In 1978, Michel Chavarria, guitarist, singer and songwriter for French band Madrigal, decided to create a guitar shop with his friend Daniel Delfour. The shop was on a street called "rue de Laganne," which inspired the name Lâg. Like in many other cases, the small business started as a repair, setting and customization shop before creating its own models. Due to the quality of their instruments, they sell custom-made guitars to French and international musicians like Jean-Jacques Goldman, Phil Campbell (Motörhead) and Keziah Jones. Among the best-known models we have the Arkane (a Super-Strat available with different pickup combinations) and the Roxane (with Gibson-like humbuckers).
Simple answer is, if you have money for the higher end of Taylor, buy a Collings. I've been working as a repair tech in a store that stocks Taylor for around 5 years. Went to lutherie school under one of the best guitar builders in the country. I've played dozens of examples from nearly every model range Taylor has to offer, as well as a few of the more limited edition high $$$$ range. I will give credit where it is due, on the USA made models fit and finish is above many other brands.

Here are our choices for the five best YouTube channels. We made sure they all have plenty of content for novice players, but you’ll find lots of videos for advanced musicians, too. Some of them are hosted by people who are simply passionate about playing guitar and want to share that passion without trying to make a million bucks out of you. Don’t forget to show them support.
If you do have logic of GarageBand they come with a vast sample library including lots of different guitar sounds, now combine that with melodyne and you can get some pretty convincing custom guitar parts. It's a slow process but it will sound a lot better than most straight VI's, I've done the same with brass section stuff in the past to good effect.
Guitar amplifiers can also modify the instrument's tone by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequencies, using equalizer controls, which function the same way as the bass and treble knobs on a home hi-fi stereo, and by adding electronic effects; distortion (also called "overdrive") and reverb are commonly available as built-in features. The input of modern guitar amplifiers is a 1/4" jack, which is fed a signal from an electro-magnetic pickup (from an electric guitar) or a piezoelectric pickup (usually from an acoustic guitar) using a patch cord, or a wireless transmitter. For electric guitar players, their choice of guitar amp and the settings they use on the amplifier are a key part of their signature tone or sound. Some guitar players are longtime users of a specific amp brand or model. Guitarists may also use external effects pedals to alter the sound of their tone before the signal reaches the amplifier.

After the success of the DD-500, RV-500 and MD-500 units, Boss's GT-1000 is a floorboard combining all three. Sleek and modern, it's a formidably robust beast. To the rear, there’s the usual array of inputs and outputs, including USB recording out and an input for an additional expression pedal plus jacks to insert two mono pedals, or one stereo external pedal and a nifty send for amp channel-switching. In terms of editing, it’s not the most intuitive. For example, when you switch between patches in a bank, you’re not just turning off, say, a ‘Tube Screamer’, but switching to a different chain that doesn’t have a gain block - standard in rack-style processing, but tough for beginners. Sounds-wise, the 32-bit, 96khz sampling finds the GT-1000 punching above its weight, and on the effects side, there’s a wealth of modulations, delays, reverbs and drives. If you run a larger, more traditional pedalboard, perhaps the so-called ‘Bossfecta’ of the MD, RV and DD 500-series units would provide more flexibility, but for most players, the GT-1000 is a highly practical solution. 


Description: Body: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Top Wood: Laminated Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 43mm - Fingerboard: Ebony - Binding: White - Frets: 22, Jumbo, Medium - Inlay: Pearloid Thumbnail - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Rocking Bar - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch, Schaller Tuners - Pickups: FilterTron - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Orange Stain
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Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
The looper is a little more limited and offers shorter loop time than its competitors (20-seconds), but hey, at least it has a looper. The inclusion of a USB means you can hook the DigiTech RP500 straight to your computer and start recording riffs and ideas. If you like, you can use the included Cubase LE software for all your recording needs. Furthermore, just like with the other pedals on our list, you can manage and adjust your presets from the provided X-Edit Editor/Librarian software, which is quicker and easier than scrolling through the menus on the unit itself. The DigiTech website has a pretty extensive Tone Library, where you can download and use a bunch of patches.
To do hammers-ons and pull-offs, you simply click the switch for it on, and every time you play two notes within a small enough interval it plays them as a hammer-on or pull-off. This seems great until you realize it still does this even if you hold those two notes down together like you were playing a chord. To not have the first note immediately cut out, you have to switch this feature off.
Gibson thought it was a good idea to label the switches to make using them more intuitive, the problem is that they don't really correspond to their use in praxis. The Rhythm label was justified back in the rock 'n' roll era (that of Guitar Slim not Boyz II Men), but the times have changed and nothing stops you now from playing a rhythm guitar in Treble position (metalheads love it).

very recently I've been trying to get a band together where the Humbuckers of my les paul would suit the sound a lot more and decided to pull out my les paul, on trying to tune it, I noticed the intonation was a little off on all strings (not particularly noticeable by ear, but plugged into a tuner one could see it was off), but on the high E string it was very much off, from the third fret and higher it is very off sounding.
Jeff Beck: select alder body with a thinner C-shaped maple neck, contoured neck heel, rosewood fretboard with 22 medium-jumbo frets, three dual-coil Ceramic Vintage Noiseless pickups with 5-way switching, LSR Roller Nut, Schaller locking tuners and an American 2-point synchronized tremolo with stainless steel saddles. Available in Olympic White and Surf Green finishes (Artist Series, Custom Artist), as well as a “Custom Thinskin Nitro” version with a “Thinskin” nitrocellulose lacquer finish.
I’m getting a bad hum that almost goes away when I turn the volume up completely….gets loud as I turn it down. Someone rewired the guitar with 2 pair wire…..they attached a ground to the vol and tone pots everywhere the wires went….and also the body of the switch. I think it’s a bad ground loop problem….I’m going to change everything to single strand wire. I’m guessing there’s a voltage difference somewhere and it gets close to normal when I turn it all the way up on the volume pot.
MXR’s Distortion+ preceded the Tube Screamer and is an even simpler design, and, despite its name, is more an overdrive than a distortion. That said, its sound is considered by many to be a little more opaque, or colored, than the Tube Screamer’s. The box uses a 741-type IC and a pair of germanium diodes to achieve its soft-clipping sound. These are different components than the famed germanium transistors, but are made of the same material. Germanium is generally attributed a “softness” of tone, and the same applies to the diodes used in the Distortion+ (and other units); change them for silicon diodes and you’ve got a hard-clipping distortion pedal.
Amp: Gain- increases and decreases how much gain your sound has. Treble- increases and decreases high frequencies in your sound, AKA the brightness of your tone. Mids- increases and decreases the middle frequencies in your sound, AKA the 'punchiness' of your tone, if that makes any sense. Bass- increases and decreases the low frequencies in your sound, AKA how much 'thump' it has.
An utterly odd topic would be a discussion of woods for a certain tone. Wood does no magic to the tone. It has properties which might change the resonant behavior of a guitar body. But, that it does by some very course parameters, say stiffness and specific weight. Of very same importance is the shape of the plank which is referred to as “the body”. Stiffness, weight and shape work all together.
And you should still be able to take it to a certified Martin repair person. There may be some issue given how long you have had the instrument, however, if there is no evidence of the problem existing when the guitar was new. But it is worth checking out. Martin has changed policy in recent years regarding what voids the warranty and what does not. But if things are as you say, they should have taken care of the issue a long time ago. And they may still be willing to under your warranty. If not, you may be able to find someone who really knows what they are doing to fix the issue – which may require a neck reset, but would be worth it in my opinion. Good luck!
Players perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the company was taken over by CBS in 1965. As a result, the late-1960s Stratocasters with the large “CBS” headstock and (from the mid 1970s) the 3-bolt necked models (instead of the conventional 4 bolts) with the “Bullet” truss-rod and the MicroTilt adjustment system fell out of fashion. However, many blues-influenced artists of the late 1960s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar’s popularity. Also, so-called ‘pre-CBS’ Stratocasters are, accordingly, quite sought-after and expensive due to the perceived difference in quality even compared with contemporary post-CBS models. In recent times, some Stratocasters manufactured from 1954 to 1958 have sold for more than US$175,000.
It wasn't long before Southland went to hell in a hand basket. I would like to acknowledge the professionalism of people like the late Lee Ingber who was quality minded enough to know that junk will ruin any business. It's too bad that the last owners of Southland never learned that, even as their company faded into the sunset of the graveyard of greed.
This should give you an idea of when the majority of the production for any one model occured (majority meaning more than 5 instruments per year). Note this does not mean a model can not exist outside of these years - it certainly can. Just these are the years recorded by Martin in their ledgers. Note this list (for the most part) does not go past 1969.

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Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.

Winner of the prestigious Music Inc. Product Excellence Award, 2017, the HeadRush Pedalboard Guitar Amp And FX Modelling Processor wholeheartedly deserves a spot on our best multi FX pedals list, thanks to the huge amount of effects within as well as its vast array of amplifier, cabinet and mic models. This is one of the best options for working musicians, yet still remains affordable.


I don’t think beginners should spend a ton of money on their very first electric guitar. However, around the $300 mark you have a lot of options for really great entry level electrics. So, if you’re a beginner with a little more cash available, I say skip the “starter packs” and buy some good, solid gear to begin your journey. Choose from this list and you won’t need to upgrade for many years.
In addition to guitars, Gibson offers consumer electronics through its subsidiaries Gibson Innovations (Philips brand), TEAC Corporation (TEAC and Esoteric brands), Onkyo Corporation (Onkyo and Pioneer brands), Cerwin Vega and Stanton,[6] as well as professional audio equipment from KRK Systems, pianos from their wholly owned subsidiary Baldwin Piano, and music software from Cakewalk. (See section #Instruments)
It’s hard to look beyond the original and classic Gibson J-45 when it comes to recommending this particular shape. Players love the J-45 on account of its sweet, warm tone with beautiful singing high notes and defined mid range. Upon release it quickly acquired the moniker ‘the workhorse’ on account of its durability and guarantee of quality. Nothing that’s happened since has diminished that.
Despite starting life in Turkey in 1873, Epiphone is actually one of America’s oldest and best-loved musical instrument producers, having moved to this side of the Atlantic in 1903. Although the brand had been making acoustic guitars since 1928, Epiphone was acquired by Gibson in 1957 and soon began producing wallet-friendly versions of Gibson’s most famous models.
Included here after the filters are shifters like your standard pitch shifters, harmonizers, or octave pedals. You want to take care of any pitch changing (I'd argue even vibrato should happen here) before you add other effects into your signal, since they will react to the audio signal itself. You don't want to add reverb and then try to pitch shift, because the signal you send becomes too complex and inaccurate for such a precise effect.

This is like an echo where the sound you play repeats either once or multiple times depending on how you set the pedal. At low repeat settings this fills up the sound which is useful if there aren’t many other musicians. With lots of repeats it sounds rhythmic and huge. This effect relies heavily on the speed of the repeats keeping time with the song tempo. With practice it’s easy to set correctly but get it wrong and it can sound like your chords are running away from you.
My brother owns a Norma acoustic guitar modeled on the Gibson Hummingbird. He bought it used in the mid 70s. Solidly built but only average sound. I would guess that like many Japanese made guitars from the 70s, Norma was not a "company," but simply an American sounding brand name chosen by a larger Japanese instrument manufacturer to market their guitars in the USA. I own a mid 70s Penco acoustic, same deal, name was used on Japanese made guitars marketed through the Pennsylvania Music Company, thus Penco.
Bruce Springsteen has always had a not-so-secret weapon: "I got signed in the pack of new Dylans," he told Rolling Stone, "but I could turn around, kick-start my Telecaster and burn the house down." Springsteen didn't make any technical breakthroughs on guitar, but few players are better at coaxing emotion from steel and wood: witness the surf-rock recklessness of the "Born to Run" solo, the junkyard-dog bite of "Adam Raised a Cain" and the melancholy twang of "Tougher Than the Rest."
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The tip of a soldering iron is very hot, around 700F, and can damage the board, component packages, and wire insulation in a fraction of a second, not to mention your own skin, so be careful the tip does not touch anything as you move it in and out of the soldering area. Put the pencil back in its holder when not soldering. Don’t leave a hot iron laying on a bench or table.

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A middle ground between solid and hollow-body guitars, semi-hollows are hollowed out but have a solid block of wood running through the center of their bodies. This achieves the increased sustain and reduced feedback of a solid-body guitar while retaining the mellow tones of hollow bodies. For this reason, semi-hollow guitars became exceedingly popular with blues players like Chuck Berry and Freddie King. Their duality — sweet and mellow but also some awesome, crunchy sounds — makes them great all-purpose guitars with classic sound.
Their first flat-top acoustic guitar was produced some time shortly before 1910, but at that time their flat-tops were still a long way behind Martin in terms of popularity. It wasn't until 1923 that they began to seriously break into the flat-top acoustic guitar market with their signature Nick Lucas Special model and began to give Martin a run for their money.
Boss's MS-3 is an ingenious pedalboard solution that gives you programmable loops for three of your own pedals and a host of built-in effects - 112 to be precise. The MS-3 can switch your amp channels, adjust external effects and integrate with MIDI-equipped pedals. Then there’s the built-in tuner, noise suppressor and global EQ. It’s as if Boss looked at everything players could want from a pedalboard controller and crammed it into one compact unit. There are 200 patch memories for saving your expertly tweaked sounds, each with four effects or pedals that can be switched in or out at will, or four presets that can be instantly recalled. The MS-3 is rammed with pristine modulations, all the essential delay and reverb types, as well as a load of Boss specials, such as the dynamic Tera Echo and sequenced tremolo Slicer. Then there’s the niche yet useful effects, such as an acoustic guitar sim, Slow Gear auto fade-in and that sitar sim you never knew you wanted. The drive tones don’t live up to standalone pedals, but for most players, we’d wager those three switchable loop slots will be used for analogue drives, with the ES-3 handling modulation, delay and reverb. A genuinely exciting pedalboard development.

Tailpieces are the end of the highway for guitar strings. Or maybe the beginning, since strings are first threaded through or over tailpieces, or pegged into them, before they are pulled along the fretboard for their big meeting with the tuning pegs. Essentially their function is to anchor the strings, which means most guitar tailpieces must be strong enough to withstand the combined tension of at least six strings without lifting off.
Small-diaphragm condenser mics, on the other hand, tend to have flatter frequency plots and a better-behaved off-axis response, giving a sound sometimes described as more focused, but they seem to be less commonly chosen by the interviewees than large-diaphragm ones. Neumann's KM84 seems to be the most regular choice of small-diaphragm condenser, and numbers John Fry and Bill Price amongst its high-profile users, while Sennheiser's MKH40 warrants a particular mention from Mike Hedges: "I started using [these mics] when I was working with the Beautiful South. I started off with two and now have more than 20. I think they were originally designed for classical recording, because they have very high gain and very low noise. This means that you can get a very clean sound. They also accept massive amounts of volume, so you can put one against a guitar amp on full and it will take it." Hedge's concern about the ability of the microphone to handle the sheer volume of some guitar amps is echoed by several of the other producers, who make a point of mentioning that they switch in a condenser's 10dB pad when recording electric guitars.

Dimebag Darrell first discovered this guitar master while he was working in a club in Colleen, Texas. King was 17 and Darrell was 15. "They played and blew me away," King says. So he asked if the aspiring guitar legend needed help breaking down his guitar. It was the beginning of a working friendship that lasted until Dime's untimely death in 2004. Learning from another guitar master, Walt Treichler of Rotting Corpse, is what put this guy at the top of the extended family's list for repair answers. He also studied with Floyd Rose at a guitar show, learning everything there is to know about the Floyd Rose tremolo. "There's nothing better than the original thing Floyd came up with," he says. King is the kind of guitar doctor who makes house calls; but he's not accepting any new clients unless you're part of his extended family of musicians. "If I know 'em, and they need work on their guitar, I'll help 'em out."


A common mistake that most beginners do is buying a guitar without checking the wood quality. Many sellers deceive buyers with shiny and very attractive guitars that are of very poor quality and come in cheap prices. We can help you out of this trap so that you aren’t fooled into buying a poor quality guitar. You can visit our website before you make your purchase, and read through the specifications of any guitar. By doing this you will know the kind and quality of wood that has been used to make a guitar before you decide to buy it. So ensure you check the wood quality of a guitar before you consider buying it.
While tube technology is still considered state-of-the-art in countries where a potato is regarded as a square meal, these days solid-state and digital amps offer excellent tone for a lot fewer bucks, and with fewer maintenance headaches. However, tube tone is still considered the standard by many top players. Take a blind listening test, and let your ears be the judge.
The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.

Higher-cost amps for professionals with an XLR DI out jack may also have a "ground lift" switch (to be used in case of a humming ground loop), a DI out level control knob, and a switch which determines whether the DI out signal to the PA or recording mixing board is pre- or post- the amp's internal preamplifier and equalization circuitry. The pre-/post- switch enables a bassist to decide whether to send the audio engineer just the signal from her bass, or to send the signal once it has been pre-amped and equalized by her amp settings. Some higher-cost amps may have a parametric equalizer (or a semi-parametric equalizer) for some frequency ranges (typically the middle frequency range), which can be used to modify the bass tone to suit different styles or performance venues. Some bass amps have a 15 or 20 dB pad which can be used to attenuate "hot" signals, such as basses with an internal preamplifier (depending on the model of amplifier, some brands may provide two inputs (high and low gain) instead of providing a "pad". This pad can be turned on using a button. Some bass amps have an even stronger pad, a 40 dB pad.


I have a similar guitar to the one you bought. It was my grandmothers and I'm estimating it at over 30 years old. Very folk style. She told me she actually had the original strings from when she bought it! I believed her when i tuned the thing and the day after found that the 4th and 6th had snapped. From what i know, Decca just made guitars around that time, 60's to 70's. Mine says it has a steel reinforced neck and it is really heavy compared to others. its still in really good shape and I actually play it. I'm not planning on selling it but I know its well worth its age. It has a hand chissled Ser. # on the bridge.
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Rule 1 - There is a logical order for groups of effects. Some effects remove or add certain amount of frequencies, some change the basic shape of the audio waveform, and others react to the shape and amplitude of the waveform. Those are three main types of effects that logically can't come in any other order than they were just listed, or you end up with amateur results. The reason for that becomes clear in the next rules.
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Johnny Marr is a chief architect of the post-modern rock-guitar aesthetic. As the guitarist for seminal Eighties poetic pop stars the Smiths, he created a tonal palette and crisp stylistic approach that still forms the roadmap for much modern rock guitar playing. It was Marr who created the orchestral guitar soundscapes that enhanced the moody drama of Smiths singer Morrissey’s introspective lyrics and ironically detached vocals.
These pickups rely on electromagnetic induction to "pick up" the vibration of the strings.  Basically, it emits a magnetic field and as the string vibrates through it this generates an electrical current, which is your audio signal. This information is then sent on to an amplifier. The reason why you need an amplifier is that the original signal from the guitar is not strong enough to be pushed through a loudspeaker without a boost from the amp.
If you play with your guitar’s tone controls all the way up, your tone is going to be trebly and bright — possibly even painfully shrill at high volumes. To get a handle on their range, get a clean sound cooking out of your amp and play at every numeral stop on your instrument’s tone pot dial. And for multi-pickup models, do that for each individual pickup and all the blended settings. Find a few positions you like, and while playing a tune you know by heart, roll to different settings for verses, choruses and solos and see how tonally diverse and interesting things become. On stage this can be a very impressive way to create fresh sounds — subtle, but noticeable — without relying on pedals or amp channel switching.
Starting to learn on an electric guitar can be much easier as compared to an acoustic guitar. Electric guitars chords are easier to hold down as the width of the neck is shorter. The strings on the electric guitars are softer than those of acoustic guitars, which is easier on your fingertips if you're just starting out. They can be slightly more expensive than acoustic guitars, especially because other gear is needed to support your playing (i.e. amps, cables, and so on). It's all a matter of personal preference, but here are some of our top choices.

6) PLEASE DO NOT POST THE FOLLOWING: Memes, jokes/skits, rage comics, sub-related rant posts, spam, advertising of your goods or services, shill advertising, links to outside retailers (links in discussions are ok), gear for sale posts (head to /r/Gear4Sale). Comment manipulation (edits made to conceal behavior) is strictly prohibited. Market research is strictly prohibited.
In the vintage setup, the pickup is wired to the pot lug alone, with the tone control capacitor being attached to the output side. This tends to allow the volume to be rolled off without losing too much high end. This is great for those who play clean rhythm by just lowering their guitar volume as opposed to switching amp channels or turning off a boost pedal. It’s old-school, and it works. The downside is that the tone control sometimes has to be rotated a bit more before its effects are heard.
Next to the great sounds and looks, the most noticeable thing about Seagull guitars is the incredibly reasonable prices. With Seagull, you get a quality guitar made from superior woods and materials for a lot less than it seems like it ought to cost. The Performer CW Flame Maple is definitely one of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000 out there.
Here we have a sweetie from the late 1970s folks they just don' make them like this anymore this is the RARE High End Lawsuit 5053 model this model was discontinued decades ago. This guitar was made nearing 40 years ago of woods said to have been aged 20-30 years at time of its being built.... food for thought. Fresh release from the JVGuitars Vintage Vault is a beauty seldom seen in this configuration and in this condition we have collected many 5053 Alvarez lawsuit era guitars not all are like this one is SPECIAL this is a must see and hear beauty! Based on the Martin top of the line D-45 this Japanese crafted D-45 copy was crafted with top workmanship only the top luthiers were allowed to use this precious expensive aged Brazilian Jacaranda rosewood on this guitar its back - sides - fingerboard - bridge and headstock are ALL made of this exotic tone wood, the neck looks to be a high grade Honduran Mahogany and proudly still displays it's original imported by Saint Lewis Music gold Medallion and fancy SLM truss rod cover see pics The top is Solid Sitka spruce this guitar is detailed and adorned with much perfling and inlay top to bottom including its fingerboard and headstock, this example is in top playing condition and cosmetically excellent as well and is VERY RARE in deed to find one so excellent. The neck is a nice handful like the old Martin a medium slim profile, its beautiful fingerboard is excellent as are its frets.... Headstock is striking with its A over A inlay in mother of pearl, tuners are original and still doing an excellent job, This guitar has the tone only the Exotic wood series guitars can produce unique rich and dynamic with excellent volume and clarity a fingerpickers delight. Just freshly received a JVG setup with a new Martin Bone & compensated sadle along with a fret dress and a new set of Martin 80/20 Phosphorius Bronze strings 12's x 54 for a substantial tonal upgrade from its old plastic. Overall rated 9.0 +++/10 well preserved it is over 40++ years old and has been lovingly played and well taken care of all these years is not new or mint of course it clearly is well above average used / vintage This comes with a good hard shell case ... and will protect it for the next 4-5 decades. Wonderful players guitar in excellent vintage condition when will I ever see another like this??? its here as of today ask if serious about owning this gem Thank you for your interest in our vintage guitar contact Joe to buy this guitar at: JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come.

In the second diagram, the two pickups are wired in series. The theory behind series wiring is that the ground wire of one pickup is connected to the hot wire of the other pickup. As a result, they become a kind of compound pickup, with one ground and one hot for both. When wired in series, the pickups combine their impedance (resistance) and the output is very high. If your Strat’s middle pickup is a reverse-wound/ reverse-polarity type (aka RWRP), you’ll get the same humbucking effect as you do when the pickups are wired in parallel—no changes there.


It can be tough to know where to start when you’re looking at as many options as there are in the world of effects pedals. In fact, your first pedal may not even be a pedal at all – many amplifiers have built-in effects sections so you can get your introduction without having to attach an external stompbox. But if you have a more straightforward amp, or if you’re ready to try effects units that go beyond its built-in capabilities, there are some great varieties for novice users. And don’t forget that you can always look up the preferred pedals of your favorite guitar hero to inspire your own collection.
This old Nickelback hit is made up of only four different chords, written in the Key of G. During the verses only use G – C – F to progress, while the chorus of the song will add an Am (A minor) to change things up a little bit. This is a fun song to listen to and play along with, especially since the song is set a slower tempo, especially for a rock song.
Different people have different opinions on what makes a vintage guitar. For the purposes of this site, a vintage electric guitar or vintage bass is one that was produced in the golden age of rock and roll. From the very early 1950s when Fender first produced the Esquire and Broadcaster, and Gibson the Les Paul; to the early 1980s, when both of these companies sold to their current owners.
What does all this have to do with guitars? Crudely speaking, the metal strings of an electric guitar are a bit like dynamos: they make electricity when you move them. Under the strings, there are electricity-generating devices called pickups. Each one consists of one or more magnets with hundreds or thousands of coils of very thin wire wrapped around them. The magnets generate a magnetic field all around them that passes up through the strings. As a result, the metal strings become partially magnetized and, when they vibrate, make a very small electric current flow through the wire pickup coils. The pickups are hooked up to an electrical circuit and amplifier, which boosts the small electric current and sends it on to a loudspeaker, making the familiar electric guitar sound. Usually, the amplifier and loudspeaker are built into a single unit called an "amp."
From an appearance perspective, at least, the most important aspect of the guitar is the body’s finish. The finish of most electric guitars is either a nitrocellulose lacquer, a polyester, or a polyurethane. Nitrocellulose, for the unfamiliar, is highly flammable and also known as gun cotton. It is obtained by the nitration of cellulose, an important structural component of plants. In guitar coatings, nitrocellulose is blended with other compounds and organic solvents to create a lacquer. The solvents evaporate as the lacquer dries.
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The specifications of the neck and string setup dictate the guitar's overall playability. As such, it is important to get a handle of important specs which include scale length (the length by which the string is stretched from the bridge saddle to the nut), nut width, fingerboard radius, and neck profile (shape of the back of the neck). Beginners normally want guitars to play easier, and will prefer those with shorter scale length, thin nut width and neck profile, and flatter fingerboard radius. On the other hand, experienced players will have grown accustomed to a specific neck configuration, if this is your case, you will want your new guitar to have similar specs to what you already like.
Oh but this guitar is beautiful. The PRS SE A50E Angelus is something you would really want to play in front of an audience because of its stunningly good looks and the quality sound it produces. This guitar has a solid Sitka spruce top, figured maple back and sides, mahogany neck, bone nut and saddle as well as ebony fretboard and bridge. It has a distinct and highly playable Angelus Cutaway body shape. The PRS abalone bird inlays on the fretboard are a really nice touch. Yes, it’s a gorgeous, well-built guitar, but that’s not all.
Over a decade after putting down the guitar I was inspired to take it up again. I got this bundle since it includes all the essentials. HOLY COW!!! WHAT A GREAT DEAL THIS BUNDLE IS!!! First, the guitar itself is a beautiful, quality instrument. It's a solid top guitar with good sound, and a comfortable action and neck. It was easy to tune and is a tremedous value for an "entry level" guitar. Second, the case. There are better cases available but there are certainly alot of worse cases out there. Bottom line on the case, it's a $90 case by itself and you get it for less than $40 here. A great value if you ask me. Third, the tuner. It works, it's easy to use, that's all you really need right? Everything else is good.
The Les Paul Traditional 2019 is one of the latest iterations of this iconic guitar, bringing over the same pleasing aesthetics and rock friendly tone using modern production methods for improved reliability, consistency and expanded tone options. The body features a classic mahogany body with no weight relief, and a AA grade figured maple arched top. The 24.75" scale length mahogany neck is topped by a 22-fret fingerboard that has a nut width of 1.695". Giving this guitar its classic voice are Burstbucker 1 & Burstbucker 2 humbuckers, with Orange Drop capacitors that replicate the ones found inside vintage Les Pauls.
The first and easiest adjustment that most electric guitars can benefit from is stuffing soft foam into the cavity behind the pickups in order to stop microphonic squealing. The first time I used this was when I was repairing a Gibson Firebird for Johnny Winter—the foam stopped the pickup’s back plate from vibrating like a microphone diaphragm. I have since learned that reducing the space (the cubic volume) behind a pickup modifies its sound at higher sound levels. Discovering this resonating-chamber effect has altered my approach to routing a body for pickups on new guitars, too.
I remember the first time I saw Eddie Van Halen on MTV, the way he played two hands on the fingerboard during his short “Jump” guitar solo. I loved his cool “Frankenstein” guitar, so named because he cobbled together a variety of guitar parts and decorated his creation with colored tape and paint. Even as a 13-year-old who grew up primarily listening to, and playing, classical music, I felt compelled to run out and buy his band’s “1984” LP at my local Tower Records store.
This is the main component that separates acoustic guitars from electric guitars. A pickup senses the vibration from a string, transfers it to the guitar amplifier which then transfers it to the loudspeaker. There are many pickups but we’ll cover the four basic ones. The single coil pickup has a single coil of wire with two horseshoe-shaped magnets. They produce a bright, cutting sound and are quite noisy. The P90 pickup is a single coil pickup with one wide coil that increases the surface area of the strings, producing a bigger yet less bright sound. Humbucker pickups were designed with twin coils. They produce richer, warmer, more powerful sounds but roll back some higher frequency sound. Active-passive pickups use a battery-powered circuit to produce a powerful yet balanced tone across a range of frequencies. It outputs a balanced, clean tone.

To celebrate the new generation of shredders profiled in our May/June “Loud Issue,” the SPIN staff decided to find some wheedle in a haystack, taking on the impossible task of ranking our favorite guitar players of all time. Traditionally, the “greatest guitarist” timeline begins with Robert Johnson magically conjuring the blues, nears perfection with Eric Clapton mutating it beatifically, and then ultimately reaches a boomer-baiting Rock and Roll Hall of Fame apotheosis with the free-spirited Jimi Hendrix shooting it into space like feedback-laden fireworks. For this list, we veer toward the alternative canon that kicks in with the Velvet Underground trying to erase that form entirely, making guitar solos gauche and using instruments as sadomasochistic tools for hammering out sheets of white heat.
Fingers: The numbering system for the fingers on your fretting hand is very simple but also important. Your index finger is your first finger, your middle finger is your second finger, your ring finger is your third finger, and your pinky is your fourth finger. Again, super-simple but really important for when you start learning where to put your fingers to make chords.
A. It is never too late to learn how to play a musical instrument. An acoustic guitar does present some unique challenges for beginners, including the formation of calluses over time. Some working professional guitarists actually develop deep grooves on their fingertips after years of performing. But this is not a requirement in order to become an accomplished amateur guitarist. Practically every musical instrument places some physical demands on players, but developing skills like muscle memory and improvisation are tangible benefits of that extra effort.

Whether your style is searing rock or acoustic folk, the right guitar will help you sound and feel like a superstar. From acoustic guitars to electric hybrids to bass guitars, there’s a guitar designed exactly for the way you play. You’ll be rocking out in no time when you choose a guitar from Best Buy’s selection of top brands like Fender, Yamaha, Squier, Schecter, Mahalo, Dean Guitars and more.


Born in Australia, Stephanie Jones is one of most promising guitarists of young generation. She started to learn guitar at Wembley Primary School in Perth when she was 11. In 2010 Stephanie started her studies at the Australian national University and she graduated with First Class Honours in 2014. After winning several guitar competition, Stephanie was awarded an Australian Music Foundation Scholarship, which included a performance at Wigmore Hall in London. She has performed extensively including two Australian tours, a New Zealand tour, and with the Weimar Guitar Quartet, a Germany tour. Currently Stephanie is studying a Masters in Classical Guitar Performance with Thomas Müller-Pering at the prestigious University of Music Franz Liszt.
My current setup is tuner>wah>blues driver>keeley falng/delay/fuzz box>sonic max>looper. The second photo is current setup which sounds way better than original. Problem is now my flanger/phase side of my keeley won’t get loud like it used to and my loop wont let me hear what I’m playing when I lay down a riff, also when I play the loop back I can no longer play over the track.

It's Mal - i posted the comment ref the muted G string on my Epi Les Paul 1960 Tribute - thanks for your response it was very good of you. I'm going to be playing (when i say playing i really mean faffing with) my guitar later so i'll have a look at the saddle, though i have rubbed my finger over it to see if there were any obvious issues which there wasn't. I have also rubbed the graphite from my clutch pencil over it when changing strings - no improvement; i'll get magnifier out and take a closer look and let you know, i may take you up on your kind offer if i'm still stumped.


Don't just slap an effect on a track: why not try using automation to apply effects (in this case delay) on single words or phrases to make them stand out? Modern audio sequencers make it very easy to play around with spot effects — that is, effects which are applied to single notes or phrases within a track, rather than to a pattern or track as a whole. Try using different reverb styles on the snare within drum patterns: a short decay on the '2' and a long decay on the '4' for example. Another idea is to apply spot chorus to individual words within a vocal line, as a way of adding emphasis to the lyrics. The 'freeze' or audio bounce-down function of a typical sequencer allows you to get around any problems your computer might have in running lots of instances of a particular effect. Stephen Bennett
My visit to NAMM showed me that we’d definitely find at least a couple of good beginner’s amps for less than $100, so we decided to make that our price ceiling for this test. That’s enough to buy an amp loud enough to play with a small combo, compact enough to fit easily into a small bedroom, and light enough for kids to carry. Beginners don’t need more than that. And when you consider that most people who take up a musical instrument don’t stick with it long, it’s wise to limit the expenditure until one really needs a larger or more fully featured amp.
First off I need to mention that there is a category of effects I will call “overdrive” effects where descriptive labels often overlap so it can be confusing. They are essentially effects that simulate amplifier tubes being overdriven to create distortion. These type of effects are can be called: distortion or overdrive or fuzz or metal. And the label is usually based on the amount of gain they produce. 
Coming from Martin's Travel Series, the LX1E Little Martin has smaller proportions, with a total length of 34", body width of 12", shorter scale length of 23" and 1 11/16" nut width. While it can be a bit too small for some, it is easy to appreciate its impressive workmanship, bearing the same build quality and materials as found on their more expensive models. With the LX1E, you can own an affordable Martin guitar that has been proven to be a true workhorse instrument.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.

I would have never finished my project without this, 20 feet sounds like alot, but it can go very fast. I used this to rewire up an Epiphone hollow body,and I needed the length to reach from toggle to jack. The gauge is a perfect feel and doesnt have me worried about accidentally breaking it from movement. Also the cloth is great as it takes much more heat than the standard rubber coverings.


Well technically, the floor and the ceiling do shape the tone, post amp. Room acoustics are a major factor in the quality of sound recordings. Also Dan isn't wrong. Each thing that vibrates that eventually moves the pickup (while a note is being played or sustained) will disrupt the magnetic field. In physics there is hardly ever an instance where things have absolutely zero effect on the things around them. It comes down to the significance of the effect. For example, if something moves the pickup .05 picometers six times a second, then it likely has a negligible effect on the sound (i.e. our ears are not capable of detecting any difference. There does come a point where other variables do begin to change the characteristics of the sound. Additionally, as a string is struck, due to the rigidity (or slight lack thereof) the neck and body will vibrate, changing the distance between bridge and nut. The shortening and lengthening of this distance will then change the vibration frequency of the string. This can result in the dampening of vibration or potentially slight amplification of frequencies or overtones. Overall, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty that something does not have an effect on something else in this case. The truth, however, is that the degree to which the change is noticeable may not be detectable by the human ear.
I’m also going to go out on a limb and suggest the earliest Univoxes also included the ‘Lectra, a version of the one-pickup Aria 1930 violin bass (made by Aria). These were basically violin-bodied basses originally inspired by the Gibson EB-0, and popularized among imports by Paul McCartney’s use of the Höfner violin bass, copied by EKO. This was a hollowbody with no f-holes, Cremona brown finish, single neck pickup, bolt-on neck with position dots along the top of the 22-fret bound rosewood fingerboard. Strings anchored to a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly.
So, which are the best budget electrics guitars available today? We've gathered a selection of the electric guitars that we reckon offer the best bang for the buck in the sub-$/£500 market. You may recognise some of the perennial budget classics (hello - again - to the trusty Yamaha Pacifica), but there's a raft of high-scoring options out there for the more adventurous.
\n\n Harmony branded some of their old acoustic guitars with the Nashville\nname. \n\n There was a Japanese company called Nashville\nMusical Instruments NMI \n\n I have an acoustic guitar with no name on the headstock, and\na label inside that reads nothing but Nashville. I tracked down the information\non it once. It's a cheap guitar from the 80’s, made overseas, imported by a US\ncompany that sells children’s toys now. I can't for the life of me remember the\nname of that company now. I was searching for it, with no luck, when I found\nyour question. \n\n There is also the Nashville Guitar Company NGC based in\nInglewood, TN \n\n
Perhaps the most famous of these sounds—or, at least, the most formative—is that of Dave Davies, the lead guitarist for The Kinks, who got bored of his Elpico amplifier in 1964 and decided to pierce its speaker cone with a razor blade. This effect, known as “clipping,” cuts off the audible waveform at the height of the amplifier’s limits (voltage, current, and thermal), thereby distorting the signal. Although Link Wray had been doing this since the late 1950s, Davies popularized guitar distortion in the first few moments of “You Really Got Me,” changing guitar music.
This technique is only possible with 4-conductor pickups or pickups that already have coil-tap lead instead of all four leads. Coil tap is a connection between two coils in a humbucker and is sometimes referred to as “series link”. Vintage style pickups have their coil tap enclosed in the pickup which means that we can’t play with it. Having coil tap gives us a couple of wiring options:

Among other things, they’re extremely reliable, sound great and built like tanks, so you can stomp on them for years and they’ll never let you down. However, collecting them all will cost an absolute fortune. Fortunately, the team at Boss have put together a couple of options for those who want a world of Boss effects pedals at their feet. One option is the Boss ME-80 Multi Effects Processor Pedal.
I got this one because my 18-year-old Takamine G-series has some serious fret wear, and a slightly warped neck, even with the truss rod maxed out, and will cost more to repair/refurbish than this one cost outright. Hence, the action is quite high, and it's hard to play bar chords higher than the 3rd fret, and there's some noticeable buzz and rattle unless I hold my mouth just right...
While Fender specialize in the single-coil pickup, it’s Gibson who are masters of the pickup in general – and it shows when you browse the chart in our dedicated Gibson pickup article. However, you’ll quickly discover that there is no ‘one Gibson pickup’, as the brand offer a wide range including single-coils and humbuckers, medium and high outputs, and vintage and modern tones. You’ll find different pickups on all of Gibson’s famous models, including the Les Paul, Firebird, SG and Flying V. Perhaps they are best-known for their PAF-style humbuckers – an awesome vintage tone that is well-replicated in their famous Gibson ‘57 Classic Plus.
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ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Main Spring Stopper Tremolo Block Stop Rod With the guitar tuned correctly, adjust the Main Spring make sure that the Stop Rod makes contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper. If the Stop Rod does not make contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper, adjust the Main Spring adjustment screw until contact is made.
We spent 45 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. One of the best things about an electric guitar is its portability. Most times, however, you can't say that about the amps you need to go along with them. Fortunately, these mini amplifiers have come along, developed by the top names in full-size models, and offer incredible sound quality in an exceedingly portable package. We've ranked these micro monsters by tonal character, power, and control. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best mini guitar amplifier on Amazon.
As I tried to point out, what is high action is based on personal taste for the most part. Also, Martins traditionally have higher action than many other manufacturers. But unless it is a true defect in the particular guitar, from wood swelling or shrinking, etc. action is easily adjustable, but it is recommended that you have a certified Martin warranty repair person do that, unless you are comfortable with such adjustments.
From Clean to Modern, chose from 8 amp settings, four modulation effects and four delay/reverb effects, with tap tempo. Its Hi-Fi sound can be sculpted by a three-band EQ, giving it a lovely spacious sound distribution; and special off-stage circuit gives it excellent overdrive qualities even at low, discreet volumes. Finally, its sleek designer looks will fit into any living space, especially with its soft tube glow.
Due to the great sensitivity of some advanced vibrato systems like the Kahler, the Steinberger and the Floyd Rose, a light touch is required. Simply placing one’s hand on the bridge can cause notes to drift in and out of tune. So players — especially the heavy handed— would be wise to try a variety of vibrato-equipped guitars out before making an instrument purchase or modifying a valued six-string friend.
The Seagull Maritime Solid Wood Series of acoustic guitars are designed to offer the features and benefits of the brand’s higher-end Artist Series of guitars but at a more affordable price point. The Maritime SWS guitars are offered in a variety of shapes such as mini jumbo, folk and dreadnought, and come in two custom-polish finishes: high-gloss and semi-gloss.
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The way you connect your amp, speaker and DI box depends on whether the DI box has a built-in dummy load.If miking isn't practical, or you don't want to find space for a soundproof speaker/mic box, then perhaps one of the available DI options will give you the result you need. I was once reviewing an analogue guitar preamp that provided several programs, both clean and overdriven, and I noted that one of the clean settings sounded really superb. When I checked the manual, I found this was the bypass position! The reason it still sounded good was that the unit was matching the high impedance of the guitar to the medium impedance of the recording system and, for clean sounds, you can get this same effect by using any good-quality active DI box that offers a high-impedance (500kΩ or more) input. A little compression will add density and 'spring' to the sound (experiment with the attack time to get the best 'pluck' sound, as too fast an attack can squeeze all the life out), while reverb will put back the missing sense of space.
Best acoustic I've owned. It's an Oregon dreadnought, an all round stunning looking guitar. The sound is beautifully balanced, clear with nice defined bass, sits perfectly in the midrange and projects well without being too bright. It's light weight with meticulous craftsmanship and beautiful timber. When you look at these guitar it's obvious that they are built with a lot of care and attention to detail.
Launch price: $799 / £679 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple/pau ferro (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x Vintage Noiseless Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, 6-position V6 rotary tone switch, tone, 5-way pickup selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized Tremolo, Deluxe locking tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Olympic White, Mystic Ice Blue, Classic Copper & 3-Color Sunburst
However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.
Nowadays it is customary to play this repertoire on reproductions of instruments authentically modelled on concepts of musicological research with appropriate adjustments to techniques and overall interpretation. Thus over recent decades we have become accustomed to specialist artists with expertise in the art of vihuela (a 16th-century type of guitar popular in Spain), lute, Baroque guitar, 19th-century guitar, etc.[4]
If you know that you want to use your mini amp to reduce the audio footprint of your jam sessions as much as possible, you’ll pretty much have your pick of the litter among miniature models. That’s because even the most powerful of these amps can produce viable tone at a very low volume, as manufacturers know that this demographic needs the ability to play quietly. If you want to maintain a certain degree of audio fidelity and flexibility, you might need to aim for one of the slightly larger mini amps out there. Models with at least five, and preferably 10 watts will be the best for generating a realistic and presentable guitar tone. Some of these are even nice enough that you could use them to perform at any venue capable of miking the amp itself.

The Jameson Left-Handed Black is an acoustic-electric guitar that comes with a slick appearance, a smooth body, and an impressive sound. With its thinline frame and cutaway design, this model is good for both amateurs and seasoned guitar players. You get a guitar that sounds just as awesome regardless if you’re playing it unplugged or through an amp.

Look at the action. Action is the distance between the fingerboard and the string at any given time. Make sure you hear no buzzing from the guitar when playing a note at a normal weight. Try it at the 5, 10, 12, fret, etc. and listen for the 'buzz' of strings banging on the frets below it. If any guitar is like this, ask the music store (any good one will do this for you) to adjust the neck if you can try it out in playable condition. If they can adjust it for you, then there is no problem, it just needed adjustment.
Unfortunately, a few years prior, we were playing in a festival where there were many bands. THAT soundman flat out refused to use a direct signal and insisted on mic’ing my cabinet. I had spend MONTHS designing and programming my TWO preamps, one for the stage and the other for the board… certain effects were sent to one and not the other… My whole sound was based on two pre-amps running at the same time. This is about as close as I’ve come to physically punching anyone. I told him to plug in to the XLR output right “there.” He wouldn’t… made excuses as to not knowing which channel on the snake ithe other end was plugged into. (That made no sense at all… wouldn’t he know which channel the MIC was in? All he had to do is remove the mic, plug that end of the cable into the output of my unit.) Weeks later, people in the audience commented to me that they remembered that I played and sang the gig “fuming” over something. Half of my sound wasn’t there AT ALL.
I gave some relief to the guitar, just enough to be able to move a business card on the 8th fret. I think the truss rod adjustment is ok now. Strangely it's still buzzing. I compared the height of the bridge to my Navigator N-LP-380LTD and i have the same height on the RLG-120 the same. The string that buzzes the most is the D string!!! E and A string buzz too but less than the D. Don't know if i want to raise the bridge more. G B E are ok! Don't know if the D slot on the nut is too low. Seems like the slots on the nut on my guitar are higher than the ones on your Burny. Don't know what to do. Frets seem even. Any chance it's the saddles or something? Do they play a role on buzzing. I will raise the bridge tomorrow morning and see how it goes. Any idea what should be a standard string height on these guitars? Lets say height on 1st fret, 5th fret, 8th fret, 12th fret, 16th fret, 22nd fret. Can we say that? Can you tell me yours to check with mine?

A looper allows you to record a musical passage or phrase then play that passage back repeatedly. You can then record more loops and layer them, one on top of the other. Most recording and playback functions are foot controlled, and once you’ve created suitable backing tracks, you can can then play over the repeated passages in real time, creating exciting one-man-band sounds never possible before. Many of the more advanced models include built-in rhythms, custom effects, inputs for vocal mics and other instruments, plus MIDI and USB capabilities so that you can use the looper as part of your digital song-creation and recording processes.

When buying your first guitar, it’s sensible to stop and think about what you are buying it for. Is it just something to learn on? Will you be upgrading in a year or two when you start thinking about forming a band, gigging, and recording? If so, you may be better off trying one of these affordable electric guitars, which all offer a solid platform on which to learn.
As the text says, the pick wasn’t exactly identical with all the samples. This would make for the differences alone: The movement of the string must not be imagined as a plain two dimensional one. In fact it’s rotating in three dimensions, while the pickup only senses that part of the movement which is perpendicular to the deck of the guitar. The vibrations direction changes all the time and does so for each frequency component (read: harmonics) independently.
Fender "Squire / Bullet" Strat. Great, low priced project guitar. Black, laminated body, maple neck with Indian Rosewood fingerboard. 4-bolt neck plate. Original, "covered" tuning machines and nut installed. Frets in NEW condition. Neck adjusted well with slight "back-bow" under no tension and does have adjustable truss rod. Body and neck finish in excellent shape. Headstock finish has wear to the word "Bullet" see photos. We have no additional parts with this one, nor a case or gig bag. Guitar as photo'd only. Ready for your custom hardware parts. Would make a great project / player or second "don't care if it gets stolen off the stage" guitar.
With the SparkFun Proto Pedal you’ll find all the problems of a guitar pedal’s complex framework solved with true bypass and LED switching; a large, open prototyping area equivalent to a standard solderless breadboard; a small prototyping area for power regulation or reference voltages; and six positions to help organize potentiometer wiring. To make your life even easier, not only have we written a complete assembly guide for the Proto Pedal; we have also written two effect circuit guides that utilize the board’s large prototyping area. All of these guides can be found in the Documents section below.
I consider Squier and Epiphone to be the two top brands beginners should be looking at for their first guitar. However, there are some key differences when it comes to their flagship instrumets. Where the Epiphones listed above have a pair of humbucking pickups, the Squier Stratocaster has a trio of single coils, and the Telecaster a pair of single coils.
When someone says: "I've got a Gibson Les Paul with Bare Knuckle Pickups" I tend to think well, you don't really have a "Gibson" Les Paul at all then, because you've removed the elements of the guitar that make it sound like a Gibson. But guitarists are a conservative bunch and tend to hold on to their beliefs, biases, and myths. I've not long managed to let go of mine and it's made me happier with the guitars I now have, and has saved me a lot of money!
The guitar's history mirrors the cultural values, preoccupations, and norms in the United States over time. So, too, does the guitar's design, especially since the development of solid-body guitar construction by the 1950s. Because the sound produced by solid-body electrics does not depend on their shape, makers could experiment with a wider range of guitar designs. This era's seemingly radical instruments echoed the popular cultural focus on space-age modernity. The Fender "Strat" recalled the modern tail fins and imaginative colors of Detroit's cars, while the Gibson Flying V literally appeared ready for takeoff.
“Back in the fifties and sixties, you could tell what studio they had been recording in just by listening to the song,” Dr. Susan Horning Schmidt says. She is a professor at St. John’s University who has researched and written extensively about sounds and the recording process. During the period Dr. Horning Schmidt is referring to, the recording facilities were also physically bigger and bands often played together in a more live-type setting. Horning Schmidt states that “there’s a lot more space in the recording, a lot more acoustical space and dynamics.” Unfortunately, we’re losing that space with contemporary recording and production techniques.
Reverb is one of the most popular guitar effects in use. It’s so subtle, natural and valuable that it can easily turn a mediocre track into something more profound. The pedals we have listed above are by far some of the best you can get at the moment. They are not all the same, and each offers its own take on reverb in general. However, all of them will serve you more than well in your search for that tasty reverberation. Lastly, we hope that this guide has helped to clear up some misconceptions about reverbs you might have had.

“The bottom line is you get a better dynamic response from the coil. Most people who play a hand-wound pickup say it sounds more ‘open’. It’s easy to make a pickup sound brighter but to have a truly open voice it’s got to be dynamically responsive – and that’s what scatter-winding [intentionally irregular hand-winding of a pickup coil] does. Also, compared to a machine-wound coil, the frequency response is slightly extended. So the sound is bigger and you hear more not just in the high frequencies but also in the depths of the frequency response.”

As can be seen from our reviews above, it clear that the best guitars are those that meet the needs of the player—whether beginner or intermediate player—the best electric guitar should be able to provide quality sound, last for a considerable time, easy to play and always reliable when needed. Although every single guitar listed here are of top quality, there are different guitar for every budget, style and genre of play.


The early Silvertone electric guitars were made by Harmony and Danelectro, with a few exceptions. Danelectro had been making amplifiers since the 1940's for Sears, Epiphone and it's own brand. Their manufacturing facility was in Neptune New Jersey. The Dano's started mainly with the infamous "U" series which had the Lipstick pickups and "Coke-bottle" headstocks. Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix and many other rock stars got started and continue to play the Dano's. Aside from the very first Danelectros for Sears they all had the Lipstick pickups. That's how you can tell a Dano from the other manufacturers. Danelectro also manufactured the infamous "amp-in-case" models of which I have two examples: a 1964 and a 1968. If you want more info on Dano's go here.
Cap paralleled with a resistor. DiMarzio and Seymour Duncan recommend this configuration. Typical values are 560pF and 300K. It’s supposed to provide more consistent treble bleed but having a resistor paralleled with the pot will mess up pot taper. When rolling the pot down it is actually getting closer to a ~190K pot because 500K || 300K gives around 190K.
Les Paul, the legend, designed this guitar. This guitar has had more widespread popularity than the Strat, IMO. Jimmy Page was a huge fan of the Les Paul and the SG. Gibson made the double neck SG on special request made by Jimmy Page which was featured in the song "Stairway to Heaven" in the concert at Madison Square garden. Jeff Beck and Pete Townshend are among other notable people who use the Gibson Les Paul.
Some guitarists find spectral overtone melodies inside sheets of feedback (see: Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music, Sonic Youth), but British wunderkind James Blackshaw uncovers them in careful stacks of 12-string acoustic guitars and bright orchestrations. Minimal in his attack and classical in his drama, Blackshaw bears the acoustic guitar torch in the 21st century, his pieces unfolding in slow, formal shifts until they beam like a burning light through stained glass.
The origins of the modern guitar are not known with certainty. Some believe it is indigenous to Europe, while others think it is an imported instrument.[32] Guitar-like instruments appear in ancient carvings and statues recovered from Egyptian, Sumerian, and Babylonian civilizations. This means that the contemporary Iranian instruments such as the tanbur and setar are distantly related to the European guitar, as they all derive ultimately from the same ancient origins, but by very different historical routes and influences.
Lets face it: when most folks first pick up the electric guitar, the only other gear they think they might need would be an amp, a pick, some cables and maybe some pedals if they are savvy. As these players become more experienced and move from their garage to live music venues and recording situations, they eventually run into some issues and realize there must be better ways to be heard than turning the amp to 11.
The MD400 has one Alnico V humbucker at the bridge and one Alnico V mini-humbucker at the neck. Both are ‘rail’-style pickups, which are quieter, and provide more consistent tone and sustain across the strings. Both pickups have been coil-split, too—so push or pull the master “Tone” knob to disable one coil of each humbucker, effectively turning them into single-coil pickups.
My 15 year old daughter recently renewed interest in the guitar she had bought a few years ago but had never really played much. She was disappointed when she noticed the strings were loose. We brought it here and Ted was so helpful and engaging. He recommended new guitar strings; normally you can buy the strings and do it yourself, or pay them to do it. He readily understood that while my daughter didn't know how to do it herself, she would like to know. He showed both my girls how to string a guitar, talking them through each step while he expertly strung the guitar and got it in perfect tune. Ted teaches guitar and his tutorial was an excellent recommendation of his teaching skills. He also threw in a cleaning cloth and gave us chocolates - how much better does it get than that?! We will definitely be coming back!
When Rolling Stone founder Jann S. Wenner asked John Lennon how he rated himself as a guitarist, Lennon replied, "I'm not technically good, but I can make it fucking howl and move. I was rhythm guitarist. It's an important job. I can make a band drive." It is, and he did: Lennon was the Beatles' spark plug and bloodletter, often adding rawness to pristine pop songs. Listen to the airborne strums that power "Help!," the circular riffage of "Day Tripper" or the deceptively sloppy "The Ballad of John and Yoko" – where, with George Harrison away on holiday, Lennon turned rudimentary lead and rhythm lines into sharptoothed magic. He was also capable of generating a truly ferocious tone: In the live promo clip for "Revolution," Lennon makes his hollow-body Epiphone Casino screech like a very angry lawn mower. Still, he didn't get his due as a guitarist in the Beatles' heyday. "They call George the invisible singer," Lennon said. "I am the invisible guitar player."

Compressor sometimes sounds good after distortion too, it helps with noise (compressors can be noisy and if put before overdrive then the distortion pedal makes the noise louder). Placing the compressor after distortion also increases your sustain (depending on the type and amount of distortion used!). It can sound darker if placed after as well - so it really is down to your ears and what you think sounds best! But I have mine first in the chain, before Fuzz as I don't often (ever?) use them together
If it is muted in positions all up and down the neck, and you've already tried different strings, then I think you really need to be looking at the bridge. Is there any sort of slot cut in the saddle for that string? It could be that it is just the right width to kind of kill any sort of vibration from the string. Might be worth slackening the string, lifting the string out of the slot and setting it just a mm or two to the side and tuning it up again to see if that helps. If it does, then you'll need to do something about that saddle. You might be lucky enough to be able to swap it with another string, or maybe even turning it around might make enough of a difference. To be honest it's a hard one to troubleshoot, but if you want to contact me by email about it with some close-up photos, I'd be more than happy to try to help you figure out what the problem is. Email is stueycoolTAKE-THIS-PART-OUT@gmail.com
• Stop: A stop tailpiece is a bar, typically made of an alloy, which is held to the body of a guitar by large screws threaded into embedded sleeves. They are most often aluminum, zinc or brass based, with the latter the most costly. Aluminum has a few advantages. When the stop tailpiece was perfected by Gibson over a half-century ago, the originals were made of aluminum. Many players prefer those today for the vintage vibe, but aluminum is also the lightest weight tailpiece alloy, which some believe allows the strings and the guitar’s body to connect — which is another function of the tailpiece — in a more resonant fashion. It’s best to be careful while changing strings with a stop tailpiece, because they sometimes fall out of their sleeves and can scratch the finish.
"Acousterr's tab maker is a tablature maker application which can be used to write down and compose music. Users can create tabs, play them out, explore tabs created by other users. They can choose any instrument like guitar, bass guitar, piano, ukulele. The sounds are mathematically modelled to be generated at runtime for any combination of notes and effects like hammer on pull off etc for different types of instruments. This gives a beautiful listening experience. Multiple tracks can be added in a single tab which play out simultaneously, so as to simulate an entire song with various parts like bass guitar, lead guitar, rhythm guitar etc. The UX for editing multiple tracks has been meticulously designed to allow tab lines to synchronise easily. With great keyboard support, notes can be easily added and chords can be created on the fly by pressing shift key and selecting multiple notes. Scale helper is there to allow composing solos easily. Designed to work well on mobile browsers too."

SJ Series: The SJ is Collings’ version of what is commonly called a small Jumbo. Although the 16 inch lower bout is slightly wider than a dreadnought, and the sides almost as deep, the tight curve at the waist creates in a very different sound chamber. SJs, especially examples in maple, typically have a more pronounced midrange response when compared to a dreadnought.
It's amazing how this relatively new company, which officially started in 2007, is now playing with the big boys. Blackstar has a pretty straightforward claim to fame, and that is to provide premium quality high-gain tone in the price ranges that they enter into. And judging from the very positive response of rockers and metal heads, they are doing their job really well. As usual, artist endorsements play a big role, and Blackstar has big name backers like Neal Schon from Journey, Richie Sambora, Ted Nugent and Sammy Hagar to name a few, along with a long list of up and coming guitarists from rock and metal bands. While they still excel in providing high-gain tones, Blackstar amps also offer versatile overdrive and distortion flavors, thanks to the company's innovative ISF (Infinite Shape Feature) technology, which lets you change the tone of your amp from American to UK flavors with just one knob.
There's just no getting around the Martin brand when there's talk about good acoustics. And since we're talking about the best of them, it's not surprising to find their name filling up multiple slots in this list. The Martin DRS2 acoustic guitar is special because it gives us a true all-solid wood body Martin acoustic guitar - at a very reasonable price point, in the dreadnought shape that the company themselves developed.

Loose frets are especially problematic in certain old guitars, but are generally very easy to fix. You'll be amazed at the difference you can make with just a few tools, a bit of knowledge, and a little time. Fixing loose frets can eliminate fret buzz, remove sharp fret ends, and greatly improve the tone of any guitar. If your luthier bill will be greater than the value of your guitar, definitely time to have a go yourself!
Various manufacturers have developed attractive looking multi-effects pedals and claim that their product is the "best". After searching forums, reading customer reviews and talking one on one with the experts, we have shortlisted some of the best multi effects pedals of this year. If you're looking at delaying sound, you may wish to look at a pedal with a delay effect.
Those items considered -- performance notation and computational capacity for emulation of stringed instrument sounds otherwise reinforced by the same speaker systems that amplify synthesized sounds -- the other significant factors in the realism matrix involve economics of VST production, listener preferences and, least we forget, performer or producer preferences.
A common theme with these models is the capability to easily access the highest notes of the instrument, alongside dual humbuckers and massive sustaining bodies.  The Explorer, much like the V, is now a very common electric guitar shape in the heavy rock and metal genres, but was widely used in other styles as well.  This is evidenced by one of the most famous Gibson Explorer players, Allen Collins of Lynyrd Skynyrd.
Although much less common, the second trick I have in store for you shouldn't be taken lightly. The idea is to double a more or less distorted guitar part with an acoustic recording of the strings of your electric guitar recorded simultaneously as the distorted part. As preposterous as it sounds at first, considering that the sound of an electric guitar without an amp is certainly not the most pleasant one, the overall result can be truly amazing! Indeed, well managed, this screeching sound has the particularity of adding a bit more dynamic relief to "trashy" sounds, providing the performance a more "organic" aspect, especially due to the accents produced by the pick. But just like with the first trick, you need to sub-mix this take wisely so that the listener doesn't end up discovering the trick.

This is a no brainer, but a value that must be considered before any purchase no less. As mentioned above, your abilities on the instrument will likely affect the price range you’re looking at, which may have an effect on the brands you shop within as a consequence. For instance, if you’re not looking to buy a high end guitar, you probably won’t even bother testing out a Gibson, as their guitars will likely be out of your range. The reverse is true as well, an experienced player on the market for high end tone probably won’t be satisfied by many of Yamaha’s offerings.

There have been several changes in the amplifier world since we last took a look at this mega amp article, spurring us to refresh a lot of content. We have replaced some models in our top ten chart, such as the Bugera Trirec and the Vox AV15, with a host of new additions. These include classic combos like the Fender Champion 100 and the Vox AC15C2, with some awesome heads such as the EVH 5150III and the Boss Katana, as well as the super portable Roland Cube Street.
A half-century later, effects are everywhere. Whether they’re built into your amplifier, a single pedal, multi-effects processor, rack-mounted, or controlled through an iOS device, there’s a vast array of tones at your disposal, ready to add sonic magic to your performances or recordings. Most recording and performing guitarists have come to depend on effects to add flavors both subtle and flagrant to their sound, helping them to carve out the signature tones with which they’re identified.

Parts made for the Kay Vintage Reissues may not fit or lineup with the original and we do not guarantee that our part will fit your guitar. We do sell SELECTED parts and hard shell cases for the following: K161V Thin Twin, K775V Jazz II, K162V Pro Bass, K5970V Jazz Special Bass, K1700V Barney Kessel Pro, K6700V Barney Kessel Artist and K8700V Barney Kessel Jazz Special.
Amazing guitars, specially the Custom Series full solids. You can choose from variety of tonewoods and soundboard combination and 4 different shapes. Offering almost every player's preference. You can also choose options such as soundport off-the-rack. Great craftsmanship, amazing tone, and superb playabality at an amazing price. Great guitar, and definitely not an OEM brand. They only make their own guitars.
I'll be honest .. my Washburn N4 is hands down the best I've ever known. To me, Les Pauls sound amazing but are heavy and play like a log cabin. A buddy of mine's Suhr Strat felt/sounded clinical and small. An old Gibson SG felt like a cigar box jobbie. I remember in the early 90s looking at the Vai Ibanezes and the body was great despite the zany colors but the neck was too thin and whispy. I had the frets leveled and crowned and the action on mine 10 years ago and it just plays and feels like butter .. maybe 2 - 2.5mm at the 12th fret. The neck I sanded with 2000 grit now slighty reflects light so it glides beautifully feeling like 'satin wooden glass'. My aftermarket pickups puts the tone squarely into a modern fusion rock camp of sorts .. Oh yea and I think it's the neck shape of these Davies N4s that might make them so cool. The nut is a wider, more comfortable 1 11/16 inches with a flat fingerboard radius .. so may of the others seem like 1 9/16 with a cramped, rounder fringerboard. I did try a JP6 I didn't care for the feel of .. tl;dr ymmv :)
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown
I bought this kit for myself. I wanted the satisfaction of building and playing my own guitar. The price was well within my budget. I did upgrade the electronics, put on a Bigsby tailpiece, a new roller tune-o-matic bridge, and planet waves self trimming tuners. The items in the kit were fine to use, but i wanted a one off guitar, that would have the sound and the look I wanted.
Delay pedals take your original signal, a guitar chord or note for example, delays it and plays it back exactly how the pedal hears it the first time. It can either play the note back once or multiple times depending on your settings or “feedback time”. Often, you’ll see Digital Delay pedals as well as Analogue Delay pedals. The major difference is that digital delay pedals will offer longer delays and a ‘cleaner’ exact sound, however guitarists often prefer the analogue sound for all the subtle nuances and slight unpredictability in sound. This comes down to personal preference but both options sound great.
Distortion and overdrive circuits each 'clip' the signal before it reaches the main amplifier (clean boost circuits do not necessarily create 'clipping') as well as boost signals to levels that cause distortion to occur at the main amplifier's front end stage (by exceeding the ordinary input signal amplitude, thus overdriving the amplifier) Note : product names may not accurately reflect type of circuit involved - see above.[38]

While other Univox brand amps may have existed during this period, these are the only ones on our radar scope. The brand was still being put on amps as late as 1976, and all of the later amps were still in a 1980 binder, though by ’79 only two Univox amps were listed in the price list. Most likely, when the Univox guitars went away in ’77 or ’78, so did the Univox amps, but supplies probably continued to be available as late as 1980. Anyhow, this sets the stage for the next development in amps to which we’ll come back…
A half-century later, effects are everywhere. Whether they’re built into your amplifier, a single pedal, multi-effects processor, rack-mounted, or controlled through an iOS device, there’s a vast array of tones at your disposal, ready to add sonic magic to your performances or recordings. Most recording and performing guitarists have come to depend on effects to add flavors both subtle and flagrant to their sound, helping them to carve out the signature tones with which they’re identified.
Here we have a beautiful player with great heritage.. This guitar was an Import from Japan back in 1978 its a very well built guitar and employs the same x bracing seen on Martins. Workmanship is very high as is materials the vintage tone woods are beautifully mellowen and the tone has opened up nicely on this and so the volume is good on this guitar with a new set of straings now sounds like quite big a Piano...clear and clean god volume and reasonible bass.. Very good sound from this one..t also plays quite nicely with good play action not to low not to high...it plays very wel.. structually no cracks or serious anything to speak up just the most minimap superficial nicks as this vintage guitar qualifies for the xcllent vintage condition catagory. The finsh is wonderful and glass like shine to it and has a beautiful warm patine to it you can't get without waiting the near 40 years for it to age this way... this guitar will make somon a wonderful D-18 /28 style instrumnt to enjoy for another 40 years... If your like us you love vintage instruments and this is a bargain of a great lttle player, for a song.. You will be pleased. Thanks for looking if interested contact Joe at : gr8bids@comcast.net .

What our panelists didn’t like about the Spider Classic 15 is the weird operation of its controls. Because Line 6 uses digital processing to model not only the basic sound of different amplifiers but also the way all of their controls work, whenever you switch amp sounds, the operation of the tone controls shifts radically. Thus, when you go to turn the treble down just a smidge, the sound of the amp changes quite a bit, and you have to spend some time experimenting to find the treble setting you want—or even get it back to how it sounded before you touched it. It also automatically adds reverb and perhaps a bit of chorus effect whenever you switch to the Clean sound; to shut off this effect, you actually have to use the effect knobs to turn the effect on, then turn it off again.
Six full steps (one octave) down from standard tuning. The Low E has the same fundamental frequency as a bass guitar, essentially the same standard tuning as a bass guitar but with a high B and E added to mimic a regular guitar. This tuning is used on the Fender Bass VI and similar instruments. Notably used by John Lennon with The Beatles, Robert Smith of The Cure and Jack Bruce of Cream. In his early days with Ronnie Hawkins, future Band bassist Rick Danko was also seen with a Fender Bass VI. This is the tuning Earth used on their seminal drone doom album, Earth 2. Also used in some Doom Metal and Sludge Metal bands such as Thou.

Orville Gibson patented a single-piece mandolin design in 1898 that was more durable than other mandolins and could be manufactured in volume.[10] Orville Gibson began to sell his instruments in 1894 out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In 1902, the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co. Ltd. was incorporated to market the instruments. Initially, the company produced only Orville Gibson's original designs.[11] Orville died in 1918 of endocarditis (inflammation of the inside lining of the heart chambers and valves).[10]

One oil finish that many luthiers use and recommend is Tru-Oil, which was originally formulated for finishing gun stocks. It is the oil finish that Luthier's Mercantile carries, and if you Google for Tru-Oil you will find plentry of information about using it on guitars including some very good instructions. And those instructions will help you with Danish Oil as well.
In the mid-1950s, guitar distortion sounds started to evolve based on sounds created earlier in the decade by accidental damage to amps, such as in the popular early recording of the 1951 Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm song "Rocket 88", where guitarist Willie Kizart used a vacuum tube amplifier that had a speaker cone,[12][13] slightly damaged in transport.[14] Rock guitarists began intentionally "doctoring" amplifiers and speakers in order to emulate this form of distortion.[15] In 1956, guitarist Paul Burlison of the Johnny Burnette Trio deliberately dislodged a vacuum tube in his amplifier to record "The Train Kept A-Rollin" after a reviewer raved about the sound Burlison's damaged amplifier produced during a live performance. According to other sources Burlison's amp had a partially broken loudspeaker cone. Pop-oriented producers were horrified by that eerie "two-tone" sound, quite clean on trebles but strongly distorted on basses, but Burnette insisted to publish the sessions, arguing that "that guitar sounds like a nice horn section".[16]
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