gretsch 6120 Upgraded with a new Pickup. They were quick and at a reasonable price. They do amazing work. They also have a great selection of guitars and Amps for sale. I highly recommend stopping by. If your looking for a new guitar for yourself or your kids they will help you find the perfect guitar for your price range. I highly recommend stopping by. They also do amp repair! Stop by and see for yourself.
Chorus – This is the subtlest type of modulation effect. It does exactly what its name suggests, making it sound as though multiple instruments are all playing in unison. The effect could be compared to running a signal through two amps at once and setting one on a slight delay; in fact, that’s how many artists created chorus effects before these pedals were commonplace.

If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.
Unlike distortion or overdrive, fuzz is meant to not sound like an amp at all. It is meant to add harmonic content and transistor-like goodness to your tone. Fuzz boxes were used extensively in the 1960s to create an over the top distortion sound. Many times fuzzes will completely change the sound of your amp, so be careful and really focus on buying one that has the sonic makeup you are looking for. Hendrix, Cream-era Clapton, and Dan Auerbach are well known fuzz users.
If you’re looking to get this pedal as a first in your arsenal, then don’t worry at all, you can keep it simple with the offered Reverb dial as it offers high-quality effects which you can tune to your liking. This astonishing “stomp-box” by TC covers guitarist’s needs who possess different ranges of experience, all available at a fantastic startup price.

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[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.


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The AX8 features the same core modelling engine as the Axe-Fx II for identical sound quality, but has different CPU power and offers just one rather than two amp blocks in its signal chain. It's still pretty potent, though, with 512 onboard presets that are built from a series of blocks. You get amp and cabinet blocks plus blocks for the most commonly used effects, and a looper. There are 222 amp models, over 130 Factory cabs, plus 512 User Cab memory slots and loads of effects. Everything has a massive amount of editable parameters to get the sound just right, either accessed from the AX8's physical controls or via the free editing software if you connect it to a computer. With rock-solid construction, the AX8 lays out its 11 footswitches in an easily accessible manner. All of them can be assigned to a host of tasks, all aimed at making your onstage experience go as smoothly as possible. Sound-wise, Fractal's realistic amp tones, carefully tailored cabinet models and crystal-clear effects give you tones that can stand up next to any conventional amp and effects rig. If you like the idea of an Axe-Fx II but aren't keen on the rackmount format or thought it out of your price range, the AX8 may be right up your street.

4) Aside from enough publishing errors that, to my sensibilities, mean that the book is not ready to be published, instructions are shown on how to add a Varistor switch to a guitar, and a Les Paul is used for the example. The drilled hole given as the example is nothing less than a hack job, I hate to say it, but it is. I would faint if I saw a tech do that to my guitar. Besides its being really bad advice in the first place, if you are going to do it, DONT follow this example!
Six full steps (one octave) down from standard tuning. The Low E has the same fundamental frequency as a bass guitar, essentially the same standard tuning as a bass guitar but with a high B and E added to mimic a regular guitar. This tuning is used on the Fender Bass VI and similar instruments. Notably used by John Lennon with The Beatles, Robert Smith of The Cure and Jack Bruce of Cream. In his early days with Ronnie Hawkins, future Band bassist Rick Danko was also seen with a Fender Bass VI. This is the tuning Earth used on their seminal drone doom album, Earth 2. Also used in some Doom Metal and Sludge Metal bands such as Thou.
This project began as a quest to find a really good software piano. Not even the expensive commercial versions were satisfying to my ears.  Most had velocity switching problems and unpleasant tones. I came across the University of Iowa Steinway piano samples which were great but there was room for improvement in the way they were presented.  My goal was to have a selection of piano and other instruments that were pleasant to play and to keep them available for free. Using SoundFont editing programs Polyphone and Viena I have done some editing to allow for expression to give a more enjoyable and realistic playing experience where timbre changes gradually with velocity where possible and without that annoying jump that is commonly found. This was applied to many of the other instruments as well.
By 1970, regular distribution of Japanese-made guitars, including Lyle brand guitars, began in America. In the early 1970s, Arai joined with instrument manufacturing company Matsumoku to produce guitars. It is inconclusive if they continued producing Lyle guitars at this time, but they did launch the Aria Pro II line in 1975, which included set-neck copies of the Gibson Les Paul and SG, and Fender Stratocaster and Telecaster guitars.
Fender was started by Leo Fender in 1946 in Fullerton, CA. Leo Fender sold his company to CBS in 1965. In 1985 Fender employees purchased the company. Leo Fender founded Music Man in 1975, and later founded the G&L Musical Instruments company. Fender brands currently include brands include Fender®, Squier®, Guild®, Gretsch®, Jackson®, Charvel®, EVH®, Tacoma…
A few months ago, I decided that enough was enough, so I began to trawl systematically through Sound On Sound's interview archive, collating and comparing different producers' views on a variety of recording and mixing topics. Being a glutton for punishment, I also waded through the 35-odd interviews in Howard Massey's excellent book, Behind The Glass.

So just to throw this out there- I've been trying to figure out how to set up electric guitars on my own for years and could never get it remotely figured out. At about 11:30 pm last night I decided to take a garbage fret buzzing machine of a guitar and try again. Your blog is the first time I've comprehended and successfully set up a guitar!! I'd buy you a six pack if you were in the neighborhood!
A band can sound good with conventional amps and PA gear. But it takes musicians who are sensitive to each other as well as the overall sound of the band. It takes a skilled soundperson who has the gear (and knows how to use it) and enough time to get a proper soundcheck.  Going direct attempts to solve these problems. Adding IEMs (In Ear Monitors) solves more. Yes, you don’t have amps blaring behind you. No, you don’t look like Jimi at Woodstock. Yes, you have to get used to the way things sound and learn how to perform without amps. 
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”

Effects units are available in a variety of formats or form factors. Stompboxes are primarily used units in live performance and (in some cases) studio recordings. Rackmount devices saw a heavy usage during the later 20th century, due to their advanced processing power and desirable tones. However, by the 21st century, with the advant of digital Plug-Ins and more powerful Stompboxes for live usage, the need and practicality of rackmounted effects units went down, and as such, prices of rack effects have diminished due to lower usage.[5] An effects unit can consist of analog or digital circuitry or a combination of the two. During a live performance, the effect is plugged into the electrical "signal" path of the instrument. In the studio, the instrument or other sound-source's auxiliary output is patched into the effect.[6][7] Form factors are part of a studio or musician's outboard gear.[8]
Launch price: $799 / £826 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Pau ferro (rosewood reviewed) | Frets: 21 | Pickups: American Vintage '58 Single-Coil Tele, American Vintage '52 Single-Coil Tele | Controls: Volume (with S-1 Switch), tone | Hardware: 3-saddle American Vintage strings-through-body bridge | Left-handed: No | Finish: Faded Sonic Blue, 3-Color Sunburst
Lawsuit Takamine F375s Hand built in Japan and still in excellent vintage condition! Build type is Rare Exotic Tone woods series Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back-sides-fingerboard & headstock overlay JUST Gorgeous. Its workmanship is really top shelf by any standards, We installed and set up with Martin Marquis 80/20 strings 12's, as well as setting this guitar up with a New bone nut & saddle, Condition is very good with a few minor hard to see scratches on its back you have to look closely sometimes at an angel ( clear coat only not threw to wood ) general play here and there as any 37 year old guitar that has been played would get... dinks and such but nothing major to detract from its obvious outward beauty, This example has an excellent neck its 1-11/16th's at the bone nut, fingerboard is very good as are the frets at 90%, its straight and has a nice meaty feel, has the Martin design detail of the Diamond Volute on back, original tuners are excellent as well, a warm vintage vibe to this 37 year old vintage Gem. Tone is rich with good volume she Sings well!!! JVG Rated 9/10 higher if it wasn't for the few minor clear coat scratches in its clear coat not to the wood that I can see more like swirls and such may be possible to fine grade 3000 wet sand and polish out its possible if it doesn't sell soon when I get the chance I'll do it, its a commitment because it may not sand out alone it may require a few thin clear lacquer applied and buffed out to cure it forever if so a guitar of this caliber deserves the attention.. ( the price will go up after I do that work ) and that really doesn't have to be done to make this guitar just very good -excellent vintage it would bring it very close to mint!.... aside from the few minor scuffs this guitar still qualifies as vintage excellent right now, just thought I would point those out. So to be clear about this listing the way you see it now is the way it is offered.Its a F375s and not the EF375s yet This guitar has a factory installed transducer type pickup installed and it sounds wonderful, Its said to have been installed by original owner in Tokyo by Takamine shop its a very clean job I call it CLEAN where they do not make extra unnecessary holes for output jack instead they use the END PIN hole and its a combination strap pin and or output jack, So this guitar is either Acoustic or Electric really nice in deed in SUPER Condition well above average. This beautiful instrument comes with its original hard shell case it to is in very good vintage condition its heavy duty molded type with plush black interior all functional fully. This is the total package. Contact Joe to buy: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Let's look at how the professionals go about combining the close and ambient techniques we've looked at so far, in order to create specific custom setups for different recordings. Joe Barresi, for example, relies heavily on the trusty SM57 and MD421 combination, but he'll choose from a variety of other mics to give character to particular sounds. "The two microphones I use most for recording electric guitars are the Shure SM57 and the Sennheiser MD421, often both, close up, placed at the edge of the speaker, where the speaker centre meets the cone, or, if I'm looking for a more bright sound, dead centre. When I want more low end, I may have an AKG C414 on there, and when I'm after a little more personality, a Neumann U87, backed up a foot, or a ribbon mic, like the Royer 122, or an RCA BK5 or 77."

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These guitars use very cheap materials. I bought a washburn WM24v PROE for $300 and it come with Mahogany body & neck, phenolic fretboard, emg81/85 and original floyd rose... Ibanez RG costs $400 and comes with basswood body, bolt on maple neck, rosewood fingerboard, shoddy pickups and a licensed floyd that WILL NOT stay in tune. Poor quality for money, if you get a Ibanez go for a fixed bridge/string-thru because their trems are HORRIBLE! Original floyd is the only way to go!
Some bonehead really put the WRONG pickups in a guitar you just bought. So you bought a sweet vintage Strat from a guy who put P-Rails in it because now it can get "any tone".  He failed to mention that all of those tones kinda suck.  Hey, you just want a great sounding STRAT!  Drop in the right vintage Strat pickups and you'll be there baby'.  Then off-load those jack-of-all-trades tone-suckers to some idiot who actually believes one weird pickup can nail EVERYTHING.
These Gibson Les Paul Reissue guitars simply perform better than those made the year after or the year before. Gibson is aware of this and has been for quite some time. That's why they've decided to push out a series of Les Pauls which aimed to match the ones from 1959. Are they equally as good? Probably not since the old ones are legendary, but they're as close as you'll get for a brand new guitar.
I just want to say I completely agree with the assesment of getting a non-shit Fender strat vs a Squire to begin with. I was on one of these cheapos and a 15w marshall amp for way too long. I became decent at playing, but in the end I didn’t feel inspired to keep playing. I recently bought a Maton MS503 Classic and a Fender Blues Deville 410 and playing that setup was like my body was on fucking fire. I wish I’d had more of that feeling sooner in my life. Those $200 for a squire goes a couple of years, but a $600 strat or other great guitar can go a lifetime. Amp matters heaps too of course.
The dual-DSP-powered Helix combines amp and effects models in a large, rugged floor pedal. There are a massive 1,024 preset locations onboard the Helix, organised into eight setlists that contain 32 banks with four presets each. Each preset can have up to four stereo signal paths, each made up of eight blocks populated with amps and effects. With the current count of 41 modelled amps, seven bass amps, 30 cabs, 16 mics, 80 effects and the option of loading speaker impulse responses, there's great potential for sound creation. Line 6 has implemented an easy editing system, complete with a joystick, and - get this - touch-sensitive footswitches offering a shortcut to parameter adjustment; you can even use these with your feet to select a parameter before adjusting it with the pedal treadle! There are some great sounds here, especially when you get beyond the factory presets and shape things to your own taste. The Helix's advantage lies in its comprehensive input/output and signal routing ability, which can facilitate just about any guitar-related studio or onstage task you can think of. However, if you don't need all that connectivity, and want to save a bit of cash, there's also the Line 6 Helix LT.
Love love love this guitar! I ordered it because it reminds me of my Dad's old Kay archtop that I initially learned to play on. The retro jazz style of this guitar is awesome. My musician friends love it and and like the sound of it although they haven't heard it plugged in yet. It took me a very short while to get used to the strings (made by the company for this guitar) and while they have a tinnier sound than what I'm used to for an acoustic guitar, they do deliver when it is plugged in. Overall it really seems to be more of an electric-style guitar. The neck is narrow and the body is small - something that I am so happy with! It is extremely playable. I may switch to bronze strings to get a warmer tone, but for now I want to give these strings a chance to sing. I also ordered a case from the company that fits this guitar, and for the price, it is awesome as well! Very light and the guitar fits perfectly and securely. At a recent gig, a complete stranger came up to me to look at and admire this guitar - it truly is a beautiful instrument. The woodgrain is rich and not as red as the pictures make it look. I feel like Stu Sutcliff - don't really need to know how to play - I can simply stand in the background and look cool ;-)
Shimming a neck: The best shims are one piece and the full size of the neck pocket. For this veneer from the hardware store works well. However, it is very hard to get an even taper on these. The next best option is to use masking tape. Masking tape is paper which is wood fiber so it's almost as good as a solid shim, and much better than the smaller shims which leave large gaps which impedes the transfer of vibration, and could cause problems later on. To make a tape shim, lay strips of tape side by side perpendicular to neck, and add layers to provide the taper. i.e. stripe 1- 1 layer, stripe 2- 2 layers, stripe 3- 3 layers. Place the neck in the pocket, mark outline of pocket, and trim just inside outline.
Lastly, if what you're really asking is "Can I play my electric guitar without making any noise that would bother my neighbors/housemates?" Many amps and all direct in setups will allow you play with headphones. I plug headphones in a small tube amp. The sound is quite nice. I find this setup allows me to experiment even more than usual since I am not self conscious about anyone hearing what I am playing. I've seen little tube amps for as little as about $125 that have headphone jacks. At that price don't expect Fender, Dr Z, Vox, Marshall or Mesa Boogie quality sound, but they get the job done of basic tube drive and bypass the loudspeaker by driving the headphones.

THE CONTROL CAVITY Routing the control cavity is just as important as the neck pocket but with a couple more steps. The best thing to do is to cut out the plastic cover. Trace the pattern that you came up with for it on the plastic then cut it out with a jig saw. Use a fine tooth blade to prevent the plastic from chipping and will also yeild a smoother cut. Once this is done, take your template and reverse it, trace the patern on the back side of the body. Next set your router to a depth that is the same as the thickness of the plastic plate and rout the cavity working out to the line you drew. I do this free hand since the first cut is too shallow for a template. Be careful when you do this and test fit the plate you cut to make sure you get a goo fit. Then you will draw another line about 1/4" along the inside of the cavity you routed out, leaving extra room in areas for the screws you will use later on to secure the control plate. Rout this area out in the same way, working out to the line you drew. When you start to get close to the half way point in the wood start to think about how much wood you need to leave at the bottom. Usualy 1/4" is good but make sure you are careful! I miscalculated once and ended up going all the way through the body. Bad experience.


Les Paul, the legend, designed this guitar. This guitar has had more widespread popularity than the Strat, IMO. Jimmy Page was a huge fan of the Les Paul and the SG. Gibson made the double neck SG on special request made by Jimmy Page which was featured in the song "Stairway to Heaven" in the concert at Madison Square garden. Jeff Beck and Pete Townshend are among other notable people who use the Gibson Les Paul.

Dyna Gakki began production in 1972 in the city of Nagano, Japan. They manufactured guitars for Fender Japan and Greco, so they couldn't have been a terrible manufacturer as Fender is very choosy about outsourcing their product. Dyna may have been a source for Japanese manufacturer Yamaki. Dyna also produced the infamous Ibanez badges for a short period of time.
Martin’s B series basses were big flat-tops with 34″-scale mahogany necks. Designed by Dick Boak, these ABGs used the same bodies as Martin’s Jumbo guitars; measuring 16″ wide with a depth of 4 7/8″, they were large enough to produce decent acoustic volume without being ungainly like other maker’s attempts. The top was solid spruce, the fingerboard was ebony, and the body was either solid East Indian Rosewood (B40) or solid flamed maple (B-65). A Fishman bridge-pickup system was available adding an “E” in the model number. Both basses were also available with fretless fingerboards.
The rest seems like a bit of an odd ball selection. It's the age old argument of technique over substance. BB King puts more into a small handful of notes than Malmsteen does in several hundred. One of the most musical guitar players to have graced the earth. In fact I think it was BB who stated that it's not the notes you put in but the notes you choose to leave out that count. Now that's music.
Many acoustic guitars come equipped with "light" gauge acoustic guitar strings. This is probably a good place to start - if you are a heavy strummer and find yourself breaking strings often, you may want to consider buying slightly heavier gauged strings. The following is a list of the standard string gauges included with each set of acoustic guitar strings.
CALIFORNIA CLASSIC models feature superb playability, distinctive looks and an unmistakable Fender vibe. The fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and natural solid mahogany back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and koa binding and rosette, give them an elegant two-toned aesthetic that was made for the stage. California Special and California Classic acoustic guitars are equipped with a Fender- and Fishman-designed PM preamp specifically tuned to complement the unique shape and voice of each instrument—complete with tuner, frequency and phase controls.

"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)


The most famous Gibson guitar is the Les Paul, which has been a mainstay in the music world for decades. The Gibson Les Paul is a high-end, made-in-the USA instrument, and it comes in a few different variations. Like Fender, Gibson has remained fairly consistent with their styles and designs. In addition to the Les Paul, other famous Gibson electric guitars include the SG, Flying V, Explorer, ES-335, and Firebird. Their classic acoustics include the Hummingbird.
You are bidding on a previously owned and in good working condition Blackstar Amplification HT Studio 20H guitar amp head. This auction is for the amp and power cable you see pictured. No footswitch is included. Nothing else is included. It comes as pictured. Please take a moment to look at the pictures and get a better idea of what you are bidding on. This unit has some scuffs and dings from being moved around. It has been tested and is in good working condition.
The origins of the modern guitar are not known with certainty. Some believe it is indigenous to Europe, while others think it is an imported instrument.[32] Guitar-like instruments appear in ancient carvings and statues recovered from Egyptian, Sumerian, and Babylonian civilizations. This means that the contemporary Iranian instruments such as the tanbur and setar are distantly related to the European guitar, as they all derive ultimately from the same ancient origins, but by very different historical routes and influences.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red
As a teacher I use a strat because it’s relatable, comfortable, and clean/clear tones. The gibson doesn’t have warmer overtones. That’s not a thing. It has weaker overtones, so a stronger fundamental. That’s why it sounds warmer/duller, and the fender sounds more lively/brighter, because the fender (longer scale) have more overtones to ring louder. That lets you hear mistakes more easily, and is helpful to improve more quickly.
The Axe-Fx II is also the world’s most powerful hardware multi-effects. To use it with an amp, just create presets with no AMP or CAB blocks. Some people run separate chains of effects —some before the amp and others in its loop. This is called the “four cable method.” Or better still: match the sound of your amp and send THAT to front of house while you use your amp on stage in all its glory.

Along with the Dobro name, OMI was acquired by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1993. They renamed the company Original Acoustic Instruments and moved production to Nashville. Gibson now uses the name Dobro only for models with the inverted-cone design used originally by the Dobro Manufacturing Company. Gibson also manufactures biscuit-style single-resonator guitars, but it sells them under names such as Hound Dog andEpiphone. The Dobro was first introduced to country music by Roy Acuff.


That’s not to say Gibson always met expectations during its storied past. “I dreamed of having a Gibson guitar and I achieved that dream,” Hook said. “It was a hollow-bodied EB-1 [a bass guitar] but it was medium scale so it was a s--t guitar and it sounded like s--t and I had to put new strings and a new bridge on it. It still sounded duff so I copied the shape and amalgamated it with a Yamaha.”
Bruce Springsteen has always had a not-so-secret weapon: "I got signed in the pack of new Dylans," he told Rolling Stone, "but I could turn around, kick-start my Telecaster and burn the house down." Springsteen didn't make any technical breakthroughs on guitar, but few players are better at coaxing emotion from steel and wood: witness the surf-rock recklessness of the "Born to Run" solo, the junkyard-dog bite of "Adam Raised a Cain" and the melancholy twang of "Tougher Than the Rest."
Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.
The only reason why anyone likes Ibanez is because it's cheap. When you're ready to buy a real axe, get a Jackson. Ibanez is not a "shredder" brand, it is a budget brand, just like Carvin. Jackson has it all: great sound, great feel, great looks, great for shredding! I'll admit because Rich makes some interesting looking guitars, but Jacksons are still cooler (if you've ever seen a Kelly, I'm sure you'll agree). Jackson For the Win!
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The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   
I too have a similar Alvarez made in Japan, 4 digit model no. etc. Mine is a 5059 autumn heringbone model and there is actually a production date on the tag in the sound hole of 1978. The tag is identical to yours as is the headstock logo inlay. Tuners are different however. Based on the similarities to yours I would date it around the same years, '77-'80. I know the model name due to an Alvarez advertisement clipping that depicts the model I have. I too am getting ready to do some much needed TLC to mine as it has been my most loved acoustic for 20 years now. It was a gift from my mother who used it in a country band way back when. These are great guitars that can be bought very cheaply when you can find them. Good luck with the search!
Filters can also be sweeping filters controlled by a wah-wah pedal. Wah-wah pedals are a foot controlled pedal that kind of looks like a car’s gas pedal. As you press the pedal forward, the filter moves to the lower end of the the sound spectrum, leaving the mid- and high-end sounding more pronounced. As you bring the pedal back, the high end is filtered, leaving a muffled sounding guitar tone.
Overdrive / distortion pedals are one of the most important effects on your board and are very much a personal taste. The ones on my pedal board change all the time, I have more than a few that I really like; Analogman King Of Tone, Pete Cornish SS-3, Ibanez Tube Screamer, Boss Blues Driver, Nobels ODR-1,  Zen Drive, MXR Distortion +... and I like and use all of them. Probably my all-time favourite os the King Of Tone, but on a budget, the Nobels ODR-1 is great value and runs with the very best!
The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:
A lot of amateur guitar players are tempted by the ‘cut’ of a high treble sound that gives their notes definition above the cacophony of the rest of the band. They become so accustomed to this sound that they lose sensitivity to its harshness. Treble becomes the ultimate weapon in their arsenal for the volume war, but to the listener, all they hear is a headache, aka bad tone.
The original Fender Mustang is something of a cult classic. It was loved by alternative bands and players - including Kurt Cobain - in the '90s for its short scale, affordability and potential for modding. The Bullet Mustang is the most affordable version of the model yet. In keeping with Squier’s other entry-level models, it features a basswood body, which gives it an incredibly lithe, lightweight feel. This, combined with its 24-inch scale length, makes it a great choice for beginners. The two humbuckers are the most obvious departure from the original, providing angular grit in the bridge position and a pleasing, earthy warmth in the neck. The bolt-on maple neck and six saddle hardtail bridge feel reassuringly rigid, while the tuners did a sterling job in our tests of holding their pitch without too much hassle. The volume and tone knobs, often a clear indicator of quality control in budget guitars, are installed firmly enough with no evident wobble, while the pickup selector switch is angled so it won’t get knocked if your playing becomes too... ahem... enthusiastic. Meanwhile, the 12-inch radius, rosewood ’board is pancake flat and makes string bends simple for even the most sausage-fingered player. The C profile neck is also extremely comfortable to hold, while the satin finish makes fretboard-spanning licks a doddle. $149/£120 is practically peanuts to spend on a new guitar. For Squier to cram in the features it has, with the overall levels of build quality on display, is seriously impressive.
In its classic form, the guitar is simply constructed, with the neck and fingerboard comprising a single piece of maple, bolted to an ash or alder body inexpensively jigged with flat surfaces on the front and back. The hardware includes two single coil pickups controlled by a three-way selector switch, and one each of volume and tone controls. The pickguard was first Bakelite, soon thereafter it was celluloid (later plastic), screwed directly onto the body with five (later eight) screws. The bridge has three adjustable saddles, with strings doubled up on each. The guitar quickly gained a following, and soon other, more established guitar companies (such as Gibson, whose Les Paul model was introduced in 1952; and later Gretsch, Rickenbacker, and others) began working on wooden solid-body production models of their own. A large chromed cover, often called the “ashtray”, was fitted over the bridge for improvedshielding, but this is rarely seen as most players find it impedes their style.
This guitar continues to rake in good reviews and recommendations, even from experienced players who are looking for a compact couch guitar. This says much about its build-quality, tone and production consistency. If you are just starting out and you are not sure what to get, or you're simply looking for an affordable grab-and-go guitar, then checkout the Yamaha JR1.
Australian singer Frank Ifield also owned and used a Maton guitar, which he later had fitted with a custom-made scratch plate, made in the shape of a map of Australia. Frank gave this instrument to his guitarist Ray Brett when he returned to Australia, and it has been featured on an episode of the BBC programmeAntiques Roadshow. Although these guitars are now normally worth around UK£2,000, expert Bunny Campione valued Ifield’s guitar at between UK£10,000 and UK£15,000, because Ifield had used it in songs featured in a compilation album alongside The Beatles‘ first two singles.[2]
Specs for your guitar include an ash body and carved maple top (rosewood was an option) bound with an abalone border, and a 5-piece maple/rosewood through-body neck. Other features include the bound 22-fret ebony fretboard with brass circle inlays, a matched-finish headstock with abalone border, 3-per-side tuners, two exposed humbuckers, and controls for each pickup. Its ivory finish is probably the most desirable color for this model, but the guitar was also available in a natural finish that highlighted the maple or rosewood carved top.
Numerous sources, such as Physics by John D. Cutnell and Kenneth W. Johnson, state that the human ear can hear sounds ranging from 20 hertz to 20,000 hertz. A guitar is going to fall in this range because it wouldn’t make good business sense to produce an instrument that can only be heard by dogs. From a scientific perspective, just about everything within the normal human range would be considered effective, since the instrument accomplishes its goal. Beyond that, a researcher wouldn’t be able to designate what’s good.
Shouldn't even be questioned. Ever hear of 'Voodoo Child'? Yeah, that was recorded in one take. & almost entirely improvised. & it's the greatest recording of an electric guitar being played EVER. & this isn't from some idiot who just listens to a lot of music, I play the guitar and have done a lot of reading and I know a few of your favorite guitarists would agree with me.
MY kid brother has been playing drums since he was a kid , until I snuck him into a bar at 15 one night and he set in with the house band , he played all my music. He was good so he & the lead guitarist clicked & they released a CD that took off & then the guitarist was killed , my brother got a doctorate in music and has played on several good CD's , MTB being but one. he can now play nearly everything and has released two more CD,s ,and owns his own studio , me I'm only an electrician but I understand Harmonic heating in electronics . its right that a watt is a watt,& it's a way to measure power & its sold in kilowatt hours, but even though a watts is a watt when measured, its a measurement of energy , it still depends on how it's used as to how far it goes or what you get from it ,it has a lot to do with how clean or distorted it is as to how loud it seems , people will perceive it differently , the only way to find to find how loud ? a decibel meter, another measurement .
There are many answers to your question like Jakedog mentioned. As far as finding a neck that is easy to play on, you'd be wise to go to a guitar shop and grab several different models of various brands and find what fits in your hand, yet allows full control over the fretting with your fingers. Smaller hands seem to like soft v shaped necks, yet I know several people with stubby little claws who play only boat necks...meaning huge round chuncky necks. I'm referring to the back of the neck in this case.
A common acoustic body style that makes use of a very large soundboard is the dreadnought. Dreadnoughts are distinctive for their square bouts, wide waists, and 14-fret necks. The first dreadnought was developed in 1916, and it has been gaining in popularity ever since. Dreadnoughts are very popular among bluegrass guitarists due to their powerful, driving sound.
A combo amp contains the amplifier and one or more speakers in a single cabinet. In a "head and speaker cabinet" configuration, the amplifier and speaker each have their own cabinet. The amplifier (head) may drive one or more speaker cabinets. In the 1920s, guitarists played through public address amplifiers, but by the 1940s, this was uncommon. A rare exception in the 1990s was grunge guitarist Kurt Cobain, who used four 800 watt PA amplifiers in his early guitar set-up.

Now that you know a little bit of history behind the electric guitar, let’s dive into some of the different types of electric guitars that you can find at Sam Ash. You may be thinking to yourself, “Why are there so many different types of electric guitars?” The reason is this: each and every type of electric guitar serves a unique purpose and will cater to various types of playing styles and musical genres.
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