Though Dennis Hartnett took good care of his ViVi-Tone instruments (mandola NMM 10809, mandocello NMM 10810, and this guitar), all three show signs of extensive use. Indentations on the bar-armature and wear to the screw-ends of the posts on the guitar pickup indicate that Hartnett also used the instrument for electric-only amplification, in addition to the electric/acoustic set up in which he left it. Hartnett's guitar is preserved with an amplifier (NMM 10812) by Webster Electric Company of Racine, Wisconsin, and an accompanying foot pedal.
This is hands down THE BEST brand there is! Trust me, I've been playing guitar since I was a kid. I've had used, owned, and tried every guitar there is. Gibson is NO WAY better than PRS, the sound quality of a PRS is awesome! They are pretty light, the designs are awesome as well, although PRS is a bit more expensive than your average guitar it is worth every penny! Gibson's are way too over priced and would never match the PRS. I used to own a gibson sg and lp, and I sold them after I had my own PRS. If you really know the difference between a good and a great guitar you would pick PRS over any other brand. Period.
Unfortunately, National’s line of instruments was not well diversified and, as demand for the expensive and hard-to-manufacture tri-cone guitars began to slip, the company realized that it would need to produce instruments with a lower production cost if it was going to succeed against rival manufacturers. Dissatisfaction with what John Dopyera felt was mismanagement led him to resign from National in January 1929, and he subsequently formed the Dobro Manufacturing Corporation, later called Dobro Corporation, Ltd, and began to manufacture his own line of resonator-equipped instruments (dobros). Patent infringement disagreements between National and Dobro led to a lawsuit in 1929 with Dobro suing National for $2,000,000 in damages. Problems within National’s management as well as pressure from the deepening Great Depression led to a production slowdown at National, and this ultimately resulted in part of the company’s fractured management structure organizing support for George Beauchamp’s newest project: the development of a fully electric guitar.[5]
You can reach me by phone all day(8am until 5pm) on Monday through Saturday  If I don't answer I probably have machinery running or have both hands busy but leave a message and I will call you back shortly. During off hours please leave a message and I will call you that evening or the next morning. Feel free to email me with any general questions you may have.
When used with the human voice, it is important that the pitch correction doesn't happen too quickly, otherwise all the natural slurs and vibrato will be stripped out leaving you with a very unnatural and robotic vocal sound. If only a few notes need fixing, consider automating the pitch-corrector's correction speed parameter so that it is normally too slow to have any significant effect, then increase the speed just for the problem sections. This prevents perfectly good audio from being processed unnecessarily.
Of course, the big news was the introduction of the Spectrum 5. This had a slim, highly contoured body with a pointed upper horn pointing up and a hooked lower horn. The body featured a German carve relief along the edge. The head was the new hooked kind from ’64-65, while inlays were triangular “picks,” sort of like Kays of the time. Pickguards were two-part plastic covering the entire area under the strings, with volume and tone controls and stereo and mono jacks. The “vegematic” push-buttons came in five groovy colors.
That’s not an overstatement, as traces of T-Bone’s influence can be heard in the early recordings of Albert, B.B. and Freddie King, Muddy Waters, and especially Chuck Berry, who adopted many of Walker’s signature licks as his own. A sharp-dressed, flamboyant performer who played the guitar behind his head and did the splits without missing a note, Walker helped reposition the guitar player from the sidelines to center stage, inspiring Buddy Guy, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to copy his impossible-to-ignore moves.
Here you will find a selection of our most popular brands of acoustic guitars. This range includes Australian manufacturers Maton and Cole Clark, prestigious American companies C.F. Martin and Gretsch as well as fantastic value for money in Fender, Yamaha and Epiphone. We stock guitars ranging from beginner to professional, with and without pickups and in all different shapes, sizes and finishes.
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
In 1944 Gibson was purchased by Chicago Musical Instruments. The ES-175 was introduced in 1949. Gibson hired Ted McCarty in 1948, who became President in 1950. He led an expansion of the guitar line with new guitars such as the "Les Paul" guitar introduced in 1952 and designed by Les Paul, a popular musician in the 1950s and also a pioneer in music technology. The Les Paul was offered in Custom, Standard, Special, and Junior models.[15] In the mid-50s, the Thinline series was produced, which included a line of thinner guitars like the Byrdland. The first Byrdlands were slim, custom built, L-5 models for guitarists Billy Byrd and Hank Garland. Later, a shorter neck was added. Other models such as the ES-350T and the ES-225T were introduced as less costly alternatives.[16] In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335T model. Similar in size to the hollow-body Thinlines, the ES-335 family had a solid center, giving the string tone a longer sustain.
For under £400 you get a set of Paul Gagon-Designed Alnico Pickups which provide a massive sound ranging from smooth and cool surf rock to all out grunge distortion. The AW4470B humbucker in the bridge position is complemented by an AP4285B P-90 neck pickup which ensures you have an array of tones at your fingertips – ideal for clean and distorted amplifiers. The addition of a push/pull coil tap allows you to split the humbucker so you can enjoy the classic sounds of a single coil. A mahogany body and maple neck provide the resonance, depth and snap you need for a wide range of tones and the G&L Saddle Lock Bridge with its six individual saddles offer incredible intonation as the saddles actually lock onto the strings.
Eddie is #1, or at least tied with Hendrix, who relies on reputation alone. Bon jovi's guitarist is a joke. For some reason, people (who have no idea what they are talking about) think Bon jovi is better than all of the other 80s bands that have solid guitar players that aren't on the list that are better in many ways, specifically the guitar. (definitely leppard, Guns N' Roses, Ratt, motley crue, etc.) Anyway Eddie Van Halens self taught style is the best that there is. This list is more of a popularity contest, a popularity contest where people who have no idea what they are talking about vote for the band they have heard 1 or 2 songs from. The electric guitar was played by many, for all those who can't get on the radio and name the band that is playing most of the time, better yet the album, shouldn't be voting. But if you can, vote whoever.
Guitar brands such as Antoria shared some Ibanez guitar designs. The Antoria guitar brand was managed by JT Coppock Leeds Ltd England. CSL was a brand name managed by Charles Summerfield Ltd England. Maurice Summerfield of the Charles Summerfield Ltd company contributed some design ideas to Hoshino Gakki and also imported Ibanez and CSL guitars into the UK with Hoshino Gakki cooperation from 1964-1987.[3] The Maxxas brand name came about because Hoshino Gakki thought that the guitar did not fit in with the Ibanez model range and was therefore named Maxxas by Rich Lasner from Hoshino USA [4].
• Wound Up: String windings directly affect tone and playability. Round wound strings have more “zing” – sustain, responsiveness and bite. Flat wound strings have a smoother and more consistent tone regardless of attack, which makes them a favorite of jazz players, like the great Gibson ES-350 legend Barney Kessel. Blues guitar kingpin Jimmie Vaughan also uses flat wounds for his vintage tone. And they offer less resistance than round wound strings, so they can be beneficial for rapid, even toned performance and squeak less.
it is my opinion that most classical and jazz guitar instructors at local colleges and music stores are better than tom morello and jack white. I like both of them and they are definitly innovators and very popular but my college classical/flamenco instructors were doing things incredibly more complex and emotional than anything ive ever heard tom or jack do. ask tom morello to play a segovia piece and see what happens. this list seems like it was made by a 17 year old kid who thinks he’s smart because he knows who robert johnson is, like putting him at #1 instead of hendrix is his “ace in the hole” of guitar knowledge. there is no real answer to the question “whos the best” but we guitarists will never tire of discussing it.
In addition to pickup selection, most guitars will have controls for volume and tone. Volume controls simply regulate the strength of the output signal. Depending on the amplifier, this can control the tone as well as the volume. Most tone knobs control high frequencies and many guitars have separate tone controls for each pickup. This can vary a guitar’s sound between soft, warm, and mellow to a very bright, raw, distorted sound.
Pedals that fit this description usually end up being more of a problem than anything else, but that’s not the case with Behringer. We get rudimentary but functional controls, which allow you to dial in a decent variety of reverb effects. Same goes for shaping said reverb. You have a certain amount of maneuvering space to work with, which might not seem like a lite when you put this thing next to a boutique model.

People that "hear a difference" are usually pre-conditioned to hear one. If you were removed from the guitars presence completely and only given anonymous samples of their tone, it's highly doubtful you'd identify, match or even come close to choosing 100% of the guitars tones correctly. Especially based on some imagined effect the wood is having on the sound.


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I took lessons with him when i was 8 years old. I stopped taking lessons when i was 12 years old. In those four years i have learned so much about guitar in such a little time. Patrick is an amazing teacher and by the time i left his teaching, i joined 4 bands and played at the whiskey twice, the house of blues four times, and the grove once. All amazing experiences and it all started from Patrick. I am 16 now and i will never forget what he has done for me. If you are thinking about eventually taking on guitar at all, Pat is your man.
The extra-versatile twin-channel layout with independent controls delivers a wide variety of tones from clean to overdrive. The Sonzera 20—which we recently reviewed—packs a hell of a punch for players who need a versatile workhorse amp that pairs well with pedals and sounds incredible on its own for any style of music. While the Sonzera 50 Combo is well suited to the stage, the 20 is easy to haul to gigs, has a lower output that’s better suited for the studio—and its “American style” voicing thanks to its 6L6 power tubes (the Sonzera 50 features EL34 tubes).
You can get a rough idea of what the All-Electric looked like in Gruhn/Carter’s Electric Guitars (Miller Freeman Books, 1995), although this example has been refinished and replated, with a new fingerboard, tuners and added tailpiece, and is an atypical 14-fret Spanish model, possibly assembled at the end of the ’30s from leftover parts. Toward the end of National Dobro’s presence in Los Angeles, a great many guitars were assembled and shipped from remaining stock, often as exports.

1. Examples. There are a handful of examples in this book and that's about it. I expected much more in the way of alternate wiring examples but they were only mentioned in passing it seems. Additionally if you're looking for good step by step instructions you wont find it here. The instructions are average at best and never really go deeper than "put this wire here and that wire there" . It's step by step,but just barely. Don't expect any deep explanations on the theory behind why certain wirings do what they do or why they sound the way they do. It's cursory at best.

With the die-cast chrome tuners, you get to ensure that your guitar never gets out of tune. The natural finish and large pickguard make this instrument a true classic. You can play this acoustic instrument as it is, or plug it into a PA and let the System 53 piezo pickup amplify its sound. You also get a preamp with 2-band EQ for more control over the tone and volume.
Vox is a musical equipment manufacturer founded in 1947 by Thomas Walter Jennings in Dartford, Kent, England. The company is most famous for making the Vox AC30 guitar amplifier, used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Yardbirds, Queen, Dire Straits, U2 and Radiohead, the Vox Continental electric organ, and a series of innovative electric guitars and bass guitars. Since 1992, Vox has been owned by the Japanese electronics firm Korg.
Finding spare parts for vintage guitars is not always easy. Manufacturers come and go, very often changing specifications throughout the course of a guitar's production; identifying exactly the right specification part can be very difficult indeed - but we aim to help you find the correct part for your instrument. We have many years experience in restoring vintage musical instruments: if you need help, please do get in contact.
There are no frills: a single channel controlled with a Volume, Tone and Gain knob. You can switch between 15 and 7 watts, and don’t forget that for an all-tube amp, that is a lot of volume! While not having effects may sound like a bummer, the stripped-down circuitry helps your guitar signal to maintain its purest tone. Simple, raw and with attitude, cool looks and a mere 5.5kg; be prepared to rattle your brain with an authentic “British” sound.

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After Fender’s decision in 1982 to switch Squier’s production from strings to guitars, the Stratocaster was one of the first models put under the Squier production line in Japan. It was the most commercially successful guitar Fender had produced. Originally in 1982, the headstock had a “Fender” name written in large script, followed by “Squier series” in smaller script. In 1983, this was later changed to the current 1970s large headstock featuring “Squier” in larger script, followed by “by Fender” in smaller script. Since then, there have been several variations of headstock size and Squier logos, typically based on what series the guitar is.
After the dissolve of Kay/Valco in 1968, the Engelhardt-Link company bought the upright bass and cello lines[clarification needed] at the asset auction in 1969, and continue to produce the same instrument lines till today. Manufactured in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Engelhardt basses and cellos are sturdy instruments, widely used by students and touring professionals. The ES9 Swingmaster bass (formerly the Kay S9 Swingmaster), is highly thought-of by jazz, swing, and bluegrass musicians.
I’m Björgvin Benediktsson. I’m a musician, audio engineer and best-selling author. I help musicians and producers make a greater impact with their music by teaching them how to produce and engineer themselves. I’ve taught thousands of up and coming home studio producers such as yourself how to make an impact with their music through Audio Issues since 2011.
The chord below (an Am) is going to be used for demonstration. Firstly, you'll notice the name of the chord labeled up the top. Next you'll see a "grid" below it. This grid represents your guitar fretboard. The 6 lines running downwards represent the six strings on your guitar with the fattest and lowest sounding string on the left hand side. The horizontal lines represent the frets on your guitar neck. The top line is the top of the neck.

Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.
Electric guitars are solid-bodied guitars that are designed to be plugged into an amplifier. The electric guitar when amplified produces a sound that is metallic with a lengthy decay. The shape of an electric guitar is not determined by the need for a deep resonating body and this had led to the development of contoured and thin bodied electric guitars. The two most popular designs are the Fender Stratocaster and the Gibson Les Paul.

Every amp will have a preamp and a power amp. These are often referred to as the preamp stage and power stage. The preamp picks up the signal from the guitar and boosts it so other parts of the preamp can manipulate it (this is where EQ and gain kick in). The power amp then takes that modified signal and boosts it to a level where the speakers can push it out. You will run into these terms most often with tube amps, as different tubes are installed in each of these stages.


I think that there is a lot more that goes into getting a rich sound than just the pickup layout. AYK different pickups also have very different sounds, so if you line up an HH next to an HSH, there are going to be so many different factors that it's impossible to just point to the pickup configuration as the difference, unless they are the same make and model. From my personal experience of wanting a nice HSH many years ago, it's not worthwhile to limit yourself to that configuration because there are so few models. IMHO. Also, I don't think you mention what style of music you play at all. – JFA Jun 25 '14 at 1:59
“You can also think of it as what the signal path in a studio situation would be if you were to plug your guitar directly into the input of your amplifier, and process that sound through outboard effects. You’re not going to have your echo first before going into your distortion boxes—unless you’re looking for a specific sound—because you want the echoes to die out naturally, and not with your distorted sound.”
Some versions of the TG-64 had the same floating-table vibrato system as on the SD-4L; my guess would be that these were earlier versions, although one can’t place too much faith in dating Japanese guitars by hardware appointments. Others had the more typical Japanese version of the Bigsby vibrato. This guitar was sold in the United States in ’65 as the Teisco Del Rey Model ET-320, but by ’66 had been dropped from the line.
The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" presents a bad case of convenience to the manufacturer (only having to make one size) disguised as a convenience to the customer (pretending one size fits all). This thing is not very versatile. With an outer string spread of 1.75", it's made for a wide guitar neck so if yours is only average, the outer strings will be suspended off to the sides of the overall width of the neck. That's not insurmountable but it's also not something every budding slide player wants to tolerate.
Wet Set: If you have a sound that you want to push a long way back in the mix, it can often be better to make your reverb effect pre-fader, and temporarily remove all the dry sound. Then alter the sound's EQ and reverb settings while listening only to the wet reverb sound. Once you've got that sounding good, gradually fade the dry sound back in until you're happy with the wet/dry balance. This approach can often be more effective than simply whacking up the reverb level while you listen to the whole song. Martin Walker
hi-can you put two caps on your two tone pots or will just the one do as is mormal-aslo on a push pull pot do you need two tone caps one for the bottom half as regular-if putting on the square part  of the push pull pot -can you put on any of the six lugs ie the ones not used -i have instaleed a push pull swich but when down the tone on the neck pickup does not seem to have any effect -when i pull it when usingn the pull pull it does have a effect is this normal-i have now neck-bridge-and all three in a row-when not pulled which would be normal five wat switch sound i seem to get a telecasster sound ,i thought this was the case when i pull it up=i have now a nice selection of sounds—thankls sean
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
I’d like to think that I am a little more forgiving of slight finish errors than most, so most of the horror stories surrounding Gibson QC do not bother me too much. After all, one area of the body where the sunburst color doesn't fade at EXACTLY the same point all the way around? That sounds more like middle aged guys trying to save face around their buddies after their wives saw the credit card bill the next month and made them take it back.
We considered more than 40 guitars for this guide, and we tested the 13 most promising models. A couple of models aside, our testing panel thought, as Lynn Shipley Sokolow put it, “These are all of good quality and are all adequate.” In fact, certain models we didn’t pick may be a better choice for beginning guitarists who are into a specific style—most notably metal, which is clearly the primary market for brands such as Ibanez and Jackson.
The tone selector on an electric guitar controls the capacitor, which basically filters out high frequencies. The same way a high-cut filter (or low-pass-filter if you prefer) works on a standard equalizer. By dialing down the tone, you remove brightness and treble. The pickup selector does just what it's called.. Selecting which pickups being used to capture the vibration of the strings, and translates the energy into electric current, though the configuration and number of "presets" can vary from guitar to guitar, depending on how many pickups it has etc. If you're a handyman you can even configure this yourself.
The guitar starts off with a basswood body, carved into the familiar Stratocaster double cutaway. Even the pickguard resembles that of a Strat, although the controls are different, with the Adrian Smith SDX just having two knobs for adjusting master tone and volume. While the neck still looks like a Strat, it is meant for fast and comfortable play, with its compound radius maple fretboard, 25.5" scale length, 1.6875" nut width and 22 jumbo frets. Giving this guitar its versatile tones are two single coils for the neck and middle position, along with a humbucker on the bridge, all of which are designed by Jackson with the approval of the Adrian himself.

Electric guitars are solid-bodied guitars that are designed to be plugged into an amplifier. The electric guitar when amplified produces a sound that is metallic with a lengthy decay. The shape of an electric guitar is not determined by the need for a deep resonating body and this had led to the development of contoured and thin bodied electric guitars. The two most popular designs are the Fender Stratocaster and the Gibson Les Paul.
A Direct Inject signal can capture the power-tube distortion sound without the direct coloration of a guitar speaker and microphone. This DI signal can be blended with a miked guitar speaker, with the DI providing a more present, immediate, bright sound, and the miked guitar speaker providing a colored, remote, darker sound. The DI signal can be obtained from a DI jack on the guitar amp, or from the Line Out jack of a power attenuator.
While we are on the subject of cute little things, I want you to consider the idea of a small amplifier with a cute name but with the looks of Marlon Brando in his early years. Wait, no, that is incredibly freaky and not something anyone wants to imagine. I mean how would you even connect your guitar to that? What I mean is imagine an incredibly handsome amplifier. Well, now that you have, let me ruin your dreams by directing your attention at the pignose 7-10 legendary portable amplifier, which is an actually rather handsome piece of equipment. The great thing about this beautiful box is that it also has a great sound, comparable to that of its betters (read: of the more expensive models). Being very light and fun to possess, it is highly portable and loud enough to captivate audiences. A great, affordable small amplifier that does not look Marlon Brando in any way, and thank god for that.
The guitar is one of the most beloved musical instruments of all time. Guitarists tend to wear that title with pride, and their instrument becomes an extension of the player’s distinct personality. Because of this, players tend to develop a strict loyalty to the guitar brand of their choosing. Luckily, there are many great options out there today, with niches that cater to virtually all genres and styles. This guide will weigh the pros and cons of the five best guitar brands on the market, to help you make as informed a decision as possible on which brand will best suit your needs.
The beauty of the Yamaha FG800 Acoustic goes way beyond skin deep with its solid Sitka spruce top complemented by a Nato back and side. The mellow, well balanced tone offers excellent note definition, worthy of dreadnoughts costing far more. Quality materials such as a rosewood bridge and fingerboard, black and white body binding and more make FG Series acoustics sweet buys with a great reputation.
Two-handed tapping was the hoariest of heavy-metal clichés until Marnie Stern reclaimed the concept on behalf of indie-prog bedroom shredders everywhere. No one would ever confuse Stern’s chops with Eddie Van Halen’s, but that’s kind of the point: If Stern’s shredding exudes the agreeably skewed internal logic of the self-taught, it also allows her to utilize the two-handed technique far more creatively than the pseudo-classical chest-puffing that usually comes with Dokken territory.

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In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
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Kent made a lot of "student model" instruments in the 1960's. I have always found most of the guitars to be quite playable but overall, the general guitar public in my area seemed to have a low opinion of them. I recently bought a solid body one pick-up, with case, that I practise on a lot. In fact, at a recording session I was using my Gibson Lespaul and the producer was complaining about the sound of it, so the next day I brought in my Kent and he loved it, it's on two songs on the CD we were working on!
The only known American distributor of Lyle guitars is the L.D. Heater Music Company. A small warehouse based in Beaverton, Oregon, L.D. Heater was owned by Norlin, the parent company of Gibson, and known more for their exclusive production rights to Alembic instruments. As protection from potential lawsuits, Lyle guitars were part of the contract that stated under which brand names Gibson-licensed guitars could be produced and distributed.
Since King Crimson‘s first rehearsal in 1969, Robert Fripp has been its distinguishing instrumental voice, a singular blend of distorted complexity and magisterial sustain. That duality is best heard on the most progressive prog-rock album ever made, Crimson’s 1973 thorny-metal classic, Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. Fripp’s most famous guitar line is the fuzz-siren hook in the title track to David Bowie‘s Heroes. Fripp would “start up without even knowing the chord sequence,” said producer Brian Eno, adding that Fripp’s work
Williamson injected new life into the group, bringing an ideal balance of discipline and frenzy, best heard on the group’s 1973 disc Raw Power, the album that launched thousands of punk and post punk bands. “I’m his biggest fan,” the legendary Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr once said of Williamson. “He has the technical ability of Jimmy Page without being as studious and the swagger of Keith Richards without being sloppy. He’s both demonic and intellectual, almost how you would imagine Darth Vader to sound if he was in a band.”
Cutting the RATE and DEPTH knobs too high will cause the effect to sound thick and chaotic. This is more so an attribute of the chorus effect in general and not a knock on the pedal itself. With that in mind, we would advise taking Roland's "formal" settings suggestions (pictured below) with a grain of salt, as long as you're using the CH-1 with an acoustic guitar. In most cases, we found that the pedal performed best on the lower settings, particularly with the RATE and E.LEVEL knobs cut before 12 o'clock.

This Ibanez has a flamed sycamore top, and delivers a well balanced sound unplugged or plugged in. It has a great finish that is referred to as vintage violin. Owners of this guitar say it sounds great as the similarly priced Seagulls and Yamahas. The price has recently dropped on this guitar, which was a pain point for many owners. At $250 it’s a steal given the quality. The onboard pre amp contains a tuner, which is nice for beginners to always stay in tune. The slim neck will also make for great playability. Click here for more pictures and details.

The guitar is also available in various packages with an amp and other accessories, such as this one that includes a Fender Frontman 10G amp, a cable, a strap, picks, and a tuner. Note, though, that Fender offers a truly awesome little amp with built-in effects, the Champion 20, for just a bit more. We strongly recommend spending a little extra and getting a Champion 20, which will give almost any guitarist practically any sound they can imagine with no need for effects pedals. Read more about the Champion 20 in our review of the best electric guitar amp for beginners.
Now lets talk amps. I have always felt like you could hand me a great guitar played through a bad amp and I would get a bad tone. However, I can make a bad guitar sound decent through a good amp. The amp, in my opinion is the most crucial part of your tone. I always prefer tube amps that deliver a much warmer, natural sound then the solid state counterparts. However if you are play jazz or something that requires a clean crisp sound, a solid state amp good be great. All the great rock legends used tube amps such as Marshall Plexi’s, Vox AC30, Hi Watt, Fender Twins, Fender Bassmans etc. Now days they make all kinds of boutique amps that are modeled after these classic amps. Matchless is my amp of choice which is loosely modeled after the Vox AC30.

The Fender Stratocaster is a model of electric guitar designed in 1954 by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Freddie Tavares. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has manufactured the Stratocaster continuously from 1954 to the present. It is a double-cutaway guitar, with an extended top “horn” shape for balance. Along with the Gibson Les Paul, it is one of the most often copied electric guitar shapes.[2][3] “Stratocaster” and “Strat” are trademark terms belonging to Fender.


As mentioned, most of the ’50s Teisco guitars were heavily influenced by Gibson-style design. At the very end of the decade or just at the dawn of the ’60s, Teisco guitars began to change to double cutaways and exhibit a playful � if slightly frumpy � more Fender-oriented design aesthetic. This was almost in lock-step with American guitar industry trends. Gibson launched its thinline ES-335 in 1958 and, indeed, changed its single-cutaway Les Paul to the double-cutaway SG in ’61. American manufacturers such as Kay and Harmony quickly followed suit. The Teisco change was a part of the guitar Zeitgeist.
Other ways to reduce feedback include: playing with the bass amp's speaker cabinets in front of, rather than behind, the instrument; reducing the onstage volume; moving the bass away from other loud instruments, such as the drum kit (low toms can trigger feedback on some basses) or the rhythm guitar player's amp); signal phase reversing; using a parametric equalizer or "notch filter" EQ to turn down the frequency that is feeding back; or using "feedback eliminators", which are basically automatic notch filters that find and turn down the frequency that is "howling". Some other ways to reduce feedback are to use a plywood laminate bass rather than a carved wood bass, use a solid - body electric upright bass and/or use magnetic or optical pickups. Many of the methods used to reduce feedback (notch filters, filling the f-holes with foam) have effects on the tone of the instrument. However, these drawbacks need to be considered against the significant problems for the audience's experience caused by unwanted feedback.
Acoustic guitar is the first choice of many guitar beginners. There are a lot of benefits to start with an acoustic guitar. First of first, acoustic guitars are cheaper than electric guitars. Then acoustic guitars are easy to carry, you don’t need electricity and amplifiers. The most important reason I think is a good acoustic guitar make amazing sound that different from electric guitars.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Construction: D-Shape - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 6 In-Line - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Hardware: Black, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Seymour Duncan Live Wire - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Charcoal Burst, Vintage Burst
It was Berry’s songs from the late Fifties with cut boogie patterns—like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Johnny B. Goode” and “Carol”—that realized electrically the guitar ambitions first dreamt by Robert Johnson. Berry’s tone—courtesy of a hollow-body Gibson through a tweed Fender amp—was raw and loud. This, along with his duckwalk, ringing double-stops and songs about cars and girls, grabbed the youth market. Tall and handsome, he brought the guitar as the “cool” instruments to a ready audience via appearances on TV and in movies, in a way that the Beatles would repeat in the early Sixties.
The same goes for Electrovoice's RE20, which counts Steve Albini, John Fry, and especially Glenn Kolotkin amongst its friends. "I like to use RE20s on most amplifiers when they're available", says Glenn, "because the quality is great and they can take really high levels. They're very directional and they're great for rock and roll." The mic also exhibits an unusually wide and flat frequency response and is specially designed to resist proximity effect.
Overdrive originally resulted from the natural breakup that occurred when a tube amp received an overly hot signal from a guitar. This pushed the tubes to deliver a subtle, warm breakup. Generally overdrive is a more subdued, natural form of distortion. While you don’t have to use an overdrive effect with a tube amp to get a great sound, the combination of the two can produce a rich, pleasing tone that many guitarists prefer. The first overdrive effects were designed to push more signal into a tube amp, giving it the very throaty, mid-range tone associated with Stevie Ray Vaughan. With that in mind, many of today's pedal makers have created circuitry to add that desired tone when used with a solid state amps as well. Since overdrive is a signal boost, adjustments from your volume knob will create a variety of different sounds.
This model comes in Takamine’s NEX cutaway guitar body, and features a slimline mahogany neck with 12”-radius rosewood fretboard. The result is an acoustic that plays really quickly, and is more than comfortable right up in the high frets. Ideal for virtuoso players. Takamine also use their own preamp system here, which includes three-band EQ and gain controls, mid contour switch, notch filter and EQ bypass. It all sounds great.
In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]
The first guitar developed was the K1 Series. Launched in 2000, this instrument had a dreadnought cutaway design and used inexpensive materials such as laminated spruce for tops, and sapele for back and sides. Kona Guitars then launched the K2 series after which it diversified, at present offering over 30 models of guitars, ukuleles, violins, and other instruments.
In the 1920s, it was very hard for a musician playing a pickup-equipped guitar to find an amplifier and speaker to make their instrument louder as the only speakers that could be bought were "radio horns of limited frequency range and low acoustic output". The cone speaker, widely used in 2000s-era amp cabinets, was not offered for sale until 1925. The first amplifiers and speakers could only be powered with large batteries, which made them heavy and hard to carry around. When engineers developed the first AC mains-powered amplifiers, they were soon used to make musical instruments louder.
Choose from electric guitars with hardwood, polyester, or leather bodies, and carbon, maple, or rosewood fretboards. We offer right-handed and left-handed configurations, along with electric guitars that feature options like Tune-O-Matic, tremolo, and adjustable bridges. If you're brand-new to playing, you can even find a student kit including lesson books and helpful accessories to keep you on beat and in tune as you teach yourself to strum.
The pickup selector switch as the name implies allows you to select which pickup produces sound. In some cases, it will be your neck pickup, bridge pickup or a combination of both. In other cases, such as the Fender Stratocaster there are three pickups which utilize a 5-way selector switch. This also allows each pickup to be isolated or used in combination.
This group contains two effects pedals, which are the noise gate and compressor (and most of the time a volume pedal). You don't want to change that ordering, because of the result of compression. It reduces the variance between the highest peaks of volume and the lowest. And if you haven't taken the noise out of your signal yet using the noise gate, your signal-to-noise ratio becomes lower, making it more difficult to take out the noise in a musical fashion (it'll have more abrupt and noticeable moments of silence).
Six slot-headed Classics were offered. The 133/8″-wide GN50 Standard ($65) had a yellow spruce top and mahogany neck and body. The 141/4″ GN60 Concert ($79.50) featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian Imulawood body. The 143/4″ GN70 Grand Concert ($99.50) sported yellow spruce and figured Brazilian fruitwood. The 15″ GN80 Auditorium (4109.50) was the same as the GN70 but with 4″ X 403/8″ dimensions. The 141/4″ GN90 Concert featured yellow spruce top and Brazilian rosewood body, with extra binding. The 14 1/2″ GN100 Grand Concert ($169.50) came in yellow spruce, Brazilian rosewood and ornate inlays. Cases were extra.

I use an EBTECH HUM X. I plug my Fender ’62 Re-Issue Deluxe Reverb into the HUM X and then I plug the HUM X into the wall socket. It works great for me. For my pedals, I use a Visual Sound One Spot to power my large board with no issues and I have a Boss BCB-3 pedal board/case with OD-3, CH-1, DD-3, and a TU-2 next to the OD-3 on the floor since my BCB-3 is really old it came with a 4 pin daisy chain. I power that with a Boss PSA-120S AC Adapter also with no issues. I read about keeping your signal as clean as possible and cable lengths no longer than is necessary. I would try everything mentioned above and make sure you have good quality and proper length cables. BTW, if you research cables, you may find that more expensive doesn’t always mean better. Check out Pro-Co. They are also made in the USA. Good luck!
Many readers will already know that germanium has been the effects buzzword of the past many years. These transistors are considered softer, rounder, more musical. Don’t be fooled: that doesn’t mean they make music all by themselves, you have to make music through them. But that’s not such a bad thing. Open up a Fuzz Face for the first time and you’re likely to be startled by its simplicity, and other early fuzzes like Maestro’s Fuzz-Tone (1963) and Sola Sound’s Tone Bender (1965) are equally basic. As far as the Face goes, you’ll find fewer than ten components on the board, two of them being those crucial AC128 or NKT275 transistors. Interestingly, the Tone Bender originally used two OC75 germanium transistors made by Mullard, the revered British tube manufacturer.
The CX-12 is a 12-hole, 48-reed chromatic, uniquely designed with a one-piece plastic housing and a more ergonomic slide button. It is available in several keys including a tenor-C. The standard model is charcoal black in color, but a gold colored one is available in the key of C only.[42] A variant of the CX-12, the CX-12 Jazz, has slightly different outer body features for better ergonomics, a red and gold colored housing, and higher reed offsets which aid in better tone for jazz harmonica players.[43]
The best guitars?  Look at what the best players use.  Certainly Gibson and Fender are in the mix, but these are typically priceless, early production or highly customized one-off units.  If you want something more or less off the shelf that is in the same range of build, tone and feel quality look at the following (BTW, you can't get these at Guitar Center, which is probably why they haven't been mentioned yet):
Back when they were starting, Jackson guitars were only available to the elite few, mostly heavy metal artists. After being acquired by Fender, Jackson has since expanded into the entry level realm with mass produced versions of their popular guitar designs, including the Dinky shape. The JS11 Dinky does just that, making the Jackson Dinky a beginner and student friendly instrument that more players can enjoy.
“Spectrum ‘5’ has an unusually thin neck. To achieve the proper rigidity in this fast action neck Teisco had to select the hardest (and the costliest) material available…Ebony. The adjustable neck is fashioned out of 5 plys [sic] of laminated Ebony to insure maximum strength. The fingerboard of the Spectrum ‘5’ is likewise fashioned out of Ebony. Note the unique position markers and the extra wide, easy to finger frets.

A 6 stringed right handed electric guitar that mostly comes in black color. It has its body made of bass wood and fret board made of rosewood with 22 frets. The dimension of the guitar is 9 x 9 x 3 cm  that is easy to handle. The model is quite affordable with prices ranging from around INR 9,071. Its beauty makes it have the required curb appeal for stage performances and give motivation in studio. More information can be found on the link that follows.


PRS started off in the 1990s. At that time, it seemed Les Pauls were being swapped in favor of a PRS guitar. PRS leveraged this opportunity to continue the trend, making PRS more accessible to all. Hence, they launched another line of product with affordable price tags – the SE guitars. Nonetheless, one cannot consider SE guitars as the beginner’s guitars, since they all flaunt with high-end specs like other instruments. Through these guitars, one gets an opportunity to enjoy playing a pro guitar without causing a blow to your budget.
Leo Fender didn’t know how to play guitar. The inventor of the famous guitar brand, which includes the Telecaster and Stratocaster models (favored by Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix), never learned how to play his own instrument. Fender began as an accountant with a knack for repairing radios, later turning that hobby into a full-time electronics operation. The highly versatile Telecaster, which he developed in 1950, became the first mass-produced solid-body electric guitar.
Tony Visconti is also into using ambient mics: "I'm very much a fan of the room sound, too. I always record it if it's a real heavy rock guitar with power chords and crunches and all. I'll go around the room and clap my hands and I say, 'Put the mics there, that's it.' Quite often, I'll turn the room mic towards the studio window, and you'll get a reflection of the guitar sound — not directly facing it, because you're looking for reflections." Although he states in the same interview that he'll try to use a pair of U87s for ambience if possible, he's also mentioned elsewhere using PZM mics as an alternative.
Are YOU joking? only 3 real real ones? I’m gonna go ahead and assume your young and don’t have much musical exploring under your belt yet. Clapton, Hendrix, King…. 3 very good choices but also pretty narrow minded buddy. Jimmy Page? Django Reinhardt, David Gilmour, Steve Gaines, LES PAUL, Chet Atkins, Gary Morse, John Petrucci, Yngwei Malmsteen, the dudes from Dragon Force!, Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughn for god sake!, Robert Johnson, Joe Bonamassa, Buddy Guy, Van Halen, Joe Satriani, Kirk Hammett, Dimebag Darrell, Jeff “skunk” Baxter, Jerry Reed, Andre Segovia, and YES John Mayer can really play!, I could go on and on……. ONLY 3 REAL ONES? WTF? Broaden your horizons my friend. only 3 real ones…. face palm…… failboat.

You can set an octave to play the higher or lower notes or both at the same time. This is ideal for those who want to really thicken up their sound and are often used by heavy metal guitarists to make solos and riffs sound really cool! The Valeton OC-10 Octave pedal is a budget friendly choice and the Electro Harmonix Nano Pog is an industry standard option.

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You wont be sorry with this harness, full size volume pot , push pull tone pot/switch both with good throw torque, great solder connects and a quality, all hardware was intact , just remove replace, I did have to carefully bend the lugs on the input switch to get it to seat properly in my Epiphone but other than that minor obstacle all went well, no hum or noise and the toggle feels solid, man Epiphone put some straight up junk electronics in my guitar so this was a great upgrade, thanks Kmise you got a new customer..will order another for my Jackson Kelly..
THE NECK POCKET The next step is to rout the neck pocket and body cavities. For the neck pocket I like to use a 1/4" bit and leave the scrap wood edge around the body to give the router the extra support it needs when routing the neck area. To find out how deep you will have to rout the pocket measure the total thickness of the heal of the neck. Then measure the hieght of the bridge from the bottom to the top of the groove the string will sit in on the saddle and add about 1/8" to it. That allows for the string clearence over the frets. The subtract that from the overall thickness that you came up with when you measured the heal of the neck. That will give you a pretty accurate depth that you will need to carve the pocket down to. Be very careful when you rout the neck pocket! You don't want to make it too big otherwise you end up with gaps between the neck and the body and you don't want to go too deep because it can be impossible to fix. Rout a little bit at a time, and set the neck in each time to make sure you get the proper fit. It shouldn't fit to tight and the pocket should be slightly lager than the heal of the neck because you will have paint accumulation in it which will shrink it a little.
Explore the myriad wood combinations in the Gibson lineup and see what’s right for you. Trying to finetune your tone without regard to what your wood is kicking out in the first place can be a frustrating venture, but learn to work with the organic template of each specific model, and you’re already swimming with the tide. Be at one with the heart of the wood, tune in to the voice that resonates deep within even the unplugged electric guitar, and you will go a long way toward understanding, and crafting, your own unique tone.

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Guitar Center Fort Worth provides comprehensive guitar repair services for the Fort Worth area. Our repair technicians are as passionate about your guitars and basses as you are, and we have the experience needed to keep them performing at their best. Whether you need a quick adjustment to make your guitar easier to play, or a complete guitar rebuild, we have the tools and know-how to take care of your instrument. Guitar Center Fort Worth can also help build a maintenance plan that fits you and your guitar or bass needs, including custom setups, restrings and more. We also take care of fret repairs, hardware and pickup installations, upgrades and customizations, bone and graphite services and more.

Possessing great look and feel, the LyxPro, the amp is small and would work best for headphone, something that is normal with beginner instrument. It also features a digital clip-on tuner that is so perfect for tuning the 6 strings that are designed on the rosewood fretboard. The Canadian maple neck also compliments the rosewood fingerboard and the overall solid wood body finishes for greater sound quality.
Another way of categorizing bass equipment manufacturers is by which part of the market they are targeting. While Peavey and Yorkville products are aimed at the generalist mass market, some bass equipment manufacturers, such as Acoustic Image or Walter Woods make expensive "boutique" equipment that is aimed at a niche market within the professional musician market. Acoustic Image amplifiers and speaker cabinets tend to be used by professional acoustic folk and jazz musicians, and Walter Woods amplifiers are associated with professional acoustic jazz bass players.
So you decided to play electric guitar. Once you get a guitar and an amp, the next step is to explore effects. Effects pedals can be separated into groups based on their functions. Understanding the different pedal groups is the key to getting the best sound when chaining them together. The largest pedal group is probably overdrives and distortions, and BOSS currently makes 16 different pedals in this category.
Plugged into a Fender blue deluxe, this instrument immediately proved to be a love at first riff. The humbuckers sounds so amazingly, and coupled with great and rich percussive and natural full tone, that overall sound that emanates from this instrument is far beyond what is normally expected for a beginner’s piece. The fact that it is made in China has nothing to do with its quality. This might just be your favourite new ax.
Is it not within the scope of eventual computational science to notate the performance aspect of playing the guitar? Sans keyboard, sans human hand - if not by bedroom producers with too much time on their hands, then by AI analysis and pattern matching logic produced by overfunded grad students spending their Silicon Valley parents' fortunes, their AI guitar-licks algorithms trained by analyzing performance records and accelerometer measurements of real virtuoso guitarists performing? Won't a well trained bot eventually turn out some licks that fall within the scope of enjoyable human performance habits?
The effect of amplifier coloration can be emulated using a parametric EQ, where you'll probably find you need to add some upper mid-range boost to get the same brightness as from an amp. Note that, if you're using a software amp modelling plug-in, you'll still get the best results if you feed your guitar via a high-impedance DI box — plugging it straight into a soundcard's line input is likely to result in a drop in level and may even affect the sustain and high end of the guitar sound due to the pickups being loaded by the impedance of the input circuitry. This does not apply to active pickup systems which, in effect, function as a combination of pickup and DI box.
Be prepared for each practice session. That means, know what you learned in your previous session and whether you're satisfied you accomplished your goal for that session. If you still need time on your previous session's goal, spend another session on it. Don't move on until you have it nailed. So important. If you feel like you're not making progress with a particular technique or concept, I'm always here to help.
When it comes to its dimensions, all interested buyers should know that it is quite sizeable on the exterior (the unit has the following external measurements 40″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 15″ (lower bout) width x 3″ height). Likewise, the bag is quite spacious on the inside (39.5″ length x 12″ (upper bout)/ 14.5″ (lower bout) width and 2.5″ in height).
With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!
One very interesting and strikingly modern Teisco guitar, the YG-6, appeared in Japan in 1965. It was very near the classic Strat shape, with offset double cutaways and Strat-like contours, but the horns were more pointed. The neck had the new hooked headstock and the rectangular edge inlays. A large multi-laminated pickguard stretched from the upper horn down to the lower bout control extension. Three large rectangular single-coil pickups, with chrome sides and black center insert (exposed poles) sat in front of a roller bridge and the clever platform vibrato design. Three on/off rocker switches sat above the strings, plus a small sliding switch, presumably a mute. It had one volume and one tone control, and is an exceptionally handsome guitar.
Gibson Brands, Inc. is considered as an American producer of guitars and other instruments, which is located in Nashville, Tennessee. The brand was earlier known as Gibson Guitar Corp. The company was founded by Orville Gibson in 1902. They are famous for its innovative and superior quality guitars. They sell their guitars under different brand names. These guitars are available at little higher rates. The price range starts from Rs. 49,500/- onwards (approx). For more details, visit Gibson.com.
I've met and talked to Andrew as his shop is 20 minutes from me. When you talk guitars to Andrew, you will get the feeling that this man knows his guitar building. He strives for perfection in his small WV workshop. There is plenty of evidence seeing some of his production models hanging on display. His quiet voice belies his guitar building abilities. As a luthier, his personal hand made guitars command a big price tag. But when you understand how he builds them, you'll understand why. One day, I'll own one his creations from his workshop. But until then, I'll just drool over the pictures. Not sure why his production models are rated at 42 though.

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For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best selling electric guitars. And the new Les Paul Special VE—inspired by the Les Paul, the greatest electric guitar in rock—continues the tradition of giving new both players and pros a real Les Paul at a price anyone can afford.

Case sold separately.

Classic Les Paul profile
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 

Epiphone Open Coil Humbuckers
The Les Paul Special VE features Epiphone’s world famous open-coil humbuckers with a warm 650R in the neck position and a slightly hotter 700T in the bridge or lead position.Controls include a 3-way pickup selector switch, a Master Volume, and a Master Tone control, each with traditional “Black Speed Knobs” pots with long lasting
500K Ω potentiometers.

All-Metal Hardware
Epiphone features all-metal rock solid hardware on all of its instruments. The Les Paul Special VE comes standard with the legendary Locktone Tune-o-matic bridge and Stopbar tailpiece for easy set up. Tuning is fast and reliable with Epiphone Premium Covered tuners with a 14:1 ratio.The higher the ratio, the more accurate your tuning. The tuners are mounted on an Epiphone Clipped Ear headstock with Les Paul Model in gold and the Epiphone log in silver. In addition, a "2016" Edition logo is on the back of the headstock. 

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The first trick is the most obvious one: to double a crunch or heavily distorted guitar with a clean one. By sub-mixing a clean sound, you will be able to retain some precision, which is no minor detail considering that distortion has the annoying tendency of blurring sound. For this trick to be as transparent as possible, the crunch and clean performances must be as similar as can be. That being said, if you have a hard time getting that perfection, you can always "cheat": be it by editing the clean sound to make it match the original performance or simply doing some reamping with the first take, as discussed previously. In both cases the trick ought to work wonders because the clean take is only meant to be "felt" but not distinctively heard by the listener.
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Semi-hollow, slim, and designed with a comfortable ‘C’ shape exterior, the D’Angelico EX-DC Standard is a high-price electric guitar with professional grade features. Creating a more natural tone that delivers an organic quality to its sound, the Standard guitar uses Kent Armstrong Vintage humbuckers for a focused sound free of excess reverberation. The Super-Rotomatic tuners maintain their tuning accuracy for a longer time, due in part to the turning radius within the design. Strings remain at a comfortable tension due to the unique Stairstep tailpiece, creating both a strong resonant sound and assured sturdiness. A semi-hollow body designed with maple on the top and back, other features include a 3-way toggle that provides two modes of volume as well as two separate tones. Meant for use throughout various genres of music, the EX-DC Standard is an electric guitar to please the masses.
The Streamliner concept is simple: to create more affordable Gretsch guitars without losing their specific DNA. Two new Broad'Tron humbuckers are controlled in classic Gretsch style by a three-way toggle selector switch on the bass side shoulder, a master volume on the treble side horn, and then a trio of controls by the treble-side f-hole for individual-pickup volume and master tone. The G2622's construction gives a different response and resonance to other new releases from Gretsch and, with these pickups, moves further from the Gretsch sound. And while its construction gives it a more solid, or at least ES-335, character, it's a little more airy and less punchy with a softer, squashier tonality. The beefier pickups certainly don't nail a classic Gretsch tonality - although if that's what you want, the full-size pickups are easy to replace - but they do broaden the sonic potential, especially for more gained styles, while staying close to the classic iconography. If you want a great-value semi-hollow, this is among the best electric guitars for under $500.
Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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