Ease of Use: Multi-effects pedals are inherently more complicated to use than individual stompboxes. As such, we value multi-fx units that are not overly complicated, and require hours with the user manual to understand. Look for pedals with intuitive layouts and interfaces. Technology has come a long way, and most multi-effects pedals have good quality sound. To us, ease of use is a huge selling point (probably the most important behind price), and can differentiate the good from the great.
Not to say that other sounds don’t have their place: the total freakout—sometimes very, very cool in itself—of a second-rate tube amp pushed way past its normal operational capablities; the smooth, pliable, ultra-saturated sound of a cascading gain preamp; the cheesy, buzzy fizz of a cheap tranny amp slammed with too much gain and clipping to beat the band… Any of these can yield the godlike tone of the day in the right application, with the right player. But think Page, Hendrix, SRV, Blackmore, Eric Johnson, Clapton, Van Halen, Gary Moore, and it’s cranked vintage amps and touch that are producing the tone. They were often aided by some type of distortion pedal, sure, because that was the only way to switch textures between verses, choruses and solos, or to push the big amps into distortion at less than full volume. But who wouldn’t choose to get their rock overdrive sound from a 50W 1968 Marshall Plexi on ten, or their blues lead sound from a tweed Bassman on 12, if the ears and the noise police would stand for it? For most players in the broad spectrum of rock, even those usually chained to the back of the stage hacking away at a clean rhythm part, these yield the sweetest, most tactile, touch-sensitive and playable tones available. Get that amp cooking to where the riffs get juicy and fluid and effortless, sustain and harmonic feedback hover into view at the tap of a fret, and the preamp and power amp tubes’ race to keep up with the pick attack lends a comforting softness and compression to the feel (a sensation further enhanced by the natural sag of tube rectification, where present). Mmmm. You can almost feel it now. If we could only get that play-it-all-day vibe at tolerable volume levels, any time we liked.
Bought this to replace my Digitech RP 255 which I had better presets and found a little easier to setup- but I have every confidence this unit will give me sounds I like just as well- I already like the clean sound better, plus it is a much smaller and lighter unit which was one of my main goals. My pedal board has a GR33 guitar synth, a boost and a headphone amp. Those units and power supplies were getting too heavy.
While Paul's Rick bass surged like an undertow, George Harrison's double-bound 360/12 (the second one made by the company) defined a new tone at the other end of the audio spectrum. Its ringing sound embellished "You Can't Do That," "Eight Days a Week," and "A Hard Day's Night," to name just three 12-string cuts from the 1964-65 period. Thus the Beatles created unprecedented, international interest in Rickenbackers, which many fans actually believed came from Britain...  (Before 1964 all Rickenbacker guitars had been made at the original Electro String factory in Los Angeles. That year Hall moved it over a six month period to Santa Ana, in nearby Orange County. )
What makes it truly stand out is the infinite Reverb this pedal provides. If you’re looking to get an all-around “stomp-box” featuring everything you ever wanted with remarkable sound output, this work of art by EH is designed to make you never think about getting another Reverb pedal. It can fit in any form of setup, and it is destined to conquer your flavor.
Sounds cool! You’re right that flats are a key to the ’50s Nashville sound. But a lot of guitarists forget that almost EVERYONE used flats until the latter part of the ’60s. Early Beatles, Stones, Who, Kinks, Motown and other R&B, surf, and of course anything jazz-related — it’s all flatwound guitar work till ’66, ’67 or so. Also, the main reason we migrated away from nickel is because the material became markedly more expensive at the end of the decade. (Though yes, some did prefer the brighter tones of replacement materials.)
Gotoh’s Telecaster bridge has the vintage look and mounting layout with a few modern additions: The In-Tune saddles give you the vintage look with unique grooves cast into the saddle to move the contact point of each string for more accurate intonation. Each saddle is reversible and can be used in any position. This gives you a huge advantage over traditional barrel style saddles that were never designed with precision intonation in mind. The brass saddles will give you that bright Tele twang! The stamped steel base plate’s cut down sides give you the unrestricted string access that many modern players prefer.
For a more neutral experience, we bring you ESP E-II Horizon FR. This is one of ESP’s top tier models which packs a set of high output Seymour Duncans. Build quality is top notch, and so is the performance. We tested this guitar some time ago, with a number of us having the chance to play it for several days. Anyone who picked it up was in love it at the end of the day. It’s just that good.
VintageSilvertones.com is a curated collection of electric guitars chosen for their unique tone, design, and significance in electric guitar history from approximately 1950-1980. This collection approaches electric guitars from the underdog perspective. So we carry guitars built for the masses, luthiers & manufacturers who pushed the boundaries as to what was possible in terms of not only instrument quality but tone. Design also plays an important consideration in this collection. Alternative materials, innovative tuning systems, and high quality-low cost manufacturing processes are only some of the unique qualities found on instruments at VintageSilvertones.com.
In the face of this mounting conservatism, Ovation entered the solidbody marketplace with an in-your-face design consistent with the radicalism of its Lyracord bowl-backed acoustics. In ’71 it unveiled the battleaxe-shaped Breadwinner, followed by its upmarket brother, the Deacon, in January ’72. As you might expect, despite the unusual shape (rounded upper edge, deep single cutaway at the double octave, s-curved lower edge, and asymmetrically scooped out lower bout) these also featured some innovations. Both had two-octave bolt-on Ovation fingerboards, the former unbound with dots, the latter bound with diamonds. Both had mahogany bodies, the Breadwinner with a kind of spackle finish (white, black, tan or blue), the Deacon a sunburst finish. The Breadwinner had a molded plastic bridge/tailpiece assembly with adjustable plastic saddles and chrome hardware; the Deacon had a similar unit with metal saddles with gold hardware. Early Breadwinners had the jack on the back of the body, but this quickly migrated to the pickguard; some transitional examples have both jacks on the back and pickguard. These Ovation guitars were remarkably ergonomic, well-balanced when standing and cradling comfortably on the knee if you preferred to sit.
Categories: Guitar manufacturing companies of the United StatesGuitar amplifier manufacturersManufacturing companies based in ChicagoManufacturing companies established in 1890Companies disestablished in 19681890 establishments in Illinois1968 disestablishments in IllinoisDefunct companies based in IllinoisMusical instrument manufacturing companies of the United States
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
The guitar features hand-rubbed solid Sitka Spruce top supported by Martin's incredibly reliable mahogany HPL (high pressure laminate) back and sides, essentially similar to the configuration found on many of Martin's mid-priced acoustics. If you're looking for an affordable starting instrument that has big-brand backing, or you are looking to get into the parlor-style guitar trend, check out the LX1E Little Martin.
The amplifier you choose to use will have a huge impact on the sound. Valve amps are still king for most players, but they can often be impractical in home recording scenarios. Though we’d all love to mic up a cranked Marshall Plexi every time a classic-rock sound is required, these days software and hardware modelling is so good that the results are almost indistinguishable from the ‘real thing’ in a finished mix. Though pricey, the Kemper Profiling Amp and Fractal Audio Axe-Fx produce seriously realistic results, while almost as impressive are software solutions such as IK Multimedia’s AmpliTube and Guitar Rig from Native Instruments. If you are recording on a Mac or iPad using GarageBand, don’t discount the built-in amp and pedal simulations either.
Martin is an American guitar company specializing in acoustic guitars. Most of their instruments are still built at their facility in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, and their legacy dates back all the way to 1833. Martin, in many ways, has helped to shape the look and sound of the American acoustic guitar. In fact, they invented the now-classic dreadnought shape in an effort to help American country musicians who wanted more projection out of their guitars onstage.
The truth is that I've never known what it's like to not want to play music of my own because I come from an Irish family that all played instruments. Luckily for me, my parents were very young when I was born -- they were like sixteen, seventeen -- and they were from a tradition of people playing instruments, accordions, pennywhistles, guitars, harmonicas and things like that -- cheap little instruments. But because they were young and moved over to Manchester, they liked rock and roll and pop music of the day.

Reverb pedals come with all kinds of different layouts. Even so, some of the controls are virtually universal. The first one we would like to mention is the dry/wet knob. This control is what you use to mix your original signal and the effect itself. When the knob is turned all the way to dry, there will be zero reverb present in the signal. As you move towards wet, the amount of reverb increases.


He has a way about him that makes you stop and listen, but he isn’t in your face. His sound is very melodic, which is why his tone was so perfectly matched to answering the needs of the vocals, yet he still holds his own in every tune. Bright, confident and edgy, he is a serious guitar-player and he has no intentions of holding back! People often say that he carries humour in his music, which is quite a clever characteristic to portray with this piece of equipment.
This is where you want to go! Steve is kind, professional, and supremely competent. just brought my Taylor 614ce for a neck adjustment and electronics work. Steve told me that he was running with about a two to three week turnaround period but then did a couple of quick fixes -on the spot- that made my guitar really sing for my next gig. I'll bring it back to him for some more in- depth repair soon but for now I am a very happy camper. And he didn't even charge me a dime!! I will be visiting Steve for all my guitar and mandolin service needs in the future.

The power handling capabilities of a speaker cabinet or individual speaker are always given in relation to a specific impedance (a measure of electrical resistance); the most common impedance ratings in bass speaker systems are 8 ohms and 4 ohms, although some equipment is rated down to 2 ohms or even more rarely to 1 ohm. For example, the Aguilar DB751 puts out 975 watts if plugged into a 2 ohms speaker cab, 750 watts at 4 ohms, or 400 watts at 8 ohms. The way to interpret ohms ratings is "backwards" to the way wattage ratings are assessed. That is, with wattage, bassists make sure that their amplifier does not put out too high a number of watts for a speaker cabinet, but with impedance, bassists ensure that the amplifier does not put out too low an impedance for a speaker system. For example, if an amplifier head is rated at 4 ohms, a 4 ohm speaker, an 8 ohm speaker (or any ohm rating higher than 4 ohms, including 16 ohms or 32 ohms) could be connected (albeit with the amplifier producing less watts as the number of ohms, the resistance, increases). However, bassists do not connect a 2 ohm speaker cabinet to a 4 ohm amplifier, because this will be too much of a load (too low an impedance) on the amplifier, and it could damage or destroy the power amplifier.
Reverend guitars are known to sport many premium appointments despite their modest price tags. And the Jetstream HB is no exception. It has a comfortable roasted maple neck, a Wilkinson WVS50 IIK tremolo, pin-lock tuners and high-end electronic components. A korina body and a 12-inch-radius roasted maple/blackwood fretboard (depending on the finish) complete the other notable specs on this guitar.

If you're a Zakk Wylde fan, take a look at his signature Les Paul or the exclusive Graveyard Disciple with its authentic Floyd Rose tremolo bridge. For the metalheads among us, there's the Brendon Small Thunderhorse Explorer, a mahogany axe based on the one Brendon plays in concert with Dethklok. To satisfy Beatlemaniacs, Epiphone also has a Casino guitar inspired by John Lennon’s famous six string.
Necks are described as bolt-on, set-in, or neck-through, depending on how they attach to the body. Set-in necks are glued to the body in the factory. They are said to have a warmer tone and greater sustain.[citation needed] This is the traditional type of joint. Leo Fender pioneered bolt-on necks on electric guitars to facilitate easy adjustment and replacement. Neck-through instruments extend the neck the length of the instrument, so that it forms the center of the body, and are known for long sustain and for being particularly sturdy.[citation needed] While a set-in neck can be carefully unglued by a skilled luthier, and a bolt-on neck can simply be unscrewed, a neck-through design is difficult or even impossible to repair, depending on the damage. Historically, the bolt-on style has been more popular for ease of installation and adjustment. Since bolt-on necks can be easily removed, there is an after-market in replacement bolt-on necks from companies such as Warmoth and Mighty Mite. Some instruments—notably most Gibson models—continue to use set-in glued necks. Neck-through bodies are somewhat more common in bass guitars.
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STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.
Typical modern Telecasters (such as the American Standard version) incorporate several details different from the classic form. They typically feature 22 frets (rather than 21) and truss rod adjustment is made at the headstock end, rather than the body end, which had required removal of the neck on the original (the Custom Shop Bajo Sexto Baritone Tele was the only Telecaster featuring a two-octave 24-fret neck). The 3-saddle bridge of the original has been replaced with a 6-saddle version, allowing independent length and height adjustment for each string. The long saddle bridge screws allow a wide range of saddle bridge positions for intonation tuning. The stamped metal bridge plate has been replaced with a plain, flat plate, and the bridge grounding cover (which, while helping with the shielding, impedes players who like to mute strings at the bridge with the side of the palm, and makes it impossible to pick near the saddles to produce the characteristic Telecaster ‘twang’) has been discontinued for most models. Also different from the original is the wiring: The 3-way toggle switch selects neck pickup only in the first position, neck and bridge pickups together in the second position, and bridge pickup only in the third position. The first knob adjusts the master volume; the second is a master tone control affecting all the pickups.
I’d just like to add that for about $120 new (less used) you can get a good practice amp, like a Peavey Vypyr VIP 1. This is a far better option than trying to make a laptop sound like an amp. If you’re going to do nothing but play through headphones, then the laptop is an okay idea I guess. But trying to play through the laptop speakers, or even most add-on speakers for a lap is going to sound bad compared to a small amp like the Vypyr. That amp has all of the effects built in and is just a more simple and practical solution. I’ve seen 15 watt line 6 amps go for as little as $50 used. The only way I’d use the laptop is if I were only using headphones and if the software was free. I would not spend money trying to make an amp out of a laptop. I say this not only as a guitarists, but also as an IT Professional.
Certainly the most desirable of the Martin body size is the 000, 0M, and D sizes. Many consider the 000 (and OM, which is essentially a 000) to be the ultimate guitar size, where others feel the "D" size is the best. It's personal preference. There are some interesting facts though about the 000 and OM sizes. (In Martin's 1934 catalogue, any flattop guitar that had a 14-fret neck was named an "Orchestra Model", while the older 12-fret design was named a "Standard Model".)
In 1992, two more models were added, the single-cutaway BC-40 and the 5-string B-540. Although widely admired[who?] for their high quality and lovely appointments, they proved to have limited appeal due to their $2000-plus list prices. By 1997, all four of these initial basses were dropped in favor of the B-1, a lower-priced ABG with laminated mahogany sides as part of Martin’s 1 series of guitars. The BM, an even less expensive model in Martin’s now discontinued Road series soon followed; it had laminated mahogany sides with a solid mahogany back. Also around this time electronics became standard on Martin basses. The most recent additions are the BC-15, a single-cutaway version with a mahogany top, the BC-16GTE, also a single-cutaway with solid Genuine mahogany back and sides with a gloss top, and the 00C-16GTAE, which is a slimmer thin-line version of the previously mentioned model. As a special edition, Martin offered the Alternative X Bass with jet black High Pressure Laminate back and sides and a Graffiti-patterned Aluminum finish top. This bass was very similar in build to the other guitars in Martin’s X series. There have been two Limited Edition Martin acoustic bass models. The first, the SWB Sting Signature Model, was released in 1999 and was made with woods certified by the Rainforest Alliance’s SmartWood program[citation needed]. The SWB’s top is made with book matched solid Sitka spruce reclaimed from pulp logs, the back, sides and neck are solid certified cherry, and the fingerboard is certified katalox. Sting’s signature is inlaid between the 18th and 19th frets, and a label inside the body states that a portion of the sale price is donated to the Rainforest Foundation International[citation needed]. The second and more recent Limited Edition is the B-28KV Klaus Voormann Signature model released in 2008 for the German market. It has a Sitka spruce top with Solid East Indian Rosewood back and sides and a black Ebony fingerboard. The headstock features a unique art design by Klaus as a circular inlay making each bass a one-of-a-kind. In addition to these U.S.-made instruments, Martin also markets Sigma ABGs made in Korea.
Nice list but how did the Hagstrom Ultra Swede not make the cut? Not only does its quality exceed most of what Epiphone has to offer (not knocking Epi, just sayin) and match many other brands 3x+ its price, it is (in my opinion) also one of the most versatile guitars I can think of. Actually, it seems Hagstrom is ignored or forgotten in what seemingly appears to be every comparison or "top ten" list available... What gives?
Nitrocellulose lacquer is one of the great original-era Fender electric guitar finishes, and is still used today on select instruments. Thin, porous and delicate, it’s a premium finish prized for sonic qualities that let body woods breathe with their true tonal character, and for an appearance that ages and wears in a distinctive way appealing to many players.
The first two Cordobas we’ve featured have been cedar-top guitars. Now we come to the C7, which is available in both spruce and cedar (see item 7). If you hadn’t noticed by now, the “SP” or “CD” abbreviations in the Cordoba listings indicate the wood that the front of the guitar is made from, so that should help you in the future when looking for a particular guitar with a particular sound, just with the factory-supplied strings alone.
Let’s learn the basic layout of Tabs. When you take a look at a Tab that you want to learn you will most likely see some standard notation on top and the Tab on the bottom. The six strings of the guitar are represented by the six horizontal lines of the Tab. The top line represents the high E string of the guitar and the bottom line represents the low E string of the guitar. This can seem a bit counterintuitive to some people so just remember that the top line is the thinnest string and you will be good to go.

This full-sized, 22-fret, single cutaway electric guitar features two single-coil pickups and is capable of producing a wide range of tones. With the bridge pickup, you can get that bright, rich, cutting tone known as the country "twang" made famous by artists such as Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings. With the neck pickup you get a warmer, mellow, bluesy tone, such as that of Albert Collins or Muddy Waters. Additionally, rock musicians as diverse as Syd Barrett, Chrissy Hynde, and Keith Richards have found a way to make their own distinctive sound using this style of guitar.
The history of signal modification isn’t just one of pleasing the ear through unconventional methods. It works both ways: Guitar effects have modified their users, just as much as their users and engineers have modified their sound. New effects can change a guitarist’s playing ability completely, concealing their technique as well as embellishing it. U2’s The Edge, for example, is known for his restraint of technique by embedding different rhythms within delay settings.
Ultimately, if you’re mostly playing rock, heavier blues, or any shred or metal styles, you might prefer jumbo or medium-jumbo frets. However, for country, rockabilly, surf, or old-school ’50s rock and roll, narrow frets could be the way to go. In any case, though, if your frets are in good condition and your guitar is set up right, the size of that wire in and of itself shouldn’t stop you from sounding great on whatever you play.
It also includes a -6dB/oct low-pass filter that’s built into the plugin’s tube/valve modeling equation, and can imitate a lower-quality tube triode.  There’s a switchable output saturation stage, which can be used to overdrive the output signal and all the standard Voxengo plugin features, such as full multi-channel operation, channel routing and built-in oversampling. It’s great for guitars and for dirtying up sounds such as vocals, drums or synths.
Silvertone was the “musical” brand for the Sears, Roebuck & Company, beginning nearly a century ago. The big boom was ukuleles in the ’teens and twenties. The first Silvertone product was a hand-cranked phonograph introduced in 1915. Silvertone radios were introduced in the early 1920s. Silvertone guitars appeared in the 1930s, with electric 6-strings appearing in the early ’40s
I once had RARE rogue made in the early 90s, set up exactly like some of the best ibanez.s. Shark fin inllays, cool headstock, grover tuners, real floyd rose, etc, even the pickups used were authentic dimebuckers. Rogue made these to compete with bigger names and sold them for around $200, best guitar ever. I wish I had never sold it. I still have pics if anyone wants to see it.
Regarding the PDF download, I have not done so yet, but all of this info is available on the web, in color, ad nauseum. I bought the book to have at my bench so I could refer to it while wiring guitars. I do not have a color printer. I find the thought that, in order to experience what the book OUGHT to look like, you have to download a file, presumptuous, at best. Annoying, at the least.
There are different ways to play electric guitar. One is to just play the electric guitar, and to take it as it is. Another way is to play the guitar as a sort of synthesizer. With the right effects (delay, reverb, volume swells, added octaves), no one would even know that it was a guitar. Neither way is wrong, but we refer to both as "playing electric guitar" even though they're being used in completely different ways that may as well be different instruments. Drama ensues.
If you’re used to using a pick to play your guitar, it might be time to get a handle on fingerpicking. This style of playing is incredibly diverse, and consists of various techniques that you can employ to gently pluck the strings of your instrument. It also has the potential to eliminate the plasticky strumming sound that can drive your unintended audience batty. It isn’t a good fit for every genre, but it’s important for all you metalheads to remember that two-hand tapping is technically a form of fingerpicking.

Wow, to work with Johnny Mac! But he makes anything sound better, right? I am not a Stick player (love the instrument though), but I would think with a well-tuned setup, it might actually be easier? I think Tony Levin is running a Kemper now for his Stick. The whole idea isn’t an either/or thing, or which one is better. The idea is “running direct is a thing now, and here’s why.” But no one is taking our amps away. BTW, Bootsy is cray cray.


Later, around 1963, rebadged Guyatone and Teisco guitars appeared, both in the U.S. and a few in the U.K., also as Futuramas. That was the beginning of several years of Guyatone-made Kents. The Teiscos seemed to be part of the 1963-64 freshman-class only. After starting with an initial group of both Guyatone and Teisco guitars, the importer seemed to settle on Guyatone as a main supplier.
The same no-compromise attitude that gives the Redondo Player its uniquely killer vibe extends to every aspect of its construction. It features optimized bracing for reduced mass and superior resonance, a Graph Tech NuBone nut and saddle for greater sustain, and a Fishman preamp system (with bass, treble, volume control and tuner) that makes it easy to plug in without sacrificing the guitar’s natural sound. The lightweight mahogany neck features a comfortable, easy-to-play, slim-taper "C"-shaped profile suitable for any playing style and its laurel fingerboard and bridge further augment its vibrant tone.
Remember that each cited Mark has many different models, some better than others. Above all, the definition of how good a brand or model will depend on the personal taste of its user. When it comes to music, there is a lot of controversy and discussion about what are the best tone, the best touch, and the most beautiful design, ultimately the perception of each person is different. We try here only give direction for those seeking to know good guitar brands. This list is not intended to be exclusive or limiting. Of course, the amount you are willing to pay too much regard to the definition of the right guitar. Soon we will be adding this list marks a bit cheaper and cost-effective. If you think we missed any brand that deserved appear here in the list, send your suggestion to onlineguitarlab@gmail.com.
SOLD OUT! Takamine EF406 RARE Here we have a RARE and GORGEOUS 1999 limited Edition Takamine acoustic-electric guitar, model EF-406. This instrument is a PREMIUM example of a New York or also called a Parlor guitar and is a Hand Crafted in Japan model an amazing example of Japans high Quality workmanship & fit & finish and is truly just as good as it gets. As you can see from the pictures, it is simply gorgeous to look at. It has a classic slotted headstock with Top Quality gold open gears and gold tuners with Pearl buttons. The Top- Back & sides are all a High grade choice AAAA FLAMED KOA with natural Koa color (there is no stain)and none was needed to bring out the AWESOME grain patterns of this Rare Native Hawaiian Wood. The top sound hole apears to be bound or painted and inside looks same as out /all Takamine internet information leeds to say the tops on this model is solid however we can not guarantee this as fact. The electronics are a GRAPH-EX pre-amp system: peizo transducer, with "exciter," volume, bass, treble, and mid controls. It comes with a deluxe, plush hardh shell case, note: In he picture close up of the ack of the headstock you may notice a dull spot running threw the center over the made in Japan tag area this is just a spot of waxed area that was inadvertently missed and not rubbed out... it is fine this guitar is in Excellent used condition. .
There exist libraries that can do astoundingly realistic guitars, but they're expensive. There are a few guitarists hanging around the AF, I suggest you hook up with one of them. Even if you do buy a library, if you don't play the guitar there's a decent chance you won't be able to write for them well. No one wants clunky, awkward guitars! Team up with a fellow musician and have some fun.
Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitar players, who wanted to play single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record include Les Paul, Lonnie Johnson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, T-Bone Walker, and Charlie Christian. During the 1950s and 1960s, the electric guitar became the most important instrument in popular music.[1] It has evolved into an instrument that is capable of a multitude of sounds and styles in genres ranging from pop and rock to country music, blues and jazz. It served as a major component in the development of electric blues, rock and roll, rock music, heavy metal music and many other genres of music.
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