Though these pickups can be modded to fit in other guitars, the Antiquity Jazzmaster flat coil design is intended to serve as an upgrade to the Fender or Squier Jazzmaster series. Popularized in the late ’50s and ’60s, the classic Jazzmaster tone is rich and crisp but, without harshness on the higher register. This pickup comes in both a neck and bridge version that work together to cancel noise and produce that same rich tone with some extra snap and good string response coming out of two Alnico magnets.
SG style guitars are synonymous with hard rock thanks to guitarists such as Angus Young of AC/DC and Tommy Iommi of Black Sabbath. As a result, most customers interested in SG guitar kits are looking to play hard rock and heavier styles of music in general. But limiting the SG to one specific style of music really doesn’t do justice to the versatility of the instrument.
That is why pick-up manufacturers are always careful to explain that their pick-ups will sound different depending on the woods and construction of a guitar. Seymour Duncan (among many others) has written about this a lot, a you can read more on the Seymour Duncan website. You can also study more at the FRETS website, GAL (The Guild of American Luthiers), StewMac, and LMI (Luthier's Mercantile International).
If a metallic object (such as an electric guitar string for example) is vibrated above a magnetic coil the magnetic field is disturbed and an electrical current is produced. This current then travels through the pickups connecting wires, eventually making it’s way to your output jack where it is transferred to your guitar lead and ultimately to your guitar amp where the small signal is amplified to produce the sound associated with an electric guitar.

Regarding the PDF download, I have not done so yet, but all of this info is available on the web, in color, ad nauseum. I bought the book to have at my bench so I could refer to it while wiring guitars. I do not have a color printer. I find the thought that, in order to experience what the book OUGHT to look like, you have to download a file, presumptuous, at best. Annoying, at the least.


Six-point rocking tremolo: This was the original rocking vibrato designed by Fender in the 1950s. Like the two-point tremolo, it is through-body, spring-loaded, and provides individual string intonation and height adjustment. Some players feel that because this type of tremolo rocks on six screws it provides greater vibration transfer to the top and hence better resonance.

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The dark underbelly is Lou Reed’s comfort zone. Despair and degradation are his muses. Emerging in the mid Sixties at the helm of the Velvet Underground, he offered up a gritty black-and-white alternative to the rainbow-colored pyschedelia of the prevailing rock culture. He brought us along, albeit reluctantly, to meet junkies and hustlers, S&M bondage goddesses and suicidal transvestites. He was one of the first rock guitarists to embrace chaos truly and wholeheartedly.
Mostly everything about a guitar in this price range feels premium, and the sound quality and playability is enough to put a smile on any guitarist’s face. You also start to find advanced features such as brand-name pickups, active pickups, and EverTune bridges, as well as unique signature models that are too expensive for manufacturers to produce as a budget line.
Modelling/digital amps: This type of guitar amp uses digital technology to stimulate old-fashioned technology. They are able to emulate old amplifiers using software, and this feature enables them to combine several amps into one. Their programmable nature enables the user to switch digital effects such as the chorus, delay, and other features. Some models of these amps have a digital or analog output that goes directly to a recording or PA system through speaker simulation.
As we’ve shown here, a lot of relatively small—and inexpensive (many are practically free)—tweaks can hot-rod your tone and maneuver it to an array of differing ports of call. In some ways, it’s like tossing a handful of dice instead of just two—because the way small tweaks interact can lead to exponential changes in sound. For that reason, my advice is to take it slow and only make a single change at a time to understand what it delivers. Besides, it’s more fun (and less stressful) that way, anyway!
Because most “top 10 guitar posts” throw a bunch of guitars up there, tell you they’re “the best” and give you little information about them. That’s unhelpful on its best day and dangerously misleading on its worst. Because “best” and “top” are not concrete terms in this sense, unless you’re talking about sales figures, which they almost never are.
If you have an envelope follower, envelope filter, auto-wah or other dynamic touch-sensitive effect, this should go at the very front in most cases, as these effects are almost exclusively dependent upon the dynamics of your playing. Placing most other types of effects in front of them will compress the signal, thereby reducing dynamics and minimizing their performance.
Reverb – The best analogy for reverb effects would be playing your guitar inside a pipe. That’s an extreme level of reverb, of course, and these pedals will allow you to go from there all the way back to subtler effects like the natural reverberation of a concert hall. This effect sounds great with a clean tone, but beware of using it with heavy distortion or else you might lose too much definition from your sound.

Power chords are one of the staples of rock music and one of the most important guitar chord types you need to have in your toolbox. They are important to learn for a few reasons: They’re easy to play They’re used a TON in many popular songs and are very versatile. They’ll help broaden your repertoire of guitar sounds / styles. This post will walk you through step-by-step what a power chord is, how to play them and what songs you can learn to start practicing them. What are Power Chords? Whether you play an acoustic or electric guitar, you are going
Bracing affects the way the guitar sounds because it changes the pitch or tune that the guitar produces out of the sound hole. Personally I think X bracing is the b est because it produces a more even and better more balance for mids and high notes and just enough bass on the E and A strings that gives a brighter more even tone. Blinded or pessed bracing gives a much deeper sound than x bracing which =less versatility but if you bought a pressed dread knot or anything else you'll still be okay just remember strings make a huge difference and running your guitar to the right amount of tone for any song will work it's just that Taylor produces the best over all guitar itself by better quality woods and they go through ver strict and rigorous testing and inspections before they are sold to retailers and customers. Higher grade parts attention to detail and style of music versatility is why one guitar can cost 3 times as much. Most companies like Taylor is know give warranties or $ back
You may not have considered Orange Amplifiers before, but they’re a company with a history that dates back to the early days of hard rock. If you watch footage of rock bands from the 1960s you’ll see Orange amplifiers onstage almost as much as Marshalls. The British amp builder has had its ups and downs since those glory days, but today Orange is as strong as ever.
There isn't a shredder on the planet who doesn't remember their first electric guitar. In fact, it's for that exact reason why your first electric guitar should built with meticulous attention to every detail. In this section, you'll find an impressive range of beginner electric guitars that were designed with your ambitions in mind, so you can enjoy sharpening your skills on that same special instrument for many years to come. Everyone who has a passion for playing music deserves to hone their craft on an electric guitar that is a perfect balance of playability, beauty and tone. But that sentiment especially applies to beginners, so they can build the confidence necessary to continue on with the instrument. Thankfully, all of the most well-known guitar brands specialize in their own beginner electric guitar models. From Ibanez and Epiphone to ESP and Dean, these companies take great pride in nurturing the skills of future pluckers, strummers and shredders. Squier is no stranger to the world of beginner guitars, and their Vintage Modified Jaguar HH electric guitar is everything a budding up-and-comer could ask for. Featuring a 24'' scale fast action neck, and a set of Duncan Designed pickups for a multitude of humbucking tones, the Squier Vintage Modified Jaguar is an updated sunburst classic that looks and plays like a dream. Another big-seller is the Epiphone Les Paul 100 electric guitar. Consisting of open-coil humbuckers and a genuine Les Paul sound, this axe contains superb electronics and a solid tone, while the tune-o-matic bridge ensures you that this beauty will stay tune through an abundance of practicing. It's incredible to think that at one moment in time, Jimmy Page had difficulty forming an open chord, or that Eddie Van Halen had trouble with hammer-ons. But even the greatest guitar players had to start somewhere, just like you. Every guitar player improves with time, and when you have a beginner electric guitar that's constructed by professionals, the learning stages feel will less like a duty, and more like the start of an exciting adventure.
The actual value of the pot itself does not affect the input to output voltage ratio, but it does alter the peak frequency of the pickup. If you want a brighter sound from your pickups, use a pot with a larger total resistance. If you want a darker sound, use a smaller total resistance. In general, 250kΩ pots are used with single-coil pickups and 500kΩ pots are used with humbucking pickups.
The wonders of digital delay arrived on the pedalboard in the early 1980s with what seemed massive capabilities of long delays, clean signal reproductions, and the endless fun of one, two, or up to 16 seconds of looping delay. In many cases, in the early days, reproductions weren’t really all that clean (or were cleaner than analog, but colder and harsher too), and many delays were prone to digital distortion if pushed, or poor resolution on the decay of the signal. Even so, the techno-power of the new technology stamped all over the bones of the old analog delay units, and for a time threatened to bury them entirely.
A companion to the Spectrum 5 guitar was a solidbody bass version with the Spectrum 5 body shape. This was the Teisco EBX-200/Teisco Del Rey EBX-200 Super Deluxe Bass. It had two small pickups with two center half-slots and two sliding on/off switches, with volume and tone and was described in the U.S. catalog as having the 5-ply ebony neck. The neck had the three-and-one hooked head and an ebony board with dots, not the picks.
It seems strange that we’ve come so far into an article about acoustic guitars without mentioning the ‘other’ big name in this world; Taylor. The American company has been duking it out with Martin since 1974 for the title of top dog in the world of acoustic guitars, and has come up with a few unique iterations of its own along the way. Nowadays, you could point to the GS Mini and Big Baby as examples of Taylor leading the way in acoustic guitar innovation, but back in the day it was the Grand Auditorium style which really put them on the map.
The earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic, later superseded by a typical electric configuration of two humbucking pickups. In the 1990s, there was a resurgence of interest among jazz guitarists in acoustic archtop guitars with floating pickups. The original acoustic archtop guitars were designed to enhance volume: for that reason they were constructed for use with relatively heavy guitar strings. Even after electrification became the norm, jazz guitarists continued to fit strings of 0.012" gauge or heavier for reasons of tone, and also prefer flatwound strings. The characteristic arched top can be made of a solid piece of wood that is carved into the arched shape, or a piece of laminated wood (essentially a type of plywood) that is pressed into shape. Spruce is often used for tops, and maple for backs. Archtop guitars can be mass-produced, such as the Ibanez Artcore series, or handmade by luthiers such as Robert Benedetto.
Acoustically I own a Martin for the living room. Best sound but I won't let it leave the house. (Taylor people are so defensive, but lets face it Martin owners never have to say "Oh it sounds just like/as good as a Taylor") I own an Ovation, the thing is bullet proof, a little thin on sound but can take it anywhere. If I plug it in, it has amazing electronics and sounds 10X better. I own an Ibenez exotic wood, pretty but a stiff box that just does not resonate, hate it.
The first thing to do is to cut out a piece of copper foil slightly larger than the bottom of the electronics cavity.This way the edges of the foil will go up the sides of the electronics cavity a bit. Next cut out strips of copper foil slightly wider than the depth of the cavity, and form them along the sides. When you are finished, it should look like the photo on the left.
Tom Petty's lead guitarist for more than 40 years, Mike Campbell never clutters up a song with notes when two or three bull's-eyes will suffice. "It's a challenge to make your statement in a short amount of time," he has said, "but I prefer that challenge as opposed to just stretching out." Listen to the skeletal hook that holds "Breakdown" together or the laconic, tone-bending solo in "You Got Lucky" to hear Campbell's ingenious use of negative space. "Michael is not one to show off," Petty once said. "What he says is essential."
• Trapeze: Although the trapeze tailpiece was original equipment on the very first runs ofGibson Les Pauls, they are mostly the province of hollowbody and semi-hollowbody guitars, ranging from the L-5-CES to the Epiphone Regent. Early ES models also came with trapeze tailpieces. These devices attach to the heel of the guitar’s body and have slots for strings to pass through. Once the strings are installed and tightened to proper tension, the tension suspends the tailpiece in air — providing the appellation trapeze. The principle behind trapeze tailpieces is that they dampen the natural resonance of the strings less than stop tailpieces. These tailpieces also transmit the string tension to the guitar’s side, rather than its belly. The downside is they are the hardest tailpieces to string, since strings tend to drop out of their slots until they are at tension. In that respect, they take some getting used to.
Unlike Christian, however, Montgomery used his thumb instead of a pick to create the percussive-yet-warm tone associated with his style. (According to interviews, Wes learned to play with his thumb because it created a softer sound, appeasing his neighbors.) With his phenomenal ear, Wes quickly grew beyond his influences and developed a style all his own. His knack for melody, groundbreaking use of octaves in a soloing context and intricate chord solos—as demonstrated in his devastating interpretations of standards like “Round Midnight” and “Days of Wine and Roses”—broadened the range of guitar, pushing the instrument into unchartered territory.
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The principal difference among the Strats was in finish options. All had 21-fret maple necks, three single-coil pickups, volume and two tone controls, and five-way select. The SWG came in yer basic red or black, with maple ‘board and chrome hardware. These had traditional non-locking vibratos. The SGV was offered in red with white graphics. The SSX was the dusey, with purple burst (white outside, purple in center), tiara turquoise, blue pearl, metallic white, black and candy apple red finish options, with… with matching colored maple fingerboard and (that’s and) matching chrome hardware.
The key to capturing any kind of ambient tracks is a good reverberant space, although a narrow or dead room can also work, as long as there is sufficient distance between the guitarist and the amp. I usually put the air mic at least ten feet from the amp, positioned off-axis, or in an omnidirectional pattern to pick up as much reflected sound as possible. Placing a baffle between the guitarist and the amp will increase the apparent room size, as will making the amp sound pass through a doorway or turn a corner into another room.
The Estimated Values shown on each web page are out-of-date in many cases. One person cannot possibly keep every page up-to-date, so that is why we created a Wiki system to allow anyone to help maintain the database. We invite anyone who sees a problem with any Estimated Value to report it to us by clicking the Report A Problem icon at the top of each page (it looks like this ).
I started using cobalt .010 and I've found they have plenty of clarity and bite. Please keep in mind there are many factors going into your sound. Amp, guitar pickups, strings, pick type, etc. Don't be disappointed if you get some premium strings that don't change your sound if your pickups can't pick up the movement very well. Start at a regular light. .010 is plenty flexible, and they won't break as often as a 8 or 9. Don't get caught up in the rookie mentality of "THIS is what kind of guitarist I will be, so I need everything to fit that." Experiment with different sizes and types.
A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.
In order to keep your guitar clean, there are some tips that you should be aware of. When taking the strings off to clean the system, do so two or three at a time. If you are not changing strings, wipe them with a dry cloth after every session. Wiping down the fretboard with a damp cloth occasionally is enough to keep it in good shape. The pickups, tuners, bridges, and nuts can be cleaned in much the same way. The pickups on your guitar should be cleaned with a dry cloth. Be sure to only use gentle cleaning products on your guitar.
So, how to use the tone knob? Open it to get a trebley sound, and roll it off to get a warmer, darker tone. Experiment. Some guitars sound best with the tiniest roll back on the tone knob, some songs require a certain combination of tone and pickup settings to sound best. Try to listen to the John Mayer DVD “Where the Light Is” and try to emulate the guitar tones there using only your pickup selector and knob. He uses different guitars and settings, but a lot of those can be emulated just with your guitar’s controls. Experiment.

Myths and Legends: Valve technology is intrinsically the most elegant means by which a speaker is able to reproduce music. This is not because valves have magical qualities but because the technology by which they function is not achievable by other means. In ten thousand years from now Valve amplifiers will possible be the only remaining technology from the 20th century that will be still be being used and loved with as much passion as when first invented. As much as there is no proof that Valve amplifiers can sound superior to solid state I for one if given the choice will only listen to music through Valve amplification.

A basic triode valve (tube) contains a cathode, a plate and a grid. When a positive voltage is applied to the plate, a current of negatively charged electrons flows to it from the heated cathode through the grid. This increases the voltage of the audio signal, amplifying its volume. The grid regulates the extent to which plate voltage is increased. A small negative voltage applied to the grid causes a large decrease in plate voltage.[42]


I bought a Yamaha EC-10 classical at a garage sale for $5.00. It was still in the cardboard box and never played according to the seller. The guitar is full size and looks cool and has real good volume and good bass, but I'd still like to get more bass out of it. I'm thinking of making some modifications to my guitar so that I can fit it with actual bass guitar strings, nylon ones. A friend of mine said I'd wreck up my guitar if I did this. Would I wreck the guitar putting bass strings on it or could I make a bass out of it?
The Fretted Synth website has mysteriously disappeared (the likes of Native Instruments not happy that they’re giving away so much goodness for free??), so we’re linking to the Rekkerd page that still seems to host the plugins. FreeAmp3 really shouldn’t be free: it features masses of sound-shaping potential and the user interface looks great. If you just want one (free) VST guitar plugin, get this.

Now that you have made it through, if you chose to build a guitar, you are probably going to want to make more. Hopefully some of the info as well as links I have provided has helped to get you started in the right direction. Guitar building is fun and chalenging at the same time, and if your like me you will always want to improve your skills and find something else to try out on your next project. I have added some pictures of some of the guitars that I have made down at the bottom so you can see my progression. So here's to having fun and building a piece of art that you don't just have to look at. Though they do look good hung on a wall!


Started shopping here when I was just getting my feet wet with the music career, bought a Mexican Humbucker strat and went on from there. Over the next 3 years, after many pedals, amps, and other major gears, I've become a solid local musician. This place has the best service hands down to take care of your gear needs in your career, they find out what you need, let you demo the gear for as long as you want, and never forces you to make a purchase decision. I'm glad I can go to this place for all my gear needs and support, so I can spend most of my time on actual music. The employees are super chill, and you eventually get to know them and the bands they play in after a while. It's a really supportive community for local musicians.
Over the years in my travels, I've seen more Peavey amps on real working musicians' stages than any other amp manufacturer. The fact that real, everyday working musicians use and depend on them also dictates that Peavey amps are out there making more money for real working musicians in total, than any other amp out there. Yes, I know, the big act shows have huge backlines of Marshalls behind them, but they are in the minority, as there are more lesser-famed bands and musicians out there working than there are "stars". I "stepped down" to Peavey almost 20 years ago, when I was beginning to have reliability issues with my Fender amps...issues I couldn't afford to keep having while on the road. I still have my old Fender amps, but I've been gigging regularly and exclusively with only Peavey for the past almost 20 years now. I still get the tone I want and need and the reliability I expect in order to keep making a living in music. And by the way, I've been gigging since 1963.
Sennheiser's cardioid MD421 crops up almost as frequently in interviews, and has a wider frequency response, none of the low mid-range suckout, and an even heftier sensitivity boost upwards of 1kHz. This microphone also has a larger diaphragm than the SM57, and the off-axis response anomalies of the larger diaphragm, in particular, give a different character to the sound. Although obviously very popular, this mic seems more often to be used in combination with other mics than on its own.
Why is Mesa Boogie so low?! Have Mesa Boogie ever made a bad amp? Look how many guys endorse their gear. Have you ever tried a Dual Rectifier or Mark V? It will tear you to shreds. They are AMAZING amps. Best part, they're all tube. Line 6, why the hell are they fifth. Why are they in the top 15? They are nothing but crap digital rubbish. Play a real amp like a Mesa Boogie, line 6, pft. Mesa Boogie is the best amp brand by far.

The Dobros and Nationals were joined by the first Supro guitar versions in late 1935, even though their announcement didn’t appear until a few months later in the March, 1936, The Music Trades. These first Supro guitars included an aluminum Hawaiian lap steel, both electric Spanish archtop 6-string and tenor guitars, and an electric mandolin. They mark the official beginning of the Supro story.


Most 700 and 800 models, except for bass and probably 12-strings, were equipped with a vibrato bar. After 45 years or so the bar has gone missing on many of them. Some model 820s were equipped with a genuine Bigsby vibrato. The advertisement at left features the Bigsby-equipped Model 820. The advertisement on the right is identical except that it showed the stock Kent vibrato tailpiece. According to the catalogue of the time, the Bigsby was only available on the sunburst model 820.

Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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