While larger frets do seem to result in a rounder tone, perhaps with increased sustain too, they also yield a somewhat less precise note than narrower frets—at least, as examined “under the microscope.” Unless it is very precisely shaped, and frequently dressed, the broad crown of that jumbo fret can “blur” your note ever so slightly, which might even be part of the sonic appeal for some players—the way, for example, a tweed Deluxe is a little blurrier or hairier at most volume settings than a blackface Deluxe. Be aware, however, that the phenomenon can work against some sonic goals too.
There were at least three different versions of this guitar with differing knobs, fingerboards, control plates, cord mounting, and trim. One even had a nice rosewood fingerboard with dots. This version was the most monochromatic of the bunch, I suppose. It cleaned up really nicely for these pictures. Okay, so it's an ugly little spud. My wife describes this guitar as "so ugly it's cute," and she fell in love with it in the store for that reason. I like that.
Next up is this beautiful standard Telecaster from Fender. All the words in the name are words that appeal to us. Fender is a well-renowned brand that most guitarists consider a safe option that delivers great guitars. The next word, ‘Deluxe’, suggests that this particular guitar is a little bit better than all the rest, and then we have Nashville, which makes all country enthusiasts curious.

In May ’71, Ovation tried once more. It introduced the K-1217 Typhoon V bass, about which no information is available, but based on the Eclipse, the difference may have been pickups. The K-1235 Eclipse was also introduced. This was a guitar offered only in a black finish that looks somewhat like graphite. It had chrome hardware, no binding, dot inlays, three-way select and two volume and two tone controls. The pickups had metal covers with black inserts and a single blade-style pole. In June ’72, all Electric Storms were discontinued except the Tornado and Eclipse, which made it another half year, until January ’73, by which time the Electric Storm had subsided into quiescence.
If straightforward lessons aren't what you're looking for, fear not: Rocksmith 2014 tries to refresh your picking skills through games that veer into the ridiculous. I tried out Return to Castle Chordead, which revels in delightfully bad NES-style graphics (the game challenges the player to zap the hungry undead by playing the correct chords). Scales Racer—which, you guessed it, teaches the major and minor scales—puts the player in a car fleeing the police. Pick the right notes and you zip between lanes, eluding the fuzz.
PRS: One of the best guitar brand one can go for (if they don’t want to go for the custom-built route). Their guitars look beautiful and sound buttery smooth. They have the most beautiful looking tops and inlay among non-custom guitars. The craftsmanship and attention to detail on PRS guitars is just exquisite. Of course they do have their custom shop called Private Stock and the Private Stock guitars are so gorgeous and meticulously built that anyone who sees them will be awestruck by their beauty, not to forget the sound of those guitars are like the voice of angels.
More expensive amplifiers may have a patch bay for multiple inputs and outputs, such as a pre-amp out (for sending to another guitar amplifier), a second low gain input, to use with active basses, an in jack to create an effects loop (when used with the pre-amp out jack), an external speaker output (for powering an additional speaker cabinet), and stereo RCA jacks or an 1/8" jack, for connecting a CD player or MP3 player so that a player can practice along with recorded music. Some amps have a 1/4" jack for connecting a pedal to turn the amp's onboard overdrive and reverb on and off or to switch between channels. Some amps have an XLR jack for a microphone, either for the guitar amp to be used for singing (in effect as a mini-PA system), or, for acoustic guitar, to mix a mic signal with a pickup signal.
Like Kleenex for tissues or Dumpster for large garbage containers, the brand Teisco has become a kind of shorthand for “strange looking Japanese guitar from the 1960s.” When someone posts a picture on a forum of a vintage Japanese guitar that he’s trying to identify, five people will immediately shout out “Teisco!” Occasionally, they’re even right.
However, unlike a boost pedal, the overdrive effect is not dependent on the amplifier to have a distorted sound. The overdrive pedal will internally boost the input signal so much that the top of the signal wave will be forced to naturally shrink itself. This is called soft clipping and it simulates amplifier like clipping as though an amplifier was being overly driven, hence the name overdrive. The distortion pedal will also boost the input signal but will then add resistors within the circuitry to not just shrink or soft clip the wave form but completely flatten the wave peaks. This is called hard clipping. For more understanding on the differences between soft clipping and hard clipping see the illustration below.
Plug one in, and you'll understand what an acoustic instrument is supposed to sound like while playing live. Unplugged they sound great as well, especially the deep bowl models. I hear from my friends that they think those rounded backs feel awkward to play while sitting down. I have a deep contour bowl, that is way more comfy playing relaxed in my couch than even my little 000-martin.
Seagull acoustic guitars are among the best values you are going find. They’re made in Canada, and there’s an attention to detail and craftsmanship here you may not expect in guitars at these price points. The Seagull Artist series is the top of the lineup. You’ll find unique tonewoods and high-quality construction techniques at an affordable price.
Decide between mic recording or using a direct box (DI). Recording the sound of your electric guitar by miking your amp is a great way to simulate studio quality sound. However, this will require expensive equipment, like a quality amp, microphone, and potentially sound dampening equipment or material. On the other hand, you can plug your guitar right into a DI to record your guitar.[1]
Excellent article. I have found that is a complete waste of time trying to convince guitarist of anything contrary to what they already believe about instruments. The level of passion for the “wood doesn’t matter” camp is truly astounding. We are not testing a new drug or solving cold fusion. The question is simple, does wood make a difference in the tone of an electric guitar? Intuitively, it would seem strange if it didn’t; but, there are many factors that are going to affect the sound produced from a guitar; isolating them is as difficult as creating a study that will convince anyone of an idea they already are clinging to. I think this is a pretty good experiment, better than most I have seen. In the end though, who cares?…really. If someone would like a guitar made out of a Formica counter top…go for it, locking tuners, the pickups and strings of your choice…you’ll be ready to rock. And won’t you be the clever one? As for myself, my opinion, musical instruments have character, a soul if you will. That character comes from the material it is made out of and the craftsman that made it. There is no object more alive than a musical instrument. For arguments sake, lets grant the “wood doesn’t matter” their entire argument. I’d still buy the korina instrument over the countertop. And like most stubborn asses who play guitar, you won’t convince me otherwise.

This brand is originally from Japan and  Hoshino Gakki owns it. Ibanez activates in U.S.A, Japan, China and Indonesia, and it is one of the largest, recognized names out there. This manufacturer has developed over 300 models of electric guitars and has collaborated with many musicians that have lent their imagination to the making of customized units.


I took it into a local shop to have it looked at, turns out the neck was warped, leading to problem #2 above. I ended up returning it and ordering the same model from a different retailer; although the new guitar didn’t have the same neck problems I ended up having to replace the bridge with a Mastery Bridge (see issue #1, above, the Mastery Bridge cost me another $200 or so, including labor for installation).
In October 2017, Gibson announced plans to relocate its Memphis operations to a smaller location and plans to sell the Memphis property. Gibson opened its Memphis facility 18 years before, which occupies just a portion of a massive 127,620 square foot complex. According to the Memphis Daily News, Gibson plans to search for a new facility for its Memphis operations and will stay in the current spot for the next 18 to 24 months. The facility, which sits across from the FedExForum along South B.B. King Boulevard, is expected to list for $17 million.
In typical pedal effect chains you will most likely be running cable lengths that are much longer than 5.5 meters. The ME-80 allows you to keep your tone pure when running lots of effects. You can run a cable up to 5.5 metres into the input of the ME-80. The multi effects engine processes up to 8 effects in its internal signal chain. Then the ME-80 outputs your guitar signal as a 2,000 Ohm low impedance signal allowing you to run a much longer cable to the amplifier.
The E-28 guitar now sported a two-octave fingerboard and a Schaller adjustable bridge/tailpiece assembly, in chrome. Pickups were twin active humbuckers specially designed for Martin by Seymour Duncan. The straplocking system was also by Schaller, as were the tuners. Controls included two volumes for each pickup plus a master volume and master tone (all with black knobs sort of like those found on Rickenbackers), a three-way select, a phase switch and an active circuit bypass switch. The headstock had an ebony veneer. The cover on the control cavity was made of black Boltaron.
Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.

Michael Bloomfield is credited with Eric Clapton for helping seed the renewed interest which compelled Gibson to return the original Les Paul to full production; both musicians began using Les Pauls at about the same time. Bloomfield first played a 1954 Les Paul goldtop (with the strings wrapped around the tailpiece rather than suspended and intonated over a bridge) while with the Butterfield Blues Band in 1966, but he swapped the guitar (plus $100) to guitar technician Dan Erlewine in exchange for a 1959 Les Paul Standard. This guitar was characterised by mismatched volume and tone control knobs (a reflector-topped “tone” knob for the bridge pickup volume, two top-hatted knobs for neck pickup volume and bridge pickup tone, and a cylindrical “speed knob” for the neck pickup tone), a missing cover on the rhythm/treble toggle switch, a truss rod cover with “Les Paul” engraved in script (this feature had originated with the early Les Paul SG models, not the original Les Paul single cutaways), and a crack in the wood behind the tailpiece. Because the guitar was lost in the 1970s (Bloomfield biographers Jan Mark Wolkin and Bill Keenom, in Michael Bloomfield: If You Love These Blues, disclosed that a Canadian venue owner claimed it as compensation after Bloomfield missed a scheduled performance and never reclaimed the instrument), Gibson used hundreds of photographs of the late blues guitarist’s instrument (and consulted with Bloomfield’s family) to produce the limited-edition Bloomfield signature. The company produced one hundred Bloomfield models with custom-aged finishes and two hundred more with the company’s Vintage Original Specifications finishing in 2009. They reproduced the tailpiece crack on the aged version, plus the mismatched volume and tone control knobs and the “Les Paul”-engraved truss rod cover on both versions, while including a toggle switch cover. The headstock was characterised by the kidney-shaped Grover tuning keys installed on the guitar before Bloomfield traded for it, and the pickups were Gibson Burstbucker 1 (at the neck) and Burstbucker 2 (at the bridge).
If, like me, you're a complete and utter sucker for watching musicians strip their songs down to the barest essentials and perform them with minimal accompaniment, then you're going to lose your mind over the stripped down, guitar version of "Wildest Dreams" that Taylor Swift has just dropped from her acoustic session at the Grammy Museum Sessions last year. Performing the hopelessly dreamy song with just her voice and her electric guitar, the performance is jaw droppingly good and the song honestly sounds even better than it does on the studio track from 1989.
As you know, like most guitars sporting more than a single pickup, your Strat lets you select any pickup by itself or choose certain dual-pickup combinations. The standard way to connect multiple pickups is to wire them in parallel. This generates the classic tone our ears know from countless records, when a guitarist uses the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups in tandem (positions 2 and 4 on a normal 5-way Strat switch).
Blend potentiometers are a popular modification to instruments with separate volume controls for pickups, no master volume and/or no pickup selector. For instance, on the Fender Jazz Bass, the dual volume controls can be replaced with blend and master volume controls, to allow the instrument's output level to be adjusted with just one knob while still retaining the various combinations of the two pickups blended together.
Gary Moore also created his own signature Gibson Les Paul in the early 1990s. Characterised by a yellow flame top, no binding and a Gary Moore truss rod cover. It featured two open-topped humbucking pick-ups, one with “zebra coils” (one white and one black bobbin). Gary formerly owned Peter Green‘s vintage Les Paul Standard with an accidentally reversed pick-up magnet.
Reverb pedals come with all kinds of different layouts. Even so, some of the controls are virtually universal. The first one we would like to mention is the dry/wet knob. This control is what you use to mix your original signal and the effect itself. When the knob is turned all the way to dry, there will be zero reverb present in the signal. As you move towards wet, the amount of reverb increases.
* The Chinese examples of the sunburst model that I have seen have a slightly golden-orange tone to the sunburst pattern, more like the traditional sunburst color in American guitars. The Indonesian examples I have seen have a much more over all orange look. Basswood does not have a lot of visible grain. The example guitar shown in the official Epiphone product photos, the photos you see on most web sites like Amazon and Musician's Friend and so forth, are probably a little optimistic when it comes to visible grain and the golden hued quality of the sunburst finish.
These are the most versatile 5 position switches around. They have 4 poles, each pole has one common and 5 switched terminal which makes a total of 24 terminals. With that many connections you can wire pretty much any pickup combination you can imagine. Poles are mounted on two wafers, two poles each. Common terminals are usually the outer two terminals on each wafer. Image below shows multipole switch, two poles on the front wafer are outlined with different colors.
First, you have 11 different modes, including the TonePrint option, just like the Flashback delay. Then you have a true bypass circuit with an analog dry-through signal, which perfectly preserves the natural tone and EQ of your acoustic guitar (again, similar to the Flashback's setup). When you're using the effect, we would advise tinkering with the mix to get about 35-50 percent of your dry signal coming through.
And therein is the VST guitar's edge, as it continues to improve in quality, not matching that of performances by the late Jimmy or the long-standing Carlos or whomever one adopts as their personal guitar deity, but bringing in new qualities of its own. In computer science terms, improved controllers are providing ever more interesting views of ever more detailed models to listeners attuned to the particular environment augmented by the virtual model. The guitar VST is not your daddy, but it might be the little sibling with your daddy's eyes. In the long run.. well... forget that. We love you pops. My little sisters, brothers and I hope you live forever, or at least as long was we do.

Hartley Peavey built his first amp in 1957 and decided to establish his own company in 1965. Ever since, he has been the head of one of the biggest audio gear companies in the world. Eddie Van Halen collaborated in the design of the famous 5150 amp, a legendary amp that is still heralded by today's enthusiasts. However, the collaboration stopped in 2004 and the brand had to rename its amp to 6505. Born in the 1970's under the name Vintage, and with a completely different style, the Classic series is still very popular among blues, jazz and rock guitar players. The brand has also developed solid-state amps (the Bandit series) and, more recently, some modeling amps (the Vypyr series).
Why would that be “magical thinking”? Unless you play a sine wave with a synth, the timbre of every instrument is made of a set of freuquencies, a dominant frequency plus a ton of harmonics (which is, I take it, the overtones people talk about). Woods, like every other material, resonate at particular frequencies, and consequently might emphasize a particular subset of these frequencies rather than another subset. Hardly magical thinking.
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.
Play heavy rock or metal music? Listen up! These guitars feature a twin horn cutaway shape and a long-neck design. They are lightweight compared to the Les Paul, but can be difficult to get used to. They can feel unbalanced because of the long neck. They have two humbucker pickups like Les Paul guitars but have different volume and tone controls for precise settings.
The jumbo frets give you extra room for shredding, which is great because this guitar plays fast and smooth, so you’ll definitely be shredding on it (once you work up the chops). It employs Ibanez’s classic bolt-on neck with the ultra-deep cutaway for high access to the fretboard and rounds it all out with a three-way selector and plenty of onboard tone controls.

A basic triode valve (tube) contains a cathode, a plate and a grid. When a positive voltage is applied to the plate, a current of negatively charged electrons flows to it from the heated cathode through the grid. This increases the voltage of the audio signal, amplifying its volume. The grid regulates the extent to which plate voltage is increased. A small negative voltage applied to the grid causes a large decrease in plate voltage.[42]
Ibanez is considered to be one of the best-selling electric guitars and bass guitar brands. But, they also produce a quality acoustic guitar for acoustic guitar players. The V series is really popular for newbies, making it one of the best acoustic guitar brands for beginners. Their guitar uses mahogany wood on the neck, and back and sides of the guitar. It also includes a rosewood bridge and rosewood guitar fretboard.
Rackmounts are most commonly used in recording studios and "front of house" live sound mixing situations, though professional musicians who play electric bass, electric guitar, or synthesizers may use them in place of stompboxes, to create a rackmounted head unit for their speaker cabinet(s). Rackmounts are controlled by knobs, switches or buttons on their front panel, and often by a MIDI digital control interface. During live performances, a musician can operate rackmounted effects using a "foot controller".[14] By setting up effects in a rack-mounted road case, this speeds up set-up and tear-down, because all of the effects can be connected together with patch cords (which can be left connected permanently) and all of the units can be plugged into a power bar. This means that a musician only needs to plug in the main power bar into AC Mains power and plug their instrument into the rack, and the last effect unit's output into their instrument amplifier and/or the PA system.

The main purpose of the bridge on a classical guitar is to transfer the vibration from the strings to the soundboard, which vibrates the air inside of the guitar, thereby amplifying the sound produced by the strings. The bridge holds the strings in place on the body. Also, the position of the saddle, usually a strip of bone or plastic that supports the strings off the bridge, determines the distance to the nut (at the top of the fingerboard).
Seller: bennick2013 (4) 100%, Location: Marietta, Georgia, Ships to: US, Item: 302905274242 Beautiful red body and maple neck looks great despite minor dings and scratches. Neck is straight and intonates well, action just fine with no divots or dead spots. Get it now before they become scarce and PLAY Condition: Used, Condition: Very Good, Brand: Lotus, MPN: Does Not Apply, String Configuration: 6 String, Body Type: Solid, Body Color: Red, Model: Strat, Model Year: ? See More
That's what I'm hoping to address in this post along with clearing some common misconceptions too. The guitar world and community is very big on the vintage thing, and that has filtered down to replacement parts of course too. It is very easy to get lost in the world of 'vintage' style parts making an improvement in tone, so let's cast those notions aside here and look at the facts of why in some cases that's both correct and incorrect. Tim McNelly of McNelly Pickups put it really well in a recent social media post '..New electronics won’t necessarily make your guitar sound any different than it does now. New pots won't NECESSARILY change the tone if you don't know the exact value of the pots coming out..'. I think this is a really great way to put it and a great starting point for this post and discussion (feel free to comment too!).
If you’re shopping for an electric guitar as a gift, find out what kind of music and artists the budding guitarist wants to emulate. It’s better to let them know you’re shopping by soliciting their input rather than “surprising” them with a guitar that’s out of sync with the music they love. For example, giving a traditionally-styled guitar designed to produce super-clean, undistorted tone to a heavy metal fan is unlikely be a hit.
THIS DELUXE PACKAGE INCLUDES - GIBSON'S LEARN AND MASTER GUITAR PACKAGE - PLUS 10 ADDITIONAL WORKSHOP DVDs. THIS IS THE MOST COMPLETE INSTRUCTIONAL GUITAR PACKAGE YOU CAN BUY. Winner of the Acoustic Guitar Magazine Players' Choice Award, two Telly Awards and an AEGIS Award for Excellence in Education, Learn and Master Guitar is widely recognized as the best home instruction course for learning guitar available anywhere. This deluxe package consists of 20 professionally produced DVDs, 5 Jam-Along CDs, a 100 page lesson book, and a free online student support site. It is the only instructional package you'll ever need on your journey toward mastery of the guitar.

Yamaha continues to rank highly in the entry to mid-tier guitar market, thanks to their student friendly instruments. I for one took classical guitar lessons with a Yamaha classical that still plays and sound great up to this day. As expected, they have an entry in this affordable price range category, in the form of the 3/4 size JR1, which is essentially a smaller version of Yamaha's popular FG acoustic guitar.


@Umberto – Thanks for supporting Strymon! 🙂 The best place for the Lex is where it sounds best to you. If you like how it sounds in front of your drive pedals, I recommend using it in that location. I also want to note that turning up the PREAMP DRIVE on the Lex can lead to lower effect output volume and recommend using the pedals on-board boost (up to +6dB of boost) to counter this loss of volume.
The guitar offers a beginner some great features in sound and playability. For starters, it is technically a Les Paul (giving you a great “cool factor,” which is important when you’re first starting out). It cuts a couple corners that a Standard or Special Les Paul won’t, like the fact that it’s a bolt-on neck, and there are proprietary single coil pickups (as opposed to the standard humbuckers you’ll usually find in a Les Paul).
i have played fender most of my life .Fast neck and comfortable .However when my musical interest changed to southern rock i decided to buy a gibson . The mahogony body sounds different as does the string thru design of my firebird .Now i play both .Out of the box i prefer gibson and dont need to change a thing .I see many fender players always looking for “that sound” changing pickups pots etc.and using many boxws to change the tone.All i use with my gibson is a wa wa and overdrive
“A magnet doesn’t have a tone, per se – you can’t put it to your ear and hear anything. It’s really the engine that drives the coils in a pickup. In a humbucker you’ve got a bar magnet located under the coils; if it’s a Stratocaster or a Telecaster you’ve got magnetic rods that are in the centre. But essentially they’re all doing the same thing: throwing up a magnetic field that the guitar strings vibrate in when they’re plucked.
Anonymous, that's tough one. Usually, breaking the D string would be down to two things - a sharp edge on the saddle (unlikely if you're using a roller bridge) or your technique. The only other thing I can think of right now is the break angle (how sharply the strings pass over the saddle on the way to the tailpiece). Perhaps raising the tailpiece (or feeding the strings through from the front and then passing them over the tailpiece - you could do this second one with the D string only) might help.
SOLD OUT; Here we have another great vintage Takamine this one is a timeless classic recreation of the trusty and also great sounding Martin D-17 , this fine Takamine F349 example was well crafted in Japan nearly 24 years ago. This guitar is a very good++ vintage Japanese guitar and has been well maintained and plays amazingly with great low action still to this day all these years later. Its made of all Mahogany( other than rosewood fingerboard & bridge ) that is a high grade solid Mahogany neck it really has a nice substantial feel to its medium profile with a 1-11/16ths width at the nut, The sound box is also ALL Mahogany and it offers a nice rich vintage tone one might expect from the company Takamine has copied in this case the Martin D-17 directly, This example’s cosmetic integrity its fit and finish to this day is still pretty nice not exactly like new vintage but is JVG rated at very good with NO major cracks at all and NO finish checking = none – . she did have some small paint chips here and there that we easily matched with clear mahogany stain lacquer applied with a brush tip to the spots only and one spot on the lower treble bout where 3 discolor spots were ( cold be from factory ) it looked original anyway I touched that up a bit as well later I buffed the touch ups back she looks much better now and this will also help to preserve its original finish integrity as well as keeping up her beauty. Great low and playing action on this one it really plays with ease Take a good look she still shines like glass and her sound is clear and the volume is very good, and tone is vintage sweet from its well Good and well aged tone woods attribute to making this guitar sound as good as she does. This F349 model is a full size Dreadnought as and she is faithful in its shape & size of the vintage Martin D-17 it copies other than its original design Takamine headstock shape… a very cool D-17 guitar, its 23+ years it’s obviously not new or mint but is surely vintage beautiful with its age and genuine warmth & patina and yes a few minor doinks but nothing to detract from its overall appeal. Please look her over well feel free to ask any questions. This is a nice players guitar and is sure to please. It is JVG Rated 8.5/10 very good+ Vintage used condition. WYSIWYG .
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Main Spring Stopper Tremolo Block Stop Rod With the guitar tuned correctly, adjust the Main Spring make sure that the Stop Rod makes contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper. If the Stop Rod does not make contact with the Tremolo Block and Stopper, adjust the Main Spring adjustment screw until contact is made.
You have 16 different modulation effects including chorus and flange, 12 overdrive/distortion effects including high gain monsters and smooth creamy overdrives, 14 mono and stereo delays and reverbs and 22 amp models including tube and solid state amps from Fender, Marshall, Orange, Diezel, and mesa Boogie. It’s safe to say, you’ll find it hard to get bored of this thing!
Are YOU joking? only 3 real real ones? I’m gonna go ahead and assume your young and don’t have much musical exploring under your belt yet. Clapton, Hendrix, King…. 3 very good choices but also pretty narrow minded buddy. Jimmy Page? Django Reinhardt, David Gilmour, Steve Gaines, LES PAUL, Chet Atkins, Gary Morse, John Petrucci, Yngwei Malmsteen, the dudes from Dragon Force!, Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughn for god sake!, Robert Johnson, Joe Bonamassa, Buddy Guy, Van Halen, Joe Satriani, Kirk Hammett, Dimebag Darrell, Jeff “skunk” Baxter, Jerry Reed, Andre Segovia, and YES John Mayer can really play!, I could go on and on……. ONLY 3 REAL ONES? WTF? Broaden your horizons my friend. only 3 real ones…. face palm…… failboat.
Just as an Auto-Wah is a version of a Wah pedal controlled by the signal's dynamic envelope, there is an envelope-controlled version of a volume pedal. This is generally used to mimic automatically the sound of picking a note while the guitar's volume knob is turned down, then smoothly turning the knob up, for a violin-like muted attack. An example is:
If you are an insurance agent, pawn store, a manufacturer or appraiser searching for used guitar prices and other musical equipment values, Used Price is for you. Our extensive database contains the value of thousands of pieces of used musical equipment. Whether you are looking for a Fender guitar value, a Gibson guitar value or a certain bass value or drum value, we have them for you all in one convenient location. 

These guitars have the smoothest necks. Their oiled and waxed naked necks are the most comfortable necks I have ever played on. They offer a lot of great options, but they especially accommodate those of us with smaller hands. Every Music Man is fully loaded with ergonomic and functional features. No fatigue, they stay in tune well and set up easily.
Capture ideas and create songs easily with a riff-based workflow, loop recording, automatic track creation (4 tracks), 7 guitar-oriented effects, support for amp models (AmpliTube, PodFarm, StudioDevil and others), 1 InstantDrummer (expandable), and more. Stay in the creative flow with tools that look like gear, and create complete songs without putting down your guitar!
Epiphone is to Gibson what Squier is to Fender. Meanwhile, the Les Paul is Gibson’s Stratocaster. Probably one of the most famous guitars on the planet, the Les Paul has been played by the likes of Slash, Jimmy Page, and Bob Marley. Epiphone, luckily, has made it available to the world with a price that won’t break the bank. And it’s an excellent guitar for those starting to play rock music.
An additional note on the methods used; although we gathered rating and review data from guitarists around the world, we only considered brands that can be found at major online music gear retailers located in the United States. This means that fine brands like Maton from Australia (played by Tommy Emmanuel) weren't included - the same goes for some respected European brands. Also, only full sized guitars, or ones very close to it, were included in the data set - had we included smaller parlor guitars then this may have boosted Martin and also Gretsch might have made the list.
Two ways. The most important is: practice. But the other way is technique. Proper fingering. Some chords have multiple ways they can be fingered, and you always want to pick the easiest. Now, some fingerings may not *seem* the easiest, just because they aren't the ones you already know, but in the long run, they are worth learning because they really do make things easier. In particular, most people play an open A chord the wrong way, but the proper fingering makes it easier.. The essense of fingering is laziness: you want to move your hand and fingers as little as possible. So in particular, if you have a finger down in one chord that's already in the right place for the next chord, you want to just *leave* it there. Don't pick it up, only to place it back down in the same place. And if you can use a fingering that *let's* you just leave it there, then that's clearly the choice!. So let's look at the open A chord. Most people play it with their 1st finger on the 4th string, 2nd finger on the 3rd string, and 3rd finger on the 2nd string, three-in-a-row. But that's a weak fingering (however popular it is). The better fingering is like this: 1st finger on the *3rd* string, 2nd finger on the 4th string, 3rd finger on the 2nd string. It may *look* a little awkward, and feel awkward until you learn it. But it really is the better fingering.. Why? Because consider the context of an A chord. What chords are you most likely to want to go to from an A? The biggest answer would probably be D. Well, notice, if you finger the A chord as I recommend, your first finger is now already in the right place for the D chord, and can just be left there! You only have to move two fingers, instead of all three, to switch between the two. This lets you do it faster and smoother. The other chord you'd be likely to want to go to from an A would be an E, and, while we don't have any fingers exactly in the right place, we at least already have the 1st finger on the 3rd string, like we want it for an E; we just have to slide it back one fret. This is still easier than entirely re-arranging all three fingers. Finally, more rarely, you might want to go between A and Amaj7. For instance, the old Beatles song "Mother Nature's Son" uses the sequence A Amaj7 A7. This is perfect for this fingering! You just slide your first finger back one fret to make the Amaj7, then take it off entirely to do the A7.. Similarly, a G chord normally be fingered using your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th fingers, instead of your 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. This makes it much easier to go to C, the most likely chord for you to be going to.. But no fingering rule is absolute, it's always contextual. If you have a song which requires you to move to something more unusual, and a different fingering would make that particular move easier, then use the different fingering. For instance, if I had something which required that I add an A note to the top of my G chord, then I might well use the common 1-2-3 fingering for the G chord, so that I'd leave my pinkie free to reach the A note.
The Hummingbird Pro's unique look breaks the typical monotonous appearance of conventional acoustics, and it does so without straying too far from the familiar. It is easily identifiable by its uniquely shaped ornate pickguard, which matches the guitar's faded cherry sunburst finish. Whether you are on stage or just jamming with friends, you can be sure that this acoustic will stand out.
Larry Robinson Fine Custom Inlays - They produce one-of a kind shell inlays for all kinds of guitars. One of a handful of inlay practicioners in the country, Larry has done exquisite work for major guitar manufacturers (Fender, gi bson, Yamaha,...), small production shops (Santa Cruz, Collings, etc.), single luthier shops (Klein, Ryan, Olson, Megas, and more), collectors like Tsumura and people who just want something to personalize their guitar.

Always use more than one mic, and when possible, double down on the amp as well. This will give you additional options in the mixing phase. You can split the signal to the amp by employing a stereo FX pedal or a DI. The second mic doesn’t necessarily have to be close to the cabinet and can be placed as far as 3 ft away to give you more tonal range.   
Your own write-up suggests that the RP500 is "best of the best" for nailing classic amps/effects, and for being affordable; additionally your own write-up suggests Zoom should not be "best of the best" since it's tonally inferior to both the Digitech and the HD500X. Finally, the M5 isn't even a multi-effects pedal. It can model any single effect, that is all: it shouldn't even be mentioned here. Otherwise I like the actual write-ups: they're informative.

Where there is more than one pickup, a switch selects between the outputs of individual pickups or some combination; two-pickup guitars have three-way switches, and three-pickup guitars have five-way switches. Further circuitry sometimes combines pickups in different ways. For instance, phase switching places one pickup out of phase with the other(s), leading to a "honky", "nasal", or "funky" sound[citation needed]. Individual pickups can also have their timbre altered by switches, typically coil tap switches that effectively short-circuit some of a dual-coil pickup's windings[vague] to produce a tone similar to a single-coil pickup (usually done with push-pull volume knobs).

If you're in need of some assistance, you've come to the right place. At BestReviews, our goal is to help you find the perfect products to fit your individual requirements. We test items in our labs, gather feedback from existing customers, and consult experts. The result? Fair and thorough reviews that help you cut through the jargon. Read on for our full guide to electric guitars to learn all you need to know to pick the right one for your next jam session.
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Masacre takes a great deal of my time, but in normal days I am also a guitar teacher in my hometown, Medellin. I counsel young rock bands as well, with the purpose of sharing my knowledge and experience with those who start in this road. I've been part of the selecting jury at several local rock festivals and when I am available and things work out, I join some of my friends and put together tribute bands to play at local clubs, paying homage to those bands that inspired us since childhood, such as Black Sabbath, Kiss, Ozzy Osbourne, Dio, and others.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
Chords in a song are arranged according to chord progressions, which are chord intervals that work pretty much the same as single notes in a scale. It’s very important for you to learn chord progressions for the various keys, because then, as long as you know what key the song is in, you can figure out the chords in it very easily. There may be times when you want to change the key of a song to one you can sing or play in better, and for this, knowledge of chord professions is critical.
The internal bracing has also been updated to a forward shifted pattern to further enhance the dynamic range of the soundboard and the guitar’s overall projection. The Taylor 214ce has a nice punchy sound and good articulation. If you need more output, just plug it in and let the onboard Expression System 2 (ES2) pickup do its job. The ES2 features a patented behind-the-saddle pickup and knobs for volume and tone, giving you total control over your tonal output.

Launch price: $499 / £279 | Body: Laminated maple, semi-hollow | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: Alnico Classic humbucker (neck), Alnico Classic Plus humbucker (bridge) | Controls: Neck volume, bridge volume, neck tone, bridge tone, 3-way pickup selector | Hardware: LockTone Tune-O-Matic stopbar, Grover 18:1 tuners | Left-handed: No | Finish: Vintage Sunburst, Natural, Cherry, Ebony


Being part of the Gibson family, Epiphone today makes a variety of officially-sanctioned Gibson classics, including the Les Paul, which comes in versions including the Tribute with authentic Gibson pickups and the Special II with Epiphone's own pickups. There are also Epiphone editions of the timeless Gibson SG, like the G-400 Pro which is available in right or left-handed versions.
This is a very rounded sounding electro-acoustic bass. Recorded straight without a mic, so there is no noise. This fits nicely with most types of music. Its deep but not overpowering, leaving room for other instruments. There is a choice of sample sets to choose from in this soundfont. Direct or through my j-station (which makes it sound more like its through an amp), or a mix somewhere between the two. The j-station samples are the same direct samples routed out and through the j-station and back in again, which is why it is possible to have a mix of the two.
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
In comparison with an electric guitar equalizer, a bass equalizer usually has a lower frequency range that goes down to 40 Hz, to accommodate the electric bass' lower range. Some bass equalizers designed for use with extended range basses go even lower, to 20 Hz. Equalizers can be used to change the tone and sound of the electric bass. If the instrument sounds too "boomy", the bassist can lower the frequency which is overly resonant, or if there is too much fingernail or pick noise, the higher frequencies can be reduced.

While jazz can be played on any type of guitar, from an acoustic instrument to a solid-bodied electric guitar such as a Fender Stratocaster, the full-depth archtop guitar has become known as the prototypical "jazz guitar." Archtop guitars are steel-string acoustic guitars with a big soundbox, arched top, violin-style f-holes, a "floating bridge" and magnetic or piezoelectric pickups. Early makers of jazz guitars included Gibson, Epiphone, D'Angelico and Stromberg. The electric guitar is plugged into a guitar amplifier to make it sound loud enough for performance. Guitar amplifiers have equalizer controls that allow the guitarist to change the tone of the instrument, by emphasizing or de-emphasizing certain frequency bands. The use of reverb effects, which are often included in guitar amplifiers, has long been part of the jazz guitar sound. Particularly since the 1970s jazz fusion era, some jazz guitarists have also used effects pedals such as overdrive pedals, chorus pedals and wah pedals.
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Tuning Instabily: Problems with tuning stability are almost always cuased by improper tuning technique (always tune UP to the note) or a binding nut. (There are RARE occasions where the string isn't seating correctly at the bridge, and we're not considering problems with set up regarding a tremolo) Even the cheapest geared tuners don't "slip" as a rule. If a geared tuner is failing it will make a "poping" type of sound as the gear jumps teeth. If the gears are loose, it is possible to pull a string flat with extensive (excessive?) use of a tremolo. If notes are going sharp it is due to the nut binding. What happens is excessive tension builds up between the tuner and the nut in order to overcome the binding. Then as you play the vibration of the string allows it to wiggle through the slot equalizing the tension, and making the string sharp. See above for info on a binding nut. If a fretted note is sharp it is an indication that the nut slots are not deep enough (or excessive presure with high frets/ scalloped or worn fretboard). If a string is going flat, it is always bridge related. Either a problem with the string seating fully (common w/ trapeeze tailpieces and ball ends in vintage tremolos (the reason they came up w/ bullet ends)) or binding on a rough saddle/ the edge of the trem block. Again, it is possible to cause a tuner to back off with extream tremolo, but rare.
Ken Rosser picked the Spider Classic 15 as his favorite of the amps we tested, saying, “I think the effects on the Line 6 sounded the best. It gives you a nice range of tone options. The clean tones stay clean even at loud volume, which a lot of these can’t do. One caveat is that, when you switch the amp sound, it changes the way all the knobs work, so the sounds can really jump out at you.” Fred Sokolow liked the Line 6 in general, saying, “I could pretty much figure out what to do with it, but I could figure out the Fender more easily.”

Epiphone are a well respected subsidiary of Gibson, and have been making musical instruments since their founding in what is now Turkey, Europe, in 1873. After being acquired by Gibson in 1957, Epiphone are now best known for manufacturing affordable versions of some of the most iconic guitar models around, including the Les Paul and SG. However they do make a couple of original models, such as the Casino, which was famously used by the Beatles.

The American Nashville B-Bender guitar is modeled after the personally customized instruments of some of Nashville’s top players, featuring a Fender/Parsons/Green B-Bender system, two American Tele single-coils (neck, bridge), a Texas Special Strat single-coil (middle) and five-way “Strat-O-Tele” pickup switching. Ideal for country bends and steel guitar glisses, this Tele is available only with a maple fingerboard.
There are two main types of amplifier: valve and solid state. Solid state guitar amplifiers tend to be cheaper and lighter, but they don't offer as good a sound as valve amplifiers. Valve ones, on the other hand, have working parts, so they're a little more maintenance heavy. Most serious musicians go for valve amplifiers due to the superior sound and lower wattage requirements.
New Born has a great riff that starts at about 1:00. It is repeated a few more times during the rest of the song. To play this riff like Matthew Bellamy does, you'll need to tune down one of your strings. Click the button below to find out which string and how to tune it. Oh, and if you look closely at the video there are some clues there for how to play it!

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I have a Schecter S-1+ (which I believe is close enough) so I'll try my best to answer. There should be 3 knobs and 1 switch. The toggle switch is the pick-up selector. When it is in the middle the sound is coming from both pick-ups. When you flip it left the sound is coming from the neck pick-up. When you flip it right the sound is coming from the bridge pick-up. Next the 3 knobs. The left knob is the volume for the neck pick-up I believe. The middle knob is the tone. And the right knob is the volume of the bridge pick-up. If you are playing a left handed guitar the switch the directions (Ex. Left would now be right; right would now be left; middle stays the same.) So there ya go. Hope that helped!

In the past, buying an electric guitar wasn’t always as satisfying as it should be. In the days before the internet, you had to rely on the wisdom of your local guitar store, a couple of magazines, and your gut instinct. You may have ended up with something half decent – if you were lucky – but rarely would you have found your ‘dream guitar’. In fact, without the internet, you probably weren’t aware it even existed!

The Original Blackout humbuckers are designed to be everything metal, handling thick rhythm play and well-defined lead melodies at higher speeds. The tone has an almost shimmering quality, especially on a clean amp setting. The tone profile of both the neck and the bridge version of this pickup emphasize treble with a hollowed out mid-range that helps give you the best of searing leads and heavy power chords.
This aim of this site is to provide high quality SoundFonts (virtual musical instruments in sf2 format) that can be played using a midi keyboard connected to a computer, tablet or smart phone. Emphasis has been placed on real or acoustic instruments particularly piano and other favourites for keyboard players (pads, strings, electric pianos, organs and orchestral) but some SoundFonts here also include high quality guitars, some synths and ethnic instruments. There is also a nice GM set for playing general midi files. The SoundFont format sf2 is widely supported by lots of programs/apps and devices.
Note from the Editors: While exploring the “Psychology of Tone” last month, we learned that digging into the mushiest part of any signal chain (the listener’s noodle) leads to a better understanding of the tonal journey involved. The journey itself may be more important than you realize. We continue this series dedicated to messing with your head with a look at the science involved with the creation of those tones. Everything can be explained with science, right?
“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.
thanks for your note. We are not drawing any conclusions whether one is better than the other, just that they are different, which I think is apparent from the samples. Also, we did use only one pickup that we moved between the samples, and mounted it in the exact same location in relationship to the bridge. I would claim that the only variable that could have been controlled to a greater extent is the picking attack.
Setting up a mic to record the natural acoustic sound of the guitar strings can add percussive character when blended with the amp sound, especially if you are capturing old-school archtop sounds. For best results, the guitar needs to be isolated from the amp to prevent excessive bleed. This technique gives a good front-end attack to the sound and plenty of definition. A small condenser is the best mic for the job, and it’s worth using a high-pass filter as well.
The amp and cabinet modeling is probably the weakest link of the Zoom G3X. Make no mistake - it’s nice to have customizable amp and cabinet pairings in a practice or headphones scenario, or if you simply don’t have a guitar amp yet. It’s just difficult to replicate the character and “oomph” of a vintage tube amp. This isn’t so much a knock on the G3X as it is of most amplifier modeling.

We carry many new and ‘lightly’ used instruments. So called “low mileage” instruments, in near mint condition, are our specialty. Currently in house: Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, Eastman, Fender, Larrivee, Martin, Epiphone, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild, Giebitz, Huss & Dalton, Sobell, New World Classical Guitars, Cordoba Classical Guitars, Loar, Recording King, G&L, LsL, Breedlove. Amps from Magnatone, […]
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Walnut & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 5 - Headstock: 2+3 - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Black - Pickups: Bartolini - Pickup Configuration: Dual - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Stained Red, Transparent Flat Black
Gibson's first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model ("ES" for "Electric Spanish", and "150" reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped "bar" pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the "Charlie Christian" pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
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