What is it about the Japanese and the Ventures? I mean, I cut my teeth with the Ventures. They were the perfect band to learn guitar from. The Ventures took songs with often complex harmonic structures—like the wonderful Johnny Smith classic—and stripped them down to their basic melodies, gave them a simple rock groove, and played them clean. I had the sheet music to Smith’s song, but there was no way in you know where I was gong to play off that. But follow along with the Ventures’ single? You bet!
One of modern metal's key figures, Dimebag Darrell founded Pantera with his brother, drummer Vinnie Paul Abbott – forging a style that combined brutally precise, punk-honed grooves with splatter-paint melodic runs. After he was tragically shot by a deranged fan during a show with his band Damageplan in 2004 – on the anniversary of John Lennon's death, freakishly enough – the tributes rolled in from fans, peers and forerunners. "One of the greatest musicians to grace our world," Black Sabbath's Geezer Butler said simply. "Rest in peace."
Have you ever tried PRS acoustics before? They come with their SE line, and are fantastic quality guitars for the price. And their American acoustics are built by a small team of acoustic professionals. They only do "private stock" American acoustics now, but they used to have it as a regular lineup with about the same price tag as their custom 24. I've only ever heard them in video, but they sound amazing, and I've only ever heard good things about them. I would argue that PRS should have made that top 10 acoustic list at least over Fender or Epiphone.
However, Class D amplifiers (also called "switching amplifiers" or confusingly, "digital amplifiers") are more efficient than conventional Class-AB amplifiers, and so are lighter in weight and smaller. The Acoustic Image Focus head, for example, produces 800 watts of power and weighs 2.2 kilograms (about 4 pounds). Class-D amplifiers use MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) rather than 'ordinary' (bipolar) transistors, and generate a pulse-width modulated signal that is filtered before it reaches the speaker.[15] In the 2010s, the availability of Class D amplifiers has enabled amp manufacturers to produce very lightweight and small, yet very powerful amp heads and small, lightweight combo amps.
Tokai was founded in 1947 and is based in Hamamatsu, Japan. Tokai began production of acoustic guitars in 1965 and by 1968 was producing electric guitars for the American market. Tokai still exists as guitar manufacturer. Tokai made guitars for Fernandes, Mosrite and Fender Japan. Tokai badged guitars included the house brand Tokai as well as Cat's Eyes, Conrad, Drifter, Hondo, Love Rock, Mosrite, Sigma and Silver Star. Possible badges include Artist Ltd., Gaban, Gallan, Gession and Robin. It's suggested that Tokai made Hummingbird acoustics as well, but if these were related to those made by Humming Bird I haven't quite sorted out yet.
I'm not sure if the same applies to LPs, but on my BC Rich Mockingbird (which has the same tone/volume setup) if one volume knob is all the way off it'll only mute the guitar in the center position. Say the bridge volume is at 10 and the neck is at 0, I'll still get sound if the bridge pickup is selected but I won't get sound if both or just the neck are selected.

Guitar amplifier design uses a different approach than sound reinforcement system power amplifiers and home "hi-fi" stereo systems. Audio amplifiers generally are intended to accurately reproduce the source signal without adding unwanted tonal coloration (i.e., they have a flat frequency response) or unwanted distortion. In contrast, most guitar amplifiers provide tonal coloration and overdrive or distortion of various types. A common tonal coloration sought by guitarists is rolling off some of the high frequencies.
This is because you won’t have to go through all the hassle of doing research on pickups, then finding a way to mount them without damaging your guitar. While magnetic pickups are surely quite easy to install, contact pickups or blended systems with microphones and preamps might require removing the top, drilling, using all sorts of screws and plates, etc.
The best way to use this type of book is to just take 15 minutes a day to work through a page or two at a time. You don’t have to find something that requires a lot of study or dedication on your part at this point. Your first priority should be finding a book that gets you thinking about theory as well as helping you develop coordination in both your fretting and strumming hand.

Synonymous in the electric guitar industry, the Gibson brand continues to produce some of the best electric guitars on the market, including the Les Paul Studio. Designed with a classic look that maintains the appearance of a vintage quality, this electric guitar comes with a neck that is slimmer than most traditional models, allowing for ease and smooth transitions when switching between notes. The guitar utilizes an upgraded version of humbucker PAF to cancel out any outside interference that detracts from the quality of the sound, while maple and mahogany wood are combined to deliver both definition and sustainability. Other features include traditional tuners that can be manually altered, a Graph Tech Nut for precise spacing between strings, and a neck heel with the class Les Paul design. Well reviewed and great for the price, the Les Paul Studio is one of the best electric guitars available if your cash flow allows.
Some acoustic guitars, regardless of the body style, feature a cutaway in the upper bout to allow players to more easily reach the higher frets on the guitar neck. Phil Keaggy, a prolific and highly celebrated American guitarist, usually uses an acoustic guitar with a cutaway. If you plan to play leads on your acoustic, or are used to playing an electric guitar, you may prefer a guitar body with a cutaway.


Get used to people staring when you bust out this guitar. Its thinner mahogany body with satin finish delivers killer sounds while also being ridiculously pleasing to the eye. When it comes to tonal diversity, this guitar hits it out of the park. With Super Rock II pickups, you’ll be able to shred crunchy riffs while also being able to switch the pickup to single-coil mode to get those beautiful, clear, resonant tones. To spare you some technical mumbo jumbo, Schecters have hardware that promises to keep your guitar in tune longer, which is always a plus! Grab a Schecter Stealth for just under $500. 

The Effect:To this day, there are 3 main delay pedal types coexist, Tape is usually the most expensive and sough-after (especially Vintage releases) type as they provide very natural sound reproduction. Analog were modernized in the 70’s and they worked on electronics, with a minor drawback according to some as they store up to 3 seconds of Delay time. Digital pedals is the type met with most frequency on today’s market, offering longer-than-usual Delay times and pristine sound reproduction, these are usually your best pick. A lot of players know that they want a delay effect but have no idea from where to start, if you are one of them, try the Boss DD-7 Digital Delay Pedal The most basic and often met controls on Delay pedals are Time, Level and Feedback, you’ll sometimes find them labeled differently but with the same function and purpose.
Basic Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet All about how to play guitar chords and guitar chord charts. Once you finished the free online guitar lessons you know all there is to know about guitar. Music guitar tabs archive with over guitar chords for guitar, keyboard, banjo and viola, tabs for guitar, bass, drums, guitar note
Don’t worry about getting the strumming patterns down perfect. You will develop your own strumming style in time. Just try to stay in time. If you have to strum open strings in-between chords, while you switch from one to the other, that’s OK, too. In fact, sometimes, it’s even desirable. It’s what we call ‘style’. You’re main objective right now is learning the chord fingerings, and getting your changes smooth.
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Ultimately, if you’re mostly playing rock, heavier blues, or any shred or metal styles, you might prefer jumbo or medium-jumbo frets. However, for country, rockabilly, surf, or old-school ’50s rock and roll, narrow frets could be the way to go. In any case, though, if your frets are in good condition and your guitar is set up right, the size of that wire in and of itself shouldn’t stop you from sounding great on whatever you play.
Hey dan, others: My first guitar was a Palmer, my parents purchased it for me from our small town's jewelry store. That was like 1968. The guitar was an electric with two pick-ups and "wabble-stick" (tremelo). It was a beautiful natural wood tone sunburst. Jewelry stores have not been known to carry the best in guitars; but I had a lot of fun learning to play that thing. I still have it; can't bring myself to part with it, though I now have three acoustics (Yamaha, Alvarez (12 string), and a Fender (DGS21, a Peavey bass and Lyon series Washburn. I'd say, for your money, your better off with a washbun. The neck action on them is very impressive. My Palmer is now in disrepair. I need to resolder the pick-ups. The key-board was quite nice; some bridge problems, however, a bit of a rattle. Maybe the nut needs to be reset. I don't know where to find them now, but I understand that they're still out there somewhere.
Richie Sambora: features an alder body, a 22-fret neck with maple fingerboard, mother of pearl “star” fingerboard inlays, Floyd Rose “Original” locking tremolo, 25dB active mid-boost circuit with active/passive switch, two Fender Texas Special single-coil pickups (neck/middle) and a DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker in the bridge position. Updated in 1999 with American Vintage hardware, dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless pickups and a 12dB active mid-boost preamp with “no-load” tone circuit and bypass switch. Also available as a “standard” version with a poplar body, rosewood fingerboard with 21 medium-jumbo frets, DiMarzio PAF Pro humbucker with two standard alnico single-coils and a Floyd Rose II locking tremolo. Discontinued in 2002.
Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.
Delay/echo: Delay/echo units produce an echo effect by adding a duplicate instrument-to-amplifier electrical signal to the original signal at a slight time-delay. The effect can either be a single echo called a "slap" or "slapback," or multiple echos. A well-known use of delay is the lead guitar in the U2 song "Where the Streets Have No Name", and also the opening riff of "Welcome To The Jungle" by Guns N'Roses.[86]
Alas, the DT-250 was more of a punctuation point than a sign of the times. Or maybe it was a sign of the times. The Phil Collen model (minus his name after ’85) and the flametop DT-350 made it through 1987, but this DT-250 lasted only from ’84 to ’85. Unfortunately for this heavy metal monster, pointy guitars were already on the way out when it appeared, about to be eclipsed by the Superstrat craze that would dominate the rest of the ’80s. While these redboards do not really qualify for rarebird status, they’re not all that common. Over the course of their production, only 1,432 were built for worldwide distribution.
A final tip: not a lot of people know this, but Antares Auto-Tune works rather well with electric guitar. Of course Auto-Tune is monophonic, so it will dutifully ignore chords and double notes, but it will come into play when it detects a single note. You might reasonably ask whether a guitar tuner might not be a wise investment, but the reason I suggest Auto-Tune is not to compensate for a badly tuned guitar, but rather to pull imprecisely bent guitar stings into pitch.
Lastly, if you fancy yourself the next Slash, Jimmy Page, or Pete Townshend… you’ll want to pick up a Les Paul style guitar. It’ll get you that classic rock sound that you’re looking for. Les Pauls are equipped with “humbuckers” which produce a fat, meaty sound that’s rounder and less sharp than the single-coil pickups of a strat. The signal is also stronger so you’ll get more sustain.
A scaled down Grand Symphony travel size guitar. It features sapele laminate back and sides with an option of a solid mahogany or Sitka spruce top. It has been acclaimed for having a full size guitar sound despite being a compact size. Although it doesn’t come with an onboard Expression System, an optional ES-Go Pickup can be easily installed for amplification.
Rackmounted effects are typically built in a thin metal chassis with metal "ears" designed to be screwed into a 19-inch rack that is standard to the telecommunication, computing and music technology industries. Rackmounted effects may be one, two or three rack spaces high. When purchased from the store, rack-mounted equipment is not equipped with the rugged chassis features used on stompboxes and amps that are designed to be transported as standalone units, such as corner protectors. Rackmounted units are typically mounted in a rack, which is housed in a road case, a tough plastic case with removable front and rear covers that can be latched on during transportation to protect the knobs and switches and then removed during performances. A rackmount unit may contain electronic circuitry identical to a stompbox's, although its circuits are typically more complex. Unlike stompboxes, rackmounts usually have several different types of effects.[13]
While it might look identical to the RevStar RS420, Yamaha Revstar RS320 is very different. The shape is the same, along with the most of the hardware. However, the tone is a whole different story. While RS420 comes with vintage humbuckers, the RS320 packs a set of extremely hot pups which are more modern. I personally liked this configuration more than the vintage one, simply because it offers extended versatility.

We are very proud to present to you a pleasant surprise I must say from way back when folks this is prime Time beginning of that Golden Era of some of the GREATEST QUALITY Acoustic guitar that FENDER ever had the smarts to Import… that’s right these are Japanese crafted beauty’s . Built back in the day when Japan had the economy riding high while US guitar builders were getting bought out by business folks not guitar builders and US economy was in the tanker just a little brief history reminder… Fender & Gibson were under the gun to cut costs and re-structure if they wanted to stay alive and that they did…. CBS , Norlin…. And others cut back on the high quality woods they once enjoyed and relied upon the reputation the US had for making great guitars basically reputation from the late 50’s – early 60’s To about 68-69 or so…. Then quality went down no doubt…. Right then it was prime time for Japan Luthiers to strike and they did…they stepped up the quality from the funny toy grade guitars we saw here in the states back when I was a kid you could get a decent cute player electric guitar at the Pawn shop in about 1965 for about $69.00 in fact my dad bought my 1st electric guitar there for $69.00 … I loved it—it was a “ KENT” and it sounded very good threw my Silvertone amp….. ..Kent is a offspring of Greco which is a factory behind making many brands buildby Fujigen Gekki…. Ok what this Fender beauty traces back to the great FujiGen Gakki in 1974 according to its serial number… making this beautifully preserved SOLID TOP Vintage Japanese guitars 40 years old a true vintage guitar in its own right. It was during the time when this guitar was built that the Japanese Luthiers set out to make some of the most righteous guitars period… fit – finish - workmanship & materials used are the good stuff folks….. This full size Dreadnought Acoustic guitar is a replica of the Martin designed D-28 known to be one of the finest most prolific designs the US Martin & co ever produced. This Fender F310 is of a High Quality example, The top is Solid Spruce straight grained with some nice figure and wow it has 40 years of patina to its color and finish and overall vintage appeal is Very strong… I was drawn to this example it sounds deep and rich and complex with an excellent volume And its highs ring threw when cording and finger picking , This guitars Back & sides are true to the masterful D-28 desigh …. High quality ROSEWOOD just beautifully grained see the pics for more detail Its absolutely beautiful back – sides are all east Indian Rosewood the fingerboard may be Brazilian Rosewood by its looksa very high grade non theless, the bridge appears to be Ebony wood….. the Bridge is nice and flat to its top which is also nice and straight, action is very good medium low and adjustable. The top has a couple of minor doinks see the pics not bad at all and certainly nothing remotely enough to detour from its vintage Gorgeous looks , no cracks anywhere found , bindings are very food, overall this guitar is an EXTREMLY CLEAN example aside from the afore mentioned . This guitar is in top Vintage used condition and is easily a 9//10 Fit and finish I suggest this was built but a high level Journeyman and can compete or compare with A nice vintage Yairi or Morris or Gibson or Martin for that matter…. .

As you know, like most guitars sporting more than a single pickup, your Strat lets you select any pickup by itself or choose certain dual-pickup combinations. The standard way to connect multiple pickups is to wire them in parallel. This generates the classic tone our ears know from countless records, when a guitarist uses the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups in tandem (positions 2 and 4 on a normal 5-way Strat switch).
The Les Paul Special VE has a Poplar body with a sleek look thanks to the Vintage Worn finish and no binding on the neck or body. The Les Paul VE is cut to the same classic profile of all Les Pauls and has a comfortable and fast Mahogany bolt-on neck with a 1960's SlimTaper D profile. The Rosewood fingerboard has traditional Pearloid "Dot" inlays, a 24.75” scale, a 14” radius, 22 medium jumbo frets, and a standard 1-11/16” nut. Just below the headstock is the famed “bell” shaped truss rod cover found on every Les Paul since the early '50s with “Vintage Edition” in white. 
The Vox T-60/AC-100 bass amplifier uses two 15-inch cabinets and thirty-to-forty watts of solid-state power using "germanium transistors".[5] The Sunn Model T was used by The Moody Blues, Kiss, Queen, The Who's John Entwistle and Rush's Geddy Lee.[5] The Sunn used a 150-watt amp with "four 12AX7WA tubes, followed by two 12AX7A tubes, and powered by four 6L6GC tubes".[6]
In the 2000s, new developments in bass amplifier technology include the use of lightweight neodymium magnets in some higher-priced cabinets and the use of lightweight, powerful Class D amplifiers in some combo amps and amp heads; both of these innovations have made transporting amps and cabinets easier. As well, some 2010s-era bass amps and heads have digital effects units and modelling amplifier features which enable the recreation or simulation of the sound of numerous well-known bass amps, including vintage tube amplifiers by famous brands (e.g., Ampeg SVT-Pro amp heads) and a range of speaker cabinets (e.g., 8x10" cabs). Digital amp and cabinet modelling also makes transporting bass amps and cabinets to gigs and recording sessions easier, because a bassist can emulate the sound of many different brands of very large, heavy vintage gear without having to bring the actual amps and cabs. Another trend for higher-priced and higher-wattage amps and cabinets aimed at professionals is providing Speakon speaker jacks in addition to, or in place of traditional 1/4" speaker jacks. Speakon jacks are considered safer for high wattage amps, since the bassist cannot accidentally touch the "live" parts of the cable end and they lock in, so there is less risk of accidental disconnection. As of 2017, a few digital amp and cabinet modelling amplifiers have a USB input or other computer input, to enable users to download new sounds and presets.
Once you are satisfied that the curve of the neck is in the acceptable range, check the string height at nut. Depress each string at the third fret and look back towards the nut to see how the string sits over the first fret. The string should neither be sitting on the first fret nor far enough above that you can see a gap thicker than a sheet of paper. This is a very subtle point to reach and you need proper nut files to set it. This setting is crucial both for achieving proper playing height up the neck, and for achieving proper intonation. If it is too high here, you are going to end up setting the action lower at the saddle than it really ought to be, resulting in buzzing ( the string will measure out "correct" at the 12th fret yet actually be inclining down as it progresses towards the bridge saddles). Additionally, a string set too high at the nut will likely play noticeably sharp at the first and other lower fret positions.
Digital reverbs, like their sibling delays, offer more power and a greater variety of settings. And in addition to doing some approximations of spring reverb sounds, digital units usually offer more “lifelike” reverberation as heard in anything from an empty room to a large concert hall, if you want to add a synthesized “natural” room sound to your signal rather than merely replicate the classic sproing of springs. A few pedals do this very well, but most such devices are rack units that are best used in an amp’s FX loop, and are beyond the scope of this article. For all the power of digital reverbs, however, there are plenty of guitarists who just don’t warm to them, and the tube-driven, analog, spring reverb effect remains hands-down the favorite for guitar.

From a perfectionist/engineering standpoint, there is a lot wrong with this circuit. The controls are complexly interactive. There is no really flat setting, as there is a residual midrange scoop unless the Treble and Bass controls are fully down. The action of the Bass control is very uneven for normal taper controls. While the Mid control appears to affect only the mids, it is actually a form of volume control that affects all frequencies, but is the only control that also affects mids. Although it has several imperfections, this tone stack actually helps some of the quirks of guitar, so it works well. 

The Yamaha APXT2 is a 3/4 size version of the world's best-selling acoustic-electric guitar, the APX500III. This well-constructed, compact guitar makes a great companion when you're on the road. The APXT2 features an ART-based pickup system and Yamaha's proprietary tuner, offering great sensitivity and accuracy for quick tuning. The APX T2 also includes a gig bag.

In the late 70’s digital technology boomed and made its way into the guitar community. It first entered in the form as rack units which were expensive and relatively large. As costs came down and the technology shrank, digital delay pedals were introduced into the market by Boss in 1984 with the Boss DD-2. Since then as technology advanced, delay pedals now offer many features in a very small box such as tape echo, analog, reverse delay, modulated delay, and loopers.
However, in the October, 2018 issue of Premier Guitar (at least the online edition) Frank Meyers, who runs the website Drowning in Guitars, says the Kent 700s were made by a small factory called Hayashi Mokko. Frank is a true expert in vintage Japanese Guitars, so I am inclined to believe him. This is another important piece of the Kent Guitars story.
For any venue, it's important to bring along the right amp. A huge amp in a tiny club is not only overkill; it's also extra setup work that you can avoid altogether with a smaller combo amp. On the flipside, a little amp in a big theatre could mean that some of the audience won't even hear you. Take your time deciding what the best option is for you.
Pedals of this template offer a sound that’s considered “natural,” “warm” and “tubey” partly by achieving smooth, symmetrical clipping, and partly by reining in harsher high harmonics that can result in sounds that are heard as jagged and spikey in other pedals. The truth is, opamps really don’t clip in the same way that tubes do, but they are manipulated in these designs to simulate a generally “tube-like” sound. Other early overdrive pedals were designed around discrete transistorized clipping and boosting circuits, though many leaned toward distortion units as properly defined, and added more artificiality to the sound—hence the Tube Screamers’ near-instant popularity when it was introduced.

The Triple Crown TC-50 is a three-channel amp, with independent preamps covering clean, low-gain and high-gain ranges. The front panel packs three identical sets of controls including gain, master volume, bass, mid, treble and presence, together with a two-way toggle switch that changes the channel gain and voice. There’s a small toggle switch for manual channel changing, and a pair of master output level controls, one of which is footswitchable. The feature-rich rear panel includes Mesa’s exceptional CabClone speaker-emulated output, with a balanced XLR, headphones socket and line out. The TC-50 also benefits from a footswitchable effects loop, separate reverb level controls for each channel, and MIDI switching for all the major functions. The Triple Crown’s clean channel is highly versatile, going from butter-sweet clarity through to edgy blues soloing, with a lot of control over that ‘just on the edge’ sweet spot. The Lo Gain channel is where the TC-50’s crunch and classic rock tones live, with a multi-layered overdrive and harmonic overtones that shift with varying degrees of pick attack. Flipping the toggle switch into Drive mode adds a subtle midrange bump, invoking JCM800-approved snarl and a dose of extra gain. The Hi Gain channel adds more of the same - lots more, so much so that in the upper reaches we think this is probably the most gain ever from a Mesa amp. No doubt about it, the Triple Crown has three channels packed full of world-class tone that only a handful of amps can compete with.


You don’t have to be a pro player to strut your stuff on an acoustic electric git. Beginners will enjoy the medium-low action the hybrid offers, the on-board tuner (on some guitars), and the convenience of not having to remain static on stage due to the limitations of a mic. With all that said, it’s time for you to narrow down your options with the customized lists you’ll find below!
While National blithely ignored Beauchamp’s electric experiments, their competition – Dobro – was next to enter the electric arena as early as 1933, with the introduction of the Dobro All-Electric. Basically, the All-Electric was a mahogany-bodied Model 37, most usually outfitted with a 12-fret square neck. It had a large lightning-bolt-engraved coverplate, two screen holes, three little holes under the fingerboard, a slothead, and rosewood ‘board with dot inlays. Instead of the usual resonator, this had a large metal plate where the cone assembly would normally be and a Stimson pickup mounted just in front of the bridge, curiously enough with the poles slanted from the bass side near the bridge toward the middle on the treble side.

The Gallien-Krueger 800RB was a solid state bass amplifier head introduced in 1983 that was liked by bassists for its loud, clean sound and durable construction. It introduced the concept of bi-amplification, as it sent 300 watts of low register sound to the bass speakers and 100 watts to the tweeter.[6] The GK used a tube preamp simulator circuit called "boost". GK 800RB users include Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea and Guns and Roses' Duff McKagan.[6]

While continuing to keep the E string depressed at the first fret, move up the neck from the 12th fret to the end of the fretboard, continuing to depress the string at each of the successive frets. As you move up the fretboard, watch if and how much the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the frets in the 6-7th fret range changes, if at all. The less the gap rises, the flatter, overall, the neck is. Using this method you may discern that there is more curve in one area than another, and not necessarily centering on the 6-7th fret area. In some cases this curve will be resolved by changing the tension on the truss rod. In other cases, adjusting the truss rod tension will not resolve them, and fret leveling, refretting, or heat bending the neck(rarely) may be necessary.
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Located in Reno, Nevada, our shop, The Strings of Reno provides services to both local musicians as well as those located throughout the United States and even abroad. If you are nearby, and would like a one on one appointment please give us a call. If you are not within driving distance of Reno, NV, please call or email us with the nature of the work you need taken care of. We are not just about guitars, if it has strings, we can fix it!
Guitar wiring refers to the electrical components, and interconnections thereof, inside an electric guitar (and, by extension, other electric instruments like the bass guitar or mandolin). It most commonly consists of pickups, potentiometers to adjust volume and tone, a switch to select between different pickups (if the instrument has more than one), and the output socket. There may be additional controls for specific functions; the most common of these are described below.
In 2003, The Blues, a PBS-TV series produced by famed director Martin Scorsese, traced the roots of the blues from Africa to modern day society, showing how it inspired other generations of musicians. While in production, Marshall Chess got an e-mail from Chuck D saying that he heard he was doing a film that connected the blues to hip hop and that he wanted to be part of it. Chess was happy to hear Chuck D say "Electric Mud was one of his favorite, most influential albums and that all the early hip hop guys were inspired by it," affirming a connection he thought had happened. In the episode titled Godfathers and Sons, the focus is on the Chicago blues, Chess records and the effect of Electric Mud on Public Enemy, with Chuck D coming to Chicago, led on a historic blues tour by Chess. There, Chuck D's feverant appreciation of EM got him to reassemble the musicians from the sessions to perform material from it for the upcoming 20th Anniversary Chicago Blues Festival. In keeping with the experimental vein of the record, Chuck D added a turntablist (Juice) and a rapper (Kyle Jason) to the band, re-naming the group the Electric Mudcats. Having the material played at a blues festival showed how the album had finally come full circle, from being hated to being respected and enjoyed.
Squier Affinity Telecaster: The Tele features the same tonewoods as the Strat, with a slightly different single-cutaway body style. It also has two pickups instead of three, and a fixed bridge. Single-coil pickups have a thinner sound compared to humbuckers, and it case of the Telcaster they create the signature twang that put the guitar on the map.

Many great players (including Hendrix) placed the wah before distortion... though many of the modern rock guys place it after distortion to make the frequency sweep cleaner. Personally, I prefer the Wah before distortion, but it's personal taste really. Depends a bit on the pedal too - how wide the frequency notch is and what frequency range it covers. I have my Wah on a G-Lab True Bypass Wah Pad, which I think is a great product... I have a few Wahs that I like, the Keeley Mod Vox Wah and the RMC3 are probably my first choices to try out.


First the lower line models were built for steel strings first. Like the style 17 in 1922, and the style 18 in 1924. Pretty much all models were built for steel by 1927-1929. But unfortunately there was no definative serial number or time line for any 1920s Martin style. This makes it difficult to determine if any particular 1920s Martin guitar is really built for steel strings. Martin didn't just implement steel string design at any one definative point. It was a transition, and apparently a very slow transition. And special orders for gut or steel complicated things.
What we consider as standard size today were not so standard back in the '30s. Back then the "parlor guitar" or "blues box" was commonly used, with its compact body and mid-emphasized tone. Many artists used this instrument to shape many of the musical styles that we have today. The L-00 Standard from Gibson captures the iconic "blues box" faithfully for today's players, adding in their premium touch and modern tech that results in a true timeless museum quality instrument.
A diagram showing a wiring modification for a Les Paul or a similar electric guitar with two humbuckers. Wiring schemes using four push-pull pots for additional pickup combinations were made popular by Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and later produced as a signature model by Gibson. The modification shown in this diagram is an evolution of the original concept combining coil splitting, phase cancellation and parallel/series switching for a total of 22 different pickup combinations.
The structure of the lessons are good, it varies between guitar technical stuff and theory as you progress, meaning that you won't get bored of any single topic, and you'll have a chance to try out the theoretical bits one step at a time. It's a shame they never made newer editions of this book with more graphics and supplemental audio-video tools.
"The Choice of Professional and Student Musicians Everywhere" This eight page catalogue was included as an insert in the 1963 annual "school music" issue of Downbeat magazine (September 1963). As well as keyboards and pedal steels, this catalog contains seven guitars, three basses and ten amplifiers - from student guitars such as the Musicmaster and Duotone to professional models like the new Jaguar.

Ibanez LGB30 George Benson Electric Guitar   New from$1,099.99Only 2 Left!or 12 payments of $91.67 Free Ground Shipping Gibson 2017 Les Paul Studio Worn T Electric Guitar (with Gig Bag)   New from$799.00In Stockor 12 payments of $66.59 Free Ground Shipping Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO Electric Guitar   New from$599.00In Stockor 12 payments of $49.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Gibson 2018 Les Paul Tribute Electric Guitar (with Gig Bag)   New from$1,149.00In Stockor 12 payments of $95.75 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 6-String
When using multiple microphones, always remember to check for phase cancellation, and keep in mind that a 2-8kHz boost is probably all that's necessary at mixdown for enhanced electric guitar presence within a track. A small amount of delay (1ms = 12") on an ambient mic track will increase the perceived ambient distance of the microphone without actually moving the mic. This trick works well when blending close and ambient microphone tracks during recording or mixing.
Comes with hard case.This is the iconic Yamaha apx-6a. Made in the 1990s it has the iconic Yamaha AMF preamp/Eq system. This specimen is in overall faircondition for a guitar that is over 20 years old. It has normal scratches and other sings of wear. Shipping is free. Estimated arrival is 4-8 business days. A signature is usually required at the time of delivery.
Dyna Gakki began production in 1972 in the city of Nagano, Japan. They manufactured guitars for Fender Japan and Greco, so they couldn't have been a terrible manufacturer as Fender is very choosy about outsourcing their product. Dyna may have been a source for Japanese manufacturer Yamaki. Dyna also produced the infamous Ibanez badges for a short period of time.

Chorus and flanging are created in fairly similar ways, the main difference being that chorus doesn't use feedback from the input to the output and generally employs slightly longer delay times. Phasing is similar to both chorus and flanging, but uses much shorter delay times. Feedback may be added to strengthen the swept filter effect it creates. Phasing is far more subtle than flanging and is often used on guitar parts. With chorus, phasing and flanging, the delay time, modulation speed and modulation depth affect the character of the effect very significantly. A generic modulated delay plug-in allows you to create all these effects by simply altering the delay time, feedback, modulation rate and modulation depth parameters. Most of the time, low modulation depths tend to work well for faster LFO speeds (often also referred to as the rate), while deeper modulation works better at slower modulation rates.
Bell's journey to become a guitar master began with a car running over him as a child. He was an aspiring baseball player just shy of his 13 birthday and left with a fractured skull that ended his future career. So he picked up the guitar and fell in love. He's been building and repairing guitars since 1975. Today, he's running Bell's Custom Guitars on the side and repairing guitars at Murphy's Music in Irving.

The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).
Simulators: Simulators enable electric guitars to mimic the sound of other instruments such as acoustic guitar, electric bass and sitar. Pick up simulators used on guitars with single-coil pick ups replicate the sound of guitars with humbucker pick ups, or vice versa. A de-fretter is a bass guitar effect that simulates the sound of a fretless bass. The effect uses an envelope-controlled filter and voltage-controlled amplifier to "soften" a note's attack both in volume and timbre.[97]
Choosing an electric guitar that addresses these preferences helps guarantee that new players will stay motivated as they learn to play. Musician’s Friend offers a wide selection of ¾-scale, mini, and travel guitars that are ideal for smaller, younger players. Full-sized electric guitar bodies vary considerably in size and weight, and those factors should be considered.

I've met and talked to Andrew as his shop is 20 minutes from me. When you talk guitars to Andrew, you will get the feeling that this man knows his guitar building. He strives for perfection in his small WV workshop. There is plenty of evidence seeing some of his production models hanging on display. His quiet voice belies his guitar building abilities. As a luthier, his personal hand made guitars command a big price tag. But when you understand how he builds them, you'll understand why. One day, I'll own one his creations from his workshop. But until then, I'll just drool over the pictures. Not sure why his production models are rated at 42 though.
Along with these effects are 10 guitars: Strat Marshall, Valve ODX, Garcia Guitar, Bleeding Guitar, Blues Guitar, Power Guitar, Mondo Guitar, Synth Guitar, Clean Guitar, and Electric Sitar. The sound of each somewhat matches the guitar it’s supposed to be, but more importantly, there is a notable change in tone with each and since it’s free, I was happy just to have that.
There are a couple different versions of the Woody acoustic pickup, both of which are highly affordable. This version, coming in at $60, is a passive and noiseless magnet that delivers a balanced tone and can be easily removed or installed at a moments notice. To do so, simply snap the pickup into the soundhole or snap it out as needed. This functionality is a big part of what makes the Woody design one of the most popular and widely used in the world of acoustic pickups.
Just SOLD OUT sorry.... Another FRESH Release from the JVG Vintage Vault: Hey Mandolin lovers here we are proud to present a wonderful vintage 40 year old beautiful sounding and is absolutely gorgeous !!! She has chop too well preserved and well taken care of this is the more rare of the Japanese mando's you do see a lot more Aria's & Alvarez but less Ibanez lawsuit version of the famously popular Gibson F5 mando. Excellent workmanship and it's the solid spruce carved example she's in very good - excellent vintage condition with just a few blemishes and yet nothing to detract from its undeniable beauty. This beauty comes with its original hard shell case it's rectangular black tolex with brilliant plugs marigold lining, open its cas and wow she's really striking .... This Iis a rare one folks a must for the ibanez mando fan... Contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com.
Let's now look at two real-life examples of what this would look like with a realistic setup. Our first example will be a linear sequence without an effects loop, while the second will use an amplifier effects loop. It should be noted that many pedals themselves can host their own effects loop, so how you set it up is up to you. It functions the same either way.
Ovation Instruments is a Division of Kaman Corporation, a major supplier to the United States government of military helicopters, rescue equipment, electronic components and other aerospace products. There are eight divisions of Kaman, participating in such diverse industries as commercial transportation, nuclear sciences, space medicine, education and social sciences, oceanography and, most recently, recreation.
Amazing guitars, specially the Custom Series full solids. You can choose from variety of tonewoods and soundboard combination and 4 different shapes. Offering almost every player's preference. You can also choose options such as soundport off-the-rack. Great craftsmanship, amazing tone, and superb playabality at an amazing price. Great guitar, and definitely not an OEM brand. They only make their own guitars.
Let's begin by getting clear on what we mean by 'effect': an effect is a device that treats the audio in some way, then adds it back to a dry or untreated version of the sound. Echo and reverb are obvious cases, and you can use pitch-shift and pitch modulation in a similar way. 'Processors', by contrast, generally are those devices that change the entire signal and don't add in any of the dry signal. Things like compressors and equalisers fall into this category: as you'll see from the tips and tricks, processors can often be used as effects in their own right, or as part of an effect chain, but until you know exactly what you're doing and what the consequences are likely to be, it is a good idea to stick to these guideline definitions, as they dictate how you can connect the effects into your system.
I agree with Squank, and I appreciate the compliment! We live in a golden age of guitar gear and I’m in the lucky position of getting to play through quite a bit of it. It’s rare that I come across an amp, pedal, or other piece of guitar hardware I truly dislike, and I can usually get a decent, useable tone out of most modern equipment. This month, I’ll share some of my thoughts on dialing in great tone on amps, pedals, and guitars.

The Axe-Fx II is also the world’s most powerful hardware multi-effects. To use it with an amp, just create presets with no AMP or CAB blocks. Some people run separate chains of effects —some before the amp and others in its loop. This is called the “four cable method.” Or better still: match the sound of your amp and send THAT to front of house while you use your amp on stage in all its glory.

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So frustrating!!!! That guy Dino!!!! Guitar exists in other type of music beside rock you meatheads!! Turn off Vh1′ top 100 countdown and try exploring some other types of music. If you play guitar and you think rock is the only style to be played…then I’m very sorry but you probably are absolutely terrible at the guitar. Hate to break it to you but compared to people like Django Rheinhardt and Chet Atkins….Eddie Van Halen and Steve Vai bloooooowwwwwww!!!!!!
This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  1 Meg Ohm, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
Another way of creating a huge sound is to split the signal from the guitar – most easily achieved via a stompbox with stereo outputs – and send it to two or more amps. All sorts of combinations of sound can be achieved, especially when panning techniques are employed. Of course, each amp can also be multi-mic’d if desired, and some truly three-dimensional results can be obtained. Different effects can be applied to the various amps, while using combinations of clean and dirty amp sounds can be really effective for delivering overdrive with definition, or grit and
To create a thicker rhythm guitar sound, overdub the same part one or more times. Depending on the desired effect, the overdub can be treated as one mono signal and mixed to the same stereo position, or panned left and right for a stereo double-tracked sound. Alternatively, treat the original track with an ADT (Artificial Double Tracking) effect. This can be done with a digital delay set to around 40 milliseconds. Again, the delayed signal can be panned or mixed as one with the original guitar track.

Pitch shifter and harmonizer: A pitch shifter (also called an "octaver" for effects that shift pitch by an octave) raises or lowers (e.g. "transposes") each note a performer plays by a pre-set interval. For example, a pitch shifter set to increase the pitch by a fourth will raise each note four diatonic intervals above the notes actually played. Simple, less expensive pitch shifters raise or lower the pitch by one or two octaves, while more sophisticated and expensive devices offer a range of interval alterations. A pitch shifter can be used by an electric guitarist to play notes that would normally only be available on an electric bass. As well, a bass player with a four string electric bass can use an octave pedal to obtain low notes that would normally only be obtainable with a five-string bass with a low "B" string.

After covering the Top 5 Guitar Plugins You Need To Know and 5 Best Multi Effects for Beginner Guitar Players and 5 Guitar Stomp Box Pedals Every Guitarist Needs let’s face it: probably half of our sound comes from our amplifiers. That makes them kind of important… and with so many little things to consider, from size and reliability to power output and built-in effects, you might appreciate some suggestions. So without further ado, here are my Top 10 recommendations (in no particular order) for beginner Guitar Amps to get you started.


When talking about 1920s Martin guitars, you hear people say this a lot (especially if they are trying to sell you a guitar!) Unfortunately there is no definative way to tell if a 1920s Martin is capable of handling steel strings. The term, "braced for steel strings", though is inaccurate. A better way to put it would be, "built for steel strings". For a 1920s Martin to be built for steel strings there were several small changes - the top, braces and bridge plate are all slightly thicker. Can you see this inside the guitar? For the most part, no, unless you really know what you are looking for (frankly I can't tell). So how do you know if a 1920s Martin is built for steel?

Although Ibanez’s S series is designed to be far more versatile than the RG guitars, its Iron Label collection is built for one, brutal purpose: heavy metal. The SIX6FDFM represents exactly what we consider a ‘value-for-money’ guitar: It sports many premium specs, is skewed towards a single use, and, at a little under $1,000, won’t hemorrhage your bank account.

Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
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Any vibration we can hear as "sound" is composed of some distribution of overtones above the fundamental frequency. Overtones exist in a set fashion based on the physics of vibrating waves and the ratios between them. The only difference in tone between any instrument is caused by a different prominence and distribution of these overtones. When a string is plucked on an electric guitar the vibrations move into the body of the guitar as well. The resonant properties of the wood will cause some of these overtones to be "summed" and exaggerated while others will "cancel" to some degree. The vibrating string will be influenced, however slightly, by the vibration of the guitar, in turn changing the distribution of overtones on the vibrating string - essentially creating a feedback loop.
As for necks, the majority of guitars will have either a maple or mahogany neck, with a rosewood, maple or ebony fretboard. Again, there’s no right or wrong, and a neck wood is never going to sway your decision. But you should choose something that feels smooth and comfortable to play. There are a variety of shapes and profiles, and what you go for will depend on personal preference and playing style. For example, a modern C-shaped neck is always a safe choice as the majority of guitarists will feel comfortable using it, while a thin U-shape is great for faster players (think punk rock and metal).
The 110ce features a dreadnought body with modern cutaway that produces Taylor's signature open midrange and clear treble tone, it works really well with various styles of music. And since it comes with their ES2 under-saddle transducer system, this guitar is ready for the stage or for recording. While it may not be as affordable as we want it to be, the Taylor 110ce more than makes up with its quality and reliability. Mark your entry into the real world with this highly recommended acoustic-electric.

Wow! I don't even know where to begin... I am using this processor with my new Cecilio electric violin. I learned and trained on classical violin, acoustic, reading sheet music, etc, so I'm pretty new at now playing an electric one hooked up to an amplifier, and even newer at using a pedal/processor. Upon first assembly, I found that many of these effects will probably not be used in the music that I play (worship & praise - old school & contemporary), but others will be very useful to bring a new sound to old songs. Also, some of the effects sound very similar to one another. I haven't yet figured out and tried to edit and save any effects to my liking, so I can't really say how well the MG-100 does in that area. But I must say that I am absolutely in love with the drum machine ... full review


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Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
Fast forward a few hundred years to the world of guitar pedals. The first registered portable effect pedal for guitarists built in 1941, called the DeArmond 601 Tremolo Control, was a clumsy toaster oven-shaped unit with a heavy granite-like exterior. The tremolo effect worked by reducing the signal from the guitar several times a second through an electrolytic hydro-fluid located in a glass canister inside the unit. When activated, the main voltage motor rapidly shook the canister, causing the fluid (water, windex, and even mercury) to stir and splash against the pin and the guitar signal to ground, creating a “watery” tremolo sound.
Many people will say that Overdrive and Distortion pedals are basically the same thing: wrong! While the overdrive tends to add gain and texture to your clean tone, emulating a cranked amplifier, the distortion intentionally clips and distorts the waveform of the guitar signal. The effect of distortion pedal is much more audible and the resulting sound is harsher and louder, and sometimes completely different from the starting sound. Distortion pedals are perfect for rock and metal players, and represents a safe boat for guitarists that may feel the need to have a backup to their tube amplifier: a distortion pedal into the clean channel of a rented amplifier can save your gig! The ProCo Rat 2 is an instant classic, while the Electro Harmonix Metal Muff/Top Boost gives you some serious distortion with a top boost in single box. And for your über-metal needs, the Harley Benton Extreme Metal is here to help.
Wes Borland (b. 1975) guitarist for Limp Bizkit has owned many Ibanez guitars, including a custom 4-string baritone guitar, although he no longer endorses them. He was mainly noted for playing an Ibanez RG7 CST which had selectable piezo and magnetic pickups, only 18 of these were made in 1999. Borland has a signature Yamaha guitar, but has been seen playing a Jackson with the reformed Limp Bizkit.
The cool thing about this setup is the EQ bypass feature. In other words, you can completely nullify any effects of the EQ and tap into the raw tone of the guitar. That works great for those who want that authentic tone or to let the mix engineer handle the rest. Overall, this Takamine is rock solid in all aspects. It is a great alternative for anyone who's looking to extract the most out of their money who wants to try something other than a Martin.
By the way, if you like older Japanese guitars, you must obtain a copy of Mr. Noguchi’s book, ’60s Bizarre Guitars (Guitar Magazine Mooks, Rittor Music). It is lusciously printed in color and, while the text is in Japanese, model names and dates are in English, so it is an invaluable reference tool, as well as a fun coffee table book. Some of the following information on specific guitars comes from this source, as well as catalogs and other research materials kindly provided by dedicated guitar fans in both the U.S. and Japan. It’s virtually impossible to reconstruct a comprehensive chronology, but we will attempt to document some broad-brush details and periods of what guitars we can, and with luck you’ll be able to search out and identify your favorite Teiscos with much greater authority. Your corrections and additions are most welcome!
Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.
The only reason the Yamaha Pacifica would have low action is if the string height was set low. Just making a broad statement like “if you want a low action guitar buy a Yamaha Pacifica” I know that is not your words but that is what you seem to be implying. Some beginning guitar player could buy a Yamaha Pacifica that has high action. All guitars can have low action if they are set-up to have low action. Some good info here regardless. Ben.
So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.
However, Class D amplifiers (also called "switching amplifiers" or confusingly, "digital amplifiers") are more efficient than conventional Class-AB amplifiers, and so are lighter in weight and smaller. The Acoustic Image Focus head, for example, produces 800 watts of power and weighs 2.2 kilograms (about 4 pounds). Class-D amplifiers use MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) rather than 'ordinary' (bipolar) transistors, and generate a pulse-width modulated signal that is filtered before it reaches the speaker.[15] In the 2010s, the availability of Class D amplifiers has enabled amp manufacturers to produce very lightweight and small, yet very powerful amp heads and small, lightweight combo amps.
Re-amping is another increasingly common production technique, often used at the mixdown stage. This process involves a dedicated re-amping device, which takes a line-level feed from a mixing console or DAW interface and converts that signal's level and impedance to one that a guitar amplifier is able to accept. That signal is usually a separate "dry" (unamplified and unprocessed) guitar track recorded using an active 500kOhm direct box placed between the guitar and the amp.
I want to focus on acoustic guitar but some electric is alright. Mainly I want to build up a repertoire of songs that MOST people will know if heard and be able to sing a long. Currently I know very few songs such as this but I have been playing off and on for years. Any really popular (old or newish is fine) songs that are not impossible to play would be great. Thanks!

Maton established itself early on the Australian rock scene in the late Fifties, assisted by Australia’s tariff regime, which made imported guitars far more expensive than the local equivalents. Maton guitars were used by many well-known Australian pop and rock groups including Col Joye & The Joy Boys. The company also made one of the first sponsorship deals in Australian rock, supplying Melbourne band The Strangers with a full set of the distinctive ‘El Toro’ model guitars and basses (notable for their outlandish ‘horned’ body shape) while the group was working as the house band on the TV pop show The Go!! Show in the mid-Sixties.


Play it and see. I've owned so many guitars I don't even look at the headstock , I'll play a few riffs or scales and see how well it holds up. how to tell a good guitar from a bad: *what is it made out of , plywood is terrible , where as say alder or mahogany are the industry standard for "tone". Google will tell you if you can find the model and or series. *how good does it sound? unplugged and plugged in assuming it's electric *can you play every fret on the neck without the notes instantly dying or getting an annoying amount of buzz *is it comfortable to play and slide up or down the neck *are the electronics in good places , I hate when my hand hits the volume knob for example when I'm soloing. down the road you can do the following to improve the sound and reliabillity put new strings on the guitar (youtube can help) adjust the string height as low as possible to make it effortless buy new guitar tuners off of say ebay , I recommend Grovers and a guitar processor will make even no name guitars sound incredible.
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid C-8 Electric Guitar, 8-String   New from$1,089.00In Stockor 12 payments of $90.75 Free Ground Shipping Ibanez RGMS8 Multi-Scale Electric Guitar, 8-String   New from$599.99In Stockor 12 payments of $50 Free Ground Shipping ESP LTD Stephen Carpenter SC-608B Baritone Electric Guitar, 8-String (with Case)   New from$1,199.00In Stockor 12 payments of $99.92 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING Jackson X Series Dinky DKAF8 MS Electric Guitar, 8-String   New from$699.99In Stockor 12 payments of $58.34 FREE 2-DAY SHIPPING See All Electric Guitars: 8-String
I think it's fair to say that we all have a pretty good idea of what reverb is, though there are several ways of emulating it in the studio. Early reverb chambers, plates and springs have now given way to digital solutions, which fall into two main camps: synthetic and convolution. Synthetic reverbs take an algorithmic approach, setting up multiple delays, filters and feedback paths to create a dense reverberation effect similar to what you might hear in a large room. Though these often sound a bit 'larger than life', they've been used on so many hit records that we now tend to accept their sound as being the 'correct' one for pop music production. Most can approximate the sound of rooms, halls, plates and chambers, but in comparison with a real reverberant environment, the early reflections often seem to be too pronounced. The advantage of a synthetic reverb is that the designer can give the user plenty of controls for altering the apparent room size, brightness, decay time and so on.
I participated in what I think was perhaps Gibson's best SG...a prototype made for Robbie Krieger. It had my then-patented carbon fiber "T" cross section fingerboard which absolutely took care of the #1 problem with SGs...the rubber neck syndrome. It also had a beautiful flame maple top on the mahogany body and it got a cherry sunburst. Fabulous guitar. Robbie must still have it.
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As one of the best electric guitars under 200 dollars, the instrument utilizes an agathis body, a bolt-on maple neck, a sonokeling neck, and a classic rosewood fingerboard with 22 frets and white dot inlays. The electronic section features a peculiar combination of one humbucker and two single pickups, allowing the guitar to cover plenty of sonic ground.

You can think of these as distortion pedals turned up to 11. Usually, a fuzz pedal comes in as an accent for solos and intros, since its effect is so strong that it could overpower the rest of the band otherwise. You can hear an example of fuzz in the classic recording of Jimi Hendrix playing The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. This is a good type of pedal to try out as an introduction to more powerful effects.
Harmony pedals are often used to generate vocal harmonies, but can also do wonders for bass and guitar sounds. Some vocal harmony processors use the signal from your guitar to create two- or three-part vocal harmonies. Most harmony effects let you specify precisely how much higher or lower you want the accompanying note to be. Modern artists such as Steve Vai and Robert Fripp have created interesting music using a purely pitch-shifted signal with none of the original signal mixed in.
Everyone listens to music for different reasons. The transition of 'acknowledgment' to 'love' of an artist or song is an entirely unique experience, starting from smell, location, time of day, time of year, repetitions over time etc., that triggers interest. Obviously, anyone who bashes John Mayer is stuck on radio feeds and needs to explore his music before judging on pop tunes, and almost all Hendrix aficionados are late adopters that buy trends (a marketer's dream).
Perry has also endorsed an affordable replica version of the Boneyard guitar made by Epiphone that carries the same USA made Burstbucker pickups as the Gibson model. It is a customized Gibson B.B. King “Lucille” guitar; however, instead of the black finish and “Lucille” signature on the headstock, Perry’s guitar features a white finish, a “Billie Perry” signature on headstock and an image of Billie Perry on the front of the guitar.
I have a Mahar bass, the one with the epic (haha) zebra stripes. My wife won it at the state fair in Puyallup throwing balloons or something. She thought it would be cute to have it in my collection. I'm a drummer, but I don't want to miss out on the fun of collecting guitars, why should guitarists have all the fun? Anyway, about the Mahar guitar... it's actually not bad! I pick it up and play it once in a while just for giggles, and have had bass players jam on it. They agree. For throwing some balloons, it's a bargain! Plug it into a decent rig and it doesn't sound bad either. I suppose if you are a virtuoso it would be notable if you had issues with it, but for fun and games it really is better than a toy, like First Act or some junk like that. If you are a beginner, this would be ideal. It plays nicely, and sounds as good as your rig can make it sound. Thumbs up!
The top of the archtop line featured two very nifty new models called the Vegas 40 and Vegas 66. The Vegas 40 (Teisco Del Rey EP-11T) double-cutaway thinline was promoted both in Japan and the U.S. It was a full size ES-335-style with two pickups (the large rectangular type with chrome sides and black insert, square poles), bound f-holes, volume and tone controls on the lower bout (no plastic plate) and a fancy new angular archtop Bigsby and roller bridge. The pickup selector was a rotary switch on the lower horn with a new round knob with a lever (versus the old chicken beak). The bolt-on neck had a new three-and-three head with a flared “check mark” indentation in the top, with wide wings on either side, a shape that would characterize a number of other models later in the decade. The fingerboard was bound, with dots. On the Japanese version, the headstock carried a zippy new typeface proclaiming “Vegas 40,” while the pickguard used a similar angular script for the Teisco logo. The Teisco Del Rey carried its regular sticker.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: None - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 707 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Tribal Purple, Black flame, Tribal Green, Blue Quilt, Satin Natural, Blue Flame
It wouldn't be called a tribute if it didn't follow convention, so having a mahogany body with an arched maple top is expected. Epiphone also designed the neck to mimic the playability of old LPs, giving this guitar a 1960s SlimTaper D profile. However, what makes the Epiphone Les Paul Tribute Plus stand out is the use of two Gibson USA '57 Classic humbucking pickups, which essentially gives this Les Paul a more premium Gibson voice, at a fraction of the price.
From 1959 to 1967, the Stratocaster was made with a rosewood fretboard as standard, as well as color choices other than sunburst, including a variety of colorful car-like paint jobs that appealed to the nascent surfer and hot-rod culture, pioneered by such bands as the Surfaris,the Ventures and the Beach Boys. Fender would paint any guitar from the DuPont car color range for 5% over purchase price.
Solid body guitars were the next step in guitar development, with Leo Fender creating a modest instrument called the Broadcaster, which was then rebranded as the Telecaster. The Stratocaster came later and, in addition to the changes in the pickups, included contours in the body that made the guitar more streamlined and easier to play while standing up. Today, the Stratocaster is still the most iconic electric guitar shape; it’s associated with guitar wizard Jimi Hendrix, and many beginners end up with a Stratocaster-style guitar. Gibson introduced their own line of solid body guitars, the considerably swankier Les Paul.

Our Parlor size guitars are approximately 25% smaller than our full size guitars but what really makes them special is they have a 2 inch shorter neck design. This means children and small adults (under 5 ft tall) don’t have to reach as far holding certain chords making playability even easier. Most of our customers buying our Parlor guitars are coming from little Martins and Taylors.  They say the Easy Play Parlor has 30-50% easier playability and sound is slightly richer and deeper.  Shipped from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska.  100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
I had gotten rid of all my effects pedals a long time ago because I wasn't using them. So when I saw this little processor and the price I thought I would give it a Try. I was amazed at all the sounds and tones this thing puts out. For the little money you spent it is deff. worth it. I have not yet messed around with the drum settings but I will. This will be loads of fun to play around with. A deff. 5 star rating.
National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
Some of the best pedals in this segment, like the TC Electronic Sentry, will allow you to set both the volume threshold where the noise gate kicks in, and the type of interference you want to filter out. The important thing to remember about noise gate pedals is that they only eliminate hissing when you don’t play. As soon as you do, the pedal disengages and the noise comes back. With that said, noise gate pedals are essential for a good tone.
Guitar chords and signatures. Find and save list of chords. Basic guitar chords A sheet of the most used rock chords. Suitable for beginners. Empty chord sheet An empty sheet of chords templates to print out and use. Basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A Free lesson on the basic guitar chords Em, C, G, D, Am, E, and A. The following chords are 7 of the most basic open position chords. An open position chord is one that contains at least o
The Dean Vendetta pack offers a sharp looking metallic red super Stratocaster style guitar with dual humbuckers, a tremolo bridge for fun dive tricks, and a 24 fret neck. This is perfect for players that want to start learning lead guitar as soon as possible. The neck is quite fast for a guitar in its price range. Also included with the purchase is a 10-watt practice amp, gig bag, instrument cable, picks, a tuner, and a fairly comfortable strap.
Gibson guitar are among the best in the world, but they can also be a little expensive. You can go with an Epiphone, but Gibson always has a few good options under the $1,000 mark as well. If you love the idea of owning a Gibson Les Paul but you’re struggling with the cash part of it, check out the Les Paul Faded. A little while back I grabbed the 2016 version and it’s been a fantastic guitar with the tone and feel of a Les Paul, minus the big price tag.
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Muelle principal Tope Bloque del trémolo Varilla de tope Con la guitarra afinada correctamente, ajuste el muelle principal y verifique que la varilla de tope toque el bloque del trémolo y el tope. Si la varilla de tope no toca el bloque del tremolo y el tope, gire el tornillo de ajuste del muelle principal hasta que lo haga.
Our guide to guitar strings, the hope and savior of beginners across the world. We're going to cover the types of guitar strings, how they're made, the best brands, the standard gauges, how to pick the right ones for your instrument and style, what to expect in terms of cost, and much more. Take a ride with me through Ledger Note's guitar string guide...

All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
Now that said, the orientation of the individual saddles does have some significance. In an ideal world, you would have all of the saddles sitting with the flat side facing the pickups. This is so that there is an immediate fall-off as soon as the strings clear the saddles so that they vibrate as cleanly as possible. At the same time, the fall-off towards the stop bar tailpiece is a little more relaxed and possibly a little more forgiving on your strings. In the real world, however, you may have to swap one or more around in order to intonate the guitar properly, and this is more important.
Effects units are available in a variety of formats or form factors. Stompboxes are primarily used units in live performance and (in some cases) studio recordings. Rackmount devices saw a heavy usage during the later 20th century, due to their advanced processing power and desirable tones. However, by the 21st century, with the advant of digital Plug-Ins and more powerful Stompboxes for live usage, the need and practicality of rackmounted effects units went down, and as such, prices of rack effects have diminished due to lower usage.[5] An effects unit can consist of analog or digital circuitry or a combination of the two. During a live performance, the effect is plugged into the electrical "signal" path of the instrument. In the studio, the instrument or other sound-source's auxiliary output is patched into the effect.[6][7] Form factors are part of a studio or musician's outboard gear.[8]
Just starting your electric guitar journey? The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar is specially designed to cater to the needs of beginner guitarists. With the Epiphone named attached to this instrument, you know you're getting top quality. The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar comes with Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups which give a lot of warmth to this guitar's sound. The neck and body are made of mahogany which gives the best sound quality. The slim design makes for fast learning.
I am a learning myself Shreya.I purchased a Fender Model CF60 (£100) .This is a high quality "Folk guitar" from a reputable long standing company.It's got a lovely mellow tone and the size is not to big.Buld quality is excellent.At the end of the day it's all subjective.I recommend you go to your local musical instrument shop and try a few.All the Best Dean

At this time (and for a while now) the best guitars are made in Japan and Korea. However Japanese guitars carry a premium which you don’t find to the same degree on Korean guitars. So Korean guitars will offer the best value and quality for price. There is a Cort factory in Korea, however 1) The Korean Cort factory also makes entry level guitars and 2) Cort also have other factories in other countries which have much lower standards. There are some good/excellent Cort guitars but there are also many bad ones with shoddy workmanship. So Cort as a brand name isn’t enough to guarantee a well made instrument - you also need to check it’s made in Korea, and also that it’s one of the better models (price will probably be a guide). All the brands made at the largest factory, the World Instrument Co. one (which makes PRS SE and Chapman guitars among others) are built to a very high standard.
The C3M comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings, but you can always change them out for something different if you prefer. Aesthetics-wise, the guitar has a matte finish (the “M” in the model name), but it really has no bearing on the way the guitar sounds.All the same, you’ll want to protect your guitar from nicks, cuts and other damage.

In mid-’29, John Dopyera left the National company to start the Dobro Manufacturing Company along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, and Vic Smith. National String Instrument Corp. continued operating under Beauchamp, Barth et al. In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the Dobro Corporation, Ltd., with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National’s, although in this somewhat incestuous world, both got their resonator cones, plate covers and other parts, like tailpieces, from Adolph Rickenbacker.
Now, imagine having that same signal but with your guitar’s volume on its half way setting. That same degraded signal comes out even worse as it only had half of the voltage to work with from the get-go. In order to minimize the amount of signal loss, it is always suggested that the guitar’s volume is kept at its max setting and either manually adjust the output level from the amp or better yet, from a dedicated volume pedal, as is the choice for most professional musicians. A volume pedal in an effects chain will control the output volume of everything that is placed before it, so it’s pretty much almost always a good idea to place it at the end of the chain if it’s going to be your main form of overall volume control.
I didn’t want to spend much money (I’m a cheap bastard…part of me thinks I could never truly love a 59 Bassman unless I scored it at a yard sale for a hundred bucks. Now, tone matters more than money to me, but I tend to love the tone of crappy amps just as much as high enders, so I’d feel like a stooge dropping that kind of money on an amp. Especially since I play them and would ruin the collectable value of anything by gigging with it).
I’ve used Eagle for a long time, but I just recently started using Circuit Maker, and I like it so far. I’ll probably end up using both since I do most of my work on a Mac, and Eagle still works fine on that. I had to set up a dedicated Windows machine for Circuit Maker. Circuit Maker has a 3D view of the finished PCB which is a very helpful tool if you are dealing with odd board sizes and very constrained layouts.
I play a Tele, but I can’t say I’m in love with it. I have this feeling that a Gibson would sound and play differently – perhaps warmer and more mellow – but I have no factual basis for thinking that. It is based more on who I have seen playing different models, and what style of music they are playing. This is what I think most of the differences guitarists imagine come down to – a lot of preconceived notions, reinforced by vague generalizations (like the ones in this article) and marketing hype. But I readily admit I could be wrong about that.
Now you see why these Spectrum 5s are so desirable! It is not clear, by the way, how many (if any) were ever made with ebony necks. The few I’ve personally seen had maple necks. Certainly the expense of the ebony would have been enormous and hard to justify on the Teisco brand name. Also, with the density of ebony, the guitars probably would have been hard to balance. In any case, these are the Holy Grails of Teisco!
yea seriously as the other reply said especially when it comes to Japan you can no longer just go with the American is better mantra. Tell that to all the amazing musicians who play top of the line regular or custom models from yamaha and Takamines. IMHO especially Takamines are on the cutting edge and even some of their cheaper guitars which are now made in china(the topshelf ones that are typically roughly $1200+ are Japanese made) . Your selling yourself short and also in many cases overpaying if you'll only look at American made. Not to mention many of the American companies even on the $30000+ models mix and match where their supplies come from and or where the labor/construction of the guitar takes place. Martin is one of only American companies that does everything in America but they are an increasingly overpriced guitar. I love any old Martin I touch at a yard sale or older family members house but I'm totally underwhelmed by the newest ones I try at guitar center.

Ooooohhhhh.... I used the Firebird 12 for two weeks on sessions in 1973.... I STILL solo the tracks I used that on... it's the BEST BEST BEST BEST OF ALL TIME !!!!!!!! FOR ANYTHING !!!!..... in fact, as I remember, the octave strings were wound different than the way Ric does it (high-low) and that even added to the incredible sound.....wanna sell the Firebird 12?

Another famous guitar shape, although we’d wager on account of it being many players’ ‘first’ guitar. We’ve all seen them. The nylon-strung small scale acoustics which many of us gain access to at an early age. The, as you progress, you learn that these particular guitars aren’t sent to test our commitment to the cause, but that in the right hands these can be amazingly intricate, highly technical instruments which have a wonderful sound and genre all of their own.
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While they may be on the dry side, these books are convenient because they’re always available for reference. In an online class or an app, you might have to go digging through files or lessons to find that one scrap of information that was helpful. You also have to be on your phone or at your computer. For some people, the old way is still the best way.
Thats a major bend of opinions! It all boils down to..the style of music that you play and what you expect out of the guitar! Is playing only a hobby or are you trying to make a living bangin that Ax? The price of a guitar is not as important as the ability of the person strumming the strings! If your abilitys suck,and you have a expensive guitar..You Still Suck..No matter how good the guitar may be! I have owned cheep and expensive guitars of all different brand names..some very good..some very bad..bottom line is..if Your happy with the AX,thats all that matters! Screw the Name or the Price!!

Vibrato: Vibrato effects produce slight, rapid variations in pitch, mimicking the fractional semitone variations produced naturally by opera singers and violinists when they are prolonging a single note. Vibrato effects often allow the performer to control the rate of the variation as well as the difference in pitch (e.g. "depth"). A vibrato with an extreme "depth" setting (e.g., half a semitone or more) will produce a dramatic, ululating sound. In transistorized effects, vibrato is produced by mixing an instrument's audio signal with a carrier wave in such a way that generates frequency variations in the sound wave.[81] Guitarists often use the terms "vibrato" and "tremolo" misleadingly. A so-called "vibrato unit" in a guitar amplifier actually produces tremolo, while a "tremolo arm" or "whammy bar" on a guitar produces vibrato.[83][84]
"Rocksmith" came out in 2011, following in the footsteps of "Guitar Hero" and "Rock Band" in look if not in game play. Developer Ubisoft claims that it can teach you to actually play the guitar. Unlike its predecessors, where you play along with any number of hit or classic rock songs, pushing the right button at the right time to earn points and unlock rewards, "Rocksmith" requires an actual guitar that you plug into your console. Thus, you're playing the actual notes to the songs, which increases the difficulty of the game.
One trait of most ribbon mics is the figure-of-eight polar response, and this is often exceptionally consistent across the frequency range. This polar pattern means, of course, that ribbons tend to pick up a little more room ambience than cardioids, given that the polar pattern is as sensitive behind the diaphragm as it is in front. Ribbon mics are also often characterised as sounding 'smoother' compared with typical condenser microphones, partly because their construction avoids the high-frequency diaphragm resonances normally inherent in condenser designs.
Additionally, George Harrison used a custom-built rosewood Telecaster during the recording sessions for The Beatles‘ Let It Be album (including the rooftop concert), played through aLeslie speaker; Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows guitarist Pete Special frequently had reissue of Harrison’s Tele onstage in the mid-1980s, but rarely played it. Pearl Jam singer and guitarist Eddie Vedder has been known to use a custom black Telecaster with a white pickguard containing a black arrow decal pointing towards a target design under the strings. Guitar virtuoso Chet Atkins, known for the variety of acoustic and electric guitars that he used, occasionally played a Telecaster in his duets with Jerry Reed.[6]
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
Talk box: A talk box directs the sound from an electric guitar or synthesizer into the mouth of a performer using a tube, allowing the sound to be shaped into vowels and consonants with movements of the mouth. The modified sound is then picked up by a microphone. In this way the guitarist is able create the effect that the guitar "licks" are "talking". Some famous uses of the talkbox include Bon Jovi's "Livin' on a Prayer", Stevie Wonder's "Black Man", Mötley Crüe's "Kickstart My Heart", Joe Walsh's "Rocky Mountain Way", Alice in Chains's "Man in the box" and Peter Frampton's "Show Me the Way".[66][67]
The Afterneath gets a place on our favorites list, largely because of the "Drag" feature that allows you to sort of delay the decay of your reverb effect, giving off an ambiance that trails off behind each original note as it bleeds into new notes. It's a very unique reverb effect, which blends particularly nicely with a fretless bass in the example video below. 
While he could put out an album of his farts or slap his name on any shitty guitar and still make millions, he is a painstaking perfectionist who spent years agonizing over every minute detail of his EVH Wolfgang guitar and EVH 5150 III amp before offering it to the public and who has refused to release a new Van Halen album until he feels it’s ready.
By the way, I’d like to also take this opportunity to thank collector and one of VG’s earliest subscribers Jim Dulfer for invaluable help in an ongoing research effort, providing access to his truly impressive paper collection and photographs of some of his instruments. These catalogs are filling in many, many holes in information. You will be reaping the benefits in upcoming “Different Strummer” columns in both information and illustrations, as well as in upcoming book project. Thanks to Jim from guitar fans everywhere!

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Wife wants to play guitar again after a long hiatus. My full sized Takamine with fat strings is too big and heavy for her. Got her this 3/4 Yamaha and I fell in love with it. I may have to get another one for her because I've been hogging it. It has a great voice for a 3/4. The action is nice, the built in tuner is a real treat. Never had one before but it is unbelievably convenient. I don't plug it in often but I had to check out that sound too. The electronics sound decent. Can't crank it up too loud or it starts to feedback, but I'm actually sitting right on top of my small but punchy VOX amp so I can't really say how it would work for playing out. The reviews convinced me to buy this one. The best review only had one major complaint; the tuning pegs. I agree they could be better, but I don't think they are awful. I have to tweak the tuning just a little once or twice a day before I play, but it isn't like it goes out of tune when I'm playing, even when I'm beating on it hard. I think it is well worth the price and was surprised by the volume it produces. Much better than expected. If you don't find the tuning pegs worthy, I think the instrument is good enough to spend money on for an upgrade, but I don't plan to. It is solid, light weight, comfortable, nice sounding, well designed, feature rich and handy. I'm keeping it in the corner by the bed and I pick it up every chance I get. I haven't played guitar much the past few years so having a guitar at my fingertips all the time is helping me get my callouses back quickly. No matter what you play, if you lose your callouses, rebuilding them is always painful for a few weeks, but this instrument is pretty easy to play. I've gone through the process several times over the years with my Takamine. This is far less painful. Perhaps that means it will take longer, but at least I can still use my fingers to type long reviews in the meantime. No avoiding the pain regardless of what you play, but there is pain, and there is agony. This guitar hits a sweet spot somewhere in between. It's just right for young or old, big or small. (FWIW, I heard an interview with Clapton where he confessed he doesn't play much when he's not working and when he has to prepare for a tour, even he has to go through the callous building process). Well, I'm way off topic now. Again, great little guitar. Go for it.


We would also recommend starting off with a DIY guitar pedal building kit. We created a list of the best DIY pedal kits here. Places like Mammoth Electronics and Build Your Own Clone (BYOC) have some fantastic sounding kits available – they even come with a step by step guide to lend you a hand along the way. Even Amazon has a killer tube drive pedal kit!

Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.

I doubt I can bring anything relevant to this discussion that hasn't been said already but since I liked the article so much and the subject has puzzled me since I got my first guitar, I jsut have to pitch in. My first guitar was a cheap Jackson-esque strat the brand was Cyclone. It was significantly lighter in weight than my friends Fender stratocaster and I liked it for that reason from the beginning. It was just much easier and more comfortable to play, esepecially while standing. Maybe because of this I've been biased to doubt the whole tonewood thing. My experience is that most 'guitar people' (at least here in Finland) seem to think that lighter wood is simply a sign of a bad quality electric guitar. I talked about this quite recently with a local luthier, who is very sience oriented and uses rosewood as the body. Guitars he makes are so light that when you pick them up at first, it is hard to believe they aren't hollow. So I asked him about his thoughts on the density and / or other qualities of the wood affecting the tone and his responce was pretty much consistent with the article. Anyhow he did mention the _theoretial_ possibility of the waves to traveling to the wood and reflecting back to the strings _possibly_ affecting the sustain. As someone stated, in real life physics there are never completely isolated phenomena but you can draw a line whether a factor is significant or not. John's comment above would support the more dense wood to be better but my guess is that when it comes to the sound that is audible to human ear, the material does not count. How a guitar feels is a totally different matter and shapes the way the player hears the sound drastically. My intuition says that lighter wood might convey the vibration to the players body which would partly exlpain Butch's experience with guitars with different materials. I've never thought about that before but do find anything else than the strings resonating (springs, screws..) uncomfprtable.
I've been to Steve about a dozen times with my guitars, families and friends instruments and have sent several people there and have nothing but great things to say.  He is reasonably priced and likely one of the most talented and experienced Luthier's in Boston.  It's rare to see any establishment get 5 stars from so many people and Steve deserves it!  Only thing is, if you're in a rush to get your instrument back, go somewhere else where they do it quickly and without much thought/TLC.  Steve takes his time to do it right and has a lot of customers because he's the guy to go to in the greater Boston area. Highly recommend!

Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.

Whether you're recording or just plain playing for the fun of it, a headphone guitar amp is a great thing to have. You can even choose headphone amps that will work with pedals, mixing consoles and other connections, giving you a ton of versatility in how you use them. If there's one thing that's universally true about these amplifiers, it's that no guitarist should be without at least one.
Martin began with a 000-size guitar, which had 12 frets clear of the body. They rejected the 27" scale idea, as this would have been impractical since the high string tension on a guitar would have made the instrument hard to play. Instead they used a 25.4" scale length. To accommodate Bechtel's request for 15 frets clear of the body, they squared the body's shoulders to add 1 5/16" to the clear part of the fingerboard. This allowed 14 frets clear of the body. Since they felt aesthetically the bridge should remain halfway between the center of the soundhole and the endblock, there really was no way to make the guitar have 15 frets clear. The bottom bout was reshaped slightly to match the new shape of the upper bout (note when the 000 went to 14 frets in 1934 it retained this initial OM body shape).
Not a bad article, but I’d go even cheaper. As a long time guitar and bass player (no longer gigging) and father, with guitars high and low cost in the house, I would advise parents to get a new Yamaha, Epi, or Squier (or a good used one of those) for a couple hundred $ or less and a decent Fender or Vox,, Spider, etc modeler amp for the same and see what happens. It has been hard to keep my kids interested, hurts the fingers, and my guitars have low action and play like butter. It isn’t like Rock Star! Reportedly 90% drop out in the first year, and by the time you are my age maybe 99% have quit! Lot of used stuff in the closets out there! So go to a decent store or a friend who plays and seek their help and advice. And get it set up by someone who knows what they are doing. My current favorite setting out and being played a lot is a 1996 Korean Squier Strat Deluxe, used for $99. So if they say spend over $400 total amp and guitar, ask someone else! They lose value real fast!
Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.

This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.
The Tele is often called a workingman’s instrument for its simplicity.  It also happens to offer tons of tone variants, just like the Strat.  The neck pickup, with its distinctive “lipstick” look, can go from perfect blues tones to jazz, just by rolling back the tone knob.  Danny Gatton was known to take full advantage of the many sounds the Tele could produce, even in one song, by rolling the tone knob to produce the “wah wah” effect that most players achieve through a foot pedal.
The Jameson Left-Handed Black is an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a slick appearance, a smooth body, and an impressive sound. With its thinline frame and cutaway design, this model is good for both amateurs and seasoned guitar players. You get a guitar that sounds just as awesome regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amp.
The strings movement moves the magnetic field creating current in the coil of the pickup. The string does not create the current the movement does. If you placed a solenoid beneath the pickup and moved the pickup you would also create a current in the coil. If you took the strings off the guitar, and held a hammer head over the pickup and activated the solenoid you would get a current in the coil.
Are you in earnest need of a guitar and do you want to buy that right now. Well, if the answer to this question is yes, then you will have to stop and think for a while before you actually make the investment. This is because of the fact that buying a guitar is an expensive investment, so you must to be quick to arrive at a decision. Now you should be asking yourself some pretty interesting questions before you buy a guitar so that you do not have to regret later on in any way.

STEM educators will take part in an intense five-day electric guitar design/build institue. Each faculty member will build his/her own custom electric guitar and will engage in student centered learning activities that relate the guitar design to specific math, science and engineering topics. Participants leave this weeklong experience with their custom-made guitars, curriculum modules with short term assessments that can be immediately integrated into the faculty team school curriculum.


Combo guitar amplifier cabinets and guitar speaker cabinets use several different designs, including the "open back" cabinet, the closed back cabinet (a sealed box), and, less commonly, bass reflex designs, which use a closed back with a vent or port cut into the cabinet.[26] With guitar amps, most "open back" amp cabinets are not fully open; part of the back is enclosed with panels. Combo guitar amp cabinets and standalone speaker cabinets are often made of plywood. Some are made of MDF or particle board—especially in low-budget models.[26] Cabinet size and depth, material types, assembly methods, type and thickness of the baffle material (the wood panel that holds the speaker), and the way the baffle attaches to the cabinet all affect tone.[26]
Some resonator guitars possess metal bodies and these are called steel guitars. This can lead to some confusion with the Hawaiian guitar of the same name. They are two distinct instruments. The Hawaiian steel guitar takes its name from the steel bar used to create the glissandi and the Resonator steel guitar refers to the material used for the construction of the body.
I still keep in touch with Mark and occasionally pose questions to him about various maintenance concerns. He's pretty busy and it may take a few days before he get's back to me. He has always been willing to help and actually encourages me to take on a lot more of the responsibility of maintaining my basses. Yeah, I spent a little on the front end but I really feel that it's going to payoff for me long term.

"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)
Particularly if you want to get into recording and production, this Blackstar model is ideal. With six distinct “voices” from Clean Warm to OD2, as well as 12 stereo effects, there is a huge range of tones and options to play with. Together with the patented ISF control it allows for a nuanced choice of timbres, allowing you to immerse into exactly the sound you are after in gloriously deep Super Wide Stereo.
Others, however, will look to Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend, or the Beatles, or credit the first recorded use of a fuzz box in Britain to Big Jim Sullivan’s performance with a custom-built Roger Mayer fuzz on P.J. Probey’s 1964 No. 1 hit single ‘Hold Me’ (according to Mayer himself)—or, supposedly, Bernie Watson’s solo on Screaming Lord Sutch’s ‘Jack The Ripper’ in 1960. Or, a little later, the one more of us remember, Keith Richard’s worldwide smash-hit fuzz riff for the Stones’s ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,’ courtesy of a Maestro Fuzz-Tone.

Overdrive pedals are intended to mimic the sweet sound of an overdriven tube amp. They are generally more subtle, warmer and a bit richer in sound. Overdrive pedals typically don’t produce the kind of heavy distortion needed in hard rock and heavy metal, but they are fantastic for blues, country, rock and anything else where you need warm, textured distortion. A good example of a quality overdrive pedal is the Ibanez Tube Screamer.
Electric Guitars- Vintage, new & used / Second-hand electric guitars by Kay, Teisco Del Rey Ray ET J-1, Univox & Silvertone. Cheesy Japanese, Surf Guitars. Also guitars by Ibanez, Gibson, Fender, Peavey, Martin, Zon, Gretsch, Rickenbacker, Diasonic & More. Les Pauls recording, lap steels / slide guitars, Barney Kessel style, Fender Stratocasters, Telecasters, Squire Bullet series, Peavey Falcon neck Martin Acoustics, bass guitars, Zon Legacy Elite 5 string Bass, Diasonic double single cutaway, Rickenbacker, archtop, Gretsch TW-100T Traveling Wliburys guitar, Hamer Mirage 1, Yamaha sg-2000, Fender Jag-Stang, Gibson Howard Roberts, Ibanez Artist AR-100 to name a few.
In standard Boss fashion, you get a set of four no-nonsense controls and a footswitch that is as durable as the case it’s installed in. However, none of this means anything if the reverb effect isn’t up to the expected level. Fortunately for us, Boss didn’t disappoint with this one. You get a reverb effect that is in that sweet spot when it comes to versatility and quality.
There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.
My impression of the advice offered so far, is that compression on the electric guitar may solve the problem. However, I have found through experimentation and practice that a compressor used on an acoustic can highlight the more fragile aspects of it's sound, which when amplified can better compete with an electric guitar. I advise plenty of trial and experimentation before trying it in public, because compressors used incorrectly can create serious feedback headaches.
the switch is to change pickups and the knobs are for volume and tone. u only need to mess with them if u want to change the sound of the guitar for various songs or styles of music. to tune the guitar u use the tuning pegs on the headstock (at the end of the neck). u need to tune it if it gets out of tune and make sure u replace the strings fairly often especially if u get a nice guitar like a les paul. old strings get tighter and can pull the neck and make it bow forward making it harder to push the strings down to the frets.
I have achieved my best results with this technique when miking resonant hollow-body guitars, getting the mic in as close as possible to the guitarist's picking hand. Large-diaphragm condensers, especially the Neumann U 87 and Manley Cardioid Reference tube mic, have proven superlative performers on big-box guitars such as the Gibson ES-175 (see photo on p. 114). The small-diaphragm Oktava MC 012 and medium-diaphragm Shure KSM32 have worked wonders on solid-body instruments, most notably on improvisational-guitarist Ron Thompson's seven-string custom axe.
Ash is a common body material in solid body guitars. It is harder than mahogany and very resonant. This gives the guitar ringing sustain and bright tone with a well-defined mid-range. A light colored wood with attractive grain figuring, it is often given a transparent finish. Swamp ash is a particularly appealing, detailed wood used on higher-end guitars.
Although electric guitar sounds vary dramatically, they are all essentially midrange instruments with little or no extreme high- and low-end information. With the tone controls on the amp and the guitar itself, recorded electric guitar sounds often need little in the way of EQ if the desired tone was produced at the recording stage. However, if the sound needs a bit more bite, try boosting the upper mids somewhere between 2.5 and 5kHz. For added warmth, a little boost around the 250Hz range should thicken the sound, while muddiness is often dealt with by cutting a few dBs at around the 200Hz mark.
A marvelous acoustic guitar with 6 strings and natural color. it has its body made from mahogany and a spruce top. The fret board is also made from mahogany. It one of the most beautiful guitar producing incredible sound. It is designed to suit the needs of the beginner in guitar playing. The price ranges from around INR 14,760 depending on available offers. To find more product information relating to Epiphone DR-212, click on the link below:
Chorus – a frequency-based effect that makes your guitar sound like more than one guitar is playing. The effect is created by doubling your guitar tone one or more times (using a short delay) and then varying the pitch of the double slightly up and down against the dry guitar tone. Chorus pedals have at least two controls: Depth and Rate. The Depth controls the lowest and highest pitches that the doubled tone varies between. The Rate controls the speed that the doubled tone moves up and down in pitch.
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However, if you want a small guitar that will give the quality of sound you might expect from a larger guitar, or if you are considering this style as the first beginner guitar for a child or student, you may want to consider other models that are more typical of a guitar suitable for learning, recording or for growing and developing better skills.
When this guitar came in the headstock was completely broken off.  Being a 12 string I knew that it would need some extra reinforcement to stay structuraly sound.  I glued the headstock in place and then started to cut away wood from the truss rod to the edge of the neck running from the 5th fret to the A string tuner.  It took hours of cleaning up gluing surfaces and precisely fitting the graft before I could glue it in place.  I then repeated that step on the other side of the neck.  With this repair the only original wood remaing around the break is directly over the truss rods making the finished product basically as strong as a new neck.  Once the neck was refinished you cant even see the original break and only if you look very closely can you see the edges of the grafts.  When the owners of the guitar came to pick it up they thought I had made a whole new neck.  Needless to say they were very excited.  -Evan
This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
While it is well loved for its HD amp models, it also packs quite a lot of effects (over 100!), applying the same HD modeling technology on actual stompboxes to get them to sound as close to the real thing as possible. The amp modeling and effects section together allow for a wide variety of tones, while the deep controls that you have over each amp and effect parameter allows for even more in-between tones, so you can craft your very own sound. The LED rings add to the unit's overall eye candy and improve the already intuitive interface of the unit. It also houses extensive input and output options, including having its very own mic preamp, so you can use it for a variety of instruments and even vocals. Other features include built-in 48-second looping, tuning and compatibility with Line 6' modeling instrument (Variax) and amps.

Mostly everything about a guitar in this price range feels premium, and the sound quality and playability is enough to put a smile on any guitarist’s face. You also start to find advanced features such as brand-name pickups, active pickups, and EverTune bridges, as well as unique signature models that are too expensive for manufacturers to produce as a budget line.
The EB-28 bass was very similar to the guitar in appointments and controls. It had a 22-fret ebony fingerboard, 33.825″ scale, a DiMarzio P-style neck pickup and a DiMarzio J-style pickup at the bridge. It, too, carried a Schaller bridge and Schaller M-4 tuners. Around 4,854 each of these 28 Series guitars and basses were built between January 1981 and February 1982.
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In addition to pickup selection, most guitars will have controls for volume and tone. Volume controls simply regulate the strength of the output signal. Depending on the amplifier, this can control the tone as well as the volume. Most tone knobs control high frequencies and many guitars have separate tone controls for each pickup. This can vary a guitar’s sound between soft, warm, and mellow to a very bright, raw, distorted sound.
There is dust or corrosion in the potentiometer behind the knob. You need to turn the volume knob between 1 and 11 over 9000 times to wear the track clean again. . If that does not help taking the electronics tray out of the amp (don't break the wires and don't electrocute yourself) to check if the volume potentiometer has any holes. Using a can of compressed air or non-reactive solvent from an electronics store with the thin nozzle tube supplied, blow or flush out the dust. . If it really annoys you and you can't get rid of it, replacing the potentiometer(s) with new sealed ones will overcome the problem forever. or use standard ones and remember to turn the knobs every week to stop dust from settling. . PS. if it is a high powered amp there will be capacitors inside that can seriously hurt you even when the amp is unplugged.
If you're anything like me, you started out with a basic beginner's guitar, and over time you realized that you were ready for something better. I had a Squier Telecaster(standard series) and I was ready for a change. I was set on a Les Paul of some sort, possibly a used LP Standard. I read tons of reviews, then I started reading some of the Epi Les Pauls(the nicer ones, $400-500).
John Mayer and Frusciante are very talented guitarists, but to include them at the expense of legends like Clapton, Duane Allman, Neil Young, The Edge, Brian May, George Harrison…that's unforgivable. I'll admit that Jack White needs more time to prove himself too, but of all the recent guitarists listed, he is the one with the most vision and confidence in his ideas. He is his generation's Jimmy Page.

A complete step-by-step guide to maintenance and setup of your electric guitar. This guide, packed with images, will show every aspect of essential electric guitar care such as changing the strings, adjusting the neck, and setting the action to match your playing style. It will also show you how to fix common electric guitar problems such as buzzing strings, scratchy pots and much more. Electric Guitar Repair and Maintenance is a great resource for any guitar owner.
One problem with adding a tweeter to a bass speaker cabinet is that the tweeter may be damaged by the overdriven amplifier tone that is popular in some musical genres, since overdriving the amplifier adds a great deal of high frequency information to the signal. Horns and speakers in the same cabinet are sometimes wired separately, so that they can be driven by separate amplifiers. Biamplified systems and separately-wired cabinets produced by manufacturers such as Gallien-Krueger and Carvin and other manufacturers allow bassists to send an overdriven low-pitched sound to the speaker, and a crisp, undistorted high-pitched sound to the horn, which prevents this problem. Since the 1960s, some bassists have obtained a similar result by plugging their bass into both an electric guitar guitar amp and a bass amp. This approach does not use a crossover, but since an electric guitar amp will only produce pitches down to about 80 Hz, the guitar amp reproduces the mid- to high frequencies and the bass amp reproduces the low frequencies. With this arrangement, distortion and other effects can be applied to the guitar amp without affecting the solidity of the bass amp tone.
There have always been slight variations in the color of the cream plastic parts used on Gibson and other guitars. It's not uncommon to see brand new and vintage guitars with bindings, pickup rings, toggle switch rings and pickguards that don't perfectly match in color. We do our best to match all our cream products, but there's no absolute control from batch to batch, or from supplier to supplier.
Later makes of fuzzes—and later generations of those above—moved on to silicon transistors. Many players found the silicon-based models a little harsher sounding, however, and the legend of the magical germanium transistors began to grow. Even so, plenty of guitarists get along just fine with the silicon variety. Eric Johnson, often credited with ears of canine keenness, has used a silicon-transistor Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face to drive the dirty rhythm of his famous multi-amped, multi-routed set-up. He also holds the unit together with a rubber band because he says the bottom plate’s central mounting screw affects its tone. Make of this what you will.
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The Telecaster has also been a long-time favorite guitar for hot-rod customizing. Several variants of the guitar appeared throughout the years with a wide assortment of pickup configurations, such as a humbucker in the neck position, three single-coil pickups and even dual humbuckers with special wiring schemes. Fender offered hot-rodded Teles with such pickup configurations, the US Fat and Nashville B-Bender Telecasters around 1998. The Deluxe Blackout Tele was also equipped with 3 single-coil pickups, a “Strat-o-Tele” selector switch and a smaller headstock than a standard Telecaster. The most common variants of the standard two-pickup solid body Telecaster are the semi-hollow Thinline, the twin-humbuckerDeluxe—and the Custom, which replaced the neck single coil-pickup with a humbucking pickup. The Custom and Deluxe were introduced during the CBS period and reissues of both designs are currently offered.
“Top shelf” simply refers to any product that is sufficiently uncommon and/or of significantly high enough quality to place it “above” the rest of the “regular” crowd of products. In a shopkeepers parlance, the top shelf was where you placed things that you wished to be visible, but were, in actuality, were rarely sold. The best stuff was kept up and just out of reach of the daily rabble and only brought down when someone who truly appreciates the quality (and is willing to pay the commensurate price) came into the shop.
You can knock the price down of the S670 down with the S520, which is from the same series as the S670, but without the middle Quantum Alnico pickup (Alnico simply refers to the type of magnet material used - it’s fancy way to say “stock” pickups). Otherwise this guitar is tough to distinguish from most of the S670. You get the same Edge Zero tremolo system and locking tuners, along with a similarly thin body and neck design.
The design of this guitar probably makes it stand out from the “crowd.” This is another awesome six string acoustic guitar from the brand Juarez available in sunburst and black . It is designed for the right handed and mostly comes in Sunburst color without a bag. The body is made from blackwood with the top laminated with Linden Wood. The entire structure has a natural gloss finish, with the fret board having up to 18 frets. The hardware structure has a chrome finish. Prices are quite fair, ranging from INR 2,790. Find more details below.

Fawned over by hard rock-loving guitarists the world over, Marshall is one of the few amplification brands that really needs no introduction. And if you’re looking for aggressive, overdriven rock – this amp is one of the best beginner’s options. What makes this one really special, however, is the sheer number of sound-shaping options it gives you – thanks to its ability to model a whopping 14 MST preamps, 4 MST power amps, and 8 MST speaker cabinets. That’s 448 possible combinations, if you’re keeping score. You can even connect it to your computer via USB or use it as a Bluetooth speaker. If versatility is your top concern (it probably should be), look no further.

First, plug your guitar in and toggle all the switches and knobs. If your guitar still plays fine, the connection problem is internal. Second, for non-Stratocaster style guitars, remove the cavity covers on the back of the guitar. Strum the strings and move the wires that are soldered to the switches, pots, and output jack. You will probably find your loose connection when the guitar cuts out again. For Stratocaster style guitars, you will need to remove the pickguard and manually check each connection point to make sure the solders are solid. Third, re-solder the loose wire and screw the cavity covers or pickguard back on. For more information about how to solder wiring, see the soldering page.
The middle S (Position 3) by itself also works very well for chord strumming, and it also responds very well if slapping is something you like to do (A single coil in the middle is literally the textbook choice: Single coils typically have more bite and will bring life to the pops, and it's position will ensure the slaps aren't too boomy (like a neck pickup would be) or too tinny/nasally (like a bridge pickup would be)).
ESP is a Japanese company, which focused on the production of electric guitars and basses. This brand was established in 1975 in Tokyo. They produce instruments under the label of “ESP Custom Shop”, “Navigator”, “Grassroots”, “ESP Standard”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” etc. Available price is Rs. 9,270/- onwards (approx). For more information, visit Espguitars.com (Global) or Espguitars.co.jp (Japan).
Side Note: The above is a visual example of how the wrong pedal order screws up your tone. When you compress before using delay, you get a perfectly shaped note ringing out and decaying uniformly over time. If you delay before compressing and even normalize with your make-up gain, you still lose volume and power due to the attack sneaking through first. Then your delayed notes are all also compressed, ruining your fine-tuned echo decay so that all echoes are relatively too loud and don't decay equally over time.
I recently bought my first tube amp, the Marshall DSL40C, which has amazing sound for the money, but the reverb that came on it is virtually non-existent. So I started looking at reverb pedals.....who in their right mind would pay over $100 for an effects pedal that does one thing like a (Fender reverb or Hall of Fame or Holy Grail)? Then I cam across the Zoom Chorus/Delay/Reverb and almost bought it for $119 but then this popped up. With the nearly 5 star average review, I thought I would spend the extra $80 and try it out. WOW am I glad I did. Not only do I now have a great sounding reverb, but I have every other effect you can ever imagine (phaser, tremolo, chorus, delay, overdrive, distortion, filters, etc....the list goes on and on and on.

I one day hope to be the man my dog thinks I am.WORDS OF WISDOM FROM VARIOUS MEMBERS"most often the guitar will rise or fall to the level of the player""people overthink ****************""Sometimes you gotta know when to shut the **************** up and have a little class. Not you, you're special.""If it sounds good to you then it sounds good"The bull**************** and myths in the guitar world are stacked very high.
Lyle guitars are among the rarest brands of electric and acoustic guitars in the world. Produced during an indefinite timeline in the 1960s and 1970s in Japan, the history of the Lyle instrument brand remains somewhat of a mystery. Total distribution of Lyle instruments in the U.S. was very limited. The same company that produced many of them, Matsumoku, also produced the more popular Aria brand.
ASSEMBLE Now you can put it all together! By this time you'll be so excited you'll forget about the electronics and start to string in up before you get the electronics in but it's ok, we'll get there. Start with bolting on the neck in the same fasion that you did when you test fitted everything. Then follow that with the tuners, bridge and pickups. Don't forget to run the wiring for the pickups when you put them in.
Mijn first guitar was a Epiphone by gibson sg, it was all right, then I got my gibson sg special(Around 550e), really good guitar, huge difference with the Epiphone. My next was, believe it or not another Epiphone, a Casino limited edition with bigsby, best price/quiality guitar ever(I paid 430e), beautiful guitar, and next week I’m getting a Fender Telecaster American vintage 58′(1755e), I’m very excited about it. I also own a Fender jazz bass classic 70s, it’s a mexican which plays like an american, very proud of this bass. First rate guitars are normally the best, you pay for the quality of the materials and the workmanship and experience, but there are exceptions with second range guitars, you can get very good ones, just good models or plainly good guitars, it’s nice to own both kind of guitars.
The person who made up the Top Ten list of best guitars has it all wrong! Of all the guitar companies he lists, Carvin is the only company that still uses ebony as standard material for the fretboard. This is because most other companies refuse to take the time and expense of this type of production. The others all use rosewood because it is cheap, relatively soft and can be "slammed" together quickly by machine; an indication of how they make their guitars in general! No other company who makes guitars even comes close to using the hand selected grade of wood (start to finish) that Carvin does. Take a hint from someone who knows how great guitars made step by step; if you want a guitar made from the best materials you can get, with critical operations still done by hand, order one one from Carvin, try it for ten days, if you really don't like it just return it... No questions and no hassles... Really. If you are not the type of person who cares, or are not willing to do ...more
Chord CG-10Classically styled guitar combo in a vinyl covered cabinet with metal corner protectors and basket-weave style grille cloth. Front control panel is recessed with retro "chicken-head" control knobs and additional features for Gain, EQ and outputs. Custom solid-state circuitry is voiced to produce authentic vintage-style clean and driven tones.•Headphone output for practice•Switchable clean and drive channels•Classic styling•Power supply; 230Vac, 50Hz (IEC)•Model: CG-10•Output: 10Wrms•Speaker; 165mm (6.5")•Controls: Gain, drive switch, volume, treble, middle, bass•Connections: Guitar input, headphones out (6.3mm jack)•Dimensions; 290 x 280 x 150mm•Weight: 4.0kg
MAKING A TEMPLATE Once you have traced out your design to the wood you can start routing. I recomend making a template first for the body rout out of 1/4" hard board or something equivalent to that. The professionals use cnc machines to carve and rout the bodies but smaller shops will use templates made from acrylic. The hard board works just fine, but might not last as long. You can also rout the body by hand and forget the template but if you mess up there's no going back so be carefull if you do.
While it was produced, Ovation’s super-shallow 1867 Legend was the recommended guitar in Robert Fripp‘s Guitar Craft.[22][23] Tamm (1990) wrote that the acoustic 1867 Legend has “a gently rounded super-shallow body design that may be about as close to the shape and depth of an electric guitar as is possible without an intolerable loss of tone quality. Fripp liked the way the Ovation 1867 fitted against his body, which made it possible for him to assume the right-arm picking position he had developed using electric guitars over the years; on deeper-bodied guitars, the Frippian arm position is impossible without uncomfortable contortions”.[22]
Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
Explorer-style guitars dropped off the radar after the mid 1980s, but were revived again under the influence of late Pantera guitarist Dimebag Darrell Abbott toward the end of the ’90s. Weird shapes were back, if anything can ever be said to be “back.” What goes around comes around. There’s clearly an algorithm going on that originated back in 1958!
they're both excellent guitars, and for jazz-only, and a little more money, the eastman was a little better. it had a bit more acoustic volume and sounded really killer plugged in. but, the godin is the one i ended up keeping. really, really versatile guitar. the tone knob has a wide range of usable tones. really a very articulate sounding guitar plugged in, especially with the tone a little more open. i play a lot of straight ahead jazz on it, and am very happy with the sound. i have always played it with 12 gague strings on it. again, it's not terribly loud unplugged, but the sound is great, and this is designed primarily to be used plugged in.
Martin’s B series basses were big flat-tops with 34″-scale mahogany necks. Designed by Dick Boak, these ABGs used the same bodies as Martin’s Jumbo guitars; measuring 16″ wide with a depth of 4 7/8″, they were large enough to produce decent acoustic volume without being ungainly like other maker’s attempts. The top was solid spruce, the fingerboard was ebony, and the body was either solid East Indian Rosewood (B40) or solid flamed maple (B-65). A Fishman bridge-pickup system was available adding an “E” in the model number. Both basses were also available with fretless fingerboards.
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
Wah – This type of pedal was a Jimi Hendrix favorite, and you’ve probably heard the original “Cry Baby” in a lot of music. It was the first wah pedal to find success, and paved the way for others to follow. The Cry Baby is an example of manual wah, controlled by a rocker pedal that adjusts the level of treble response dynamically as you move it. Some modern wah pedals, by contrast, are “auto-wah effects,” which do the same thing but use presets for control instead of live input from your foot.
Made of mahogany, just like the classics, the DT520 Destroyer's iconic body style has attracted many artists. Ibanez's biggest leap forward will continue to be appreciated by today's player: namely the mahogany slim neck grip and set-in neck that offer ultra-smooth playablity. No matter what the setting, the DiMarzio Air Norton pack this axe with a rich tonal palette. Gorgeous old school pearl/abalone block inlays make for a path back to one of rock's most dynamic chapters. The original Ibanez Tight-Tune bridge provides improved transfer of string vibration and better tuning stability.
Gibson carefully adjusts the action and the string height before shipping the Epiphone Dot. Don't make adjustments unless you've got clear problems, particularly with string buzzing. Exercise extreme caution when adjusting the truss rod. Overtightening can damage the neck of your guitar. If you're not sure what you're doing, do not attempt to make these adjustments; have your guitar set up by a qualified professional luthier.

Part of their Espana series, the Cordoba 45MR is handsome, handmade in Spain, and brings all the character of Spanish guitar music to the player, starting with the idea of using the guitars of the 1880s and 1890s as a model for the appearance and sound. Nylon-string guitars themselves came from Spain, so this is perfect for the player who wants as much connection to tradition and authenticity as possible.
Maton Guitars - Australia's leading manufacturer of Acoustic and Acoustic / Electric Guitars. Until the late 1930's the Australian guitar manufacturing industry was virtually non existent and good quality guitars were hard to find. The best guitars, it was well understood, came from the U.S.A. Bill May, a Melbourne born jazz musician, woodwork teacher, and luthier, decided to change all that.
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
The downside of boosting the volume of an acoustic guitar this way is the fact that every microphone adds a color of its own to the end result, not to mention the preamplifier and any compression and equalization applied. In other words, not only do you have to position the microphone correctly, but you also need to be very careful when choosing which mic to use.
1960's Kay, Model K-1 "SG-Style" Electric Guitar. 1 single coil Pickup. Great, original "see-thru" Mahogany-color finish. Bound fingerboard. Laminated maple neck and laminated Mahogany body. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Stop Tailpiece. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with no visible wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .011 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .009 strings.  No case included.
Dirk Wacker lives in Germany and is fascinated by anything related to old Fender guitars and amps. He plays country, rockabilly, and surf music in two bands, works regularly as a session musician for a local studio, and writes for several guitar mags. He’s also a hardcore guitar and amp DIY-er who runs an extensive website—singlecoil.com—on the subject.
Hand built with the same precision as our larger guitars, just 25% smaller.  Great for travel, ideal for children struggling to get their arms around full size guitars, fantastic second guitar for the office.  Because it has a smaller box design our Travel will have a smaller sound (like any smaller guitar) but our Travel Electric with built in auto tuner allows you to plug into any amplifier or PA system giving you the same power as our full size guitars.
What's funny is that guitars with cheap pickups very often sound better direct than guitars with "good pickups". I have an Epiphone Special I with ( presumably GFS ) P90-style pickups and that thing sounds great direct. It's also fine with a band thru an amp if the band doesn't play too loud - if the band's too loud the low mid buildup means you gotta EQ a lotta bass out and it loses it's girth.

This is probably the most iconic guitar effect ever – from Slash to Jimi Hendrix to Mark Tremonti to SRV, the list of players who use wah pedals is almost never ending. Originally created to emulate the muted sound possible on a trumpet, it quickly became an iconic effect in its own right. The sound is pretty self-explanatory – rock your foot back and forth of the pedal to shift the EQ from bass heavy to treble heavy and you’ll get a nice “wah wah” as you play.
Fender California Series Classic This acoustic guitar series will make you swoon with its original Fender body shapes, fully painted tops of solid Sitka spruce and matching Stratocaster-style headstocks. But the California Series Classic models don’t only have the looks; they also have the sound and tonal quality to match. We don’t expect anything less from Fender, and this lineup surely delivers.
The 5-position switch controls which pickups are activated. On a standard Strat, the position closest to the neck activates only the neck position pickup. The position next to that activates both the middle pickup and the neck pickup. The middle position activates only the middle pickup. The next position activates both the middle pickup and the bridge position pickup. The last position activates only the bridge position pickup.
i have played fender most of my life .Fast neck and comfortable .However when my musical interest changed to southern rock i decided to buy a gibson . The mahogony body sounds different as does the string thru design of my firebird .Now i play both .Out of the box i prefer gibson and dont need to change a thing .I see many fender players always looking for “that sound” changing pickups pots etc.and using many boxws to change the tone.All i use with my gibson is a wa wa and overdrive
The godfather of all that is sought after in rack gear; behold, the Soldano SLO Rackmount Amplifier. Those of you that have heard of the SLO (Super Lead Overdrive) already know that this thing can be brutal when it comes to lead tones. Possessing one of the tightest crunch and overdrive channels known to man, the SLO Rackmount is hailed as a grail piece of gear for many guitar players. The SLO-100 offers two channels, Normal and Overdrive, each with independent Preamp gain and Master Volume controls.  A footswitch is also provided for effortless noise-free switching between the two channels.  The Normal channel has a Bright switch and a Clean / Crunch gain selector switch.  Standard features include a tube-buffered effects loop and a slave output.  Bass, Middle, Treble, and Presence controls provide the tone shaping.  From Clapton to Van Halen, from Warren DeMartini to Lou Reed – and from you to Mike Soldano himself, the SLO is simply the player’s choice.
The D-55 is Guild's dreadnought, very similar in shape to the all-conquering 14-fret Martin on which it's based. However, if your used to a handful in the neck, the D-55 dreadnought makes for quite the contrast: a gloss neck, and slimmer nut accentuating the neck's overall thinness; more a D than a C profile, to invite comfortable first-position chords, aided by an impressively low action. That Adirondack bracing is doing its job, too, because string separation, definition and dynamic range are all notable and it feels loud, alive and resonant when playing soft or hard. If this guitar is anything to go by, the latest Traditional models are absolutely up there with the other big American names, offering superb quality craftsmanship and world-class tone. The D-55 is a potentially serious workhorse that has every likelihood of outlasting and outperforming any one of us as long as we can keep on picking - a sumptuous strummer.
When looking to buy a guitar, you want to make sure that you’re picking a model that is right for your skill level, playing style, and needs, all that while ensuring that you don’t overspend. If you’re just starting out, there’s probably no need to spend a couple grand on a flashy model when one of the quality cheap acoustic electric guitars will do.
This article was extremely helpful for me to understand the 5 way (ok, 3 way) switch. I’ve only previously wired a guitar with one double humbucker, and now I’m going to replace the bridge and neck pickups in an Ibanez that has HSH. The 8 contacts were confusing me since my last wiring job didn’t even involve a switch, but after reading this I know exactly what to do.
Melodious tuning powerful pickups and with supreme body ESP is also famous for its affordable prices. This brand is famous for its quality and best for the lovers of Electronic Guitar lovers. The Japanese company was founded in Tokyo Japan in 1975.it manufactures some best  brands like  “ESP Standard”, “ESP Custom Shop”, “LTD Guitars and Basses”, “Navigator”, “Edwards Guitar and Basses” and “Grassroots”.
Some solid-bodied guitars, such as the Gibson Les Paul Supreme, the PRS Singlecut, and the Fender Telecaster Thinline, among others, are built with hollows in the body. These hollows are designed specifically not to interfere with the critical bridge and string anchor point on the solid body. In the case of Gibson and PRS, these are called chambered bodies. The motivation for this may be to reduce weight, to achieve a semi-acoustic tone (see below) or both.[34][35][36]
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