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I want to talk about a session that I got hired for this week. On this particular session, I was asked to recreate a very early-to-mid 70’s guitar tone. Something in the vein of George Harrison. Maybe “All Things Must Pass” era.

So I want to talk about my method, and the process to get this sound. The first key element is guitar and amp. I always start here. I feel like this is the most important relationship in getting any era of sound.

Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
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Most Martin guitars made are "flat top" models. That is, they have a round sound hole in approximately the center of the flat top of the guitar, with a "pin" style bridge. Martin also made some archtop models during the 1930s. These can have a round sound hole, or two "f" style sound holes (one on each side of the top of the body), and have an arched top, with a "trapeze" style bridge. Martin also made ukuleles. If a guitar only has four strings (and is not a ukulele), this is known as a Tenor guitar. Uke size instruments with ten string are Tiples. Uke size instruments with eight strings are Taropatches. Martin also made mandolins, which have eight strings. To summarize:

Semi-acoustic guitars have a hollow body (similar in depth to a solid-body guitar) and electronic pickups mounted on the body. They work in a similar way to solid-body electric guitars except that, because the hollow body also vibrates, the pickups convert a combination of string and body vibration into an electrical signal. Whereas chambered guitars are made, like solid-body guitars, from a single block of wood, semi-acoustic and full-hollowbody guitars bodies are made from thin sheets of wood. They do not provide enough acoustic volume for live performance, but they can be used unplugged for quiet practice. Semi-acoustics are noted for being able to provide a sweet, plaintive, or funky tone. They are used in many genres, including blues, funk, sixties pop, and indie rock. They generally have cello-style F-shaped sound holes. These can be blocked off to prevent feedback, as in B. B. King's famous Lucille. Feedback can also be reduced by making them with a solid block in the middle of the soundbox.
On August 21, 1965, during a Beatles concert tour, Randy Resnick of B-Sharp, aMinnesota music store, presented Harrison with a second model 360/12 FG “New Style” 12-string electric guitar, distinguishable from Harrison’s first 12-string by its rounded cutaways and edges. There was a television documentary produced by KSTP TV in Minneapolis documenting this event.
For an overdrive pedal, turn your attention to the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Drive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal. Compact yet versatile, this pedal is great for anyone who likes a raw vintage-like overdrive, and it even makes a great boost pedal. Now, if it's a distortion pedal that you're after, take a closer look at the Electro-Harmonix Classics USA Big Muff Pi Distortion/Sustainer Guitar Effects Pedal. The Big Muff Pi is a legendary pedal in itself, and this reissue has 3 controls that let you dial in the finest harmonic distortion/sustain ever produced. From warm bass to crisp treble, you'll be blown away by what this distortion pedal can do for your hard-rocking guitar performance.
[Fausto] It's calculated by the sound coming from the amp. When you stop the note, it stops the magnetic disturbance and in turn the signal created and sent. The instant it is plucked or strummed above and vibrates above the pickup, the magnetic field is disturbed, not before, not after. Harmonic resonance does occur, obviously, but doesn't affect the magnetic field disturbed between the struck metal string and the electromagnet in any meaningful way, nor does it affect the tone.
If you’re recording or practicing at home, or you think your own amplifier sounds like garbage you’ll enjoy the Cab Sim switch. This when activated, causes your signal to simulate the sound of a mic'd up guitar cabinet rather than your direct amp signal, which is extremely useful when you want high quality recordings at home direct to a DAW, or you just can’t seem to make your amplifier sound good!
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Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.
As to the “where,” positioning your mic an inch or less from the grillecloth and aiming it straight at the center of the speaker cone – pointing at the dust cap, in other words – yields a bright, punchy, detailed sound that suits many requirements, but can be too harsh. At the other extreme, aiming the mic at the edge of the cone, where the cone meets the suspension (the area just inside the speaker cutout in the cab’s mounting baffle) usually results in a looser, warmer, more raw and edgy tone. Between these two positions, there’s a wealth of voices to explore, and every inch of real estate that the mic covers between dust cap and cone edge will bring a noticeable sonic shift, without touching the amp’s controls. Also, aiming the mic straight at the speaker, in other words, mounted at 90 degrees to the flat plane of the front of the amp, and aiming it off axis, at a slight angle to the speaker, will illicit different sounds, too. With an assistant helping, or the guitarist playing if that’s not you, try moving the mic around the surface of the speaker while listening for the changes in tone through monitors or headphones, or if you don’t have enough isolation between live amp and monitors, record a little in each of several positions to listen back to. Pick the position you like for the track, and go with it.
A continuation of the 7-string, adding another string a perfect fourth lower than the seven strings low B. The eight string guitars additional low F♯ string is just a whole step up from a bass guitars low E string. While luthiers have been building these instruments previously, mass-produced Eight-string electric guitars are a relatively recent innovation. Ibanez was first to offer a production eight-string guitar in March 2007.[46] Many other companies now produce mass-market eight-string models, yet these guitars remain relatively uncommon.
One of the first successful methods was to record a track as you would any other. Then you would take the recording and play it through a speaker that is placed in a very large room. The magic happens when you put a microphone somewhere in that room to essentially record the sound of a recording. However, by placing that speaker in a large room, they have added a layer of natural reverb.
Distortion became more popular from the mid-1960s, when The Kinks guitarist Dave Davies produced distortion effects by connecting the already distorted output of one amplifier into the input of another. Later, most guitar amps were provided with preamplifier distortion controls, and "fuzz boxes" and other effects units were engineered to safely and reliably produce these sounds. In the 2000s, overdrive and distortion has become an integral part of many styles of electric guitar playing, ranging from blues rock to heavy metal and hardcore punk.
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Most, if not all of us have at least given some thought to learning to play the guitar. It is, after all, an instrument which takes the leading role in virtually every genre of popular music. No matter what type of music you aspire to play, there is almost certainly an important part there for you as a would-be guitar player. Of course, learning to play begins with actually owning a guitar. 
Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
You’re probably not going to damage your laptop by plugging in a guitar. But take it easy. Instrument output is usually about 10dB louder than mic level and 10dB quieter than line level. But there’s a big variation between instruments, and of course, your guitar has a volume output. On an electric, it’s just an attenuator — there’s no active circuitry, the volume knob just knocks down the output of your pickups, some use it as creative control, some just to match a cheap amp better.

A well-reviewed electric guitar with a high-quality design, the ESP LTD EC-1000 is the best electric guitar for the musician looking to upgrade their sound and achieve an exaggerated tone associated with the world of rock-and-roll. Both the body and neck of the guitar are made from mahogany with a rosewood fretboard, making this guitar lightweight in feel and balanced in design. The 24 frets come in an extra-large size for ease and comfort in chord changes, while the tailpiece and locking bridge make tuning  both easy to achieve and maintain. Output of the sound is well controlled with the toggle switch, and the model comes with two volume controls for different modes of play. Designed for the musicians with years of experience and a desire to play with a harder edge to their sound, the ESP LTD EC-1000 offers high-end features for a reasonable price. We’re huge fans of their entire EC series.
For an overdrive pedal, turn your attention to the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Drive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal. Compact yet versatile, this pedal is great for anyone who likes a raw vintage-like overdrive, and it even makes a great boost pedal. Now, if it's a distortion pedal that you're after, take a closer look at the Electro-Harmonix Classics USA Big Muff Pi Distortion/Sustainer Guitar Effects Pedal. The Big Muff Pi is a legendary pedal in itself, and this reissue has 3 controls that let you dial in the finest harmonic distortion/sustain ever produced. From warm bass to crisp treble, you'll be blown away by what this distortion pedal can do for your hard-rocking guitar performance.
Epiphone introduces the Les Paul Special VE (Vintage Edition) electric guitar featuring the classic Les Paul profile with a lightweight Poplar body. The Les Paul Special VE is powered by Epiphone Open Coil humbuckers and is available in beautiful “Vintage Worn” color finishes.For decades, the Les Paul Special has been one of Epiphone’s best se...  Click To Read More About This Product
This is a Japanese Fender Jaguar electric guitar played on the both pick-ups setting and is played through a Fender Bassman '59 Reissue with old valves in. This amp gives a really nice full clean sound. I have recorded it on the edge of break up so the low velocity samples come out clean and the high velocity samples come out with a bit of nataural power valve distortion. You can add more distortion with effects if you need it dirtier. It is hard to get this natural break up sound with effects which is why I have recorded it that way and if you add distortion it still has the natural bite of a valve amp (except with more distortion). This makes it very expressive just by the difference in tones at different played velocities. The lowest velocity is muted samples. Presets include a standard mapped guitar, a fake twelve string (octave harmonies on each key) and split voices of muted fifths at one end and solo guitar at the other end of the keyboard (for quickly creating tunes and ideas). There are other banks of the same presets except with long releases (for sustained notes), chorus and/or reverb added to give the different variations. The amount of reverb can be altered with cc12 and the amount of chorus can be altered with cc13. Reverb and chorus has to be enabled on your soundfont player to use them. The sound is suited to a lot of types of music. These guitars have been used for all sorts of music over the years. It has not much sustain and makes a bright clean sound.
I do all my recording through my Axe FX, though there are many ways to USB record to computer. That being said, I plan to play live using my Ax and my other FRFR gear. I’m using a Matrix 1600-watt amp and a Matrix 2×12 (FRFR) cab and will run direct-out to PA when the time comes. I see no reason to lug around a half-stack or stack let alone the consistency and versatility of this setup. This is my first time using FRFR, and was tempted to go with a hi-end head and cabinet combo, but the up front investment will be worth it. I won’t ever have to buy effects pedals or change heads when I want a different sound. I did add a Mission SP-2 expression/volume pedal and also use my old Pod X3 Live for a midi controller. As for volume, I’m confident that my setup will hold its own vs. most other half-stack setups. I may add an Atomic CLR or another Matrix 2×12 (like the one I have) for a monitor later on. Another important factor is my band does cover songs and the Axe setup allows me to tailor my tone to match the bands we cover at the click of a switch. As a guitarist and computer tech/nerd, it doesn’t get any better than this for me. The configuration possibilities are endless.
Dude everything your saying about Martin is basically true of Taylor. They are the two big brand names. Taylor is to acoustic guitars what Tagheur is to Swiss watches. The low end of an expensive world where thhe best stuff comes from tiny companies who don't advertise much or pay for all he shelf space at a place like guitar center. I'm not saying Taylor's aren't good-that would be ridiculous. I'm just saying your distinction between Taylor and Martin is laughable. They are both well known companies that can charge way more because of their names just like fender and Gibson can with electrics. For the same money think you get better sounding and lasting guitars from Takamine and Breedlove than Taylor and Martin just to name a few. But there are so many smaller luthiers that will make incredible stuff.
Everyone has an opinion on Crate amplifiers. Some guitarists are strong supporters, if for no other reason than a fond recollection of a Crate as one of their first amps. Others aren’t as impressed. While it’s true that many Crate models are geared toward beginners and intermediate guitarists, they also have plenty of pro-quality gear in their lineup.
Get a Luthier (or do it yourself if you have the knowledge) to change the tuners to the ones I specified, take the sharp edges off the neck, throw some extra light strings on, and do a set up and this guitar becomes a dream guitar for kids or adults for a lifetime. So while the Yamaha APXT2 may not be the best guitar for your purpose, in this price range you WILL NOT find the perfect guitar, period. At least Yamaha gave us a foundation off which to build (which you can't say for other brands) and with a little modification here and there, you will have the perfect little guitar. I bought this for my child and I find myself picking it up and playing it more than my more expensive full size guitars. It's just a pleasure having it around the house, but not so much so before I modified it. There's nothing worse than having a guitar that's just about not a toy as compared to a professional guitar. You want to make your guitar easy to tune and enjoyable to play so spend the extra bucks to make it perfect and you will have no regrets.
The name Epiphone stands above all for very good, less expensive alternatives to the unfortunately always quite expensive Gibson guitars. Gibson tries to offer good alternatives to their Gibson branded Instruments through its subsidiary Epiphone. Les Paul, SG, Explorer and other models. Todays Epiphone program includes electrical, half- and full-resonance guitars, basses, acoustic and electro-acoustic instruments, banjos and mandolins. Epiphone stands on the one hand for innovative ideas in guitar manufacturing and on the other for successful replicas of instrument classics that are affordable for everyone.
The Les Paul Traditional 2019 is one of the latest iterations of this iconic guitar, bringing over the same pleasing aesthetics and rock friendly tone using modern production methods for improved reliability, consistency and expanded tone options. The body features a classic mahogany body with no weight relief, and a AA grade figured maple arched top. The 24.75" scale length mahogany neck is topped by a 22-fret fingerboard that has a nut width of 1.695". Giving this guitar its classic voice are Burstbucker 1 & Burstbucker 2 humbuckers, with Orange Drop capacitors that replicate the ones found inside vintage Les Pauls.
So there you have it. An absolute workhorse with fantastic sounds, and just about a must-have pedal no matter what type of guitarist you are and no matter your skill level. Equally a perfect first pedal to buy as it is a perfect last pedal in your collection. The biggest downside is that it probably can’t be your only pedal, since you can only use one effect at the same time. Famous users include Russel Lissack of Bloc Party, James Edward Bagshaw of Temples, and Dave Knudson of Minus the Bear. At the “too good to be true” price that it sells for (seriously, we’re not just saying that, one of our writers immediately sold his DL4 and bought the M5), this is without a doubt the Best Bang for your Buck.
While there are many exquisite guitars that can easily take this spot, this one hit the shelves in 2016 and is the A-grade of what Gibson has to offer!  The Gibson Les Paul Standard 2016 T Electric Guitar is a testament to Gibson’s fine craftsmanship, tone, and reputation – that’s why it’s our top pick and is the best all-round electric guitar for serious users who want the prominence and notoriety of owning a Gibson!
The fretted instrument market is in many ways an excellent leading edge indicator of world economic conditions as a whole. China is not only rapidly advancing in the fretted instrument market but in all areas of manufacturing. Furniture factories in North Carolina are closing due to competition with imported Chinese products of equal quality for far less money. Numerous other industries are moving offshore. As you have all noticed the price of gasoline has risen dramatically in recent months. It should be noted that China now consumes approximately an equal amount of petroleum to Japan. This was certainly not the case five years ago. If OPEC and other producers pump the same amount of oil as they used to, but China emerges as a new player consuming this much fuel, it should come as no surprise that prices will go up. China now is a major importer of fuel, wood and agricultural products. Commodity prices in general are rapidly rising. China is not only becoming a world leader in manufacturing but it is becoming one of the world's leading consumers of all sorts of raw materials and commodities. While the per capita income in China and the per capita consumption of fuel is much lower than in the USA, their population is well over a billion people. At the rate they are going it will not be long before they consume fully as much fuel and other raw material as we do and have an economy which could rival the annual GNP of the USA. Not only are they an economic and manufacturing powerhouse, but they have a huge army. As their manufacturing capability increases not only quantitatively but qualitatively they become more and more of a super power. While the USA may have won the cold war with Russia, at the rate things are going as much as American consumers may benefit from inexpensive but high quality-guitars, furniture and other products from China, we may find ourselves in the uncomfortable position of no longer being the only world super power.
Welcome to Silesia Guitars, the guitar repair shop in Shoreline that is dedicated to taking good care of your dear friend, the guitar. We are located in Shoreline, just 15 min north of downtown Seattle. Our work consists of repairs of anything from broken headstocks and  cracked guitar tops, through replacing/installing electronics and custom inlays. Just need a set up or a string change? No problem! We try to accommodate any needs, big or small. Usually, the cheaper the guitar, the more it would benefit from being professionally set up. Evaluations are free, so stop by with your guitar today and let's talk about how we can help you get the most out of it!
Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.
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Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.

Peerless hollowbody guitars are excellent at this price range. Both of these brands manufacture from factories in South Korea. PRS SE is made by World Instruments Co. and they have consistently high standards - all brands made in this factory will be exceptional. Peerless is a company which used to manufacture high end guitars for other brands such as Gretsch and Gibson, and then launched their own brand. They are exceptionally good guitars.

You can always rely on Epiphone to provide an acoustic guitar with eye-catching looks and a quality sound at an excellent price, and the EJ-200CE is certainly a testament to this. Based on one of the world’s most famous guitars, the J-200 (introduced in 1937), this revamped model offers an excellent mix of vintage style and modern components, perfect for any level of skill.

Rock music evolved from Blues, the music of the streets. Most musos’ of the 50s and 60s were poor and guitar amps made to a budget. Some but not all technical principles of amp designs were well thought out. Fender and Marshall were the dominant and most copied brands. The powerful amps had 4 output valves in parallel push-pull and gave approx 60 - 100Watts.
The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
Kay was indeed one of the earliest American manufacturers of electric guitars. Things progressed, and by 1934, the company was officially known as the "Kay Musical Instrument Company". The company became larger and more successful over the years, leading to the addition of a new factory in Elk Grove Village, Illinois in 1964. But somehow by 1965, the company had hit rough times and was bought by Seeburg, a jukebox manufacturer that sold Kay to Valco in 1967.
Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.
All the connections are conveniently grouped together on the back of the unit. You have a mono 1/4” input for your guitar and a stereo output which allows you to listen to your playing on headphones, speakers, or a guitar amp (there’s also a balanced XLR output if you need it). Zoom also includes a USB connection, which not only can power this pedal via USB, but also turns the Zoom G3X into an audio interface! This way you can easily record in your favorite DAW. The USB connection also means you can use Zoom's free Edit & Share software so you can easily manage your patches on your computer. Just like everything else on the Zoom G3X, the input and output options are just right and provide plenty of flexibility. There’s really no major omission we can think of.
The problem that had led to Martin and the idea of making guitars in the first place also led Kaman to the idea of using synthetic materials in guitars. He realized he could use a composite fiberglass to “improve” two aspects of guitar construction. He could solve the problem of cracking due to wood shrinkage caused by changes in heat and humidity, and he could improve vibration transmission from the back because fiberglass actually resonates at frequencies similar to many woods, but is more efficient (wood actually absorbs some of the instrument’s vibrations).
You should be aware of some drawbacks to using the 'free' sites over the licensed sites (or purchasing a book of official TAB). First, the versions of the songs at the free sites were created by folks who enjoy music and did their best to document how to play the song. It may not be correct. Second, even though these sites don't charge for access to the TAB, most are in the business of making money. You'll have to put up with advertisements, often including flashing banners and pop-up ads. Finally, the original artists do not get paid for these transcriptions. If you like what you find, you should follow-up by purchasing the official music from an licensed reseller.
Another unusual bass amp is Ashdown's B-Social combo amp, which the company calls a "desktop amp".[10] The 75 watt combo amp has two 5" speakers, which provide stereo sound. While some keyboard amplifiers and electric guitar amplifiers provide stereo sound through two speakers, this is a rare feature on a bass amp. The B-Social provides Micro USB and Bluetooth 4.0 connections for hooking it up to a desktop computer. The amp is versatile enough to be used for playing bass, playing recorded music or streaming music as a home entertainment centre, or for amplifying video game sound effects.[11] The amp has a special socket for connecting amp and cabinet simulation and effects unit apps which can be downloaded on iPhones and iPads. The amp was called "B-Social" because it has a second input, so that a bassist can jam with another performer. The B-Social's USB audio interface can be connected to Digital Audio Workstations for sound recording.[12]
Here we have e very nice example of a great sounding and beautiful Vintage Martin D28 style copy acoustic guitars made by the master luthiers at Yamaha Japan Nippon Gakki. This is a high quality example folks not to be confused with the Taiwan China made versions.. this is the top of the line made famous from the last 1960's... The workmanship is excellent as is the woods chose he fit & finish is still 90% or better which translates to very good to excellent used vintage condition all-round .. The guitar plays with ease and has been upgraded here at JVG with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Martin strings for its new owner who is going to love this classic no nonsense full sounding Boomer!... Here is a link to more pics of this fine Japanese crafted Yamaha: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/80sYamahaFG200TanLable4?authkey=Gv1sRgCO-azJ2orZPeLw#slideshow/5617864934522537362.

1960's Harmony H-54 Rocket 2 Redburst- Here's a excellent example of rock-n-roll to jazz all rolled up in one. For not much coin the Harmony Rocket was a great choice of hundreds of thousands from music stores to Sear Catalogs. This guitar is in very near mint condition as you can see. We repaired a slight crack at input jack common area. Yes, someone years ago stepped on the cord. We professional glued it from the inside and it's stronger than new. All that shows is a slight line about 1 1/2" long on bottom edge. Anyway, the Rocket 2 is getting harder and harder to find. Two DeArmond Gold Foil Pickups power this baby. It's all original, except for the pick guard, which no one can detect. Condition other than slight repair is a 9 3/4 for this great 50 year old beauty. Guitar comes with period clip board case. SOLD
But there are two things in which latency matter. Latency is time. Every digital thing ever adds latency. If you’re a well trained musician or studio rat, you can hear about a millisecond of latency if you’re listening closely. You won’t likely be bothered by 1ms latency, but 10ms might be a bit of an issue, and 100ms makes some things completely unworkable.
String gauge refers to the thickness of the guitar string. This thickness in thousandths of an inch. The larger the gauge, the heavier the string. When describing gauges, guitarists typically omit the decimal, and speak only of the number (they will say an "eight" when referring to a string gauge of .008). There are both advantages and disadvantages to using lighter/heavier gauge strings.
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Of this list I think it's such a shame to see some names there and others missed but it's only a list to grab attention, not a definitive, set in stone, tablet for future generations to adhere by. But seriously where is Brian May? The man that made me want to play in the beginning. Every time I hear him hit those strings it sounds like the first time. And no Danny Gatton either. But hey that opinions for you.
Started in 1997 by Steve Suhr and Steve Smith, this Lake Elsinore, California-based guitar-building brand is the finest in a relatively new wave of manufacturers. They do not have a line of guitars, per se. Instead, they make every single guitar to order. This high-end boutique style manufacturing in a large-scale format was all but unheard of until the internet changed the world. Now, this brand can offer dozens of shapes, pickup combinations, finishes, etc. reasonably. But don’t let the fact that their guitar shapes seem like knock-offs of other long-standing brands fool you. Any Suhr guitar you’ll encounter is going to be of the utmost in quality of construction and sound. There simply is not a better custom brand out there with the same vast catalog of offerings. There are literally thousands of possible combinations, so if you are looking for a unique and superb instrument and are willing to pay for it, it’s hard to say there’s anything better.
We now know why series wiring attenuates the highs, but why is it louder? Why do you end up with such a beefy, meaty tone? Let’s assume each pickup on your Strat puts out 100 x of power. When wiring two pickups in parallel, each pickup loses 3/4 of its output when combined with the other. This drops each pickup’s output to 25 x, instead of 100 x. Together, you get a total of 50 x (25 x + 25 x). This power drop is why any dual-pickup combination on your Strat doesn’t sound as loud as a single pickup.

Chorus pedals actually make your guitar sound like there are a variety of different guitarists playing the same thing that you are playing, but with a different guitar and slightly out of time with you. This effect makes everything you play sound a little bit ‘warbly’ and thickens up your guitar or bass lines. We recommend experimenting with these as you can use them subtly to add weight to your sound or as a full-blown effect that completely takes over your signal.

Launch price: $999 / £899 | Body: Basswood | Neck: 5-piece maple/walnut | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Maple | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Ibanez V8 humbucker (bridge), S1 single coil (middle), V7 neck humbucker | Controls: Volume, tone, 5-way selector | Hardware: Edge locking vibrato | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Desert Sun Yellow, Road Flare Red, Purple Neon, White


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They may not always be the first thing you reach for, but the MIDI effects plug-ins that come with most DAW applications like Logic and Cubase often offer something very different from most audio plug-ins. For example, arpeggiators and step sequencers can be great for use in the composition process, and you can use MIDI note to controller data (CC) plug-ins to generate automation data for the parameters of other plug-ins. As they process only MIDI data, and not audio, MIDI plug-ins put very little strain on your computer. Matt Houghton
I don't have enough good things to say about this shop. Are you used your music shop being being run by snotty musicians who judge you based on the skinniness of your jeans or number of piercings? Well, this ain't that shop. James, the owner, is super helpful and knowledgeable, and stocks his shop with really top quality gear. I'd recommend this place primarily for pedals and amps, as well as for checking out some small batch electric guitar manufacturers (like their gorgeous Asher collection). That being said, they have a really nice selection of Breedloves, Rain Songs, Guilds, Martins, Gibsons in the acoustic section as well. They also do top-notch repair on equipment. I brought in my Princeton Reverb for a speaker swap, and the work was completely cheaply and flawlessly. They definitely have a loyal customer in me going forward!
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Hey Frank i removed the pick guard and discovered why they were so tall.I just bought the guitar the day i asked you about it and it was late very late after midnight and i found out someone used pick guard screws to just secure them to the PG…lol And i have it back together correctly installed now.No pictures yet here is a better detailed description.The body is solid wood stained factory dark cherry.Rosewood fretboard semi-enclosed tuners…SSS P/U arrangement in a 3 ply black PG and 5 way switch and probably weighs 8 lbs.Thanks ….Larry
Now imagine the puddle again, but this time imagine some wood blocks (12 inch long 2x4's for those of you with rusty imaginations) that are placed on their sides in the puddle in the shape of a three-sided box with the open side facing the pebble's point of impact. The radiating lines go in to the box and bounce back or reflect off the walls. Soon, there are so many lines radiating around in that imaginary box that they all collide with each other and become a random, jumbled mess. Eventually, the size of the lines and the number of them diminish. That my friends is reverb.
Now, let’s consider the tone knobs. Eric Clapton was one of the first guitarists to realize the power within those unassuming plastic spinners. His famed “woman tone” sound during Cream relied on rolling the pots on his Gibson Les Paul Standard, SG or ES-335 all the way off and turning the treble and midrange of his superbly overdriven Marshall amps high. Similarly, jazz guitar players who are looking for a classic tone roll their pots back until they get in the Wes-Benson-Burrell-Pass-etc. zone.
Considering that the setup on a factory-fresh guitar might be good or bad (and few music stores bother to do setup on inexpensive guitars), we strongly recommend that you have a new guitar professionally set up, which will likely cost about $50. You can also learn to do it yourself; there are plenty of online tutorials, and even at age 15 I managed to figure out how to set up my first electric guitar with a little guidance from my guitar teacher. It’s a good idea for every electric guitarist to at least learn how to set action (string) height because you will want to adjust this to suit your style and skills as they evolve.

I'll be honest .. my Washburn N4 is hands down the best I've ever known. To me, Les Pauls sound amazing but are heavy and play like a log cabin. A buddy of mine's Suhr Strat felt/sounded clinical and small. An old Gibson SG felt like a cigar box jobbie. I remember in the early 90s looking at the Vai Ibanezes and the body was great despite the zany colors but the neck was too thin and whispy. I had the frets leveled and crowned and the action on mine 10 years ago and it just plays and feels like butter .. maybe 2 - 2.5mm at the 12th fret. The neck I sanded with 2000 grit now slighty reflects light so it glides beautifully feeling like 'satin wooden glass'. My aftermarket pickups puts the tone squarely into a modern fusion rock camp of sorts .. Oh yea and I think it's the neck shape of these Davies N4s that might make them so cool. The nut is a wider, more comfortable 1 11/16 inches with a flat fingerboard radius .. so may of the others seem like 1 9/16 with a cramped, rounder fringerboard. I did try a JP6 I didn't care for the feel of .. tl;dr ymmv :)

Sigma Guitars look strangely similar to Martin guitars. This folk style acoustic electric cutaway meets our budget of $500, and people are saying good things about these guitars online. It's my pick for the best folk guitar under $500. The model SF18CE features a grade A sitka spruce top with mahogany back and sides. It also boasts a hand finished scallop bracing system. It’s sound is described as tighter and higher than similar quality dreadnoughts. This guitar will have a warm and open tone, according to the manufacturer. Get more info here.
Another famous guitar shape, although we’d wager on account of it being many players’ ‘first’ guitar. We’ve all seen them. The nylon-strung small scale acoustics which many of us gain access to at an early age. The, as you progress, you learn that these particular guitars aren’t sent to test our commitment to the cause, but that in the right hands these can be amazingly intricate, highly technical instruments which have a wonderful sound and genre all of their own.
Why We Liked It - Unless you’re looking for an electric guitar to play genres like heavy metal, chances are you would love this guitar. It just makes us happy and it’s hard to put it down. Fender is a good brand and they offer guitars of very high build quality. It’s available in green, blue and red, so you can really get a guitar that matches your personality and music.
Small-diaphragm condenser mics, on the other hand, tend to have flatter frequency plots and a better-behaved off-axis response, giving a sound sometimes described as more focused, but they seem to be less commonly chosen by the interviewees than large-diaphragm ones. Neumann's KM84 seems to be the most regular choice of small-diaphragm condenser, and numbers John Fry and Bill Price amongst its high-profile users, while Sennheiser's MKH40 warrants a particular mention from Mike Hedges: "I started using [these mics] when I was working with the Beautiful South. I started off with two and now have more than 20. I think they were originally designed for classical recording, because they have very high gain and very low noise. This means that you can get a very clean sound. They also accept massive amounts of volume, so you can put one against a guitar amp on full and it will take it." Hedge's concern about the ability of the microphone to handle the sheer volume of some guitar amps is echoed by several of the other producers, who make a point of mentioning that they switch in a condenser's 10dB pad when recording electric guitars.
Joan Armatrading, Roy Clark, Jim Croce, Kevin Cronin, Neil Diamond, Al Di Meola, Robert Fripp, Mick Jagger, Greg Lake, Adrian Legg, Paul McCartney, Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Jim Messina, Steve Morse, Eddie Rabbitt, Kenny Rogers, Richie Sambora, Tom Scholz, Seal, Bob Seger, Paul Simon, Rick Springfield, Eddie Van Halen, Josh White, and Nancy Wilson;[32]
Rackmounted effects are typically built in a thin metal chassis with metal "ears" designed to be screwed into a 19-inch rack that is standard to the telecommunication, computing and music technology industries. Rackmounted effects may be one, two or three rack spaces high. When purchased from the store, rack-mounted equipment is not equipped with the rugged chassis features used on stompboxes and amps that are designed to be transported as standalone units, such as corner protectors. Rackmounted units are typically mounted in a rack, which is housed in a road case, a tough plastic case with removable front and rear covers that can be latched on during transportation to protect the knobs and switches and then removed during performances. A rackmount unit may contain electronic circuitry identical to a stompbox's, although its circuits are typically more complex. Unlike stompboxes, rackmounts usually have several different types of effects.[13]
• Sound Judgment: Consider the sonic characteristics of the various materials used in making electric strings. Stainless steel strings are the least glamorous, but offer plenty of bright bite and sustain. Pure nickel has a warm old-school sound, for vintage tones. And nickel-plated steel is a bit brighter than classic nickel and responds more adroitly to picking attack. Chrome guitar strings are typically the province of jazz players or blues artists who are looking for the kind of warm retro tones chiseled into history by the likes of Charlie Christian or swinging Gibson ES-250, ES-5 and ES-335 bluesman Aaron “T-Bone” Walker. And then there are coated strings – the most expensive and theoretically the longest lasting. They are, however, not really the best, sonically speaking. Coated strings tend to have less sustain. Also, their Teflon exterior surfaces are slippery, which might take some getting used to for particularly aggressive electric guitar players. And when the coatings wear off, they rust like any other string.
By placing two (or more) mics at different distances and angles from your speaker cab you will get two different sounds - and more variation will of course depend on whether these are the same model of mic, or different models. Mics placed further away will capture more room tone, and close mics are more upfront. Angled mics offer a less direct sound. Capture both feeds and blend or select from the two after recording.
On a Les Paul, adjusting the saddle position can be a little tricky while the string is tuned to pitch. Sometimes you can get a screwdriver in there and turn it, but often you need to slacken the string and move it to the side. Also note that sometimes the adjustment screws are at the back of the bridge rather than the front. I prefer adjusting the saddle while the string is slack anyway as there is a lot of stress on both the string and the saddle otherwise.

My Les Paul never did sound quite right. It was always off somehow. I discovered it had the same problem like yours with the intonation being off the scale. Once I followed your guide, I discovered the neck adjustment was far too loose, and gapped it properly. Shazaam, the intonation problem disappeared, and now it plays like butter with all the notes dead on! U R the MAN!
To make frequency selective networks, we must use capacitors and/or inductors. Unlike resistors, both caps and inductors discriminate against some frequencies in favor of others. Capacitors preferentially pass higher frequencies; inductors pass lower frequencies more easily. Resistors help us set how much gets through, while caps and inductors select which frequencies get through. Inductors are big, heavy and expensive, so almost all tone controls use only caps and resistors.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Nickel, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - Guitar Features: Pickguard - String Instrument Finish: Various

At this point you should have the pots, switch, and jack out of the guitar with the pickup wires still connected. You can either de-solder the pickup wires or use wire cutters to clip them off. If you’re replacing the pickups as part of your re-wiring, you can do this now (I did not in the example photographed here). Just feed the leads of the new pickups back through the holes in the pickup cavities.
It was Berry’s songs from the late Fifties with cut boogie patterns—like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Johnny B. Goode” and “Carol”—that realized electrically the guitar ambitions first dreamt by Robert Johnson. Berry’s tone—courtesy of a hollow-body Gibson through a tweed Fender amp—was raw and loud. This, along with his duckwalk, ringing double-stops and songs about cars and girls, grabbed the youth market. Tall and handsome, he brought the guitar as the “cool” instruments to a ready audience via appearances on TV and in movies, in a way that the Beatles would repeat in the early Sixties.
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
Harmony pedals are often used to generate vocal harmonies, but can also do wonders for bass and guitar sounds. Some vocal harmony processors use the signal from your guitar to create two- or three-part vocal harmonies. Most harmony effects let you specify precisely how much higher or lower you want the accompanying note to be. Modern artists such as Steve Vai and Robert Fripp have created interesting music using a purely pitch-shifted signal with none of the original signal mixed in.
My first guitar was a fender knockoff. My first professional guitar was a Gibson LP custom. I like the richer tone of the Gibson for ballads, folk and country and the Fender gives you the edge you need for rock, garage and loud stuff. Foot pedals get the sounds you need for just about any style of music with either brand. The fender neck is a bit easier to move over because it is thin and fat-fingered guys like me need a bit of help that way. The Gibson reminds me more of my acoustic guitars. Strings are an important selection for any guitar to be comfortable and get the right sound.

Most guitar especially for those which have more than 1 pickup have selector switch. Attached on the body and normally below the 1st E string on the body of a stratocaster guitar. And on the top shoulder for Les Paul. Its a basic things to understand the switches on which pickups its toggling. First, you need to understand what is the switch for???
Variable 2: Speaker configuration. In Clip 2 you hear cabinets with varying numbers of speakers. First comes the 1x12 sound of a midsized Fender combo amp. Next is a 2x12 Fender-style cabinet. After that is the distinctive sparkle of a tweed-era 4x10 Fender Bassman. The last phrase is a classic 4x12 Marshall stack with 25-watt Celestion Greenbacks. These sounds represent a single mic on a single speaker, yet you can differentiate single- and multi-speaker cabinets due to leakage from adjacent speakers.
The Les Paul 100 by Epiphone is an entry level electronic guitar. The body is made of mahogany which is known for warm/balanced sound with a good sustain. The rosewood fretboard enhances the sounds and sustains. A C-shaped neck provides the beginner with incredible comfort. Finally, this guitar features two humbucker pickups for clean and great sound.
When you dream of playing guitar, how does it all happen in your mind’s eye? Perhaps using a guitar app like Uberchord (click to download) to learn? Or are you shredding an awesome heavy metal guitar solo, sliding on your knees across a vast stage in front of thousands of adoring fans? Do you imagine a more intimate setting, jazzing up a storm in some exclusive New York nightclub? Is it amazing the crowd with your brilliant finger-picking at the Newport Folk Festival?
   I am now building several models which I offer as my signature work. I've always had a special affinity for archtop guitars, but as you'll see in this website, I will go wherever the creative impulse takes me. The instruments I am building now are a distillation of the best design ideas I've found in classic instruments, re-imagined and evolved into higher form and function, as fine tools for discerning artists. 
The sets, as mentioned above, are paired with Vox's BC108, which is a compact, portable, semi open-back cabinet that is front loaded with a single "8” VOX Original 8 Ohm Speaker" rated at 25W input (Dimensions W x D x H: 260 x 200 x 285 mm/10.24" x 7.87" x 11.2"). The BC108 also comes with two 1/4" jacks, wired in parallel, for adding another cabinet. Vox has also suggested the compact BC112, a semi-open back, oval port cabinet containing a single 70W, 12" Celestion G12 V-type speaker, to pair with the MV50.

It's amazing how this relatively new company, which officially started in 2007, is now playing with the big boys. Blackstar has a pretty straightforward claim to fame, and that is to provide premium quality high-gain tone in the price ranges that they enter into. And judging from the very positive response of rockers and metal heads, they are doing their job really well. As usual, artist endorsements play a big role, and Blackstar has big name backers like Neal Schon from Journey, Richie Sambora, Ted Nugent and Sammy Hagar to name a few, along with a long list of up and coming guitarists from rock and metal bands. While they still excel in providing high-gain tones, Blackstar amps also offer versatile overdrive and distortion flavors, thanks to the company's innovative ISF (Infinite Shape Feature) technology, which lets you change the tone of your amp from American to UK flavors with just one knob.

Alan Parsons: "I always use condenser mics on a guitar amp, never dynamics — they're too telephoney. That's an unfair expression for a very good dynamic mic, but by comparison to a condenser, you're not going to get the bottom end." While this stance is more hard-line than that of most engineers, condenser mics are, of course, regularly used for recording electric guitars. However, in practice they rarely seem to be used on their own and are very often lined up alongside the trusty SM57.


Standard eight-string tuning. Used by Scar Symmetry on the song "The Three-Dimensional Shadow" from the album Holographic Universe (album) and "Mechanical Soul Cybernetics" from the album Dark Matter Dimensions, Deftones, Periphery on "Ji", "Overture", "Extraneous", "22 Faces", "Four Lights" and "Stranger Things", by Fear Factory on "Mechanize", "Metallic Division", "God Eater" and "Soul Hacker" and by Devil You Know on some songs.

Correct bridge placement determines a guitar's intonation when playing fretted notes. The distance between the guitar nut and bridge is the scale length. Placing the bridge too close to the neck shortens scale length and makes fretted notes sharp. Moving the bridge too far from the neck increases scale length and creates flat fretted notes. No amount of tuning helps a guitar with a poorly positioned bridge. Any fretted note falls high or low of the desired pitch.
The Last of Us™ has been rebuilt for the PlayStation®4 system. Now features full 1080p, higher-resolution character models, improved shadows and lighting, in addition to several other gameplay improvements. 20 years after a pandemic has radically changed known civilization, infected humans run wild and survivors are killing each other for food, weapons and whatever they can get their hands on. Joel, a violent survivor, is hired to smuggle a 14-year-old girl, Ellie, out of an oppressive military quarantine zone, but what starts as a small job soon transforms into a brutal journey across the U.S. The Last of Us Remastered includes the Abandoned Territories map pack, Reclaimed Territories map pack, and the critically acclaimed The Last of Us: Left Behind single-player campaign that combines themes of survival, loyalty, and love with tense, survival-action gameplay.

Other artists, such as George Benson, John Lennon, and the world renowned B.B. King would use the instrument to its fullest capability to produce a clean, bright, woody tone reminiscent of fully hollow guitars, while being able to provide the volume levels to perform in much larger concert halls without the inherent issues known with fully hollow body guitars.


If your guitar is your personality, your amp is your voice. Together, they join forces to deliver your sound. Choosing the right amp ensures the audience hears each note, chord, bend, and trill-just the way you intended. From the compact convenience of a combo amp to the iconic stack to the bone-crushing fury of a wall of cabinets, your new amp is in stock and ready to ship at AMS. Read more
Most guitars have at least one tone control installed. They can be either assigned to a particular pickup (Strat or Les Paul) or work as master tone control (Ibanez and others). Electronically, it’s a variable low-pass filter. Lower the resistance, more treble gets cut which means that higher pot values will sound a bit brighter (typically 500K vs 250K). Capacitor values usually traditionally range from 0.022uF (22nF) to 0.047uF (47nF) but many people find these values too large and install much smaller caps instead. Values of 10nF, 6.8nF or even smaller are reported to work quite well (I used 10nF in my latest mod). To help you decide between cap values and composition, check out this site. It hosts a couple of useful videos with cap value and composition analysis.
Beginning in 1960 with the T-60 solidbody, Teisco began to use the elongated “Strat” six-in-line headstock. This lasted through 1963. In 1963, the squarish Strat headstock appeared with the GB-1 solidbody bass. This seems to have lasted through 1965, but only on selected models, and with several subtle variations, including a slightly more rounded version. In 1964, probably later in the season, most of the Teisco solidbody line acquired a new hooked Strat-style headstock with four-and-two tuners on the guitars and three-and-one on the basses. This had the little hook at the throat like a Strat, and a larger hook on the tip, almost like a Woody Woodpecker plume.
The fourth type of system employs string-through body anchoring. The strings pass over the bridge saddles, then through holes through the top of the guitar body to the back. The strings are typically anchored in place at the back of the guitar by metal ferrules. Many believe this design improves a guitar's sustain and timbre. A few examples of string-through body guitars are the Fender Telecaster Thinline, the Fender Telecaster Deluxe, the B.C. Rich IT Warlock and Mockingbird, and the Schecter Omen 6 and 7 series.
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