This body and headstock shape are identical to my Nivico Balladeer, and both guitars are real keepers.  This truss rod cover would become the standard curved plastic type seen on many Matsumoku-made guitars for the next 10 years.  Of course the Palmer badge is missing, but the Palmer name (as it pertains to Japanese imports) was being used as early as 1964.  I’ve seen Kawai S80s badged with the Palmer name.  If you do a search for vintage Palmer guitars, you’ll come up with all sorts of hits but you probably won’t see too many guitars like this one.  These were probably made for one or two years, and I’d bet the pickups were sourced from local Matsumoto.

I would call it waistful or just plain ignorant to buy a $3000 guitar if your learning. Unless your actually a musician, buy yourself a decent$200 fender or whatever it may be and learn on that. Theres not that much diferrence if any at all, at least to someoe who doesnt know how to play yet. If youve got it like that do yourself a favor, buy a $3000 dollar guitarand whn you give up on it like most do in two or three months, find someone who actually plays and can appreciate a guitar of that quality and make his day and give it to someone deserving.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite. 

A lot of amps, especially in higher price ranges, have a lot of effects and features. They catch an eye and are pretty fascinating, but in a lot of cases, they are … useless. Well, not all of them but I am pretty sure that if an amp has a hundred different features you won’t be using all of them or even half of them. Features on amps are like the stand at the registrar of a grocery shop. They just catch an eye and you want WANT WANT them (for no other reason than it is interesting and cool looking)! Well, if you are going for an amp is the $100 price range you won’t have as much luxury or freedom to choose from a lot of features. Most practice amps are pretty standard and basic (in the best of ways). And to be honest, I don’t think as a beginner you really need a lot more than the basic effects and functions.
Most often, you will see effect pedals housed in small metal boxes on the floor at a guitarist’s feet. They are often called stompboxes because stepping on a metal button turns them on and off. Many effects boxes also include a foot pedal allowing the player to modulate the effect’s intensity or volume. Sometimes you will see a larger floor unit with multiple buttons and pedals. These are called multi-effects pedals or processors. They usually have a wide variety of different effects that can be engaged simultaneously. Multi-effects processors have grown enormously in popularity as their sounds and functionality have improved.
Excellent condition Traveling Wilbury's solid body electric guitar. Each Gretsch TW-100T is unique in it's graphics. Featuring a solid maple neck and an ebony colored finger board w/ dot inlays and no fret wear. Fully adjustable "Strat-style" tremolo / bridge including whammy bar. One single coil pickup and a volume control. Only the most minor of wear to the finish.
Look for lyrics or chord changes. Many songs have guitar parts made up solely (or mostly) of chords. This is especially true for rhythm guitar parts. In this case, the tab may forgo typical tab notation in favor of a simplified list of chord changes. These chords are almost always written in standard chord notation (Amin = A minor, E7 = E dominant 7, etc.) Simply play the chords in the order that they're listed - if it's not noted otherwise, try playing one chord per measure, but if the changes don't sound right, listen to the song for the strumming pattern.
The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959. From 1959 until summer 1962 the fingerboard was a piece of rosewood milled flat on the underside and glued to the maple. This has become known as a “slab fingerboard”. The slab fingerboard was approx 4.8 mm at its thickest point in the center of the neck under strings 3 and 4. From mid 1964–1979 the rosewood and maple were pre radiused and the fingerboard became known as curved, round laminate or “veneer”, having an even thickness across the neck unlike the previous slab type. This design change was made because Fender encountered problems with some of the necks twisting with the slab design and this new method of construction reduced this problem significantly. Maple fingerboards were available as a special order only. The following year the pickguard design changed to a 3-ply (4-ply on some colors) “multi-layer” with 11 screw holes. After purchasing Fender in 1965, CBS began to offer both a maple neck with a separate glued-on laminated maple fretboard in 1967 (known as a “maple cap” neck) and the rosewood fretboard over maple neck remaining the other neck option. Three years later, the CBS-owned Fender companies re-introduced the 1-piece maple neck after a 10-year absence. The primary reason for the switch to rosewood in 1959 was that Gibson guitars had rosewood fingerboards and customers wanted this. Also, the maple fingerboards discolored very quickly because the old nitro cellulose lacquer was not very durable and wore through on the fretboard very quickly.

Now, you said that most people you see just crank the tone knob to the maximum and leave it there. That’s fine, and some genres of music actually have no need for a tone control. Heavy metal and hard rock and their derivatives have almost no need for tone control. Guitarists either keep the tone knob wide open and never touch it, or they just buy a guitar that don’t have a tone knob (nor a neck pickup). Guitars made and designed for metal are built this way. I think a lot of country musicians also keep the treble wide open to get that biting shimmery single coil tone.
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.
To show you how to read the chords diagrams above, let's use the A chord as an example. For the purposes of chord diagrams, here is how your left-hand fingers are numbered. As you will notice, the index finger is denoted with number 1 the middle with 2 the ring finger with 3 and the pinky with 4. These numbers are used on the diagrams to show you what fingers use for pressing the frets composing the chords.
I’ve written in previous issues of Premier Guitar about how the size and shape of a guitar’s headstock affect its sustain and tone. Clearly, the mass of the tuning machines is a factor in this, as well. Having overseen the building of tens of thousands of custom guitars over the course of my career has given me cause to consider machine-head weight as a fine-tuning tool in and of itself. This kind of mod is more complex than the others I’ve presented here because it is harder to predict, and obviously more costly to dabble in because it involves replacing the existing tuners. Nevertheless, I put it out there for those of you who are willing to go to the limit of sanity in the search for a responsive instrument.
Fender is the biggest guitar company in the world right now. Fender guitars make more sales than any other guitar manufacturer. Fenders are used by many celebrated musicians today. The guitar produces great sound due to its imported wood. In addition, this brand is deemed to have some of the best looking guitars. Their most successful guitars include the Telecaster and the Stratocaster. The Stratocaster has been used by big names including Eric Clapton and of course the legendary guitarist, Jimi Hendrix. If you are looking for a guitar that’s both good looking and sounds great, go with a Fender.
The tone knob is similar. Like the volume knob, the more you turn down the knob, the more of the sound you contain instead of sending it through the amplifier. But there is an additional trick involved. See, the current generated from each string is quite complex, like the sound characteristics it produces. Think of it like a continuum. On one end, the current is turned into low frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'warm') and on the other end of the continuum, the current generates high frequency sound (which makes the guitar sound 'bright').

If you love effects like we do, we hope you'll find this top-50 list a useful guide to discovering the classic effect boxes that have shaped the guitar sounds of rock, metal, blues, punk and many other styles. And if you're like us, it will undoubtedly compel you to plunk down a chunk of cash for a collectible pedal or two on eBay. Don't say you weren't warned.


Hoshino Gakki also had semi acoustic, nylon and steel stringed acoustic guitars manufactured under the Ibanez name. Most Ibanez guitars were made for Hoshino Gakki by the FujiGen guitar factory in Japan up until the mid to late 1980s and from then on Ibanez guitars have also been made in other Asian countries such as Korea, China and Indonesia. During the early 1980s the FujiGen guitar factory also produced most of the Roland guitar synthesizers, including the Stratocaster-style Roland G-505, the twin-humbucker Roland G-202 and the Ibanez X-ING IMG-2010.
Hi Paul, sorry you’re having trouble. If you’ve got one of the ‘import’ type switches described above you have 8 contacts (lugs). The “5 positions” are the 5 resting positions the switch lever can be set to (which correspond to your 5 possible pickup selections). You need to get the hang of switches before you attempt to rewire one of these so if the idea of a 2-pole 3-way switch doesn’t make sense then you should probably put the soldering iron down and look for a local guitar tech who can help you, your local guitar shop is a good place to ask.
Buying a new guitar amp is easy. But, as you will have seen, ending up with the right amplifier for you isn’t as straightforward. Amps are not something you buy every day, so take your time, read our guide, use our categories and charts as inspiration, and ultimately you will find something that will suit you and your playing perfectly. Good luck in your hunt for the perfect amp!
Like a door that's repeatedly opened and closed, you'll sometimes need some basic maintenance. Ensure everything is tight, and get some electronic contact cleaner (available at any electronics store), various screwdrivers and wrenches and you can often solve your own problems. It's easier on a Gibson Les Paul (with backplate access to the controls) than on a Gibson ES-335, but it can be done.
1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's a excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. We repaired a slight crack at input jack common area. Yes, someone years ago stepped on the cord. We professional glued it from the inside and it's stronger than new. All that shows is a slight line about 1 1/2" long on bottom edge. Anyway, the Rocket 2 is getting harder and harder to find. Two DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition other than slight repair is a 9 3/4 for this great 50 year old beauty. Guitar comes with period clip board case. SOLD
In the Beatles' early days, George Harrison briefly billed himself as Carl Harrison in honor of his quick-picking hero. Perkins' bright, trebly style – which the rockabilly king picked up from blues players in Tennessee – defined the singles he put out on Sun Records ("Blue Suede Shoes," "Glad All Over") and influenced scores of players from Eric Clapton to John Fogerty. "He took country picking into the rock world," Tom Petty has said. "If you want to play Fifties rock & roll, you can either play like Chuck Berry, or you can play like Carl Perkins."
The best guitarists of all time, voted on and ranked by many music fans, with photos and other info. With help from the wisdom of the crowd, you'll find a comprehensive ranking of the greatest guitar players in history. All the top guitarists are on this list - monster guitar heroes from rock, metal, blues, and alternative music. Are you on Team Eddie or Team Jimi? How about both!
Now, none of this should take away from the actual tones, which are beautiful, even when not fully convincing.  I haven’t commented on Instant Guitar’s GUI yet and that should tell all you really need to know. It gets the job done well, but looks unfortunately ugly — or at the very least bland and not matching the high-quality of the sounds found in this line of guitar VSTs.
An additional note on the methods used; although we gathered rating and review data from guitarists around the world, we only considered brands that can be found at major online music gear retailers located in the United States. This means that fine brands like Maton from Australia (played by Tommy Emmanuel) weren't included - the same goes for some respected European brands. Also, only full sized guitars, or ones very close to it, were included in the data set - had we included smaller parlor guitars then this may have boosted Martin and also Gretsch might have made the list.
The Last of Us™ has been rebuilt for the PlayStation®4 system. Now features full 1080p, higher-resolution character models, improved shadows and lighting, in addition to several other gameplay improvements. 20 years after a pandemic has radically changed known civilization, infected humans run wild and survivors are killing each other for food, weapons and whatever they can get their hands on. Joel, a violent survivor, is hired to smuggle a 14-year-old girl, Ellie, out of an oppressive military quarantine zone, but what starts as a small job soon transforms into a brutal journey across the U.S. The Last of Us Remastered includes the Abandoned Territories map pack, Reclaimed Territories map pack, and the critically acclaimed The Last of Us: Left Behind single-player campaign that combines themes of survival, loyalty, and love with tense, survival-action gameplay.

3) Had a little fret buzz on the high E but that was probably more my fault than anything else because I changed the light gauge strings to extra lights which sometimes requires the neck adjustment to be loosened. This guitar is set up from the factory with light gauge strings which means if you put on extra lights, the neck will have a tendency to straighten out too much which brings your strings closer to the frets and sometimes results in fret buzz. An easy fix though...just take a straight edge, like an aluminum yardstick, and lay on the neck, or hold down the string on the first and last fret and you should have just a slight space (approx. 1/64" - 1/32") between the frets and strings in the middle of your fret board. In other words, contrary to popular belief the neck is supposed to have an ever-so-slight dip in the middle and IS NOT supposed to be perfectly straight. My guitar required about a 3/4 turn (loosened) on the neck adjustment to fix the fret buzz. And, remember when adjusting the neck don't expect immediate results. Give the neck time to settle-in adjusting a little at a time and then waiting a couple hours or so before checking it again. If you still have fret buzz after adjusting the neck then it most likely will be at the nut because Yamaha keeps their action really low at the nut. If so, just take a piece of paper and put it under the string at the nut which should be an easy fix.

The use of two or more mics is likely to result in other phase issues when these mics are combined in the mix, since they will almost certainly be capturing sound waves that reach the mic capsules at slightly different times. Whether such issues are bad enough to cause a problem (or even be heard) depends on the situation. First, if your two mics sound odd and hollow and/or lacking in low-end from the outset, flip the phase of one (usually via a switch on the preamp or afterward in your DAW) to ensure you aren’t trying to blend two mics that are reverse-phase in the first place. If your two-mic sound goes from hollow and thin sounding to fat and full, you had a reverse-phase issue. If it doesn’t improve – or gets worse – you need to consider other remedies. Once you know that both mics are at least in phase with each other, you can improve their phase relationship even further by moving the position of one around until any other sonic oddities are less obtrusive, which is simply determined by finding a pair of positions that are really smoking tone-wise.
For those players who prefer the good old valve sound and searching for one on a reasonable price, the VOX AC10 can be that great choice of an amplifier for the job. This 10 watts amp with 1×10” inch celestion speaker has a 2x12AX7 tube preamp section and 2xEL84 valve reactor power section housed in a closed back cabinet and its trademark grill cloth to deliver a genuine VOX brown sound. 
The more pedals you collect, the more you should consider investing in a pedal board as well. Some pedal boards are simply that – boards – to which you can stick your stompboxes to keep them organized. But you can also get powered pedal boards, which have built-in DC power supplies. That means no need for batteries or individual adapters connected to each pedal: just tether them to the central source, and you can power them all up by plugging the pedal board into a single outlet.
Just like Fender, Epiphone – the Gibson subsidiary – know a thing or two about budget acoustics, and this DR-100 (reviewed in full here) more than proves that! With a range of finishes, the DR-100 features a classic dreadnought body shape, with back and sides made from laminated mahogany, with a select spruce top, and black pickguard sporting Epiphone’s iconic E logo.
1967-1969: about the coolest guitar Danelectro ever produced. Has 13 drone strings that move from the vibration of the usual 6 strings. Three pickups, 2 for the 6 stings and 1 for the drone strings. Crinkle burgundy finish, 3 point body shape. Has a "buzz" bridge which similate the sitar sound. The resonation from the buzz bridge vibrates the top of the body and the drone strings. Clear pickguards protecting the drone strings and Vinnie's name on the lower 6 string clear pickguard. Body is made entirely from Poplar, with a semi-hollow construction.

To show you how to read the chords diagrams above, let's use the A chord as an example. For the purposes of chord diagrams, here is how your left-hand fingers are numbered. As you will notice, the index finger is denoted with number 1 the middle with 2 the ring finger with 3 and the pinky with 4. These numbers are used on the diagrams to show you what fingers use for pressing the frets composing the chords.
X-Series: Back and sides constructed from compressed wood fibers (high-pressure laminate or “HPL“) and solid Sitka spruce or HPL top. Due to this construction these guitars are more environmentally-friendly.[citation needed] Models include: DX1, DX1-R, DXM, DCX1E, DCX1R3, 000CXE Black, and 000X1. Some earlier models used ‘Ebonite’ (black Micarta) fretboards, later models use koa or striped ebony. Necks on all models are constructed from Stratabond, a laminated wood product used for decades in gun stocks and hunting bows. Some of the more recent models are made in Mexico.
There are few companies in the music industry that understand guitarists as well as Suhr. What other company can you think of makes excellent guitars, amplifiers and pedals? Whether you need the warm, vintage voice of a Badger or the paint-peeling roar of a PT-100... Suhr has a connoisseur level amplifier to scratch any guitarists itch. Stop in and a play a Suhr amplifier at Eddie's Guitars today. 
Use the numbers on the tab to fret spaces on the neck. Unlike normal musical notation, guitar tabs don't tell you which notes to play. Instead, they tell you where to put your fingers. Numbers on the lines correspond to frets on the fretboard. Each number represents a specific fret on the line it's written on. For instance, a "1" on the bottom line means to fret the first fret of the lowest string and play that note.
Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .
The late ’36 Supro Amplifier was a spiffed-up version of the amp seen in the ’36 Bronson catalog, with a leatherette-type covering, leather handle, and enclosed, removable back. It now had an 8″ speaker, which spoke through a round grill with four bolts visible from the front. It’s impossible for me to tell from the illustration available to me, but this may still have had the resonator plate grill. The amp had four tubes and a “…special high fidelity circuit” that was “…rich in tone quality, and superfluous [sic!] in power.”

Controls available are extensive, but pretty straight forward and the quality of the entire package defies logic when you consider the price. In terms of budget reverbs, this one is among the best you can find at the moment. Behringer keeps pushing the line further and further by delivering quality and versatility to those who are limited financially.
In 2004, the Gibson Custom Shop introduced the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard, a guitar that Gibson has used ever since as the “standard” non limited edition Slash Les Paul (this guitar is in the Gibson range all year round).[33] This guitar features a plain maple top with a Dark Tobacco Sunburst finish, and has a piezo pickup with a switch located near the tone and volume knobs .[32] In 2008, Epiphone issued the Slash Signature Les Paul Standard Plus Top, which was modeled after the Gibson Custom Shop model.[32] It has a solid mahogany body, flame maple top, and a Dark Tobacco Burst finish.[34]
Hum in pedalboards is usually “ground loop hum.” You have two paths to ground, your audio ground and your power supply ground. You could use an expensive power supply with isolated grounds. But all you have to do is break one of the ground connections. You could disconnect the audio ground at one end of each of your patch cords. Or better, if you use one power supply, connect the hot and ground to only one of your pedals. Clip the ground wire on all the other pedal connections in your daisy chain. The power connections will then get their grounds through the audio grounds. No more hum

The pickups on an electric guitar can only pick up the vibrations of the string and convert those vibrations into electricity, which is ultimately converted into sound waves that emanate from the speakers. Do the pickups shape the sound? Of course! Can pickups mask the characteristics and make two electric guitars with different tonewoods sound the same? Yes again. So, I guess the correct answer to the question if wood makes a difference in the sound of an electric guitar is “It depends”. A pickup that can’t pick up these subtle overtone differences, enough compression, or other kinds of dynamics-killing processing, will kill the dynamics of any guitar, regardless of tonewood. Does that make it a bad guitar? Not necessarily – it depends on what the musician is after.
The twelve-string guitar is a simple variation of the normal six string design. Twelve-string guitars have six regular strings and a second set of thinner strings. Each string of the second set corresponds to the note of its regular string counterpart. The strings form pairs and therefore you play a twelve-string guitar in the same manner as you would a standard six-string.

The first two Cordobas we’ve featured have been cedar-top guitars. Now we come to the C7, which is available in both spruce and cedar (see item 7). If you hadn’t noticed by now, the “SP” or “CD” abbreviations in the Cordoba listings indicate the wood that the front of the guitar is made from, so that should help you in the future when looking for a particular guitar with a particular sound, just with the factory-supplied strings alone.
The first effect in our signal chain is a pedal wah. A wah is an effect known as a filter that alters the basic tone of the guitar. When you push the pedal fully forward, the filter brightens up your guitar tone and you bring back the pedal your guitar tone gets darker. For the most variety of sound, you want all the other effects to have a shot at the sound from the Wah so the ME-80 places it as close to the guitar as possible.

Although acoustic guitars have recently surpassed electrics in popularity, the electric guitar is still the most prominent instrument in rock music, and it’s a key component in many country, R&B, pop, and jazz groups. If you want to play in a band, you’ll probably want an electric guitar. You’ll also want one if you want to develop the ability to play melodies and solos because electric guitars are, in general, better designed to accommodate fast fingering and more able to stand out in a musical group.


Russell, George (2001) [1953]. "Chapter 1 The Lydian scale: The seminal source of the principal of tonal gravity". George Russell's Lydian chromatic concept of tonal organization. Volume One: The art and science of tonal gravity (Fourth (Second printing, corrected, 2008) ed.). Brookline, Massachusetts: Concept Publishing Company. pp. 1–9. ISBN 0-9703739-0-2.

Guitar Tricks has a special Discount Coupon Code that will make it even cheaper for the first month. You can get 60% discount if you choose the monthly subscription. To take advantage of this offer follow the link below and key in your email address. You should wait for an email with your username and password for Guitar Tricks. Use this information to logon.  Once you are inside Guitar Tricks select the Upgrade button and choose the Monthly Membership option. In the Coupon Code section on the same page enter the Coupon Code ‘60OFF’ to get the 60% discount on your full access membership for the first month.
He also opened the doors for left-handed guitar players by showing them that they too can master a musical instrument and make something unforgettable from it. In the same way that a “southpaw” boxer like Manny Pacquiao achieved unbelievable things in the ring, the gifted left-handed guitarist Jimmy Hendrix pushed guitar playing to its highest level.
Guitar amplifiers and electronic keyboards may have switch pedals for turning built-in reverb and distortion effects on and off; the pedals contain only a switch, with the circuitry for the effect being housed in the amplifier chassis.[106] Some musicians who use rackmounted effects or laptops employ a MIDI controller pedalboard or armband remote controls to trigger sound samples, switch between different effects or control effect settings.[107][108][109] A pedal keyboard uses pedals, but it is not an effect unit; it is a foot-operated keyboard in which the pedals are typically used to play basslines.
Thanks for the list. Michael Gurian was a luthier in NYC who began as a classical guitar maker then began making steel string instuments in the 1960’s , I remember seeing his instruments shortly after i bought My first Martin in the dog years of the 70’s along wi Don Gallaghers instruments. Recently acquired one of his jumbos in Brazilian rosewood made in 1971 still in remarkable condition. He was among the first to compete as luthier with the big boys at Martin and gibson , even before Bob taylor jumped in.

Overdrive, and its noisier cousin distortion, are effects used to ‘push’ your guitar’s signal before it reachers your amplifier. Most amplifiers have some degree of drive capability built into them so you’re most likely familiar with what they sound like. Overdrive is what pushes a clean sound to break up slightly, giving it a warmer, thicker sound. This is perfect for blues and rock playing. It also serves to add more sustain to your playing, meaning notes ring out for longer. In addition to giving a noticeable boost to your volume. Distortion is effectively a more extreme version of overdrive, in that it takes the signal you’re feeding it and makes it all degrees of nasty. You’ll typically hear distortion used in heavier guitar styles like metal and punk. Here, a liberal dollop of dirt is required to give the sound its thicker characteristic.
Take a guitar playing friend with you, decide on a price range and try out all the guitars you can afford. Then go to another shop and do the same. Include used instruments too, and don't worry too much about the appearance. The important thing is how it sounds and how well it plays. A guitar with a nice low action which sounds reasonably good will help a great deal toward helping you stick with it. A guitar with a high action that sounds horrible will make you give up before your fingertips have time to harden!
Many of the best guitars I saw in my trip to Japan were models made for their own domestic consumption. After World War II, U.S. Armed Forces Radio blanketed Japan with American music. As a direct result, rock and roll, country, bluegrass and American popular music all took strong root in Japan creating a vibrant market for good guitars. Although Japanese players would have preferred to be able to buy genuine American Martins, Fenders and Gibsons, the supply of such instruments in Japan was extremely limited and prices were simply beyond the budget of most of the Japanese population. Japanese manufacturers produced a very wide range of instruments from low-priced student models on up to remarkably sophisticated professional-grade instruments, some of which were better reproductions of vintage American instruments than any of the American manufacturers were doing at the time. These high-end instruments are seldom encountered in the USA because they were priced high enough that wholesalers in the USA did not find them economical to import. Regardless of how good a Japanese guitar of that time might have been, if it cost anywhere near the amount of a new Martin, Fender or Gibson in the USA, there would have been no point in bringing it into this country. For example Tak Inoue, the export director of the Morris Company of Matsumoto, Japan, told me at that time that he had approached Fender to offer them Japanese-made versions of the Telecaster and Stratocaster which he proposed they could import and sell at a lower price that the standard American-made models. He told me that he gave them what he considered to be a very competitive price only to be told that Fender would not be interested since their cost at that time to make a genuine American made Telecaster or Stratocaster in their Fullerton, California, factory was actually lower than the amount quoted by Mr. Inoue. Needless to say, it would appear that CBS, the owner of Fender, had a very good profit margin at the time.
By 1970, however, market conditions were changing rapidly. Japanese manufacturers had greatly improved their quality as well as their range of product offerings. Japanese labor at the time was much cheaper than American, and the imported guitars offered more "bang for the buck" than American ones. In a relatively short time, brands such as Yamaha and Ibanez were outselling Harmonies and Kays. The Japanese guitars had more comfortable neck contours and had truss rods that actually worked. The Japanese rapidly improved the quality of their instruments as well as the variety of their offerings such that by the mid 1970s, Harmony, Kay and Danelectro had all ceased operations, and Martin, Fender and Gibson had eliminated most of the low-end student models from their lines to concentrate on a price range well above any of the Japanese imports. I went to Japan in 1974 and attended a music trade show there as well as visited numerous factories and music stores. I was absolutely astonished at the variety of offerings available. Whereas in 1970 most Japanese guitars were low-end student models which often copied currently available new American products, by 1974 the more progressive Japanese manufacturers were well aware that many vintage American instruments were far superior to the new ones of that time. As a result some of these Japanese manufacturers stared to concentrate on studying vintage American originals. Fuji Gen Gakki and Tokai started producing extremely detailed copies of old Les Pauls, Stratocasters, Mastertone banjos and other vintage American acoustic and electric guitars and mandolins.
With smaller combos, it is worthwhile experimenting with their position within the room, especially when a distance mic is being used. For example, raising the combo further from the ground will result in a different reflected signal path length for ground reflections. Placing a reflective material such as hardboard or linoleum on the floor between the amp and mic will emphasise any coloration this produces. Where a small combo or practice amp lacks bass end, you can try to exploit the boundary effect by placing a mic in the corner of the room, then facing the amplifier into the corner. If the added bass is too much, move the mic and amplifier away from the corner until the tonal balance seems right.

I'm looking for a similar guitar. My first electric in 1969, purchased used for $50.I lost it sometime in the 70's, but still have a picture of it. It was a sunburst finish cutaway violin shaped body with Bigsby type tailpiece and a tunable bridge with a flip up mute bar. The headstock is similar to a Gibson but the neck was thinner.I can't remember how it played or sounded.I'm just looking to replace it for nostalgic reasons. I also recently purchased a Kent Les Paul copy I found on e bay while searching for kenr guitars.I have seen the framed ads but I have yet to find that model.

Although they just released the Gibson 2016 line, Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish” and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup, named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar. The ES-150 achieved some popularity, but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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