Solder is basically a low melting alloy, which in a nutshell means it’s melting point is far lower than the typical materials it will be used to join. It’s melting range is generally between 200 to 800 °F. Solder is available in either lead-based and lead-free. Most commonly you will use a 60/40 (60% tin, 40% lead) rosin core solder when working on guitar wiring.
When people ask "What are the guitar string sizes?" they really want to know about the gauges, the term referring to the diameter of the string.  The answer is... that's not quite how it works.  Yes there are standard gauges but in several standard sizes like light, medium, and heavy.  Each, when properly tuned, will exert a different tension on the guitar's neck and if you jump to another size you'll probably need to adjust the truss rod and get used to the new action of the fingerboard.
Musicians might not want to be replaced by machines - we (or they, as it were, because I lost whatever musician credentials I might have earned annoying people with my wooden flute as a beggar on the streets of a tourist town when I started programming computers to play music) might make a strong case that no machine can express the human soulfulness of music. It is easy to conclude that, the more of the musical task that is assigned to a machine, the less soul is expressed in the music. Well, great big rock-n-roll wall of sound that all over your acoustic guitar soul. That stack of Fender amps I can hear five miles from the stadium where David Gilmore is strumming a guitar is as much an instrument as was the Shepard's lute - and a much more popular instrument now, for audiences attuned to the daily roar of tires crushing air against pavement.

I have had an old beat-up non-functioning norma electric archtop (hollow body) since i was 13(in 1984). A friend gave it to me and said i could have it if i could fix it... well like 20 years later i fixed it! and had the electrical redone for like $60.00. it needed some new parts (basiclly EVERYTHING) but i really wanted an archtop and knew i could fix this one up to sound pretty cool.... what i have found out about these guitars is that they really arent worth anything... i thought this one may have been from the late 50's early 60's so i may be worth something.. but as it turns out most people i have talked to about restoring it says its not worth anything that they were just little copies made in the 50's-60's and bought in the US at probably sears or something.... oh well I DONT CARE i really like it and its made well, so for the sheer vintage look and great feel I LOVE IT!-jj


The Line 6 Spider Classic 15 is similar in many ways to the Fender Champion 20. It offers digital simulations of various amplifiers and built-in special effects. The two amps are usually priced identically. The reasons we didn’t make the Spider Classic 15 our top pick is that it’s much larger and heavier than the Fender (about 40 percent overall, at 14.7 by 15.7 by 8.3 inches and 18.4 pounds), and its controls work in an unusual fashion that sometimes frustrated our panelists.
Hey dan, others: My first guitar was a Palmer, my parents purchased it for me from our small town's jewelry store. That was like 1968. The guitar was an electric with two pick-ups and "wabble-stick" (tremelo). It was a beautiful natural wood tone sunburst. Jewelry stores have not been known to carry the best in guitars; but I had a lot of fun learning to play that thing. I still have it; can't bring myself to part with it, though I now have three acoustics (Yamaha, Alvarez (12 string), and a Fender (DGS21, a Peavey bass and Lyon series Washburn. I'd say, for your money, your better off with a washbun. The neck action on them is very impressive. My Palmer is now in disrepair. I need to resolder the pick-ups. The key-board was quite nice; some bridge problems, however, a bit of a rattle. Maybe the nut needs to be reset. I don't know where to find them now, but I understand that they're still out there somewhere.
Although not as dominating in amp modeling, Guitar Rig takes the top spot in our guitar effects software list. It leads the pack with its meticulously detailed effects modeling. Its 54 modeled effects closely follow the behavior of legendary stompboxes and studio racks. Even professionals are having a hard time picking out the real pedal against this guitar effect software in a blind test. Its versatile design allows you to chain effects together in virtually any manner, without the hassles of cables, space and budget constraints. It is truly a truck load of gear in one software package. Retail Price: $199.00
ok thank you so much! Unfortunately, it’s not as loud as the other single coils of my strat. I tried splitting to the other coil but doesn’t split. I followed the wiring diagram bit by bit. =( Thank you so much for responding right away. I’m a session musician here in our country and this is actually my first time to mod my guitar. Thank you so much!
Amazingly well made and a beautiful guitar. The finish is incredible, it looks like a guitar that should cost a $1000 and up. Mine is the red color and found it in a pawn shop looking very rough, price on it was $99 and at first I thought it looked like a $99 guitar so I didn't pay any attention to it. I was looking a some Epi SG400s and a couple of Gibson's but for some reason I went back to the Samick. I had some cleaner with me and I grabbed a rag and started cleaning it up, after a few minutes of scrubbing this beautiful guitar appeared. I plugged it in along with the Epis and Gibson SGs and played them side-by-side and I was amazed at the sound I was getting from the Samick. I compared it along with the other SGs and the finish and the build quality smoked the others. I am all about American made guitars but this Korean made SG has completely changed my opinion about Asian made guitars, especially when I compared it to a $900 Gibson. I wasn't even looking for a new guitar but I couldn't let this one get away. I bought it and have played it for hours every day for the last week. It's amazing, the neck is the smoothest and easiest to play that I've ever seen, I like it much more than my Ibanez RG with the Wizard II neck I've got. I am now looking out for other Samick Artists Series guitars and if you see one for a good price try it out.
Fender is considered as an American manufacturer of amplifiers and stringed instruments, which was founded by Clarence Leonidas Fender in the year 1946. They provide a wide range of guitar. It has comfortable necks and  smooth fingerboard. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, United States. The guitar will available at Rs. 12,199/- onwards (approx). For further information, visit fender.com.

Chorus: Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally, by having slight variations in timbre and pitch, by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or "vibrato" to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.[71][72] A well-known usage of chorus is the lead guitar in "Come As You Are" by Nirvana.[61]
GNUitar is a basic free guitar effects software that allows you to turn your PC into a guitar effects processor without having to spend a single dime. Nothing much needs to be said aside from it is working as intended. Although you don't have too many options, it has all the essential effect types including distortion, reverb, echo, delay, chorus, flanger, equalizer, wah, phaser, tremolo, vibrato and noise reduction. The package comes with 2 different types of distortion and has various flavors of echo, reverb and delay. This free software works for both Windows and Linux.
I have a 12-string Lyle in really good shape. Bought as a b-day present from me back in late 1970's from a pawn shop. I need to take it to a luthier to have it set up better, but it sounds really good. Just right now the action is a little high, but not that much wear. For a long time, I put it away, finding it hard to chord as a relative newbie back then. But now, I am more than ready. It does say it was made in Korea ~ which makes it seem a little more rare. The sound is still great or maybe even better! Wish I knew what it was worth, but I hope the guy I find to set it up will know more.
Johnny Marr is a chief architect of the post-modern rock-guitar aesthetic. As the guitarist for seminal Eighties poetic pop stars the Smiths, he created a tonal palette and crisp stylistic approach that still forms the roadmap for much modern rock guitar playing. It was Marr who created the orchestral guitar soundscapes that enhanced the moody drama of Smiths singer Morrissey’s introspective lyrics and ironically detached vocals.

Talk box: A talk box directs the sound from an electric guitar or synthesizer into the mouth of a performer using a tube, allowing the sound to be shaped into vowels and consonants with movements of the mouth. The modified sound is then picked up by a microphone. In this way the guitarist is able create the effect that the guitar "licks" are "talking". Some famous uses of the talkbox include Bon Jovi's "Livin' on a Prayer", Stevie Wonder's "Black Man", Mötley Crüe's "Kickstart My Heart", Joe Walsh's "Rocky Mountain Way", Alice in Chains's "Man in the box" and Peter Frampton's "Show Me the Way".[66][67]

These bundles usually throw in a gig bag, so you don’t have to spend extra money to safely transport your gear, as well as spare picks, strings, and an instructable DVD that will help you learn some essential guitar techniques quite fast. You might also want a bundle that comes with a clip-on tuner so that you make sure you can keep your guitar well-tuned on the go.

"Guitarists frequently ask me to recommend a gig-worthy combo that sells for less than a thousand bucks," wrote Guitar World's Chris Gill in the May 2017 issue. "The question is never quite that simple though, as players often stipulate that they need great clean tones with plenty of headroom and that work well with pedals, a solid overdrive/distortion channel that really projects on stage, and really good reverb would be nice, too. While there are a few amps on the market that meet those requirements, the new PRS Sonzera series has jumped to the top of my list of recommendations."


Sometimes referred to as a fret “dress” and setup, The Works includes precision level, re-crown and polish of your instrument’s frets along with complete set-up of truss rod, string height (action) and intonation. This work will minimize fret buzz, eliminate fret pitting and divots, and improve your overall tone! The whole instrument will be cleaned and polished and all hardware and electronics inspected, cleaned, and lubed.
The role of a pickup is simple. They pick up the sound produced by the guitar and create an electric signal which then travels via an amplifier. For instance, pickups do not relate to getting a partner with your music, but they are actually a characteristic of the electric guitar. They serve the same purpose that frets do on an acoustic instrument, but the pickups will determine the vibrations before sending them to an amplifier.
The Les Paul Custom then became known as the “tuxedo” Les Paul with its Ebony and Alpine White color finishes, accentuated with shiny gold hardware. The Custom PRO features a classic gold LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and a gold stopbar tailpiece. You’ll find more gold in the headstock with the gold Grover tuners. It also features a fully bound body, headstock and neck, as well as pearloid fretboard inlays.
Rosewood » The diminishing supply of Brazilian Rosewood has led to Indian Rosewood replacing it in most markets. While the two look different, the tonal quality is virtually the same. One of the most popular and traditional woods used on acoustic guitars, rosewood has been prized for its rich, complex overtones that remain distinct even during bass-heavy passages. It's cutting attack and ringing tones make for highly articulate sound and plenty of projection. Rosewood is also a popular choice for fingerboards and bridges.
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The acoustic solos Reinhardt recorded with the Quintet of the Hot Club of France between 1936 and 1940 are simply astounding displays of virtuosity, melodic taste and speed that left indelible impressions on players throughout several generations, including Les Paul, Jimmy Page and Michael Angelo Batio. Django didn’t even need all four fretting fingers either, using only two left hand fingers to play complicated chords and hyperspeed solos (his third and fourth fingers were badly burned in a fire).
The first guitar developed was the K1 Series. Launched in 2000, this instrument had a dreadnought cutaway design and used inexpensive materials such as laminated spruce for tops, and sapele for back and sides. Kona Guitars then launched the K2 series after which it diversified, at present offering over 30 models of guitars, ukuleles, violins, and other instruments.
Many pedalboards on the market are powered. They feed DC power directly from the board to your pedals, eliminating the need for battery changes or external power adapters. This simplifies your setup and minimizes your need for power outlets. Some pedalboards even have a small built-in combo amplifier, making them a great practice and jamming solution.
Because of stiff competition in today's low-end market, guitar companies are constantly trying to outclass each other by improving the quality and value for money of their instruments. One brand that consistently tops in terms of sales and feedback is Epiphone, a sub-brand of Gibson that specializes in quality mass produced guitars. The DR-100 is a great example of their impressive ability to balance quality and affordability, garnering nearly perfect positive feedback for its build quality and sound.
The early rock bands of the 1960s used the PA system only for vocals. The electric guitarist and electric bassist had to produce their sound for the hall, club or other venue with their own amplifiers and speaker cabinets. As a result, bass players from the 1960s often used large, powerful amplifiers and large speaker cabinets. Some bass players would even use multiple bass amplifiers, with the signal from one bass amp being sent to one or more "slave" amps. In the mid-1960s John Entwistle, the bassist for The Who, was one of the first major players to make use of Marshall stacks. At a time when most bands used 50 to 100-watt amplifiers with single cabinets, Entwistle used twin stacks with new experimental prototype 200-watt amplifiers. This, in turn, also had a strong influence on the band's contemporaries at the time, with Jack Bruce of Cream and Noel Redding of the Jimi Hendrix Experience both following suit.

These two articles show us how me can manipulate coil winding direction, electrical phase, and magnetic polarity to achieve hum-cancellation between two coils. Having this knowledge allows us to create hum-cancelling combinations of coils over and above than just using humbuckers. A good example is using a RWRP pickup in the middle position of a Strat.
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Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
Bass amp speaker cabinets are typically more rigidly constructed, with thicker wood and more heavy bracing than those for non-bass amplification. They usually include tuned bass reflex ports or vents cut into the cabinet, for increased efficiency at low frequencies and improved bass sound. Preamplifier sections have equalization controls that are designed for the deeper frequency range of bass instruments, which extend down to 41 Hz or below. Bass amplifiers are more likely to be designed with heat sinks and/or cooling fans than regular guitar amplifiers, due to the high power demands of bass amplification. They are also more commonly equipped with audio compression or limiter circuitry to prevent overloading the power amplifier and to protect the speakers from damage due to unintended clipping in the power amp.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
Also shown in ’60s Bizarre Guitars, but not in the Teisco book photo, is a ca. 1954 Hawaiian Teisco EG-R which was sort of shaped like a Gibson and which had the same pickup as the J-1, with more elaborate symmetrical metal rocket shapes on the sides, housing the volume and tone controls. A chrome dome sat in front of the pickup between it and the dot-inlaid fingerboard. The head was stubby and rectangular. This was very “Moderne” looking, very Buck Rodgers.
You have tonnes of distortion models based on the likes of the classic DS-1 (Dist-1) and Pro Co Rat (Squeak) pedals and more as well as boost, delay and modulation effects. An onboard tuner, stereo/mono looper with up to 80- seconds of phrase recording, tap tempo, stereo headphone output for silent practice and the ability to use up to 7 effects simultaneously.

Probably also new in ’39, though it could have been available as early as ’38, was the Supro No. 50 amplifier. This was a typical Supro rectangular cabinet, now with a round grillcloth broken by two horizontal strips of wood. A Supro logo plate sat on the upper left corner. It had a flat leather handle and five tubes putting out 12 watts through a 10″ speaker. There were two inputs, an on/off switch and volume control. Cost was $50.
Most modern effects use solid-state electronics or computer chips. Some effects, particularly older ones such as Leslie speakers and spring reverbs, use mechanical components or vacuum tubes. Effects are often used as stompboxes, which are typically placed on the floor and controlled with footswitches. They are also built into amplifiers, tabletop units designed for DJs and record producers, and rackmounts, and are widely used as software VSTs.
Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!
Your skill level on the guitar is another factor that should be taken into consideration while shopping for the perfect instrument. It is generally wise to start out with a lower quality model when you are first beginning to study the guitar, whereas a veteran player with a trained ear will likely require the bells and whistles of more high end gear. If you’re a beginner, it’s a great idea to start out with a Yamaha or a Fender Squier, for example, as you get plenty of quality to learn on without breaking the bank. It’s wise not to go overly basic, however, as cheap guitars will have harsh playability that will leave a beginner with painful calluses that may scare them away from the instrument.

The Fender Deluxe Players Stratocaster Electric Guitar gives you classic Strat sound and feel in a beautiful package. This luxurious model is upgraded with American-made Vintage Noiseless pickups, medium-jumbo frets, and a 12" neck radius. As a result, it sounds fantastic and plays easy. It also is equipped with a push-button pickup switch (in addition to the usual toggle) that gives you 7 pickup combinations. Other deluxe features include a vintage-style synchronized tremolo, vintage-style tuners and gold-plated hardware throughout.
Guitar Tricks is a step-by-step learning system that’s designed to make learning guitar easy. The Guitar Fundamentals level 1 training curriculum has been totally reworked, improved and only recently re-released. Nothing else is as beginner-friendly as Guitar Tricks. In addition to working your way through the fundamental lessons of the Core Learning system you can explore great songs arranged with beginners in mind.
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved sruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, unbound elevated tortoise pickguard, style 28 type multiple bound top and back with white outer layer, zipper zigzag backstripe, trapeze tail piece, rosewood fingerboard, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
Though these pickups can be modded to fit in other guitars, the Antiquity Jazzmaster flat coil design is intended to serve as an upgrade to the Fender or Squier Jazzmaster series. Popularized in the late ’50s and ’60s, the classic Jazzmaster tone is rich and crisp but, without harshness on the higher register. This pickup comes in both a neck and bridge version that work together to cancel noise and produce that same rich tone with some extra snap and good string response coming out of two Alnico magnets.
As suggested by the numerical designation, Martin’s 28 Series was essentially an upgrade or refinement of the earlier 18 Series. Martin typically indicates fancier materials and appointments with a higher number (a D-28 is fancier dreadnought than a D-18, etc.). These consisted of one guitar, the E-28, and one bass, the EB-28. The first prototypes appeared in June of 1980; production began in January of 1981.
All-fifths tuning is a tuning in intervals of perfect fifths like that of a mandolin, cello or violin; other names include "perfect fifths" and "fifths".[35] It has a wide range, thus it requires an appropriate range of string gauges. A high b' string is particularly thin and taut, which can be avoided by shifting the scale down by several steps or by a fifth.
As this site was founded by one of the circuit board designers from GuitarPCB.com, you can be assured that all of the homework has been done for you in selecting the appropriate parts for each circuit. Many of the kits we sell are not available from any other US supplier. Currently, we only ship to the USA, however, we plan to expand to the rest of North America in the future.
These chords will form the foundation of your guitar playing and are, thankfully, rather easy to learn. With a little practice and patience you will find them coming together quickly. The beginner guitar songs use the chords below and introduce them gently. These songs are a great way to build up your guitar foundations to a level of solid competency. By playing through them in order and being patient with each one you will quickly develop your skills.
Then, there are the venues where all you get is a vocal mic or two, where you're left to curate your sound all by yourselves. This category accounts for the vast majority of places a young band will play, and if you can hone your tone here you can hone it anywhere. What's most important is that you keep your amps low enough to allow the drummer to play at about 80% intensity. That way, the audience can actually hear all those important vocals, and when your drummer kicks it up to 100%, and you stomp on your distortion pedal, the audience will actually feel a shift.
2. Do your saddles have notches cut into them? If not, then I suspect they could do with some (or if they have, but they're extremely shallow, perhaps they need deepened a little). Just note, however, that this is very easy to screw up and should probably be done by a tech if you're in any way unsure about doing it yourself. Also, you can't just cut a notch in one saddle. You would have to do all of them to the same depth, then raise the bridge a little to make up for the depth you just removed.
John McLaughlin was invited to record with Miles Davis while still in his twenties, co-parenting jazz fusion on Bitches Brew and other Davis LPs. But he achieved guitar-god status with his own Mahavishnu Orchestra, where he made his Gibson spit fire like a many-headed dragon. A breakneck stylist, McLaughlin was peerless, mixing psychedelic rock, R&B, gypsy jazz, flamenco and Indian raga techniques. That polyglot mastery earned him huge respect from jazz and rock peers alike: Jeff Beck called him "the best guitarist alive."
It also comes in a colour that is unique and leaves most other guitars in the dust - their OPB colour, or Open Pore Black finish. It’s a matte black guitar. Matte (or a satin finish) means that you won’t have the grubby finger marks or oil stains that a glossy finish would have. Plus, if you play for a while and your palms get sweaty, this matte finish won’t be slick and slipper - unlike guitars with a glossy finish.
In the 1980s it seemed like Washburn guitars were everywhere, and they were leaders in the hard rock and metal guitar genre. Even though they aren’t quite as prominent as they once were, they still feature some nice guitars in their lineup. From metal to jazz and anywhere in between, Washburn has you covered. With signature models for Paul Stanley and Nuno Bettencourt, they still have strong name recognition in the rock world.

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Starting in January 1999, Taylor guitars are made with a patented bolt-on neck; the NT neck (new technology). It differs from other necks by using a continuous piece of wood all the way to the 19th fret to support the fretboard.[7] The standard practice is to support the fretboard up to the fourteenth fret with the unsupported portion being glued to the constantly moving soundboard. The NT neck fits into a pocket on the top of the guitar body with the desired angle being achieved by small, accurately milled neck spacers (shims). Over time, some guitars require the neck angle to be realigned (referred to as a neck reset). This process is greatly simplified by allowing the replacement of different sized neck spacers to return the neck to the required angle. Prior to 1999, Taylor Guitars had a simpler bolt-on neck. These guitar necks allow for simple adjustment later if needed. Traditional (Non-Taylor) guitars with a glued neck with a dovetail would need to be disassembled to be adjusted.[8][9]

What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
Some guitarists and guitar makers avoid this by including an additional resistor, around 4.7kOhms, in series with the capacitor. This provides a minimum level of resistance, so the tone circuit is never at “zero” even when the knob indicates it. You can see in the chart that around 4kOhms (about “1” on the tone pot knob), there’s no hump in the midrange, just a very rapid falloff in the upper mids and treble frequencies.

A rackmount effects unit may contain an electronic circuit nearly identical to a stompbox-based effect, but it is mounted in a standard 19" equipment rack, which is usually mounted in a road case that is designed to protect the equipment during transport. More recently, as signal-processing technology continuously becomes more feature-dense, rack-mount effects units frequently contain several types of effects. They are typically controlled by knobs or switches on the front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface.
Prior to being acquired by Gibson back in 1957, Epiphone once competed with the most popular guitar brands in the market - including Gibson. These days, Epiphone is known for being the affordable sub-brand of Gibson, producing cost-effective alternatives to many of their premium guitars. Many experienced players today credit this brand for manufacturing their first ever instrument, and their popularity in the entry level market continue to soar high.

Delay/echo effects can sound pretty good when plugged directly into an amp’s input (See Example 3, above)—hell, the Edge built a whole career out of doing just that—but if you want absolutely clean, pristine delay and echo effects with no distortion, the effects loop is the only way to go. Reverb effects should always be patched into the effects loop (See Example 4, below) unless you always play through the cleanest of clean sounding amps. Overdriven or distorted reverb just ain’t very pretty, and it can destroy any semblance of clarity or definition and smear your sound like the ketchup on a baby’s face when it’s trying to master the fine art of eating a messy pile of French fries.


Many pedal builders will order their resistors, capacitors, IC, and other components in bulk online. Most of the time, this is a much cheaper method than buying single components – plus it gives you an enormous variety of components to use. It may also be wise to check out the circuit boards inside of any old electronics, or broken guitar pedals you no longer use. You’d be surprised what you may find.
The Martin DSR2 also comes equipped with built-in Fishman Sonitone electronics, which features discrete soundhole mounted controls, allowing for stage-ready performance without having to drill excessive holes on the side of the body. With its continuesly high rating and incredible value for money, the Martin DSR2 should be at the top of your list when you're looking for an acoustic-electric guitar in this price range.
All of these soundfonts can be opened with most zip programs, but if you are not sure or you haven't got a zip program you can use 7zip in windows or xarchiver in linux. I chose the SF.tar.bz2 format as it compressed to almost half the size of the original. Let me know if you have any problems downloading or extracting the files. These samples have been tested in SFZ free player in windows (check this forum for download details) and Qsynth in linux.

accessories aeolian mode analog basic chords basic guitar chords beginner best guitar brands cheap guitars chord diagrams digital dorian mode easy guitar songs effects guitar guitar amp photos guitar buying guitar effects guitar equipment guitar kits introduction ionian mode lessons locrian mode lydian mode major key major scale mixolydian mode music studio natural minor scale noise control pedalboard pentatonic major pentatonic minor phrygian mode pickups practice room recording scale diagrams soundproofing theory used guitars
Hardly any mention of female players, why is that? I’m a bloke, not a chick, yet this is like the UK 2011 sports personality of the year awards based on press coverage – not performance or results but drunk journo’s who only like watching blokes – but not Pat Metheny LOL – SO… No Jennifer Batten then? Rightly tho’ someone thought slide player Bonnie Raitt should get a mention – Derek Trucks got a look in (what a slide player) – had to look hard to find Larry Carlton – and Lee Ritenour – and John Scofield! Yet no Nile Rogers? And Keith Richards should be up there but why not Ronnie Woods? Nice to see Tom Scholtz remembered yet no Steve Miller who learned at the feet of Les Paul and yet no Les Paul either? Such a narrow list limited by populism not necessarily ability, tone or compositon. Not really much of list was it?
To make a long story short, I ordered from Amazon two Epiphone EJ-200SCE guitars, Color: one Natural, one Black and the Hummingbird Ephiphone. My wife liked the black one. I liked the natural one. We decided to compare the two side by side, and sent for both of them. Later, my wife changed her mind and liked the way the natural looked and sounded. I had just listened to the Andertons review "What ones are the best, the ten times more expensive J 200 Gibson or the ten times more expensive Hummingbird Gibson comparing to the similar Epiphone EJ-200SCE and the Hummingbird Epiphone.
The Science of Electric Guitars and Guitar Electronics considers the electric guitar and related accessories from a scientific point of view. The majority of books about electric guitars try to avoid using mathematics when describing the scientific phenomena related to the electric guitar. However, mathematics is an invaluable tool in the design processes of all areas of technology, even when designing musical instruments and audio electronics. This book presents simple mathematical methods for modelling the electric guitar as a signal source for electric circuits such as effect pedals and amplifiers. In addition to modelling the electronics inside the electric guitar, the principles of operation of some vintage guitar effects and amplifier circuits are explained and analysed using systematic methods of circuit analysis. The book is intended for everyone who is interested in the design and analysis of basic analogue electronics used in the electric guitar and guitar-related accessories. The presented topics cover the whole signal chain from the guitar strings to the loudspeaker. Therefore, a solid foundation is established for creating own designs in guitar electronics using basic components of analogue electronics.
Nobody ever forgets their first guitar. It's an exciting moment that signifies the beginning of a life that's filled with musical enjoyment. For this reason, you need to be sure that the guitar you purchase is more than worthy of making your talents fully realized. And thankfully, there is no shortage of astounding guitar value packages to choose from, right here.
Hollow Body Guitars: Guitars with hollow body construction were the first mass-produced round-neck models built, in the 1930s. Jazzman Charlie Christian was the most-fiery champion of the early hollow body electric, using a Gibson ES-150 — a model first released in 1936 — to record vastly influential sides with Benny Goodman, Lester Young. Buck Clayton and as a leader in his own right. He also used the ES-150 to help invent the art of single-note lead guitar.
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.

The actual value of the pot itself does not affect the input to output voltage ratio, but it does alter the peak frequency of the pickup. If you want a brighter sound from your pickups, use a pot with a larger total resistance. If you want a darker sound, use a smaller total resistance. In general, 250kΩ pots are used with single-coil pickups and 500kΩ pots are used with humbucking pickups.


The Fender Stratocaster Squier is possibly the most recognizable shape in electric guitar history. The Fender Stratocaster design is mimicked by manufacturers all over the world. Fender produces its own line of budget “Strats” called the Squier series. If you want to start with an electric guitar, chances are you’ll buy something like this for around $130 USD.
An octave pedal listens to what note you’re playing and adds the next octave up or down (depending on your settings) making it sound like someone is playing the octave note with you. If you’re familiar with guitar or just learning, you’ll know that an octave is the distance between one musical note and it’s corresponding note at a higher or lower pitch. For example, if you play an open E string and then play the E string on the 12th fret, it will sound the same, just an octave higher.
Alongside the Stratocaster, Les Pauls have defined rock ’n’ roll. Everyone from Jimmy Page to Slash to Zakk Wylde has wielded one of these, and the guitar’s fat, creamy tone with near-endless sustain is instantly recognizable. Not everyone can afford a bona fide Gibson, though, but the Epiphone Les Paul Standard makes those sounds accessible to most of us.
Could be a couple of things. Either it's hitting off a high fret, or more likely the saddle is killing the string's vibration (that can be caused by the string sitting in a slot that does not have a sudden enough drop-off, for example). Try slackening the string and lifting it to the side slightly on the saddle (like 1 or 2 mm), then tune it up again. If that sorts out your problem, at least you've identified the cause.
With guitar companies continually coming up with new models or refreshed versions of their bestsellers, guitar players can feel both excited and overwhelmed to try out and buy the latest shredders and jazz boxes. Will these really be better than their vintage archtop or not? Are the new humbuckers any good? Will the new version of an old favorite be a good buy? – And the list goes on.
this is a norma guitar. i think from the late 1960's to maybe 1970estate find. has scratches in some placeshas two on and off button in white they push in real easy. theres a rhythm, and solo button theres two knobs bellow.theres only 3 strings on it. theres three missing part off the r is missing on the norma. i have no equipment to test it to see how it sounds it seems ok when i play with what strings i have on it.please check out all the pictures for better detail selling as is no returns... more
There's no denying the popularity of the Stratocaster, thanks to it being the weapon of choice for a long list of iconic players that include Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck to name a few. The American Professional Stratocaster is the latest iteration of this classic, carrying over much of the look and feel of the original, but more reliable and road worthy.
I, too, am searching for more info on my Kent. It's a Model 834, violin shaped with a cutaway. Mine is red with "racing stripe" binding on the edge. It's sounds INCREDIBLE (very vintage) and plays well, though I find the neck very narrow. There was an E-Bay auction for a couple of framed ads which featured this model, plus the 833, 835 and 836 from 1967 (one of the pictures, from what I could tell, looked exactly like mine). I also tracked down a picture of one that is a Yellow 67 with a Bigsby-Style vibrato (mine lacks this). If anyone finds a source for more Kent info, I'd love to hear from you...
The Epiphone ES-335 Dot was the world's first semi-hollowbody electric guitar, introduced in 1958. Today, it's made by Gibson, but it is still prized by jazz and blues musicians looking for a classic sound. Setting up the Dot involves adjusting the truss rod to correct for any underbowing or overbowing of the neck because of humidity changes. The bridge saddle on the Dot may also be adjusted to get the right distance between the string and the fretboard, called the “action.”
You can use compression not only to keep levels under control but also to increase sustain. Sometimes a guitar part will work better in a track if the sustain is created using a little less overdrive augmented by compression rather than relying on overdrive alone. Even a heavily overdriven guitar sound can be made to appear more powerful if compressed, as its average energy level is increased further, though any noise will also be rendered more obvious. Clean guitar parts can also benefit enormously from compression, as it creates a more dense, even sound and can emphasise the picking attack of the notes when a longer attack time is set. Using a faster release time, so as to cause audible level pumping, can make for exciting rock guitar sounds, but some compressors pump more gracefully than others — Dbx models are quite popular in this respect.
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