The neck's profile and width affects the guitar's playability and the player's comfort when fretting. While most necks are either "C"- or "U"-shaped, the width and depth of the neck in relation to the player's hand is an important consideration. Players with smaller hands should seek out narrower, shallower necks while those with larger hands will most likely find beefier neck profiles more comfortable.
Solid-state amplifiers incorporating transistors and/or op amps can be made to produce hard clipping. When symmetrical, this adds additional high-amplitude odd harmonics, creating a "dirty" or "gritty" tone.[37] When asymmetrical, it produces both even and odd harmonics. Electronically, this is usually achieved by either amplifying the signal to a point where it is clipped by the DC voltage limitation of the power supply rail, or by clipping the signal with diodes.[citation needed] Many solid-state distortion devices attempt to emulate the sound of overdriven vacuum valves using additional solid-state circuitry. Some amplifiers (notably the Marshall JCM 900) utilize hybrid designs that employ both valve and solid-state components.[citation needed]

A lot of amateur guitar players are tempted by the ‘cut’ of a high treble sound that gives their notes definition above the cacophony of the rest of the band. They become so accustomed to this sound that they lose sensitivity to its harshness. Treble becomes the ultimate weapon in their arsenal for the volume war, but to the listener, all they hear is a headache, aka bad tone.
If you’re using temporal effects such as delay and reverb, these generally work best at the end of the chain. Putting a delay at the end allows the effect to give a more natural echo to everything that comes before it; the echo itself will not be altered by other effects. The same applies for reverb. Most guitarists leave reverb as the very last effect, occasionally using the amp’s in-built reverb over a pedal. Amps that have onboard reverb usually use a spring unit which produces a shimmery twang that works well for many types of music. However, if you’re looking for a roomier type of reverb that emulates a giant concert hall, a pedal based reverb is probably what you’re looking for. Either way, putting reverb at the end of the chain provides a spacious, natural tone that simulates a cavernous echo.
2. Do your saddles have notches cut into them? If not, then I suspect they could do with some (or if they have, but they're extremely shallow, perhaps they need deepened a little). Just note, however, that this is very easy to screw up and should probably be done by a tech if you're in any way unsure about doing it yourself. Also, you can't just cut a notch in one saddle. You would have to do all of them to the same depth, then raise the bridge a little to make up for the depth you just removed.
The Playability of the guitar is outstanding, and has a thin, nicely rounded fast neck. It has a very musical tone, with a particular sweet spot in the upper end. The bluegrass G chord in the 1st position with G/6th string, D/5th strings sounds tremendous on this guitar. Both fingerpicking and strumming are effortless, and jazz chords are well articulated. The volume of the guitar is Loud, and should only increase over time as the top opens up.
It depends on whether you are playing with someone, or you just wanna start to play home in your bedroom. If you play with others, you need an amp that can play loud enough to follow the bass and especially the drums. Marshall make some great tubeamps, but also Vox make some great amps, where this one on 40 watt with effects incl are real good. Sound like a tubeamp, and have a 12ax7 in the frontamp.
Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
Also new in ’39 was the Supro Collegian Guitar Family. This consisted of a number of metal-bodied resonators, the No. 25 Spanish, No. 26 Hawaiian, No. 27 Tenor, No. 28 Mandolin, and No. 29 Ukulele. These had metal bodies made of brass – no doubt leftover Style 97 and Style 0 National bodies – and painted a yellowish maple color, with a clear plastic pickguard. This latter guitar took over the bottom of the National resonator line, pushing out the Duolian, which was no longer offered. All but the uke cost $35, the uke $20.
Also included was the GP, an equal double-cutaway model with a mahogany body, flamed maple carved top, glued-in neck, fine-tune bridge and stop tailpiece. The only models I’ve seen, which were also advertised, had twin humbuckers and conventional electronics. One source refers to a GP-1, which by nomenclature would suggest a single humbucker, but it’s not known if this ever actually existed. Also, it’s not clear if the GPs came in parts or fully assembled.

Tempo Delay: Most plug-in and hardware delays now allow you to automatically sync delay times to MIDI clock and then specify the interval of the repeats in terms of note values rather than milliseconds. A trick here is to use two simultaneous tempo-based delays with, say, a triplet delay setting, panned hard left, and a straight-note delay panned hard right. Things can get more interesting still if you apply this technique using ping-pong delays, so that alternate repeats bounce from one side of the stereo spectrum to the other. To create a true 3D effect, play around with the amount of original signal left in the middle. Depending on the intervals between your repeats, you can turn simple guitar and synth lines into complex, arpeggiator-like patterns or totally spaced out ambient pieces. Stephen Bennett


A DPDT (2PDT or 2P2T) on/on switch has two channels (poles), each having three lugs. This is like having two SPDT switches in one. It’s the standard configuration for most push/ pull or push/push pots, and you can use it for almost all mods, including the seven-sound mod (if you leave one pole unconnected), coil-splitting a humbucker, out-of-phase mods (by adding some jumper wires from pole 1 to pole 2), a direct-through mod, and countless others. Let’s see what’s going on here.
Guitar amplifiers and electronic keyboards may have switch pedals for turning built-in reverb and distortion effects on and off; the pedals contain only a switch, with the circuitry for the effect being housed in the amplifier chassis.[106] Some musicians who use rackmounted effects or laptops employ a MIDI controller pedalboard or armband remote controls to trigger sound samples, switch between different effects or control effect settings.[107][108][109] A pedal keyboard uses pedals, but it is not an effect unit; it is a foot-operated keyboard in which the pedals are typically used to play basslines.
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Finally, there were some twelve Hawaiian lap steels in ’55, the EG-NT, EG-K, EG-Z, EG-A, EG-S, EG-R, EG-L, EG-7L, EG-P, EG-8L, EG-M and EG-NW. Again, since I have no reference materials, there’s no point in attempting any description. However, many of these guitars continued on into the ’60s where we’ll discuss them in detail, and you can probably extrapolate backwards to these mid-’50s models, allowing for pickup changes, etc.

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I am not completely sure this tuner info is completely accurate. Sorry about that... Remember as a general rule Grovers were used on style 21 and above, and Klusons were used on style 18 and lower. There are some exceptions (like during 1940 to 1945, and pre-1930s). On pre-war Grover tuners, there are basically two types used on Martins: G-93 (round button 'butterbean') and G-98 (scalloped buttons, aka "Sta-Tite"). Both came in 6:1 and 12:1 tuning ratios, with 12:1 coming about in 1938 (and replacing the 6:1 ratio). The post-1938 12:1 ratio Grovers can be always be identified since they combine the thin seamed tuner buttons with the long pointed baseplate, and the tuner gear is screw mounted. The 1938 and prior Grover G98 tuners have a thin seamed button combined with the a square tipped baseplate, and always had the 6:1 ratio. They also had the riveted tuner gear. Ater WW2 the G98 was reintroduced with pointy baseplates and a screw mounted gear, and this was copied by Waverly, Grover, Schaller, etc after the war. Also Martin used original Waverly tuners (open back, rounded base tips, butterbean buttons) after WW2 on 00 and 000 and some D guitars style 18 (and some 28) in the late 1940s and 1950s.
Frets on finished fingerboards may be tough to measure accurately when the finish has appreciable thickness (think Rickenbackers, 70s Fenders) as these manufacturers spray the finish over the fretted neck.  I have measured a finish chip from a 70s Fender maple neck refret that was .010” thick – lowering the fret height by .010” (25% in the case of the stock medium wire at the time) from just finish alone.  I recently refretted a 2008 Fender Eric Johnson Strat where the fret height prior to any work was .040”, yet the crown of the fret removed from the fingerboard was .045”.  I personally do not like this feel and so often I will suggest refretting over a finished fingerboard when working with them rather than under the finish.
The intonation here refers to the forward/backward position of the individual string saddles. By moving the saddles forwards or backwards, we are actually adjusting the length of the strings. Without going into too much detail, if the string is the wrong length, the positions of the frets will not be correct and the guitar will be out of tune on some of them. Adjusting the intonation is not difficult. All you need is a guitar tuner and a tool to move the saddles forwards or backwards. Play an open low E string and make sure it is in tune (using the guitar tuner).
I have to say I'm really impressed with the Obsidian HSS wiring harness, The build quality is top notch, and the simplicity to install really delivered.It only took a few minutes to connect and be up and running. I love to customise my guitars and love to play around, so having the ability to swap out pickups without a messy soldering iron is fantastic, and the wiring is super clean giving a professional finish. I'll be intending to use the obsidian wiring harness in future project guitars -I highly recommend- Guitar sounds great ( oh did I mention the extra guitars picks too. nice touch)" - Ricci Custom HSS Strat® Wiring

There’s always been something special about playing a great guitar riff. Riffs that are memorable, get stuck in your head, and that everyone knows are actually in many cases are relatively easy to play. That’s because most people remember simple melodies that they can hum along to. I don’t think many people would be able to hum along to “Through the fire and flames”.
The V40 expands the elusive low-to-medium gain range, putting a wide spectrum of subtly shifting overdrive textures under your fingers. There are rotary controls for gain, EQ and master volume. The real fun starts with a two-position voice switch, which subtly changes the V40's character. Voice 1 is centred more on the early 60s 'blackface' tone; Voice 2 is edgier and a touch more aggressive, evoking the tweed amps of the 1950s. A small toggle switch called 'mid kick' adds a touch of extra gain in the midrange, not least to give weedy single coils a lift for solos. There's also a digital reverb with a front-panel level control and on/off switch. Then there's the standby switch, which has two 'on' positions for high power (approximately 40 watts) and low power (seven watts). This switch also works in the V40's single-ended mode, offering a choice of around 1.5 watts in the high-power position and 0.5 watts in the low-power setting. The V40's sonic palette made us sit up and take notice. By reducing the gain, all the mildly overdriven and chime effects normally squeezed into a fraction of the gain knob's travel now occupy the whole range. The V40 Duchess is a unique design - many of its competitors feature high-gain lead channels, teamed with high headroom and often uninspiring clean channels. By focusing on those often-overlooked but highly effective low-to-medium overdrive sounds, the V40 has effectively carved out its own niche, and looks set to become popular for blues, roots, jazz and country players.

Ibanez RG20061, also known as the RGT220A CAH, is an RG series Prestige limited edition guitar model specially created for the 2006 Winter NAMM Show. It based on the RGT220A, but stained brown, although claimed to be barbecued to a chocolaty brown color. Features include a neck through body construction, ash body wings, Dimarzio IBZ pickups and the Edge Pro tremolo. Only 153 Made 8/10 Condition
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.

Most users are happy with what they got for the money, from its wood quality, to the included hardware and electronics. As expected, many of its buyers are fans of the Les Paul Jr who want to try their hand at customizing their own straightforward rock machine. Surprisingly, there are some who are happy with its default configuration, including the feel of the neck, the sound of the P-90 pickup and the quality of the tuners.
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
Here, we look at the third and final kind of mini-toggle switch, the “on/on/on” switch. After showing how the connections are made within the switch, and seeing the two types that can be found, we look at two uses for the switch: firstly to create a series/split/parallel switch for a humbucker, and secondly to use the switch as a three-way pickup selector.

Gibson Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar The Gibson Les Paul Studio electric guitar has been around since 1983. For 2018 Gibson upgraded one of its most well-loved models, fitting it with cryogenically treated frets for greater fret durability, adding fingerboard binding and giving it a Slim Taper neck profile. The core Les Paul tones and quality hardware and electronics are still there, of course.


You will be able to chord the guitar with comfort and has bend strings. You will be able to play with ease as it has c shaped neck with satin finished. Its three single-coil pickups can allow you to play the rock and jazz sounds, two-tone sound controls, 5-way switches to pick up. ITS Synchronized Tremolo chrome allows you to create a flat pitch and sharp sound. This is just the right guitar in your certain budget to get the best quality assurance and peace of mind. 
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REGOLAZIONE DELL'INTONAZIONE (FAT20) Per garantire l'assenza di movimento, ogni selletta è provvista di una vite di fissaggio. Per regolare l'intonazione, allentare la vite di fissaggio della selletta con una chiave a brugola da 2 mm (D). Per regolare l'intonazione, inserire una chiave a brugola da 2,5 mm nella vite della selletta sul retro del tremolo.
It looks like there was no information about Lyle guitars on google back in the day.Now you can find some info, but very little. I purchased my first guitar of my life age 14 from a seller on ebay for $100. I baught an awesome looking black SG style guitar with the name Lyle on it. Years later now, I know a lot more... Lyle is one of the rarest brands of guitar manufactured in the world. This rarety however does not increase the value of the instrument. Lyle is not a brand that can even be found in the guitar Pricing Guide. I have looked. The value is determined usualy by the seller. If your selling one, hit me up. Lyle was never associated with Gibson. Lyle was never purchased and closed down by Gibson. However, Lyle started manufacturing Gibson style guitars at a cheaper rate but they failed to observe copyright laws. Lyle was created by the Motsimoku Company in Japan from 1965 to 1970. In 1970 the Motsimoku Company was slapped with such high lawsuits by the Gibson Corp of the US, that they bankrupted and closed. Making Lyle one of the rarest brands of guitar because of their extreamely limited production life of 5 years.
There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.

Tube amplifiers are the original amplifier and still seen as the best way to amplify an electric guitar – and for good reason! Despite impressive advances in amplification technology, nothing beats the natural sound of a vacuum tube that has been pushed to its very limit. In fact, for many guitarists it’s either tube or nothing, as the volume, vibe and fluid sound profile of these amps is extremely hard to replicate. One model we really like is the Hughes & Kettner TubeMeister TM18H, which has killer looks, delivers a delightful tube tone, has switchable wattages, and doesn’t break the bank.
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