Martin flat top guitars were made in various sizes. The bigger the guitar body, the better and more collectible the guitar. This is why guitar body size is so important to identify on a Martin flat top guitar. Starting in October 1930, Martin stamped the guitar body size right above the serial number inside the guitar. This makes identifying body size on October 1930 and later guitar very easy. For flat top guitars made before October 1930, the easiest way to figure out the body size is to use the flat top guitar body size chart below. Body sizes, pretty much from smallest to biggest, include O, OO, OOO, OM, D.
To answer this question, all you need to do is close your eyes and focus on what is currently going on around you. Just about every sound you hear, whether you are at home or on a busy street, is packed with some dose of reverb. In nature, sound reflects off of multiple objects and surfaces across various distances. Both our ears and our brains are used to reverb by default. That is one of the reasons why even an artificial reverb effect tends to make a track more enjoyable.
Two-hand tapping AKA Emmett Chapman technique involves both hands tapping single notes (less often) or chordal (more often) instances. Even if you’re experienced tapper of one or more approaches, two-hand tapping is a whole new world. Keep in mind your pick hand will need time to develop compared to your fret hand, which by default has had a massive head start on fretting notes.
Kent 545 Polaris ll- Yes the 60's are back. Here's a Fab solid body Kent in sunburst. Check the features on this baby. First off the selector switch is super. It's made in Japan, and the good part is, it looks it! This unit has a great 60's feel and tone. Guitar is is in great condition, neck straight, and action just right. It comes with that vintage chipboard case also in wonderful condition. Sold
While many appreciate its bulk of features, there are a few who feel that Fender went overboard, and should've limited the voicings to just a few to ensure that sound quality is not compromised. On the other hand, there are some who felt that the extra features are nice, but they are turned off by the need to use a computer to get full access to all the controls.
We spent 45 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. One of the best things about an electric guitar is its portability. Most times, however, you can't say that about the amps you need to go along with them. Fortunately, these mini amplifiers have come along, developed by the top names in full-size models, and offer incredible sound quality in an exceedingly portable package. We've ranked these micro monsters by tonal character, power, and control. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best mini guitar amplifier on Amazon.
By the late 1960s, as electric guitarists in rock bands began using powerful, loud guitar stacks to play large venues, bassists needed a large, powerful bass stack to keep up in these performance settings.[3] The Acoustic 360 was a "200-watt, solid state head designed to drive the 361 cabinet, a rear-firing 18” speaker enclosure".[3] The engineers who designed the amp and cabinet in 1967, Harvey Gerst and Russ Allee, mounted the 18" speaker in a folded horn enclosure; the 360 amp had a built-in fuzz bass effects unit.[4] The Acoustic 360 and its 361 cabinet "...got the bass world ready for the Woodstocks, Altamonts and giant festival concerts" and it was used by notable players such as funk bassist Larry Graham, Led Zeppelin's bassist John Paul Jones and jazz fusion player Jaco Pastorius.[3] John Paul Jones used two of the amp/cabs in Led Zeppelin; Dave Brown used them with Santana; John McVie played with the amp/cab in the beginning years of Fleetwood Mac.[4] In December 1967, the loud sound of the Acoustic 360 led to The Doors getting "...arrested for noise violations".

One reason why the sound changes in different parts of a given room is that sound reflecting from room boundaries reaches your recording microphone later than the sound travelling directly from the amp, causing phase cancellation — in effect a series of peaks and dips in the recorded frequency response, the spacing of which is related to the delay between the direct and reflected sounds. Keith Olsen suggests lifting and/or tilting the amp to minimise the effects of phase cancellation. "Leo Fender put those legs on the sides of a Fender Twin, and he did it so the guy in the orchestra could actually hear it when he was playing soft. But the other reason is that when you put a mic up against an amp tilted that way... you don't get phase-cancellation problems off the floor and wall. Let's take it one step farther. Let's lift that speaker cabinet off the floor and put it up on something that is stable enough to be able to give the speakers a platform to work from, but where... the reflected sound is going to be so far down in volume to the direct, it's of no real consequence... All these things start adding together into mic technique, stuff that you learn over years."

Technically the knobs are just the parts you turn when adjusting your volume or sound. When you remove the knobs however you are left with the pots (potentiometers) which are used for both volume and tone control. They look identical and almost are but there are differences in the way a volume pot and a tone pot is wired, which will make more sense by the end of this article.
I understand and concur with you totally, as a sound man, I love it when everyone is direct, it makes life so much easier. every mike you eliminate adds roughly 3 db headroom overall to the max level without feedback. But as a bassist, and a Chapman Stick player, ampless just feels too flat and lifeless for me. I recently worked a John McLaughlin and Fourth Dimension gig in Bali, Both John, and Gary Husband went direct, it was wonderful. The bassist was amped though, for the same reasons I prefer to be amped If I am playing bass. Nathan East is another who doesn’t like bass in the monitors, preferring the sound and dynamic control of having his own amp. By and large, I find that generally (with some VERY notable exceptions) people who grew up playing concerts “back in the day” prefer amps, subsequent generations of people who grew up playing with small “portable” amps (think SWR, etc.) generally don’t mind going ampless, they have pedal racks, and have the sound they want from that. They don’t miss the air moving on their strings, because they never had it.. Perhaps because I am a dinosaur, I need the feel of 6, or 8 10s behind me, (or at least 2 15s), the resonance effect it has on the strings, makes my instrument come alive and it breathes with a feeling no pedal rack can duplicate. You should see Bootsy Collins’ rig, he had 2 1x18s, 2 2x15s, and 2 4×10 boxes, and that is what he calls his “small gig rig”! I guess I grew up regarding the amp as an integral part of my instrument, without it, playing feels, well, like you don’t have an amp! Even in the studio, I run a DI into the board, but I play through an amp for my own feel. Peas.

Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple & Bubinga - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: EMG 707 - String Instrument Finish: Black

A musician is only as good as the songs he or she plays - except when you're improvising, of course! And even for those of us who write mostly our own music, there's always room for a repertoire of the classics. Building up your musical library starts with the tablature available in this section, and where it ends is up to you. If you're like most musicians, you'll probably spend your whole life collecting and trying your hand at new music. And with material here for guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, mandolin and even violin, there's something for virtually everyone. Cover the songs in your own personal style or try your hand at recreating them as they were first recorded; it's up to you.
Schooled in flamenco and jazz, Robby Krieger pushed beyond rock at a time when most players were still bound to the blues. In the Doors, he had the improvisatory flair to follow Jim Morrison's wildest journeys, wrote some of their biggest hits ("Light My Fire"), and picked up the slack in their keyboard-drums-guitar lineup. "Not having a bass player… made me play more bass notes to fill out the bottom," he said. "Not having a rhythm player also made me play differently, to fill out the sound. I always felt like three players simultaneously."
Over 20 years, Ovation produced some very interesting guitars. Not only do the American models feature innovative technology that alone makes them worth seeking out, they really handle nicely as players, despite their rejection at the time. Some were ahead of their time. Most were out of step with it, as well. After two decades of failed attempts to market solidbody (and some hollowbody) electrics, Ovation did what other companies who failed to successfully cross over from the genres that brought them their fame. In ’88, Ovation purchased Hamer guitars. Ah, but that’s another story…
A third product which does not fit into the "combo"/"head"/cabinet categorization are powered speaker cabinets designed for use with bass instruments. While these powered speakers share many features with a regular combo amp, a bassist cannot plug her bass directly into a powered speaker cab. The powered speaker system is designed to operate as a "slave" to another amplifier's unpowered signal (or another combo amp which has a pre-amp out jack). Some powered speaker cabs only accept a "link" XLR cable from the main amp. Some powered speaker cabinets are designed as part of a company's line of bass amps; as such, the colour of the cabinet and its grille match the combo amp which will be placed on top of the powered speaker. As well, the powered speaker may have interlocking corners to ensure that the main amp stays put on top of the powered speaker.

For years, Seymour Duncan has provided guitarists with first-rate, handmade pickups and parts that are anything but stock. All of our products are designed and customized to suit the needs of specific musical styles and the musicians thereof. If you’ve got a guitar that doesn’t have a good-quality set of pickups and seems to lack that “extra something” in the tone department, investing in a set of pickups is your first stop.
Until the 1950s, the acoustic, nylon-stringed classical guitar was the only type of guitar favored by classical, or art music composers. In the 1950s a few contemporary classical composers began to use the electric guitar in their compositions. Examples of such works include Luciano Berio's Nones (1954) Karlheinz Stockhausen's Gruppen (1955–57); Donald Erb's String Trio (1966), Morton Feldman's The Possibility of a New Work for Electric Guitar (1966); George Crumb's Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death (1968); Hans Werner Henze's Versuch über Schweine (1968); Francis Thorne's Sonar Plexus (1968) and Liebesrock (1968–69), Michael Tippett's The Knot Garden (1965–70); Leonard Bernstein's MASS (1971) and Slava! (1977); Louis Andriessen's De Staat (1972–76); Helmut Lachenmann's Fassade, für grosses Orchester (1973, rev. 1987), Valery Gavrilin Anyuta (1982), Steve Reich's Electric Counterpoint (1987), Arvo Pärt's Miserere (1989/92), György Kurtág's Grabstein für Stephan (1989), and countless works composed for the quintet of Ástor Piazzolla. Alfred Schnittke also used electric guitar in several works, like the "Requiem", "Concerto Grosso N°2" and "Symphony N°1".
This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.
: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! VoteinNovember
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