While you can play one through an electric guitar amp, an acoustic guitar will sound its best if it is played through a dedicated acoustic amplifier. While similar in structure to electric guitar amps, acoustic amps are primarily designed to offer transparency. In other words, it strives to reproduce the tone of your acoustic guitar’s natural sound as closely as possible. Interestingly, they almost exclusively come in a combo format, while most acoustic amps will have two channels – one for the instrument and the other geared towards microphone use. The AER Compact 60 represents what a great acoustic guitar amp looks and sounds like, with enough power for stage use as well as a high-end organic tone.
Nothing sounds as good as a tube amp turned up to 10. You can do this with some old amps, and they will sound fairly clean; others will explode. Use caution and keep an eye out for plumes of smoke. Newer tube amps generally have separate preamp and master-gain controls that can duplicate the gritty anarchy of yore, minus the lease-breaking SPLs. For jazz and other clean guitar styles, it's okay to turn the volume down a bit, as long as you don't "underdo" it.
This question is one of those legendary analog vs. digital type debates. Many a forum war has been started around this topic. It’s typically a question asked by beginner and intermediate guitarists looking to get into effects. Given a budget, is it better to start a collection and buy a couple of individual effects, or get a single multi-fx unit? There’s not really one correct answer to this question one way or the other, since it largely matters on what your goals are.
Continuing the example of making comparisons of specifications, there are Guilds in this price range that come with all solid woods, a rosewood fretboard, and with built-in tuners. Also, Epiphone Masterbuilt has solid wood acoustics, even some with cedar tops which are highly sought after by finger style players, plus they have a rosewood fretboard, a built-in tuner, two pickups and deluxe tuning machines. Moreover, both of the above guitars sell for less than the Taylor 200 series model you listed. So which is better?
We are proud to offer this very Rare and beautiful and highly collectible vintage 1983 Alvarez Electric/Acoustic 5078 with a les Paul style body shape. Top of the line workmanship fit & finish work here Crafted in Japan this is the limited special production Anniversary model made in 1983. This truly fine rare example comes with its nice original Alvarez black exterior tolex with the blue Martin style plush lined hard shell case. Did we say SUPER RARE....WoW!...we were completely amazed at the fact that this ( Les Paul style baby sounds so great plugged in or unplugged just beautiful. This one has a rich full bodied sound as an acoustic which is hard to find with this thin Les Paul shaped body makes it very comfortable to play long duration and not to mention did we say BEAUTIFUL as well as a real unique player...see the Headstock shape in the pictures this is truly a real beauty. This one is sure to please the Vintage Alvarez Acoustic lover... I'm a vitage Alvarez believer & after you see and play and hear this so will you. Condition for a 26 year old vintage guitar this thing is darn near mint with just a few tiny minute dings, see the detailed high res pictures for all the cosmetics, JVG RATED at 9.2 out of 10 ....... any questions? please email us @ gr8bids@comcast.net Thanks for your interest! .
Some of the earliest electric guitars, amps-in-cases, pickups under the bridge, fiberglass guitars, built-in electronic vibratos. Sound curious enough for you? The subject of Supro guitars and amplifiers represents a profitable avenue for exploration by collectors and enthusiasts interested in the many curious and significant byways off the guitar superhighway, which can be enjoyed without having an oil sheik’s bankroll. While National resonator guitars have received superb attention by Bob Brozman, little has been written about this mysterious corner of the Valco universe. Well, with a little help from our friends (in particular, catalogs and invaluable information supplied by Mike Newton, Jim Dulfer, and Michael Lee Allen), let’s set the record straight.
8. Fender Champion 40-watt 1x12 ($179.99): If you are looking for a great introduction into the world of Fender tone, you need to look no further than the Fender Champion 40. This solid state amp with Fender classic styling allows you access to a variety of on-board effects like Vibratone, tremolo, delay and many more. The two amp channels allow you to switch between Fender Blackface clean or a variety of different amp voicings, accessing the sounds of other Fender amp greats. The ability to add a footswitch pedal allows you to switch channels and effects with great ease at the tap of a button. There’s a reason why Fender is the go-to company for many of those in the music community.
While SG Guitars kits are sold in a number of different timber varieties, if you are looking to match the original as closely as possible you will be best selecting a model constructed with a Mahogany body and Maple neck with Rosewood or Ebony fretboard. * Gibson has recently transitioned from Rosewood to Richlite due to New CITES Regulations For All Rosewood Species.
“This is a very complicated mix of economy versus market, demand versus what products are they putting out, versus are their products as good as they used to be, versus what’s going on with the Internet, versus how are the big-box stores dealing with what’s going on,” Smith says. “But I’ll tell you this: You put a magic guitar in a case and ship it to a dealer, it will sell.”
An acoustic guitar is a guitar that uses only an acoustic soundboard (the top of an acoustic guitar) to help transmit the strings energy into the air in order to produce its sound. The soundboard will add various tonal qualities due to its own mix of tonewoods and bracing, and the soundboard also has a strong effect on the loudness of the guitar. Without a soundboard, the string would just cut through the air without actually moving it much because it is large, the soundboard can push the air, creating a much louder sound. In addition, the acoustic guitar has a hollow body that resonates, increasing the efficiency of its lower frequencies.
Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.

The “fatter wire = fatter tone” equation is nothing new. Ever since jumbo frets have been available, many great players—Rory Gallagher, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Kenny Wayne Shepherd— have been known to re-fret their Fender Stratocasters in particular with jumbo wire (vintage-spec Strats arguably provide a more dramatic before and- after picture than some other guitars, since they were born with narrow frets). More metal in any fixed component usually means a greater vibrational coupling between string and wood, so there is presumably something to this theory. But what else changes with fret size?


Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturing company, which is famous for being the first to mass-produce the seven-string and eight-string variants of guitars. The perfect size, great projection and beautiful tone offered by AEL, PF and EWP series of Acoustic guitars are remarkable. RGX and the GRX series of electric guitars come with the Ibanez brand at an affordable price. The mid-range GRG series include offers greater precision, high performance and playability.
By far the best bang for the buck. These guitars are beautifully made with good attention to details such as fret ends, bridge fit and neck joints. They also have wonderful finishing and are made from quality materials. The 'snob' factor is the only thing against them, they are not Gibsons. Martin's or Fender's, BUT they do play just as well and quite frankly, only those with a good ear and perfect pitch could tell the difference in a rock environment. I have Fender, Gibson, Taylor, Columbus, Washburn, Squire and Maccaferri Guitars, as well as Richwood. Sadly like the great majority of guitarists, the guitars themselves are more capable than I am, and I am happy to admit it. Having an exceptional guitar will not make you an exceptional guitarist, just as a more professional camera won't make you a professional photographer. The Richwood Artist / Master series of guitars are good, believe me! For the average guitarist, pro or am, you can buy more expensise guitars but not better as far ...more
For quite some times now, many musicians have been making use of the distinctive sound and look of Koa wood construction on instruments. Designed to meet the taste of Hawaiian culture and tradition, the Koa wood on the ESP LTD EC-1000 is native to Hawaiian island, boasting a remarkable history and well-deserve popularity for its recognizable natural reddish and grain pattern eliciting a well-balanced sound while adding tone brightness without affecting the guitar’s warmth.

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The ’37 Spanish Guitar ($40, $5 for a case) illustrated in both the Sorkin and Grossman catalogs was basically the same as before, but now with plastic button tuners. This still had no f-holes. The previous basic Regal trapeze tail is now shown replaced by a stamped National trapeze. Indeed, despite the fact that catalog illustrations remain retouched versions of the old Regal-made guitars, these probably had Kay bodies and bolted-on National Dobro necks. Gone is the 1/4″ jack in favor of the screw-on microphone attachment. Finally, the new cylindrical-magnet pickup is offered as the “Mated Pick-Up.” This is significant both intrinsically and in light of later Supro features. This pickup is “mated,” i.e., attached by three screws, to the bridge saddle. The pickup sat inside the guitar contained in a wooden box. This was the beginning of National Dobro/Valco’s association with what would later be called the Bridge-Tone under-bridge pickup featured in many of its electric guitars.
Echo controls usually let you determine the level, the period between playbacks, and the decay—the rate at which succeeding notes become quieter and quieter until they fade out altogether. The period (or time) parameter is often controlled by a single button you push repeatedly in time with the music. This is called tap delay and keeps your echo effect from clashing with the music's time signature.
An octave pedal listens to what note you’re playing and adds the next octave up or down (depending on your settings) making it sound like someone is playing the octave note with you. If you’re familiar with guitar or just learning, you’ll know that an octave is the distance between one musical note and it’s corresponding note at a higher or lower pitch. For example, if you play an open E string and then play the E string on the 12th fret, it will sound the same, just an octave higher.

On stages and in recording studios all over the globe, the Epiphone name can easily be found thanks to the incredible amount of work that's put into every instrument they design. So with that in mind, which is the right guitar value package for you? You certainly have plenty of choices, but starting with the top-rated items is a great way to speed up the decision-making process. For example, check out the Les Paul electric guitar player pack. Featuring an Electar-10 amp with overdrive, gig bag, pinch-on tuner, strap cables, picks and of course the classic Les Paul Special II in ebony, this package has it all. Plus, it also includes free online eMedia guitar lessons, so you'll be impressing family and friends with face-melting riffs in no time.


In this buying guide, you’ll learn the essentials of what effects pedals do and which ones to look for depending on the kind of tone you want to experiment with. Here’s the quick overview: effects pedals (also called “stompboxes”) are electronic devices that connect in-line with your guitar and amp to change the signal going through them. Some work with analog circuits and some are digital, but they’re all powerful tools for shaping your sound in endlessly creative ways.

You don't have to use plug-ins! Some synths such as the Virus TI have very flexible effects built in. You don't have to create audio effects in your sequencer. For example, I use the Access Virus synth, which features a simple delay effect, with the added bonus that all its parameters are available in the modulation matrix. One favourite trick involves routing velocity to the delay colour parameter. For parts that get brighter with increased velocity, it adds extra animation and bite if the echoes also get brighter. Unusually, the Virus also features four-way audio panning, so you can position an audio signal anywhere between the main stereo outputs and a second pair. If the second pair of outputs is routed to an external effects unit, you can play with the concept of moving a note around in a space, where its position also determines the treatment it gets. More fun can be had by modulating reverb time and colour via an LFO. The same LFO can then be used to control filter cutoff, EQ frequency and maybe wavetable position too (if your Virus is a TI). In this way, timbral changes happen at the same time as effect changes. Paul Nagle
And how does adding a pedal, basically one more optional pre-amplification stage that you can turn on or off at your leisure, make somebody less “real”? Imagine some old-school guy is just using guitar to a (insert amp brand)? Great! I love them too. Which one? Ah, nice amp! Did they know that amp has one more gain stage than that amp over there? If I plug into that one while they play theirs, did I make them less real or genuine, or did I become SUPER-real? Are they going to start fading like Marty McFly when the outcome is in doubt at the end of Back To The Future? Will they spring back to life and start playing “Earth Angel” properly once I unplug?
While electric guitar manufacturers like this are often more expensive, they do provide a level of customization that isn’t available with several mainline models. Most companies of this size can have a casual email or phone conversation with you, take a few notes about how you want your guitar setup (probably jotting it all down with pen and paper) and then making a guitar to your exact specifications.

Hybrid bass amplifier heads typically pair a tube preamplifier with a solid-state power amplifier. This provides the player with the best elements of both amplifier technology. The tube preamp gives the player the ability to obtain tube amplifier tone, which tube enthusiasts state is "warmer" than a solid state (transistor) preamp. As well, tube users state that tube preamps have a more pleasing-sounding, natural tone when the preamp's volume is pushed up so high that the bass signal becomes overdriven; in contrast, a solid state preamp that is pushed to the point of signal "clipping" can be harsh-sounding. Some hybrid amp heads have a bypass switch, so that the tube preamp can be bypassed, if the tube breaks or develops a technical problem. The tube preamplified signal in a hybrid amplifier head is then sent to a solid state power amplifier. Compared with tube power amps, solid state power amplifiers are more reliable, require less maintenance, less fragile and lighter in weight. A hybrid tube preamp/solid state power amp thus provides a bass player with the benefits of both technologies' strengths: tube preamp tone and solid state reliability for the power amp.
I had this guitar handed down to me. It is in pretty rough shape. I think it is in good enough shape to restore to good condition/used shape. Before I attempt such a thing I would like to know more about the guitar itself. I know the history of Lyle and "Lawsuit" guitars so that part is done. The body has a cherry red finish with 2 "f" openings. The neck has had some stress on it, enough to have the wood lift a little on its grain pattern about 2 inches long from the nut to the fret board. I am not sure if injecting glue into this will keep the neck from breaking in the future. The fret board is loose at the nut but I believe I can glue it again. This is not the first restoration I have done. I have restored a flute and a grenadilla wood clarinet. Any comments regarding how to or if I am wasting my time will be welcome.
Festive music track with cheerful and happy mood, with “We Wish You A Merry Christmas” song melody. I’ve included in pack different logo and looped versions of this track, for your comfortable using. This celebratory track can be used for Winter Holyday projects, children arcade games, as New Year jingles, advertising and Youtube commercial video. Enjoy!

Not all guitars sound the same. The type of pickups, strings, wood, and body style all dictate the sound a guitar makes. One of the most important decisions a guitarist can make is whether to get a solid body, semi-hollow, or hollow body guitar. A solid body has a cutting tone with plenty of sustain, whereas a hollow body has a warmer, more rounded sound.
There are tons of different online retailers and ebay stores that you can find a great deal on parts and supplies, but those were just some of the ones that I have purchased on and been satisfied with their service and parts. NOTE: Do your research when it comes to parts and the quality of the parts you buy. I like to get feedback and reviews from Harmony-Central. You might not be able to get reviews on everything, but it helps you out allot. 

In the 1980s, when shred metal was at its peak, Ibanez took a big share of the market with models that were geared towards the fastest, loudest players – thin necks, floating double-locking tremolos and high-output pickups. These guitars were endorsed by modern day virtuosos such as Paul Gilbert, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, with many artists designing their own custom Ibanez models.
If you see a "\n/," where n = some number, perform a tremolo bar dip. Quickly hit and release the bar to dip the note's pitch. The number between the slashes gives an indication of the pitch you should dip to - dip the pitch by "n" semitones (a semitone is the same as the pitch between two adjacent frets.)[1] For instance, "\5/" means to drop the pitch by 5 semitones, which will be the same tone as 5 frets below the original note.
This site is dedicated to all you guitarists out there who ever owned an old Japanese Teisco guitar, especially those of you who started out with one and still have it today. I created this site out of frustration at not being able to identify the model of my first Teisco despite my best online and off-line efforts. I found out (eventually!) that it's an SS-4L made some time in the early/mid 60s.

In this article you will learn the basics of guitar effects pedals so you will be better prepared to choose the right analog stomp boxes and digital effects to complement your sound. I’m not going to spend too much time on the science of how effects boxes do what they do. But I will do my best to explain, in plain English, the basics of each effect.


Many amplifiers have effects built in, but even those that do are no substitute for a well-equipped pedalboard. There are literally thousands of effects to choose from, some of which (like the Boss TU-3 Chromatic Pedal Tuner) are more like accessories that don't directly impact your sound. Others will transform it completely. For example, two of the most popular effects are the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal and the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer Effects Pedal - these are both overdrive pedals, and together with a good amp, they'll take an electric guitar's sound from its default, vintage-like tone all the way to the high-powered distortion of a modern rock anthem.

The first thing to do is to cut out a piece of copper foil slightly larger than the bottom of the electronics cavity.This way the edges of the foil will go up the sides of the electronics cavity a bit. Next cut out strips of copper foil slightly wider than the depth of the cavity, and form them along the sides. When you are finished, it should look like the photo on the left.


1.  And now for my favorite customer fix… A re-glued bridge on an acoustic using Gorilla Glue and wood screws.  This is an epic failure on so many levels.  Wood screws should never be used to hold a bridge on (Gibson, take note) .  And anyone who has ever used Gorilla Glue knows it has no place in guitar construction/repair.  It’s a polyurethane glue that works very well in certain circumstances (water contact, etc.) but the foaming that occurs when the glue is curing can create a humongous mess.  Fix:  Take the bridge off and refinish the top.  What could have been a $85.00 repair is now over $400.00.


Scott Baxendale has been building custom hand made guitars since 1974. Recently he settled in Athens Georgia where he is currently building custom guitars, restoring vintage guitars and teaching the art of lutherie to aspiring craftsman. Scott Baxendale’s legacy of building custom instruments began in 1974, when he arrived in Winfield, Kansas to work for […]

One half step down from Drop D. Utilized by bands like Dir En Grey, Our Lady Peace, Your Demise, Oceana, Alter Bridge, Alice in Chains on some songs (like "Them Bones" or "We Die Young"), A Day to Remember (on the song "It's Complicated"), Chevelle (on Sci-Fi Crimes), Of Mice & Men, Deftones (on their Around the Fur album), Evanescence, Paramore, Disturbed, Theory of a Deadman, Puddle of Mudd, Linkin Park, Sevendust, Skillet, Black Veil Brides, Steel Panther (on songs like "17 Girls in a Row" or "Gloryhole"), 10 Years, Black Stone Cherry, Truckfighters, Fireball Ministry, RED on End of Silence, Nirvana on In Utero, "Blew" live performances, "Been a Son", the Nevermind album and also by System of a Down. Also used by Lamb of God somewhat on their albums Wrath and VII: Sturm und Drang, and almost exclusively on their album Resolution. Avenged Sevenfold used this tuning on songs "Scream", "Almost Easy", "Hail to the King", "Requiem" and "Coming Home". Guns N' Roses used this tuning on "Shackler's Revenge" from Chinese Democracy. Metallica use this tuning on their song "Minus Human" off S&M, on Dirty Window from their album St. Anger and live performances of songs recorded in Drop D, Asking Alexandria on their first album (Stand Up And Scream), As I Lay Dying have used this tuning on a few songs. Trivium used this tuning on their albums In Waves and Vengeance Falls. Van Halen on their 1981 song "Unchained". The Presidents of the United States of America use guitars tuned to this tuning with the top three strings removed, although on Freaked Out and Small, regularly strung guitars were used. Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown use this tuning on some songs (like "Heartland" and "Aftershock")
Over the past three years, Gibson’s annual revenue has fallen from $2.1 billion to $1.7 billion, according to data gathered by Music Trades magazine. The company’s 2014 purchase of Philips’s audio division for $135 million led to debt — how much, the company won’t say — and a Moody’s downgrading last year. Fender, which had to abandon a public offering in 2012, has fallen from $675 million in revenue to $545 million. It has cut its debt in recent years, but it remains at $100 million.
Producing one of the most popular clean sounds in rock, you’ll rarely see a solid-state amplifier with as much notoriety as the Roland JC-120. The amp was introduced in 1975, offering pure “JC Clean” sound with 120 watts of power and a built-in Dimensional Space Chorus effect. The JC-120 features dual 12” speakers plus dual power amps that drive the speakers to their full potential for a stunningly clear sound. As a result, the amplifier became a favorite among players like Andy Summers, Robert Smith, Johnny Marr, Jeff “Skunk” Baxter and more.
The United States Department of Justice found emails from 2008 and 2009 in which Gibson employees discussed the "gray market" nature of the ebony wood available from a German wood dealer—who obtained it from a supplier in Madagascar—as well as plans to obtain the wood. It filed a civil proceeding in June 2011,[40][43][44] the first such case under the amended Lacey Act, which requires importing companies to purchase legally harvested wood and follow the environmental laws of the producing countries regardless of corruption or lack of enforcement.[44] Gibson argued in a statement the following day that authorities were "bullying Gibson without filing charges" and denied any wrongdoing.[39][45] Arguing against the federal regulations and claiming that the move threatened jobs, Republicans and Tea Party members spoke out against the raids and supported Juszkiewicz.[46]

Earth Quaker Devices – Have you ever heard a song and wondered “how did they get that sound?”. If it was a recent recording there is a good chance these guys were behind it. They make an incredibly wide range of pedals that all go from great quality, usable pedals for almost any style to the weirdest, most wonderful tones that you have never heard before.
In May 1965 Keith Richards used a Gibson Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone to record "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction".[24] The song's success greatly boosted sales of the device, and all available stock sold out by the end of 1965.[25] Other early fuzzboxes include the Mosrite FuzzRITE and Arbiter Group Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix,[26] the Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pi used by Hendrix and Carlos Santana,[27] and the Vox Tone Bender used by Paul McCartney to play fuzz bass on "Think for Yourself" and other Beatles recordings.[28]
Music Go Round® is a registered trademark of Winmark Corporation based in Minneapolis, MN. Each franchise is independently owned and operated. Other brand names are trademarked or registered by their respective companies. The trademarks and logos used in this website are owned by Winmark Corporation® and any unauthorized use of these trademarks by others is subject to action under federal and state trademark laws.
The fact that the output is electrical has made possible a dizzying array of sounds produced by electrically and electronically modifying this electrical output. Besides the volume and tone controls on the guitar and on the amplifier, a variety of outboard devices are used to obtain custom sounds and effects. As an attempt to organize these effects, consider the following classifications:
Description: Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: U-Shape - Nut Width: 48mm - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24, Jumbo - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 4+3 - Bridge: Floyd Rose Speedloader - Bridge Construction: Maple - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: ESP Tuners, Black, 1x Volume Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Dimarzio Crunchlab 7/LiquiFire 7 - String Instrument Finish: See-Thru Black
Jump up ^ DeCurtis, Anthony (1992). Present Tense: Rock & Roll and Culture (4. print. ed.). Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. ISBN 0-8223-1265-4. His first venture, the Phillips label, issued only one known release, and it was one of the loudest, most overdriven, and distorted guitar stomps ever recorded, "Boogie in the Park" by Memphis one-man-band Joe Hill Louis, who cranked his guitar while sitting and banging at a rudimentary drum kit.
AmpliTube's effects are as noteworthy as its amp modeling capabilities. The current version comes with up to 51 effects - modeled after rare vintage gear like Ibanez Tube Screamer, Arbiter FuzzFace, MXR Phase100, MXR Dynacomp, Electro Harmonix Memory Man and many more. What sets AmpliTube apart from the competition though is its very intuitive interface. No parameter is more than two clicks away, and its realistic looking graphics are extremely easy to operate - even allowing for drag and drop operations. If you want a quick setup software, AmpliTube is your best bet. Price: usually about $200 - Check out Amazon.com for the latest price and reviews
Another clarification about brand names is in order. Teisco guitars can be found mainly bearing at least eight brand names: Teisco, Teisco Del Rey, Kingston, World Teisco, Silvertone, Kent, Kimberly and Heit Deluxe. Teisco was the name used mainly in Japan but also on a few occasions here in the United States. Most Teisco guitars were imported into the United States by Chicago’s W.M.I. Corporation � originally owned by guitar importing pioneer Jack Westheimer � bearing both the Teisco Del Rey and Kingston brand names. By the mid-’60s W.M.I. was providing Teiscos to Sears and Roebuck carrying the Silvertone moniker. I’m not sure the World Teisco brand ever got to the U.S.; my guess is that it was an export designation that went to other markets. Some of the early Kent guitars imported by New York’s Bugeleisen and Jacobson were purchased from Teisco. The distributors responsible for either the Kimberly or Heit Deluxe brand names remain a mystery at this time. It is possible that you may encounter other brand names on Teisco-made guitars sold through other distributors, but these will be in a minority. If you know of any other names, please let us know.
With the neck profile and nut slots correct, approximate the positions of the string saddles for correct intonation. Low E and G string will set back about 3-4/32nds of an inch longer than the exact scale length. The A and B strings will set back 2-3/32nds , The D and high E about 1 32nd. Scale length equals the distance from the fretboard edge of the nut (where the strings bear off) to the middle of the twelfth fret, times 2. If the measurement from the front of the nut to the middle of the 12th fret is 12.75", then you have a 25.5 inch scale length (12.75 x 2= 25.5) Final positioning is done once saddle height is determined, but you need to be close to this final location when determining the saddle height.
When looking at acoustic pianos, there are so many variations that can lead to differences in tone: upright vs. grand, hammer types, mechanical condition, the player, mic choices, and mic techniques. No matter what, though, the piano tends to be a behemoth in the mix – for better or worse – so most often you'll be looking to cut holes out for other things in your mix.

Awesome for the money! I have had my guitar for about a month now. The guitar itself is worth the money. I play on a 100w amp at church and it sounds good. Definitely not the highest quality but still a good full body sound. (After restringing it. The strings it comes with are garbage) The amp that this comes with is nice ... I actually was using it as a practice amp with my bass and it did fine. Nothing that I could play with any other instruments but definitely can hear what I'm doing. My son also uses it as a practice amp on an electric guitar and it does fine, it doesn't have any functions just meant to be an accustic amp. Definitely worth the money.
As with drive tones, many guitar amplifiers will come with reverb built-in. As such, you may have an idea of the type of effect it is already. In pedal form though, there are companies taking things to new heights by embracing reverb as a gloriously creative tool in its own right. Not just something you add on as an afterthought. Strymon, the American pedal brand, are the masters of this as you’ll see in their Blue Sky (reviewed here) and Big Sky (reviewed here) pedals. Both offer a host of unique, interesting and quite incredible sounding reverbs which will alter your tone in all kinds of wonderful ways.
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black
pedal bass fender stratocaster electric amp left handed guitar fender telecaster gibson les paul telecaster ibanez epiphone martin guitar fuzz prs taylor guitar gretsch electro acoustic guitar les paul gibson sg marshall stratocaster fender precision bass tokai rickenbacker free fender bass fender jazz bass resonator guitar 12 string guitar fender amp fender jaguar
The headstock is located on the end of the neck opposite the guitar body. It is fitted with tuning keys, also known as tuners, tuning pegs, or machine heads. These adjust the tension of each string, changing their pitches. The nut is a small strip located where the headstock meets the neck, that is grooved to guide the strings onto the fretboard. On an acoustic guitar, the nut is commonly made of plastic, but it can also be bone, graphite, or any number of other materials.
To be able to buy a name brand guitar like this at such a great price was a real steal. One of my sons is a beginner learning to play, so it was great for me being able to purchase a guitar like this that would carry him from beginner into an intermediate player in later years. It is a well-made and beautiful guitar, and it produces a wonderful sound that you would expect from a name like Fender. Plus, with my son being left-handed, I thought it would be difficult to find a good affordable left-handed guitar for him. Not only was able to find this high quality one, but the price couldn't be beat.
AmpliTube Free is a cool entry level program for those that want to experience software based guitar effects and amp modeling without spending money. It only comes with 9 stompbox and 2 rack type effects, but it covers essential effect types which are good enough for various musical genre applications. Should you need more, AmpliTube offers an upgrade system in which you can shop for additional amps, cabinets, mics and effects. Each model can even be tried out for free for two days prior to purchase, quite impressive for a free software!
One possible way of dealing with the g string tuning issue (my experience has involved the low e more than anything) is to wind the string on the peg so that the winding goes up from the bottom of the peg, not v.v as it is done at factory. This reduces the angle at which the string sits relative to the nut and neck, potentially reducing the problem caused by the friction this angle creates when it contacts the nut. It will likely have a significant impact on the string staying in tune over time and you don't have to worry about filing the nut. A little nut lube might help too.
Gotta say a tele has to be the hardest but most rewarding to play. If you make a mistake, you will definitely hear it, but it just helps you're playing get more clean. Les pauls are a lot easier with the shorter scale length and forgiving pickups. Haven't played any metal guitars but I figure it has a lot to do with their setup that makes it sound so easy. You can do just about anything with the tremolo arm into a van halen kind of setup and it'll sound cool. Or you can whack one off with your guitar like steve vai
Ear Wring is a ring modulator controlled by three phase distortion oscillators and one LFO. Depending on the pitch, this can go from a gently oscillating tremelos to fuzzy, synth-like freak-outs. An optional harsh fuzz can be added to the signal before modulation. Mixed with the dry input signal and fed into an amp simulator, Ear Wring can add some meat to your guitar tone.
If your instrument receives regular maintenance, then you are likely to avoid any unneeded guitar setup cost. A properly cared for guitar will be regularly cleaned, oiled, and treated gently at all times. Of course, this is not possible for all people, as their preferred style of music may negate the ability to treat a guitar gently (metal and punk are good examples). Having the guitar setup can be thought of as maintenance in itself, as it is an invariable need in environments that have inconsistent weather patterns (which would be virtually all of them). The cost of a guitar setup can be insignificant if you maintain it on a regular basis.
The Ibanez Artcore AF75, PRS SE Standard 24 and Schecter PT, for example, are priced below $600 and have been highly rated. They’re not exactly cheap money-wise, but they’re definitely worth a lot more. Getting one of those from the get-go will make playing guitar a lifetime passion. “Cheap” guitars may seem more affordable at first, but many of these are poorly made and can be more costly in the long run because of constant repairs and replacements.
Many of the modulation type effects pedals are made to approximate some aspect of the original rotating speaker.  That’s correct, you heard right.  The Leslie Cabinet was made as a companion to the Hammond B3 Organ and literally had a rotary speaker that could produce all of the common modulation effects depending on the speed setting.  Many companies now offer digital pedal versions that mimic the Leslie sound very well, so lugging around a huge speaker cabinet isn’t necessary, unless you are a purist or have a crew of roadies available.
The standard practice for many distributors was to offer a line of guitars based on popular American designs like Les Pauls and Strats, for example, along with a few original designs. And all were offered at a bargain price or were at least inexpensive enough to compete with the American manufacturers. While the majority of imported Asian-built copies from the era aren’t considered to be of very good quality, the Lotus brand was an exception, mainly because of the factories they were built in.
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Blending vintage-spec Alnico V single-coil sparkle, chime and quack with contemporary playability and versatile electronics, the Fullerton Standard Legacy from G&L offers superb Made-in-USA craftsmanship at an amazing price. With a stunning metallic lacquer finish over a resonant solid alder body, this instrument looks as good as it sounds, and the Leo Fender-designed PTB (passive treble and bass) system puts an incredibly wide variety of tones right at your fingertips. The Legacy also features Leo's acclaimed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato bridge for incredible tuning stability and quaver to dive-bomb range that's smooth as silk.

Oh and you play really great sounding exercises in blues, rock and country that encourage you to noodle around and find your own riffs and leads to play over the tracks which is something that I had never really been inspired to do before with any other book. The author doesn't just throw a bunch of tired, boring, public domain yankee doodles and scarborough fairs because he is too cheap to pay royalties or some crappy tunes that a kindergardener could write but actual original pro sounding tunes and riffs. Yes, I HAVE been around my fair share of crappy guitar lesson books, thanks for asking!
Nice and great are just two of the many positive adjectives that people use to describe the Ibanez AEG12II-NT. And most of these satisfied users are pleased with its playability, describing it as a truly inspiring and fun instrument. Its visual appeal and sound quality are also commended often, some even coming from experienced players who compare it to more expensive acoustic-electric guitars.
The new HT Club 40 looks familiar, but practically every detail has been worked on and sweated over. The control panel has separate channels for clean and overdrive, with two footswitchable voices on each channel. There’s also a new, low-power option, which reduces output from around 40 watts down to just four watts. Global controls include a master volume and level control for the Club’s built-in digital reverb. On the rear panel, you’ll find extension speaker outlets and an effects loop, with new features including a USB recording output together with speaker-emulated line outs on jack and XLR. The MkII’s clean channel has a completely reworked architecture with two tightly defined voices, best described as classic American and classic British, which can be pre-set on the control panel or footswitched. Although only one button is pressed, lots of changes happen inside, including preamp voicing, EQ and valve gain structure, as well as the power amplifier damping.  A similar thing happens on the overdrive channel, with a choice of two voices called ‘classic crunch’ and ‘super- saturated lead’, which can be infinitely tweaked between Brit and USA response using Blackstar’s patented ISF control. Like the clean channel, these voices have been reworked to be richer and more responsive. In use, the HT Club 40 MkII is jaw-droppingly good - while the MkI version was efficient if a little bland sometimes, the MkII is full of character and attitude, with astonishing tonal depth and response that will have many top-dollar boutique amps struggling to keep up.
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This is a musical problem rather than a technical one. Guitarists engage overdrive when they WANT to dominate. That's fine, but don't do it ALL the time! Not if there's an acoustic guitar in the band and you want to hear it! Everyone needs to listen, everyone has to be aware that another player may have something interesting to play, and therefore make space for it. Like turn down or - horror - even stop playing for a bit!
There was a band in Manchester called Sister Ray, who were just this scary bunch of men/reprobates. I guess word had got around that I had a knack and was a useful little guy to have around, and you only have to buy me some Coca-Cola and I was good to go. So I played with them. I started playing my first sort of shows in front of real [crowds] when I was fourteen.
Sound quality-wise, it’s too close to call. All modern Zoom, Line 6, Boss, and DigiTech multi-effects units sound excellent. Distortion sounds a bit better on the DigiTech, and if reverb is your thing it doesn’t get much better than the Lexicon verbs. The other multi-effects units might be better if you’re looking for more experimental sounds and textures. The DigiTech RP500 tends to be more conservative, and focuses on nailing the classics.

My 5056 has pretty high action on it, and these guitars are very bad candidates for neck resets, as the necks were glued with epoxy, not hide glue (which can be softened with heat). Anyone who looks at buying a vintage Alvarez should bear this in mind if the action is high. There may be no practical remedy (Search web for comments on it.). And those who own them should probably stay away from heavy string gauges, i.e., not bigger than .12's on high "E". I now de-tune my Alvarez guitars when I put them away for longer period storage even though I use 11's on them. If you do use heavier gauge strings, you might want to de-tune when putting away the guitar. Just a suggestion. Cheers.


After covering Types of Guitar: Beginners Guide to Buying a Guitar, I feel it is appropriate this week to focus on learning guitar chords and the importance of practicing them. By that I mean anything from two-note power chords to spidery jazz chords spanning all six strings. Don’t make the mistake of attempting lead guitar without first getting a solid grasp on chordal, rhythmic playing.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.
The Squier Affinity series is a great beginner instrument. All of the bodies & necks have been CNC manufactured, so they are consistent and solidly built. In recent years, Fender has completely re-hauled the Squier series of instruments to make them decent introductory level instruments, at a great introductory cost to the beginner player. You can choose from Strats, Teles and even Jazzmaster style guitars!
James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix was an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music, and one of the most celebrated musicians of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame describes him as "arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music". Born in Seattle, Washington, Hendrix began playing guitar at the age of 15. In 1961, he enlisted in the US Army; he was granted an honorable discharge the following year. Soon afterward, he moved to Clarksville, Tennessee, and began playing gigs on the chitlin' circuit, ...more on Wikipedia
Martin actually got into the electric guitar business in the late ’50s when it started slapping DeArmond pickups onto some of its acoustic guitars yielding the D-18E, D-28E and OO-18E. These pickups were the DeArmond humbuckers with chrome sides and a black center in a trapezoidal hole, large pole pieces along one side and smaller poles along the other. Prototypes of the D-18E began in 1958 and in 1959 production began on it plus the D-28E and OO-18E.
The quarter-sawn mahogany neck has a rounded “C” neck shape and it’s topped with a smooth 22-fret A-grade dark rosewood fretboard with small block pearloid inlays. The 2019 Gibson ES-335 Figured also features an ABR-1 bridge with titanium saddles for added sustain and clarity and Memphis Historic Spec II humbuckers. In addition, this classic axe now has MTC Premiere Controls.
A soldering iron is basically a tool that allows you to transfer heat that in turn melts the solder which is used to join two pieces of metal. The heat is supplied electrically (this wasn’t always the case) and the soldering iron itself will have an insulated handle protecting you from the heat generated. For some useful tips on best practice for soldering click here: https://guitarkitworld.com/common-mistakes-to-avoid-when-building-an-electric-guitar-kit/
• We'll add EQ to give some polish and let the guitar cut through a little better in a mix. Enable a stage in the standard channel EQ (which comes after the inserts in the signal chain), and choose the Parametric II response. Add a boost of around 4‑5dB at 3.5kHz, with a Q of 0.2.This screen shows the VST Audio Channel Settings and the roster of effects used to create our basic guitar rack.
It’s little wonder that Fretboard SE is such a popular guitar book. It focuses on the practical application of learning guitar and relies less on intellectual theory. That is not to say that a guitarist attempting to improve their skills from this book won’t be challenged and introduced to a unique system. It is just to say that the system it introduces is different than you may be used to if you’ve read other books or tried learning guitar from another method. This book teaches around the "CAGED" method. That is, the book will attempt to explain the fretboard layout to you and how to navigate it by focusing on the five basic chord shapes and the root notes in those chords. As you might have guessed, the chords the method teaches are C, A, G, E, and D, thus the name. For a more detailed explanation check out this article from Premier Guitar.

So, what string gauge is standard for electric guitars? Most new guitars come strung with super-light or light-gauge strings. For beginning guitarists, that’s probably a good place to start. As you develop fretting and picking skills and your fingers gain calluses and strength, you may want to gradually move up to heavier strings, depending on the music you play and the tone you seek. Many guitar manufacturers make specific recommendations about what strings to use. Some produce their own strings or have them custom-manufactured to their specifications.

It starts off with a chambered basswood body with an arched maple top, that follows the Pro Jet single cutaway shape. Because of the semi-hollow body, it is lighter on your shoulder and on the ears, and many notice that it emphasizes the high frequencies a bit more. Playability is also light, thanks to this guitar's shorter 24.6" scale length. The maple neck is topped by a 22-fret rosewood fretboard with a standard 1.6875" wide nut. Giving this guitar its biting tone are two Blacktop Filter'Tron Humbuckers.
To finish, here's one damn good last trick: doubling an electric guitar with... anything else. I know that's pretty vague but I must say that I had a hard time putting it any other way. The goal is to listen to your guitar sound and analyze it to find out what it lacks. Then you "only" need to find a sound that can fill this "hole." For instance, a friend of mine once told me he doubled a crunchy guitar sound with a sample of a lightbulb being rubbed on his boot with the goal of emphasizing the strumming sensation. Much less arcane, there's the famous example of the particularly "fat" riff on Radiohead's Airbag. If you listen to the intro, you can hear that the riff is being doubled with a cello, which obviously adds a lot of the breadth to the sound, as I'm sure you'll agree. I would love to keep on giving you more ideas in this regard, but the scope of this method is so wide and open that the only thing I can tell you is to let your imagination fly, experiment and have fun!
Here's a fresh one from the JVG Vault... vintage tone much like an old classic Martin Acoustic has some wear and has the "feel" just feels great in your hands and plays & sounds wonderful. Good volume and rich sounding lows and very nice.. condition rated at a solid 8.5 / 10 or better no cracks no repairs and plays nicely with original nut & saddle still in place , optional change nut & saddle & set up add $80.00. Please SEE MORE FULL SCREEN HIGH RES PICTURES HERE: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sYamahaFG140RedLableLikeFG180?authkey=Gv1sRgCIHmw573kYa6HA#slideshow/5634523767539294722.
In October 2017, Gibson announced plans to relocate its Memphis operations to a smaller location and plans to sell the Memphis property. Gibson opened its Memphis facility 18 years before, which occupies just a portion of a massive 127,620 square foot complex. According to the Memphis Daily News, Gibson plans to search for a new facility for its Memphis operations and will stay in the current spot for the next 18 to 24 months. The facility, which sits across from the FedExForum along South B.B. King Boulevard, is expected to list for $17 million.

Fender released the first successful solidbody electric guitar, the Broadcaster, in 1950. (Remember, the original Esquires were problematic.) Gibson produced the first Les Paul 24 months later. And a mere six years after that, a small run of sunburst Les Pauls flowed out of Gibson’s Kalamazoo, Michigan factory. Originally just another instrument, those Les Pauls now occupy a mythic status in the minds of guitarists and collectors everywhere. The instruments, along with a small handful of Fender Stratocasters and examples from one or two other manufacturers from roughly the same era, represent the Holy Grail in guitar tones.
Run a length of wire (approx two feet is usually plenty) through the jack mounting hole and down into the cavity. When you see the wire in the cavity pull it up through the F hole. Make sure the wire is long enough for one end to stick out the jack hole, and the other to stick out the F hole. Tape the jack hole end of the wire to the guitar with masking tape, or tie it to the strap button. This will ensure it doesn’t fall through the jack hole while you’re working on the other end.
"Our expertise is to customize guitars according to the specifications of our clients and we have our own factory that recreates all major guitar brands, boutique brands and collectible guitars. Owning the latest state of the art equipment, craftsmanship and skilled technicians. We take great pride in the quality and designs of our electric guitars and basses. From traditional to unique styles a U.S. Masters instrument rates with the finest in detail, woods, finish, feel, components and consistency. Our designs incorporate some advanced high performance features, some patented, to improve on aspects of sonic response and feel, upper fret access, the ease of playing, comfort and all designed to provide you with one of the finest responding instruments available. These guitars are of the finest, and yet it is only fraction of the cost that you would normally pay. You may be wondering how such an amazing product could be so cheap, It is possible because it has been manufactured in China, where labor is cheap. Cheap labor does not mean that has been compromised; all parts are of the highest and have been imported from overseas. When purchasing this guitar you can only stand to win. If you are satisfied, you have just saved yourself hundreds of dollars! So go on, treat yourself to the guitar you have always wanted. Our 100% satisfaction guarantee allows you to buy with confidence!"
You may not have considered Orange Amplifiers before, but they’re a company with a history that dates back to the early days of hard rock. If you watch footage of rock bands from the 1960s you’ll see Orange amplifiers onstage almost as much as Marshalls. The British amp builder has had its ups and downs since those glory days, but today Orange is as strong as ever.
With Apple including their Guitar Amp Pro plug‑in in Logic, Sonar coming bundled with Native Instruments' Guitar Rig, and Ableton adding their new Overdrive plug‑in to Live, guitar‑slinging Cubase 5 users might initially feel a bit left out. But you don't have to, because you can assemble some pretty amazing 'guitar racks' in Cubase: it's just that Cubase takes a more à la carte approach, where you need to draw on the existing effects as if they were stomp-boxes. A VST audio channel in Cubase offers inserts for up to eight series effects, including an amp simulator, so you actually have more options than with many pedalboard setups. Furthermore, you can add some quality 'studio effects', like the new Reverence reverb, as send effects. So think of Cubase as 'virtualising' a pedalboard, then bringing it into the studio so that its output can go to studio rack processors.

Overdrive and distortion are effects that introduce harmonics to your guitar tone by pushing more volume into a circuit until it can’t handle it anymore and starts to break up. The types of sounds you can get from an overdrive or distortion range from a light boost to a full on metal crunch. Overdrive and distortion effects are great when placed after a compressor but before any of your other effects.
And it's not just about looking different because it does follow conventional acoustic guitar builds with its solid spruce top, scalloped X-bracing and laminated mahogany back and sides. For plugging in, it comes with the Fishman Sonicore under-saddle pickup and Isys+ preamp system, which comes standard with many acoustic-electric guitars in the market.
Hawaiian lap steels are not in the American Teisco Del Rey catalog, however, five laps remained in the ’66 Japanese Teisco catalog. Still available was the Harp-8, an 8-string console with two pickups and some sort of electronics controlled by four floor pedals. Still around were the H-39, the H-905 and the self-amplified TRH-1. Also available was the H-850, a single-pickup 6-string very similar to the H-905.
In the image above, the first higher peak we see is E4 (i.e. the low E-string on a guitar in standard tuning), the second peak is E5 (i.e. an octave higher) and the following high peaks are B5, E6, G#6, B6, D7, and so on. Remember that the test rigs only have two strings, both tuned to E, and plucked open. So what you are hearing is a mish-mash of tons of overtones that shape the character of the “tone” that you hear.

Coming from the back of its introduction in 2006, this Hellraiser series of Schecter’s electric guitar is proving to be a game changer in the strumming market, by excelling far ahead in areas like sight, sound, durability, quality, and affordability—a stark definition of a unique electric guitar. These set of Hellraiser guitar are not only beautiful but also versatile.
This is like asking, how long is a piece of string? There are more brands than can be counted. This is because the factories in the east that produce mass production instruments often change name, and will label the same instrument with different labels depending on which market it is going to. Then there are the individual luthiers, small companies, large companies, toy shops hobbiests. The answer to this therefore would have to be infinite.
Look, as far as we know, our asymmetrically coiffed party pal has never held a guitar in his life. But no contemporary musician has a more primal understanding of adrenaline-pumping, pulse-raising, chest-caving bulldozer riffs than dubstep mosh ambassador Skrillex. Somewhere between the unfiltered piston-pumps of nü-metal and the twinkling emocore melodies that weaned him is a gaping sarlacc of yawping melodies and buzzsaw edges. The bass drop to “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” might just be this generation’s “Smoke on the Water” — look no further than the obscene number of “Skrillex guitar cover” videos on YouTube!
The value of the guitar will also be an important factor that will contribute to the overall score – because spending $200 on a model that sounds like a $2000 guitar is always something that can’t be ignored! We rate the best acoustic guitars and the best bass guitar list in the same way. With every new model we add and review, we update the top 10 rankings.
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I can't even begin to tell you how much I love mine, both for sentimental reasons and due to the fact that you couldn't buy that kind of quality nowadays for under a grand! I too, like the OP, am getting ready to do some restoration/ TLC on mine. New nut, saddle, bridge pins, tuners upgrade, and eventually fretwork. If you guys ever see one at a pawn shop, pick it up quick!! They can usually be bought for under $300!!!!
Hello. This is a great article. Does strymon have a user fourm group anywhere. I own the g system, i love it for its effects, but it cant do everything i want. I found strymon, and instantly bought a timeline. I have also ordered big sky and mobius. Is there a way to connect the strymon up to the gsystem, and haveva patch on the g pull up a bank on the strymon, and also be able to choose one or multiple strymons.
That's the worst list I've seen. Jack White is on that list? That's a complete joke. I could play Jack White under a table. The guy can barely hit a note let alone stay on pitch. John Frusciante again, decent, but not even in the top 50. John Mayer? I'm not hearing much going on there to be honest. No Originality, same old, same old. Tom Morello? No! Sure it's cool to show off your little switches and digital effects but whatever, play something without a hip hop influence for God's sake. Michael Angelo Batio>Morello. Mentor beats student this time round.
The Magnums met with a reception roughly as enthusiastic as the previous Breadwinner and Deacon. In the Carter tables it suggests that the Magnum line was redesigned to look like more conventional Fender-style basses with offset double cutaways in 1978. Other than the body shape, the 1263 Magnum III was identical to the I, and the 1264 Magnum IV was the same as the II.
Granular Guitars is the second exclusive VST Sound Instrument Set created by sound designer, composer and multi-instrumentalist Simon Stockhausen. Adding to the sound libraries of Padshop and Padshop Pro Granular Guitars spans nearly three gigabytes worth of studio-grade recorded samples, covering various acoustic and electric guitars as well as providing more exotic instruments like psaltery, celtic harp and oud played in traditional styles, plus experimental ways of treating the guitar. With 260 presets, Granular Guitars includes big cinematic soundscapes, beds and pads, beautiful fragile textures, plucked string sounds morphed into alien noises, heavy metal sounds and overdriven guitar screams clashed with divine New Age sounds.
Great guitar for the aspiring 4-10 yer old. This Lotus 20.25" scale, Kid's Strat copy is in excellent condition! Featuring a maple neck, an unbound rosewood fret-board, simulated mother of pearl fret marker, dot side markers, graphite nut, 6 "in-line" head stock, and an adjustable truss rod. 3 strat style, single coil pickups with 5 position selector. Volume and tone controls. (While not photo'd, the guitar does include the whammy / tremolo bar). This guitar is in great shape with virtually no wear to the original gloss black finish. I actually special ordered it when I worked at Colorado Springs Music Company for my son. I think he took it out of the gig bag a couple times. Comes with a thick padded "codura" gig bag.
They may not always be the first thing you reach for, but the MIDI effects plug-ins that come with most DAW applications like Logic and Cubase often offer something very different from most audio plug-ins. For example, arpeggiators and step sequencers can be great for use in the composition process, and you can use MIDI note to controller data (CC) plug-ins to generate automation data for the parameters of other plug-ins. As they process only MIDI data, and not audio, MIDI plug-ins put very little strain on your computer. Matt Houghton
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
There are few companies in the music industry that understand guitarists as well as Suhr. What other company can you think of makes excellent guitars, amplifiers and pedals? Whether you need the warm, vintage voice of a Badger or the paint-peeling roar of a PT-100... Suhr has a connoisseur level amplifier to scratch any guitarists itch. Stop in and a play a Suhr amplifier at Eddie's Guitars today. 
Regarding the PDF download, I have not done so yet, but all of this info is available on the web, in color, ad nauseum. I bought the book to have at my bench so I could refer to it while wiring guitars. I do not have a color printer. I find the thought that, in order to experience what the book OUGHT to look like, you have to download a file, presumptuous, at best. Annoying, at the least.
The guitar offers a carved mahogany top with a set neck and a slim-tapered profile (a shape normally reserved for more premium guitars). The rosewood fingerboard sports premium trapezoid inlays for a really pro look. The Alnico classic humbuckers are true, high-output gems that, paired with the set neck, will offer a rich, long sustain. There are two tone knobs and two volume knobs, as well as a three-way selector switch for all of those classic Les Paul sounds. The stop bar tailpiece and the LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge give you rock-solid tuning stability, so you won’t have more frustrating retunes than you absolutely need.
For those of you out there with a stereo or home theater system, you'll be fine as long as you run the audio directly from the xbox through that. But since I have neither, I was stuck. I ended up bringing down my old CD player from my bathroom, just to see if that would work. SO much better. But since I didn't want to leave that ugly thing sitting under my TV in my living room I went out and checked around for speaker prices. After the money spent on the game and the guitar, I didn't really want to put too much more money into this. I ended up with a Turtle Island headset for $40. It seems to be doing the trick. Just be prepared for this extra expenditure if you don't have an external speaker system in place.

Taylor also has a Build-To-Order program that allows anyone to design their very own guitar. There’s an extensive menu of guitar options starting from tonewoods, including species and grades that aren’t offered through Taylor’s standard line; inlay, binding and purfling options; finish options such as solid colors, sunburst, or vintage finishes; wood accents like a backstrap, armrest or truss rod cover; neck options such as scale length and neck profiles; and finally body shapes including the deep-body Dreadnought and the new Grand Orchestra.


I have 12 years whit my SL3 Jackson and 12 years whit my RG7420, so far I have replaced both POTs on the jackson, the frets are really worn out and FR chrome is peeling.. great guitar crappy components. oh, I havent had to replace anything on the Ibanez yet other than the stock pickups for something better. both are made in Japan =). So dont tell people that Ibanez sucks before actually owning one...
Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.
You finally bought that guitar you've been eyeing for a long time. You open the case, gently remove it from its plush cradle, and hold it in your arms. A fresh pick in your fingers, you begin an elegant and complex arpeggio that ranges across the fretboard. Suddenly, right in the middle of the run, the strings start buzzing. You check your technique and it's fine. So what's the problem?
Albert Lee‘s extensive use of the Telecaster earned him the nickname of “Mr. Telecaster”. His acolyte Ronnie Earl (then still Ronnie Earl Horvath) favored a Telecaster during his tenure with Roomful of Blues. Both John Tichy and Bill Kirchen of Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen wielded Teles, as did Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons with the Flying Burrito Brothers. Hugh Cornwell of The Stranglers has used Telecasters throughout his career. Joe Strummer (frontman of the punk band The Clash) used his worn and battered 1966 Telecaster (originally Sunburst but spray painted black) with its distinctive “Ignore Alien Orders” sticker from the beginning of his musical career until the day he died. In January 2007, Fender issued the G. E. Smith signature Telecaster in honor of Smith’s reputation as a modern master of the Telecaster. G.E. Smith was the lead guitarist in the Hall & Oates band and the musical director of Saturday Night Live. Tom Morello of “Rage Against The Machine” plays a black American Telecaster called “Sendero Luminoso” (Shining Path) for songs in drop-D tuning. Jim Root from Slipknot had a signature Telecaster released in 2009. Prince plays a Telecaster in the opening scene of his film, Purple Rain. Singer and Songwriter Jeff Buckley (Son of musician Tim Buckley) played an American Telecaster throughout his career. Lynval Golding, one of the guitarists for 2-Tone band The Specials, used a yellow telecaster throughout his time as a Special. Jonny Greenwood, lead guitarist of Radiohead uses a Telecaster Plus model with lace sensor pickups as his main guitar. British singer and guitar player Anna Calviexclusively plays a Telecaster through a Vox AC30. Danny Jones, of McFly, uses a Telecaster Vintage ’52. Deryck Whibley (frontman and guitarist of the band Sum 41) uses his own signature Telecaster Deluxe, issued in 2005. It features one knob for volume and tone, a single humbucker pickup near the synchronized six-saddle bridge and without the traditional pickup selector switch.
When you're learning your instrument, having Books, Sheet Music & Media on hand is absolutely invaluable. It doesn't matter if you're a first time player or an old pro, this type of literature is going to help you to enhance your skills and become a better player overall. Think of having books, sheet music & media at your disposal like having the world's most diverse roster of teachers at your disposal 24 hours a day, seven days a week. By being able to learn on your own schedule, you'll find yourself playing new chords, progressions and songs in no time. So which books, sheet music & media are right for you? Well, as you can imagine, that's just going to be a matter of skill level and personal preference. If you're looking for a serious method book that will give you a solid basis in guitar technique, be sure to check out the Hal Leonard Guitar Method Complete Edition. This book and CD combo is designed to help anyone learn to play their acoustic or electric guitar. With convenient teaching ideas and fantastic audio assistance from Greg Koch, this set will help you cover all of your bases.
Generally speaking, the amp market tends to be less fueled than other categories by the year-to-year cycle of new product hype that kicks off at the annual NAMM show in January. While there are always hot new models and brands (Quilter amps being a good recent example), amp sales on Reverb are largely dominated by tried-and-true favorites and good deals on used gear.
   I am now building several models which I offer as my signature work. I've always had a special affinity for archtop guitars, but as you'll see in this website, I will go wherever the creative impulse takes me. The instruments I am building now are a distillation of the best design ideas I've found in classic instruments, re-imagined and evolved into higher form and function, as fine tools for discerning artists. 
Amongst the best guitar brands in India for acoustic guitars, Martin is one that stands out. Martin is one of the best known brands for its steel-string guitars. It is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars which produce top notch sound quality. However, the company is best known for their signature dreadnought acoustic guitar with X-bracing. It is truly one of the best guitar brands for some of the best quality guitars in the market.

Mentioned below are some of the tabs for guitar, that a beginner could practice. Take the guitar and let us first learn the 4 x 4 rhythm. Strum the guitar with a plectrum in downward and upward direction in the form of - four beats in each measure and the quarter note gets one beat. That is, strum the guitar strings (chord) 'Up-Down' 4 times a then just end it coming up after the 4th downward strum. Yes! You got it right. 'Up-Down' is 1 note (that needs to be played 4 times) and 'Up' is the half note (that needs to be played once). Practice this rhythm till you get your hands on it and then practice it, changing the guitar chords.
We are proud to offer this very Rare and beautiful and highly collectible vintage 1983 Alvarez Electric/Acoustic 5078 with a les Paul style body shape. Top of the line workmanship fit & finish work here Crafted in Japan this is the limited special production Anniversary model made in 1983. This truly fine rare example comes with its nice original Alvarez black exterior tolex with the blue Martin style plush lined hard shell case. Did we say SUPER RARE....WoW!...we were completely amazed at the fact that this ( Les Paul style baby sounds so great plugged in or unplugged just beautiful. This one has a rich full bodied sound as an acoustic which is hard to find with this thin Les Paul shaped body makes it very comfortable to play long duration and not to mention did we say BEAUTIFUL as well as a real unique player...see the Headstock shape in the pictures this is truly a real beauty. This one is sure to please the Vintage Alvarez Acoustic lover... I'm a vitage Alvarez believer & after you see and play and hear this so will you. Condition for a 26 year old vintage guitar this thing is darn near mint with just a few tiny minute dings, see the detailed high res pictures for all the cosmetics, JVG RATED at 9.2 out of 10 ....... any questions? please email us @ gr8bids@comcast.net Thanks for your interest! .
I've gone into a fair bit of detail here, which may be baffling to some, or may be old news to others, but I hope it cleared some of the common misconceptions about certain parts transforming tone that I have discovered in my time doing this! Truth is, upgrading your wiring is a really worthwhile modification to carry out. Replacing parts with quality components, of reliable build quality and accurate tolerances and ratings will simply be the best for your guitar. You may well see a tonal improvement afterwards which each customer of mine has reported back after fitting one of our harnesses, which is lovely to hear. But approach with the right facts, approach without the mystique of 'this vintage style pot will transform my tone' and you'll be pleasantly surprised I'm sure! There's no magic to a responsive, great guitar tone. 
Mic placement is pretty crucial. You can get a million different EQ responses depending on where you throw the mic in front of the cab. I personally have the best luck - or at least I think so - when I back the mic off a little bit. I know a lot of engineers throw it right on the grille to get the bass boost, the proximity effect and all that garbage, but I find that if I back it up about six inches, I get a more balanced EQ curve.
It was also during this time that Perry Bechtel, a well-known banjo player and guitar teacher from Cable Piano in Atlanta, requested that Martin build a guitar with a 15-fret neck-to-body join[citation needed]. Most guitars of the day, with the exception of Gibson’s L-5 archtop jazz guitars, had necks joined at the 12th fret, half the scale length of the string. In keeping with Bechtel’s request, Martin modified the shape of their 12-fret 000-size instrument, lowering the waist and giving the upper bout more acute curves to cause the neck joint to fall at the 14th fret rather than the 12th. Fourteen-fret guitars were designed to be played with a pick and replace banjos in jazz orchestras. Thus, Martin named its first 14-fret, 000-shape guitar the Orchestra Model (OM). Martin applied this term to all 14-fret instruments in its catalogs by the mid- to late-1930s.
The 2-6kHz region is good for adding bite or presence to guitar tracks at the mixdown stage.There is no 'right' electric guitar sound because the instrument has no natural sound, so you can use as much EQ as you like without feeling guilty. Even so, getting something close to the desired sound at source is always the best way to work. Should you need to use EQ, here are a few comments concerning the frequency areas you might want to tweak. Boxiness tends to occur between 100Hz and 250Hz, so if this is a problem, use a parametric to tame it. Experiment with the Q setting as you may be able to notch out a narrower section than you think to get the desired result. Cabinet thump can be accentuated by boosting at around 80-100Hz, but take care not to boost anything much lower than this, as you'll just bring up unwanted resonances and hum.

Granite, when quarried in its natural state, also has a crystalline atomic structure which is ideal for sonic transference and has a compression strength of 19,000 psi, and a tension strength of 700 psi—the material these blocks are made of is the fourth densest on earth next to Diamond, Carbon and Quartz that has ideal resonant qualities which will decrease signal loss from your guitar to your amplifier by at least 30%. Utilizing this optimum material allows you to achieve maximum attack, clarity, sustain, note articulation, note separation, harmonics and punch. While the lows get tight and articulate, the harmonics scream effortlessly! Palm mutes, tapping, sweeps, you name it, all sounds so much better.

Dick Dale: Nicknamed “The Beast” by Dale himself, the guitar comes in “chartreuse sparkle” (a greenish-gold color) with a white pickguard and rosewood fretboard, with vintage 50s features and a number of custom modifications. Notably, the guitar comes with a reverse headstock and a reverse angled bridge pickup to achieve the sound of playing a Stratocaster upside-down, which was how Dale learned to play.

@Dax – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble with the pedals in your setup. If the pedals work on their own in front of the amplifier isolated one at a time, this is likely related to a setting or connection with the pedals. Please shoot us an email to support@strymon.net with full details on the amp make and model, the inputs and outputs used on both the amp and each of the pedals, and the setting of the switch on the back of the pedals. Also, include whether this happens on every preset or only certain presets with each pedal.
ASIO drivers do a bunch of things. For one, your DAW talks directly to an ASIO driver, no going through the Windows Mixer and actually bypassing a bunch of other Windows stuff you can’t see. The ASIO driver itself is very efficient. And native ASIO drivers allow you to adjust the buffering on that interface. If you’re working a DAW with 64 tracks of audio going to and from hard drive, you may need to add some “buffer’ memory to keep everything working, because computers are way better at doing a fewer big things than lots of little things. But if it’s just your guitar playing live, you can dial down to minimum buffering to make the delay through the PC as small as possible.
Before you start thinking your pickups can kill you, bear in mind this is a very small signal (2 volts) that requires amplification (this is where your aptly named guitar ‘amplifier’ comes into play). To put things in perspective, the little rectangle shaped batteries (D) found in distortion pedals are 9 volts…as mentioned it’s a very small signal.
Solid body and Hollow are just two of the electric guitar types.  In many ways, the Semi-Hollow Body guitar is synonymous with Gibson’s ES series from 1936.  There have been many variants produced by Gibson itself, as well as copies built by other companies, but they all hark back to this original design.  Even though Rickenbacker first released the Semi-Hollow guitar, the ES-335 is now the mainstay in the world of guitar.
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Guitar lessons work best if you're putting your skills together to learn how to play songs. That's why Guitar Tricks has a ton of great song tutorials for when you've mastered the Core Learning System, or if you want to try something new. These easy guitar songs are great, especially if you're a beginner that recently picked up an electric guitar. 

I just noticed that no-one has mentioned Robben Ford – another master of both technique and taste and a certain contender for my top ten list, fighting for a place in the same space as Larry Carlton and John Scofield. (John Mayer can certainly play, but for me, any of those three offers at least as much technique, and a wider range of accomplishments, than JM – check out their various versions of “I don’t need no doctor”).


PLOTTING OUT THE PEICES Once you have drawn out the shape of the body you can then locate and draw the cavaties that the pickups and electronics will go and set you bridge placement. It is good to know wher the center of the guitars boy is so you can make sure that the pickups and bridge are in good alignment with the neck pocket. I like to take a piece of poster board and trace the fretboard of the neck on it and cut it out, that way I can properly place my bridge according to my scale length.
It seems strange that we’ve come so far into an article about acoustic guitars without mentioning the ‘other’ big name in this world; Taylor. The American company has been duking it out with Martin since 1974 for the title of top dog in the world of acoustic guitars, and has come up with a few unique iterations of its own along the way. Nowadays, you could point to the GS Mini and Big Baby as examples of Taylor leading the way in acoustic guitar innovation, but back in the day it was the Grand Auditorium style which really put them on the map.
Had a seven string Ibanez with loose/worn frets worked on. Steve knew right away that the frets had to be tacked and it could use a fret re-crowning and gave me a quote for 125$. I thought it was a bit high but trusted him because of the good reviews. Came back a couple weeks later and he had re-crowned the frets, tacked all the loose frets, tightened down some more loose hardware and did a set-up for only 100$. I am overall quite satisfied with the quality of the work and the pricing. I will be going back to have my acoustic worked on.
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Even by the mid 1970s costs to manufacture instruments in Japan were rapidly rising. Labor was still cheaper than in the USA (it isn't anymore), but real estate, raw material, fuel, transportation costs and virtually all other manufacturing costs were fully as much if not more in Japan as in the USA. The Japanese were able to compete in the international market due not only to low labor costs at that time but also due to highly efficient manufacturing techniques and the fact that their low-cost workers were skilled and highly motivated.
As a beginner, you are prone to make mistakes while purchasing your guitar due to lack of experience. Many end up buying very cheap guitars that with time start developing technical issues. Being in this business for a good amount of time, we have noted some of the common challenges faced by all beginners. When you want to buy a guitar as a beginner, there are a number of qualities that should be looked into before deciding which one to buy. These factors include:
Ovation, Roundback, Adamas, Legend, Custom Legend, Elite, Applause, Celebrity, Balladeer, Ultra, Thunderbolt and Lyrachord , The Roundback body shape, Roundback design and Roundback Technology, Guitar Bowl Shape, Fingerboard Inlay Design, Sound hole Rosette Design, Adamas Peghead Shape, Bridge Design, Epaulet Design, Soundboard and Sound hole designs, Guitar Tuning Head are protected by one or more US and Foreign Trademarks and Patents.
According to Mr. Noguchi, Teisco instruments debuted in 1946 and were made by a company founded principally by the late Mr. Atswo Kaneko, a renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist, and Mr. Doryu Matsuda, an electrical engineer. Mr. Doryu Matsuda was born in 1921 and was still alive at the time of this writing. As mentioned, Mr. Kaneko gave the guitars the Teisco brand name, however, the original name of the company was Aoi Onpa Kenkyujo (roughly translated: Hollyhock Soundwave or Electricity Laboratories). This was a small workshop formed in war-ravaged Tokyo.
Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.
Postscript: About that “capacitor type doesn’t matter” statement: Them’s fighting words in many online forums, especially in the stompbox realm. You’ll often see the inclusion of some rare “mojo” capacitor cited as a selling point for a particular product. I used to think I sometimes could hear a difference—until I built a couple of effects with quick-change sockets for comparing cap types. The audible differences were negligible, no more meaningful than the variations between two caps of the same value and same type. My advice is, if someone tries to sell you anything based on cap type, proceed with much caution. I now strongly believe that cap type is of no importance, at least in guitar and analog stompbox applications.
Half a step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as: Jimi Hendrix, Coheed and Cambria, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Cannibal Corpse (Chris Barnes era), Nirvana, AFI, Rise Against, Failure, Weezer, Green Day, Kiss, The Hellacopters, Backyard Babies, Guns N' Roses, Neil Young, Van Halen, Brand New, Blind Guardian, Metallica (on the "Load", "Reload" and "Garage Inc." albums, "The God That Failed" and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 1995), AC/DC (some songs and in live performances of standard tuned songs since 2008), Slayer, Alcest, Rage Against The Machine, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Yngwie Malmsteen, Alice in Chains, The Smashing Pumpkins, The Killers, Relient K, Suede, RED on "Not Alone", Beach House, Third Day (on "I Can Feel It"), Die Ärzte (since "Geräusch") Skillet (on "A Little More"), and Vertical Horizon, Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown.
I’m Björgvin Benediktsson. I’m a musician, audio engineer and best-selling author. I help musicians and producers make a greater impact with their music by teaching them how to produce and engineer themselves. I’ve taught thousands of up and coming home studio producers such as yourself how to make an impact with their music through Audio Issues since 2011.
The Pacifica family of guitars was launched years ago to address this market in particular. They’re excellent guitars for the working man and student alike. After a break-in period, these machines should provide stable, frustration-free operation for many years, with enough tone and versatility to play any style. The video below even demonstrates how, with a solid amp, you might not even know it was inexpensive.
Without a doubt, Instant Guitar is a bit messy when it comes to sound quality, and from the looks of it on the web, others agree. First, there are incredible tones here; Cathedral mode is angelic and the low chord hits are drool worthy, to put it lightly. The problem is that the more you shape your guitar to sound like an actual guitar, the worst the sound quality becomes.

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About a year ago (or maybe more) I was in a real Marc Bolan/T Rex phase, and I came across a Lotus Les Paul copy in my local Sam Ash used for $199. Like the idiot I am, I played it, and it played and sounded good, so I bought it. Well, that did not sit well with my folks, who made me take it back a few days later. It had a bolt-on neck and was quite heavy, but other than that, it looked sweet. I even was smart enough to take a picture of it:

I liked that the test used identical setups and that the results were captured on a high resolution display. Often the debunkers use either their ears alone (and in a MP3 format as well for us to compare) or an oscilloscope which is a terrible measuring device for real sound because it can only display time and amplitude where the amplitude is a summed view of all the frequencies at the same time. The FFT clearly showed much much more.
Take a guitar playing friend with you, decide on a price range and try out all the guitars you can afford. Then go to another shop and do the same. Include used instruments too, and don't worry too much about the appearance. The important thing is how it sounds and how well it plays. A guitar with a nice low action which sounds reasonably good will help a great deal toward helping you stick with it. A guitar with a high action that sounds horrible will make you give up before your fingertips have time to harden!
Valco manufactured Spanish acoustic guitars, metal-bodied resonator guitars, electric lap steel guitars, and vacuum tube amplifiers under a variety of brand names including Supro, Airline, Oahu, and National. They also made amplifiers under contract for several other companies such as Gretsch, Harmony, and Kay. In the 1950s they began producing solid body electric guitars.
Although acoustic guitars have recently surpassed electrics in popularity, the electric guitar is still the most prominent instrument in rock music, and it’s a key component in many country, R&B, pop, and jazz groups. If you want to play in a band, you’ll probably want an electric guitar. You’ll also want one if you want to develop the ability to play melodies and solos because electric guitars are, in general, better designed to accommodate fast fingering and more able to stand out in a musical group.
Contrary to popular belief, magnetic pickups are used on both acoustic guitars and electric guitars. These pickups sit in the sound hole of a guitar, so they don’t require any drilling or permanent modification. They’re also commonly an aftermarket addition (the John Lennon signature guitar is the only exception to this trend that springs to mind).
Players and rock historians alike will talk endlessly about who either created or discovered or recorded the first distorted guitar tone. They argue, pontificate, debate, and even break it down into categories of type and of geographical location. “So, do we mean distortion, overdrive, or fuzz tone?” or “Do you distinguish between North American and European ‘firsts’?” Dave Davies of the Kinks is often credited with the first appearance of a heavily distorted electric guitar sound in the British charts for ‘You Really Got Me’ in August 1964.

Aside from the superstrat ESP M-10 shown earlier. The ESP LTD EC-10 is also an affordable guitar but with a different body design derived from the Les Paul. The features of this LP inspired guitar that makes it different is the bevels on the body and belly cut at the back for comfort. Its major resemblance to a Les Paul is the humbuckers pick-ups equip on the guitar. Together with the bridge design for having a stopbar and tom bridge without a whammy bar.
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.
Electronics kit building kind of fell out of favor during the computer age as the home based technology enthusiasts moved to assembling PC’s, and software development. But home brew electronics has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years in what is now called the maker community. Internet electronics stores such as Adafruit and Element 14 are enabling 21st century geeks to build anything from simple circuits to complex embedded computing projects. These sites provide documentation, tutorials, video channels, and of course, a store, where you can purchase the tools and components required to internet enable your toaster, or feed your cat from the couch.
Pickup adjustments are also very important, and I set the height of my pickups by ear. I typically like the bass side of each pickup to be a bit lower than the treble side, so the wound strings don’t overpower the treble strings. Also, strings generate more energy and volume in the area closer to the neck, so I typically set neck pickups lower than bridge pickups.
As successor to the Bogner Triple Giant, the Fish is a pre-amp with a legendary status, due to it’s unique character and it’s 4-channel configuration. Originally introduced in 1990, the unit was limited to 250 pieces, and is a rare find now-a-days. But thankfully, Bogner decided to reintroduce the Fish, featuring a “Country”, “Shark”, “Strato”, and “Brown” channel. Just like the original, this amp can take on just about any style you throw at it!
A giant when it comes to the British amplification companies, Vox is always in the conversation when talking about great guitar gear. And that’s no different when the conversation is about amps for beginners. As far as bang-for-your-buck options are concerned, the Valvetronix VT20X definitely ranks at the top – and with good reason: it features tube amp sounds, but with the versatility of a modeling amp (which it is). This impressive hybrid boasts 11 onboard models, 13 effects, and 33 preset programs – allowing you an astonishingly wide range of produceable sounds. And you can control the whole thing from your smartphone, making it easier than ever before. Excellent work, Vox.

THE BODY This is where your guitar starts to take shape. After you have finnished your design you will need to trace it onto the wood that you are going to use for the template or body. A solid blank of tonewood that you can get from online retailers like Catalina Guitars can run anywhere in the price range of $70 to $250 depending on what wood you use. Some people will tell you that different wood will produce a different tone. While this is true in some cases like the crisper higher pitch tone of Mapel and the warmer fuller tones of Mahogany, you probably won't be able to tell the differnce between using a lower grade wood versus a higher grade more expensive wood. The only time that I would splurge and buy expinsive wood is if I was going to use a clear finish on the body and all the other parts of the guitar were going to be high end quality parts. For my project I didn't have a lot of money, much less the expensive tools to work with to produce a result that I would want to break the bank on.
You can reach me by phone all day(8am until 5pm) on Monday through Saturday  If I don't answer I probably have machinery running or have both hands busy but leave a message and I will call you back shortly. During off hours please leave a message and I will call you that evening or the next morning. Feel free to email me with any general questions you may have.
Ok, whoever downvoted me needs to explain their reasoning, since I clearly laid out my reasoning. The person said they're interested in punk/rock/experimental, and there's no possible way you can tell me that a multi-fx pedal is better than a Big Muff and/or a DD3 delay. I will laugh in your face and point if you suggest such a thing. You could get both pedals for the price of any multi effect pedal, they hold their value, and they sound great. If you don't like a Muff, whatever, swap it out for a Rat. – Dan Gayle Aug 1 '14 at 17:39
Here is a list of the schematics that are exclusive to this site. We created several and we have redrawn some schematics that were already available on the internet  for readability or ease of use (these needed an easier-to-read format, corrections or part identifiers).  Many of these schematics include “modernization” that are included and explained in the “Project” for the given schematic.  You may freely post links to any of the pages or files on this site, but please do not put copies of these files on your site. We frequently update our files.  If you want to see photos of the original units of any of these guitar effects see our  “Originals” board on Pintrest  Note: All Trademarks mentioned here belong to their owners and not to General Guitar Gadgets
I had just finished signing up for guitar.com. I am a 54-year-old disabled Miner of 22 years, so I thought I would try to take up playing the guitar once again like I did when I was a kid. I forgot a lot about it through the years as life moved on, but now all I have is time. I came across your website and thought why not give it a try. so anything you suggest I will try once twice if I like it lol
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Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.
The Duo-Sonic is a short-scale student model that has become highly prized for its excellent playability and tone, making it one of the best electric guitars for beginner guitarists with cash to spare. This updated model - with its slab alder body, flawless in sparkly Surf Green - features the classic offset Fender waist that gives the series its name. The three-ply white/black/white scratchplate also plays host to a chrome-tipped three-position pickup selector switch and knurled (aka easy-grip) volume and tone knobs servicing two pickups, a neck single coil plus a bridge humbucker. The latter is also coil-splittable via the push/pull tone knob. We've encountered guitars at more than twice the price that don't play anywhere near as well as this thing does. Oh, and it doesn't matter what size your hands are. If we had to use a song to describe the tonal range of the bridge pickup, we'll have Smells Like Teen Spirit, please. A clean setting here echoes the clattering rhythm voice of the song's intro while a fuzz box unleashes a racket not unlike the heavy sound Kurt craved. If it sounds like we're typecasting this guitar then rest assured the Duo-Sonic is versatile enough to handle country picking, surf, indie, classic rock, whatever. Plus, the neck pickup warms things up perfectly for clean or dirty blues lead or jazz chords.
From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!
"We strive to offer our clients the highest level of service in guitar sales, repair and consulting. We will, as keys to attaining this objective, conduct our business according to a high standard of excellence. We are dedicated to earning our clients' trust through our professional conduct, our many years of experience, and our extensive preparation for their needs."
The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.

What if you could get a wide variety of sounds from your acoustic guitar, including complex effects and virtual (MIDI) instruments, without having to use an external amp? That would certainly be a game-changer, as it could essentially turn your guitar into an all new instrument, and by adding to your available 'soundscapes' without needing to be tethered to a plug, it could also convert acoustic performances into rockin' ones.
We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.
Umm, no. Jimmy Page and Hendrix have both alluded to the fact that without Robert Johnson, they would never have existed. His albums were released before the 50's and 60's. To think that most of these guitarists (and by effect the people influenced those artists as well) didn't have their hands on Robert Johnson or Mississippi John Hurt albums which they learned from is preposterous. Please stop typing.
Using that pickup and gain level, you should be able to hear some guitar distortion. Of course, if that's not entirely satisfactory, there are a few other things you can do. If your amp has tone controls, you can turn up the mid knob to hear the guitar distortion more clearly. If there's only bass and treble controls available to you, you can turn both of these down a little to hear more distortion.

Another thing to keep in mind is the purpose of the amplifier. And I don’t mean the actual purpose. We all know that I’m pretty sure. What I mean is what you will be using it for? Are you a beginner who wants to practice a lot in their basement before they ever take their guitar and amp into the daylight or maybe you have been playing for quite some time and want to record your music. MAYBE you have gathered all your strength and confidence (and your band) and decided to gig. All of these situations are somewhat different and various amps work for different purposes. While there are a lot of amps that do all of them together, sometimes getting an amp just for practice might be more efficient and, of course, affordable.
I have been a musician for many years now. I have played in everything from metal bands to acoustic coffee house sets to worship/praise bands. I feel that with these many years of playing I have earned a sharp ear, no pun intended. By that I mean that I have developed an ear not only to hear pitches, tones, and notes, but I can also hear good and bad timbre. I feel that Taylor guitars simply produce the best timbre of any acoustic guitar I have played. Naturally, all of my acoustics are Taylor! With that, thanks to Bob Taylor for doing it best and doing it right the first time!
A typical modern guitar tube amp has both a preamp stage and a master power amp output stage. The preamp section will be supplied with a set of smaller tubes (frequently 12AX7 or the lower-gain/lower noise 12AU7), and the power amp section has a set of large tubes (EL34, EL84, 6L6, etc.). The preamp controls input gain and typically provides treble, midrange and bass tone controls.
Introduced in 1948, the Fender Deluxe was praised for its dynamic, harmonically rich overdrive and compression. It was offered in numerous configurations and designs over the years, but the most desirable model is the 5E3 narrow-panel Deluxe, built from 1955 to 1960 and offered in a tweed-covered cabinet. The circuit runs at higher voltages than other models and features a split-phase inverter and driver that add a little gritty breakup at the start of the output stage.
Many amplifiers have effects built in, but even those that do are no substitute for a well-equipped pedalboard. There are literally thousands of effects to choose from, some of which (like the Boss TU-3 Chromatic Pedal Tuner) are more like accessories that don't directly impact your sound. Others will transform it completely. For example, two of the most popular effects are the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal and the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer Effects Pedal - these are both overdrive pedals, and together with a good amp, they'll take an electric guitar's sound from its default, vintage-like tone all the way to the high-powered distortion of a modern rock anthem.
Bass guitars (like guitars) in many ways are like cars. Their appearance is a major factor in your buying decision. But also like cars, especially for the first-time buyer, there are far more important factors to know about in order to ensure you buy a bass guitar that is both properly playable and that stays in tune, enabling you to make progress with it. 

I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
One very interesting and strikingly modern Teisco guitar, the YG-6, appeared in Japan in 1965. It was very near the classic Strat shape, with offset double cutaways and Strat-like contours, but the horns were more pointed. The neck had the new hooked headstock and the rectangular edge inlays. A large multi-laminated pickguard stretched from the upper horn down to the lower bout control extension. Three large rectangular single-coil pickups, with chrome sides and black center insert (exposed poles) sat in front of a roller bridge and the clever platform vibrato design. Three on/off rocker switches sat above the strings, plus a small sliding switch, presumably a mute. It had one volume and one tone control, and is an exceptionally handsome guitar.

The guitar is very light in weight and pretty resonant. At this point they were hard-wiring the cord right into the guitar with a nifty spring strain relief on the plug. This guitar has a brighter sound than my Gretsch and I probably prefer it for ultra-clean work because it has that vintage "thang" going on that some call "mojo." I am, however, trying to get the driven sound sorted at this point because of all the overtones. Now I know what sort of sound the Telecaster bridge pickup was based upon!
The Top Guitars specialized only in Custom Made Electric Guitars and Basses - "We will create an instrument that will delight you with exceptional tone and great playability, optimized to your personal preferences and all with the utmost quality, beauty, and rigorous attention to detail. We are experienced builders of custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks. We craft our exquisite custom electric guitar and bass bodies and necks using a variety of time tested, great sounding woods, offering options that you can not buy off the shelf. We can also build for anyone that has a custom design that they would like built to their specifications. We do our best to meet your dreams continually striving for unattainable perfection.Only the best, one-of-a-kind, and built just for you! "

3. Peavey Vypyr VIP 2 40-watt 1x12 ($199): This amp is an all-in-one powerhouse, equally capable of handling electric guitar, bass and acoustic all in one amp. Not only is it capable of effects modeling, it can also handle instrument modeling, giving the player access to acoustic, violin, bass and many other stringed instruments. As far as effects go, it boasts more than 25 effects with controllable parameters and with over 40 watts of power, it’s even ideal for rehearsal.

© Frank Meyers and Drowning in Guitars, 2012-2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Frank Meyers and Drowning in Guitars with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

	If you prefer the Linux platform, then Guitarix is your best free guitar effects solution. It is a free, full featured guitar amp and effects software. Aside from its impressive amp modeling capabilities, Guitarix has 25 equally impressive effects modules. Effects include a noise gate, modulation effects like flanger and phaser and it even has weird stuff like auto-wah. Guitarix's low latency audio engine ensures respectable audio, which is said to give you not more than 10 milli seconds of delay. This is a simple yet effective guitar effects software, unfortunately it is only available for Linux users.

Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.
The focus of my career has been audio journalism, but I’ve been active as a musician since taking up guitar seriously in the 1970s. I’ve played various stringed instruments with jazz, rock, and folk groups in New York and Los Angeles, and I currently play double bass in three jazz groups in Los Angeles. (I sub regularly in a couple more groups.) Having conducted innumerable multi-listener comparisons of audio products over some 25 years, I have a good idea of how to conduct fair product tests. I own two guitar amps, which I loan to visiting guitarists and use with my electric ukuleles, and I’ve even built a couple of guitar amps, so I understand how they work.
Fender-type switches are, obviously, found in Fender guitars but are easily available so could find their way into any guitar, most likely Strat-type guitars. Import-type switches are often found in other makes like Ibanez and on replacement pickguard assemblies. If you have a look at my HSH wiring page and scroll down you’ll see I have an import switch in my Godin SD.

EDIT: I didn't even think of scale size. I think that the difference between a few inches of string shouldn't make as much difference as some of the other factors I've described above. The conservative bet would be to get a short-scale, since that puts the frets closer together, which might make it easier for your fingers to stretch between them. (did I say that right? hmm...) If you're concerned about weight, go with a Fender or ask your Carvin rep what the weight of the guitar you're looking at is, and compare with other guitars. Lighter guitars will have a different tone than heavier guitars, but if it makes the difference between being able to play and not, then do whatever it takes!


La Niña en la Tienda de Flores / The Girl in the Flower Shop (https://shop.per-olovkindgren.com/?product_tag=la-nina-en-la-tienda-de-flores) is inspired of when I was in a flower shop in Miami for buying red roses for Valentins day. The young girl serving me was a beautiful young "Latina" with a smile I will never forget. She told me my wife/girlfriend was very lucky to receive those...
Stop tailpieces are usually paired with two types of bridges. The most basic is simply a wooden or metal bar with grooves that strings pass through. Most Gibson guitars come with another of the company’s early electric era innovations, the tune-o-matic bridge. Tune-o-matics have adjustable individual saddles for each string and are therefore more desirable for most players looking to control their instrument’s action and intonation.
PICKUP CAVITIES Same basic thing here. Be careful routing as you don't want to go outside you lines. The pickup rings tend to be thin along the outter edge, so if you go outside you lines it will look like there is a hole in the body of the guitar once you fit the rings on. Determine the depth that you will need for the pickups you are using. This is usually based on the length of the mounting screws. You will need enough room for them to fit. I use a 1/4" bit for this as well. You can use a template if you want but I do it free hand because any imperfections will be covered by the pickup rings.
   These prices reflect the opinion/perception of the editor of guitarrepairshop.com. while these are prices one could expect from a quality repair shop, repair rates can vary. A full time repairman can have as much training time and investment in tools as any mechanic. Shop overhead costs are on par with those of any other profession, so if you take your instrument to a professional shop, expect to pay professional rates. And expect professional work. While this list reflects prices one would expect to pay at a professional shop, rates will vary. Expect to pay by the hour for some extensive restoration jobs. Rates based on an hourly charge of $60.00 p/hour. Shop minimum labor charge - $60.00 Prices updated January 2014

The microphone set up I described earlier will give you a similar effect. The close mic gives you great detail (in audio terms, top-end, treble) and warmth. The mid-distance mic will give you the perspective that the amp is in a room, but without too much loss of detail. The far mic will tell you in no uncertain terms that you are definitely in a room, and with any luck, the listener's brain will process that information and tell the listener what size the room is (I'm not talking exact measurements here--just rough approximations). There will be a fairly significant loss of detail though. The combination of any of the mics will give you varying degrees of perspective and detail.
The list is leaving off some HUGE names. You absolutely cannot leave out Clapton and Van Halen. However, you apparent uninformed people saying that John Mayer shouldn't be on the list should wake up and get in your music. He is on track to waxing this whole list by the end of his career. Clapton is practically handing him the torch. But then again, I guess that Tiger Woods will never be as good as Jack to some.

Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
It is to note that each of these metal strings is made to vibrate at a particular rate. The amount of electrical charge produced by the vibrating motion in the pickup coils is then sent to an electric circuit, consisting of resistors and capacitors, which controls the tone and amplitude of the electric signal. The electric signal is then sent to an amplifier which is electrically connected to the magnetic pickups.
Mastering guitars isn’t a piece of cake, mainly if you are a greenhorn. You get lost in the labyrinth of types of guitars, each having different size, shapes, and price values. Most of these especially hunt your wallet, burdening down your pockets with hefty price tags. As an amateur, you find no other option but to pay the said amount hoping to get something useful. Indeed, the best electric guitar brands are usually inclined towards the more pricey side. If you have background knowledge about the best brands, who knows you may get your desired guitar in an affordable range. Through this article, you will learn what different types of guitar brands are available in the market.
Given the small amplifier that comes with the Rise by Sawtooth, one would have thought it wouldn’t offer much, but it turns out to be just everything you ever wanted in a beginner or intermediate electric guitar, even as it is capable of giving that adequate sound and melody when connected to the guitar using the connecting cable that comes with it.
Maple is the most common wood used to make guitar necks. It is very hard and dense, and often has attractively detailed grain patterns referred to as figuring. Maple also has a very bright overall tone. Due to it’s figuring and its tonal characteristics maple is often used for a veneer or top laminate on more expensive solid body guitars. It is also used as a top wood in some archtop guitars, where it is usually laminated. Its hardness brings out the trebles in a guitar's sound. It is also often used for the fretboard where it adds definition to the sound. 
In 1967 Lipsky introduced a line proto-copies carrying the Domino brand name. Most were inspired by European models such as the EKO Violin guitar. Among the offerings were two models sporting a California cache, the #502 Californian, an asymmetrical copy of a Vox Phantom, and the #CE82 Californian Rebel (wouldn’t California Rebel have made more sense?) shown here.
The company makes four models, the FS (fingerstyle), GC, D, and the Jumbo, each retailing at a flat price of $8,880 as of September 2011, making them amongst the most expensive new guitars in the world. The company also provides the option for customized furnishings such as exotic woods, buffalo horn nuts and saddles, mammoth ivory bridge pins and nuts, and specialized inlay and cutaway designs etc for an additional fee. The customized Petros guitars made of rare woods such as African Blackwood, Ceylon Satinwood or old flitch matched Brazilian Rosewood are sold for an extra $4,000 which with other furnishings such as ivory bridge pins can fetch over $13,000 in total.[2]
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA7QM guitar equipped with EMG 707/81-7 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 5-Piece maple/walnut Wizard II-7 neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard 7 bridge Pearl dot inlay
The old Harmony and Kay guitars were notably inferior in playability and sound to professional-grade instruments by Martin, Gibson and Fender. Typically the necks on the student grade instruments were clumsy in contour compared to a professional-grade instrument, and generally the action was much higher. Neckset angles on student-grade acoustics were often quite poor on Day One such that they were physically hard to play when new. By the time they were ten years old, the neckset angles had often shifted so much that they were virtually unplayable. While today many craftsmen are very adept at resetting necks, in the mid 1960s no one I knew had mastered techniques for doing this. Even companies such as Martin and Gibson did not reset necks if guitars were sent back to them for warranty service. Martin's typical approach at that time was to plane the fingerboard, such that it was virtually paper thin by the nut and full thickness by the body joint, and then refret. Gibson would frequently tackle such a problem by sawing the neck off at the heel joint, chopping the remainder out from the dovetail with a chisel, and installing a new neck. Student-grade instruments with poor necksets frequently were simply thrown away. Truss rods in student grade guitars usually were little more than window dressing. Although many of these guitars bore labels reading "steel reinforced neck" or actually had a truss rod in the neck, these rods usually were not functional. Martin had a steel T-bar in the neck from late 1934 through the 1960s, and Gibson and Fender both had highly functional truss rods, but Harmony, Kay and other makers of student guitars usually installed rods so poorly that any attempt to adjust the rod was simply an exercise in frustration and futility. While Harmony and Kay as well as some other makers turned out many hundreds of thousands of guitars and greatly exceeded the number of instruments produced by Martin, Fender and Gibson combined in those days, a surprisingly small percentage of those instruments have survived over the years, such that good condition original examples are remarkably scarce today. Some of these instruments have become quite collectible and now bring prices exceeding $1,000. Kay hollowbody electrics with the so-called "Kelvinator" peghead, especially the early Barney Kessel models, are now considered to have a considerable "cool factor." Likewise, original Danelectro "longhorn" guitars and basses have a visual flare as well as a funky distinctive sound of their own.

Our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod. You may bring your brand new guitar in your Local Guitar Shop for proper setup and adjustment of the truss rod.

With that budget you can look about anywhere you choose. Try epiphone, maybe a boutique builder along the lines of your ideal, even a good kit that you rough in and take to a great tech/Luthier to trim finish….but about the Gibson…play em yourself, don’t get upset by a bunch of rumbling that’s largely bad noise. What your hearing is chatter largely perpetuated by their competition. They had a rough patch when they had ALL their imported wood jerked out from under them do to a screw-up of paperwork, wouldn’t at all surprise me if the government changed the rules and didn’t tell anybody(again). You can imagine what Gibson had to do to stay afloat, compromise was inevitable. I’m sure they more than anyone regret that, but you know everyone else in the industry was plenty happy to keep the scuttlebutt going, they ALL hate you when you’re on top. She. I was with strings and things of Memphis, Gibson came out of packing set up beautifully, usually perfectly in tune or nigh on to it. No other maker came close at all. By the way , I’m not a Gibson guy, the only one I’ve had is for sale, I prefer a more modern platform, that’s just my preference. But I still have to give props where they’re due…say, if your interested in an SG ’67 reissue at a good price, hit me up. I’ll give you the skinny on it, all right and wrong, and beat the brakes off any price from a shop!


Hi! In this instructable I will be showing you how to fix and/or upgrade guitar electronics. This is applicable to most electric guitars, but I will be using a Fender Stratocaster. It is easier than most people think, especially if you know how to solder. Before you start, find a wiring diagram for your guitar and purchase the parts that are needed.
Nearly all Martin instruments come in different styles. The higher the style number, the more fancy (and collectible) the instrument. Again starting in October 1930, Martin stamped all flat top guitars with the style number, directly after the body size (and above the serial number). Style numbers can range from 15 to 45. A letter can follow the style number too, giving some additional info about the instrument. For example, a "T" after the style number indicates a Tenor guitar. See the general specs section for a full list of these suffixes.
These are great choices, but if you want a great guitar for the price go used and get either esp ltd ec400vf or the ec401vf. They come w seymour duncan 59 neck and jb bridge or dimarzio pickups. Grover tuners jumbo frets set neck mahogany neck and body. You can find em used for $300-400 and need absolutely nothing but to be plugged in. The ec256 is a great option but for the same price get the 401 used. I have a 65 jaguar a newer mustang 2 epi's 1 paul 1 SG and when I picked up the ec401vf for $300 it was the best value to quality ratio I have ever had in a guitar. You won't be disappointed. The ec400 series were also made in s korea and the earlier 401s were made there also. The newer ones are made in China and Indonesia but the quality is still incredible. I got a s korea model ec401vf w seymour setup. It smokes my epi l.p. tradional pro and was $250 cheaper. By far best deal it there.
By the 1960s and 1970s, semiconductor transistor-based amplifiers (also called "solid state") began to become popular. This was in large part because for a given wattage level and feature level, solid state amplifiers are less expensive, lighter weight, and require less maintenance than tube amplifiers. As well, transistor amplifiers are more reliable and less fragile than tube amps. In some cases, tube and solid state technologies are used together, usually with a tube preamplifier driving a solid state power amplifier. There are also an increasing range of products that use digital signal processing (DSP) and digital modeling technology to simulate many different combinations of amp and cabinets.
Possessing great look and feel, the LyxPro, the amp is small and would work best for headphone, something that is normal with beginner instrument. It also features a digital clip-on tuner that is so perfect for tuning the 6 strings that are designed on the rosewood fretboard. The Canadian maple neck also compliments the rosewood fingerboard and the overall solid wood body finishes for greater sound quality.
An American company that makes some amazing acoustic and electric guitars, Taylor guitars are considered as one of the best in the world. Like Martin, they can be expensive, but surely worth every penny. Taylor and Martin have the upper hand when it comes to acoustic guitar brands in America. One of the popular series is the 200 series and is of great value. For beginners, Baby and Big Baby, and the GS Mini are perfect choices as they are small-bodied.
Note: For additional information and history on Ibanez guitars, please check Wikipedia. For a great overall resource for Ibanez guitar questions, check out the Ibanez Collectors World website. The ICW is a gathering of Ibanez collectors who relish in the challenge of not just collecting Ibanez guitars, but of identifying old models, dating guitars by serial numbers, and generally watching the vintage guitar marketplace to understand how interest in Ibanez guitars is evolving.
This guitar continues to rake in good reviews and recommendations, even from experienced players who are looking for a compact couch guitar. This says much about its build-quality, tone and production consistency. If you are just starting out and you are not sure what to get, or you're simply looking for an affordable grab-and-go guitar, then checkout the Yamaha JR1.
I have an acoustic Decca and a brand new Fender acoustic. Not only is the Decca easier for me to play because I have tiny little doll hands, I think it would hold tune if I threw it out of a moving car. I put both the Fender and the Decca into storage for two years - I just got them out recently. The Fender popped the B string and took a good twenty minutes to tune. The Decca was *STILL* *IN* *TUNE*. Plans have changed; I am selling the Fender and keeping the Decca!
It is also believed that 'Terada Musical Instrument Co., Ltd. of Japan also made some guitars for Ibanez during this period.' It's thought that 'these would be mostly hollow-body guitars, but may also included some solid-body Artist series models.' There is no proof whatsoever for either of these assumptions. It's most likely that this is a big misunderstanding caused by an over generalization in the database of the "Guitar Dater Project" website, which is not able to assign the right factory to a vintage Ibanez guitar based on its serial number. The false information this website generates has been propogated in numerous advertisements of sellers of vintage Ibanez guitars. There is no proof whatsoever of any solid body Ibanez guitar produced by Terada. On the contrary: the fact that the production of solid body Ibanez Artist guitars shifted to Iida Gakki 1987, while hollow-body and semi-hollow Artist guitars became Artstar labels with H serial numbers, shows that the original production before 1987 came all from the FujiGen Gakki factory, which was experiencing capacity problems during that time period caused by their commitment to produce guitars for Fender Japan. If Terada had produced AR models already, they would have continued doing so. The AR and AS models shared the same necks under the Artist flag. Splitting the production up from a situation in which they were already both made in the Terada factory wouldn't be efficient, so it is highly unlikely that pre-1987 AR and AS models were ever made there.
Our private lessons in guitar, bass, keyboards, and drums are available in 30 and 60-minute sessions with flexible scheduling, so you can progress at your own pace. Maybe you'd rather be the instrument - in that case, come learn more about our singing lessons. And those are only scratching the surface of the unique services at Guitar Center Lessons in Roseville, which also include jam sessions, recording lessons, group lessons and more. Want to know what it's like to be in a band? Ask us about our Rock Show program, which connects you with other musicians at your skill level to get the full experience.

I sold my Yamaha Pacifica 12 and have been trying to find out more about the Italia Rimini 12, the Schecter TSH-12 Classic(which is the new version and I only saw 2 -both sold) and the Eastwood Sidejack 12. I have the money, but finding anything but the Eastwood online, is rather difficult. I still would like to try them out before buying, if I could.
Consider so-called “vintage” or “’50s-style” wiring, in which the tone pot and cap are connected to the middle lug of the volume pot rather than the usual third lug. Given the sheer number of posts the topic has amassed on guitar-geek sites, you’d think it was an earth-shaking option. Yeah, it’s a cool mod that I happen to dig, but really, the sonic benefit is modest: just a bit less loss of brightness when you dial down the volume.
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Add your vote to this list of the top guitarists ever and help to pick the best guitar player in the history of music. These roock, jazz, blues guitarists have all had long careers filled with success and failure. Some are still jamming out today, which other rock stars died too young, before their talents could be fully appreciated. Now is your chance to give the best guitar players in the world some recognition.

Last and not necessarily least, consider the ever-popular closet and sound blanket trick. This involves a speaker cabinet, a closet or large cupboard, and at least a pair of the thick, padded blankets normally used professionally for sound insulation or by moving companies (quilts and regular bedding blankets are ineffective). You'll lose some speaker "air" and room interaction, but you'll be able to crank the amp and avoid unwanted noise complaints. Assuming the blankets are properly placed, the volume level should seem no louder than that of a distant stereo system blaring at someone's party.
Most newbie guitarists want a small amp that sounds good but doesn’t cost too much. The amps listed above are that and more. However, there are some guitar players who mean business from the beginning, and won’t want to waste time on small beginner amps when they have the resources and ambition to grab an intermediate or pro-level amp. If you know you are going to stick with playing guitar, and if you can justify it in your budget, that’s not a bad idea.
StepFilter ('Filter' category): I'm a huge fan of Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn processor. When I play with groups like Air Liquide, it's the only gear I take other than the guitar, and of course a MIDI cable to sync it from the band's MIDI master clock. You can get many of the same effects from Cubase's StepFilter.The StepFilter offers synchronised filter effects that recall Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn signal processor. StepFilter is basically a tempo‑sync'ed dual step‑sequencer, each with 16 steps, and there's a total of eight patterns. One sequencer controls filter cutoff and the other resonance. The filter response morphs from low‑pass to high‑pass, with a stop along the way for band‑pass. You can also copy a pattern, paste it into a different pattern, and create variations. All of these parameters, including pattern selection, can be used with VST host automation control. If you're into electronic guitar effects, you really should check this out — but also try the Tranceformer ('Modulation' category) and Chopper ('Other' category), which are similar, although Chopper works on amplitude, and Tranceformer syncs a ring modulator's carrier frequency to the project tempo'
Where do you people get off not even mentioning BC Rich. They have a fine selection of Guitars, they use some of the best woods you can ask for, very good electronics, and Kerry King of Slayer fame will only play BC Rich, that in itself should be enough said. On top of that the body styles that they have to choose from is far more innovative and original than anything that Ibanez could ever dream of producing. Fender and Gibson are in fact the most well known guitars in the world but frankly the body styles are outdated and worn. They believe in staying with what works but wheres the originality? Im sorry if I offend but BC Rich til death. I have never seen anyone come up with anything as wild and as evil looking as the worlock models. I mean the nickname for a guitar is an axe but so far only BC Rich guitwrs look like somthing you can take into battle, and the sound is like the very voice of Satan himself. And shame on you all to forget about Dean Guitars, They were used and endorsed by the God of Metal shreddiing himself Dimebag Darrell Abbott. The man died on stage with one in his hands. RIP Brotger and Goddspeed. give repect where respect is due.
Smaller-scale instruments are produced to assist children in learning the instrument as the smaller scale leads to the frets being closer together, making it easier for smaller hands. The scale-size for the smaller guitars is usually in the range 484–578 mm (19.1–22.8 in), with an instrument length of 785–915 mm (30.9–36.0 in). Full-size instruments are sometimes referred to as 4/4, while the smaller sizes are 3/4, 1/2 or 1/4.
NEW ARRIVAL SORRY SOLD OUT QUICKLY ...She's super clean Genuine Ibanez Hoshino Factory release this is a cool collector piece of Japanese Law-suit modle guitar history WoW is this well made guitar Beautiful in person just impressive . This vintage J200 is now over 39 years old that plays with ease and has a HUGE SOUND... really sweet beautiful tone that rings out pretty loudly and its playability makes this guitar fun to play and an excellent choice in your next cool Japanese Vintage guitar... she's in better than average cond too well taken care of Adult owned right here in California she's in top form folks. With its Nice medium slim taper flamey maple neck 1-11/16ths at the nut. Classic beautiful original pick guard looks exactly like the old age Gibson, the detailed workmanship fit & finish you will be sure to notice and love. Ready to tour or record tonight! every time you pick it up to play. TO SEE THE PICTURE GALLERY OF THIS GUITAR CUT & PASTE THIS LINK THEN CLICK OR RETURN: https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/73ElDegasJ200BlondFlamed?authkey=Gv1sRgCKTqjqGy09roBw#slideshow/5573434646760239042.

That’s what this book is about and it delivers in spades. It sharpens your will to learn and how to set goals rather than your actual technique. If you need to reinvigorate your desire to learn and find the importance of why you are learning in the first place, this book that will apply Zen lessons to the art of learning guitar in a way that is very motivational (but not in a shove spiritual dogma in your face kind of way). If that is what you are looking for in a guitar book, it is hard to beat Zen Guitar.
• For the fifth insert (leave the fourth empty), go to Distortion/AmpSimulator and click on the plug‑in's edit button. For the Amplifier Model, select Crunch, and try the following parameter values: Drive at 8.7, Bass, Middle, and Treble all at 5.0, Presence at 6.2, and Volume set to 5.0. For the Cabinet, select Cabinet 2, with Lo Damping at 38 and Hi Damping at 35.

A boost pedal is one of the most useful pedals one can have. Simply put, it boosts the signal that goes into it. It can perk up a low output guitar, or bring out more character or a different quality to your amp. This is especially useful for solos where overdrive or distortion would overwhelm the tone you've got. Boost adds more “you” to the sound. Look out for what tone the boost adds, like treble or mids before purchasing. Some boosts claim to be transparent, maintaining the same EQ of your original tone, while others spike a certain part of your EQ intentionally.
I think this is one of the better done tests. Any musical instrument is subjective, so there is no “this one sounds ‘better’”, but having an understanding of how individual components interact in the overall sound is important in a luthier. Too often players are too quick to label one guitar as sounding “good” or “bad” instead of quantifying what characteristics they do or don’t like. Building this sonic vocabulary helps a musician work their way towards their ideal instrument instead of haphazard trial and error.

Overdrive originally resulted from the natural breakup that occurred when a tube amp received an overly hot signal from a guitar. This pushed the tubes to deliver a subtle, warm breakup. Generally overdrive is a more subdued, natural form of distortion. While you don’t have to use an overdrive effect with a tube amp to get a great sound, the combination of the two can produce a rich, pleasing tone that many guitarists prefer. The first overdrive effects were designed to push more signal into a tube amp, giving it the very throaty, mid-range tone associated with Stevie Ray Vaughan. With that in mind, many of today's pedal makers have created circuitry to add that desired tone when used with a solid state amps as well. Since overdrive is a signal boost, adjustments from your volume knob will create a variety of different sounds.
Epiphone was once among the most significant competitors of Gibson. Later on, Gibson acquired them and, now, Epiphone form sits budget-friendly. However, the popularity of Epiphone as one of the best electric guitar brands was always there owing to their affordability and near to top-notch quality. Thus, choosing an Epiphone Les Paul guitar doesn’t mean you have to compromise much on the tone and specs. In fact, you get a guitar with specs comparable to Gibson – that too – on a much cheaper rate.
The first trick I will show you is very simple: you only need to add a bit of distortion to the signal so that the bass line stands out from the mix without making it too heavy. To achieve that, and as awkward as it seems, guitar pedals seem to be more fitting than bass pedals, at least for recording and with this particular technique. Indeed, "crunchy" guitar distortion pedals are usually pretty "poor" in the low end of the frequency spectrum, which makes it easier to mix the distorted signal with the original one. In the following example I used the famous Ibanez Tube Screamer:

This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo’s PTB™ (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What’s more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy’s hard-rock maple neck features an easy-playing satin finish, while its 12” radius lets you bend notes deeply and its Plek-dressed medium-jumbo nickel frets deliver silky playability. The moment you open the luxurious deluxe Tolex hardshell case, you’ll be greeted with a stunning instrument and delicious aroma that’ll have your pulse racing.


Generic PC audio cards often don’t have ASIO drivers. However, there is a freeware thing called ASIO4ALL - Universal ASIO Driver that can turn some of the low-level game friendly Windows audio interfaces (WDM streaming) into an ASIO driver, which is better than nothing. So if you’re going to start with your guitar going direct to the PC sound card, get this next.
Treadle-based volume pedals are used by electric instrument players (guitar, bass, keyboards) to adjust the volume of their instrument with one foot while their hands are being used to play their instrument. Treadle-style volume pedals are often also used to create swelling effects by removing the attack of a note or chord, as popularised by pedal steel guitar players. This enables electric guitar and pedal steel players to imitate the soft swelling sound that an orchestra string section can produce, in which a note or chord starts very softly and then grows in volume. Treadle-based volume pedals do not usually have batteries or require external power. Volume effects: Electro-Harmonix LPB-1, Fender Volume Pedal, MXR Micro Amp, Ernie Ball Volume Pedal.
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It is easy to make the mistake that the tone control set-up in an electric guitar is a simple single stage Resistor / Capacitor filter, where the two components are in series, the other side of the capacitor goes to ground, the signal is applied to the other end of the resistor and the output is measured across the capacitor. If that were so then your first calculation is roughly correct, while in a practical situation in the second, the capacitor would be fed from the impedance of the signal source. Lets say this is a test generator with an impedance of 600 ohms – the -3dB cut off would be around 12kHz. This is not the case for the typical electric guitar.
Leaving aside guitarists whose relative fame is debatable (such as Steve Hillage or Terje Rypdal), how can you have a wannabe like John Mayer on your list, but not Dr. Brian May, Jerry Garcia or Jeff Beck? And I’d have also swapped out Tom Morello in favor of Adrian Belew. Belew was making his guitar sound like “everything but a guitar” more than a decade before anyone had heard of Morello. Adrian played with Talking Heads, Joan Armatrading, David Bowie (that’s him playing the crazy solos on DJ and Boys Keep Swinging), and King Crimson back in thee late 70’s and early 80’s. And his song Oooh Daddy at least grants him one hit wonder status, as far as “fame” goes.

Given the price tag, you’d expect the J-200 to be of a very high quality throughout, and we’re pleased to be able to say that it is. Every millimeter of the guitar has been expertly crafted, and nothing is an afterthought. The end result is a stunningly beautiful guitar that feels very special in your hands. No wonder everyone from Elvis to Jimmy Page has used a Super Jumbo in some form throughout history.
Although it is well known for its guitars, Gibson's largest business is in fact electronics.[citation needed] Gibson offers consumer audio equipment devices through its subsidiaries Gibson Innovations (Philips brand), Onkyo Corporation (Onkyo and Pioneer brands), TEAC Corporation (Teac and Esoteric brands), Cerwin Vega and Stanton,[6] as well as professional audio equipment from KRK Systems and TEAC Corporation/TASCAM.
We round off this list with a relatively modern innovation in the world of acoustic guitars; the ‘baby’ acoustic. As usual, Martin and Taylor have led the way with these particular guitars, which are effectively shrunken down dreadnoughts which focus heavily on their portability and the wide range of musical scenarios in which they can be used. Martin had dabbled in this world before, with its rather odd looking Backpacker, but it was with the LX1 – and Taylor’s subsequent Baby Taylor – that the world began to take note.
One of the tricky parts about teaching yourself to play is knowing what to focus on. As I said, I strongly encourage you to start by learning as many chords as possible because even tunefully outlining them through a progression will help you keep up in just about any setting. But that’s a pretty broad ask. This book is laser-focused on what modern guitarists need to know to best express themselves. Each of the 200 exercises comes with an audio track to help you learn how to listen, too. Though there are no shortcuts to greatness, consider this a quick-start guide that will help you know where to look. A fine complement to this might be Alexander’s The Practical Guide to Modern Music Theory for Guitarists, which takes a similar approach to learning the theory.
Jazz guitarists use their knowledge of harmony and jazz theory to create jazz chord "voicings," which emphasize the 3rd and 7th notes of the chord. Some more sophisticated chord voicings also include the 9th, 11th, and 13th notes of the chord. In some modern jazz styles, dominant 7th chords in a tune may contain altered 9ths (either flattened by a semitone, which is called a "flat 9th", or sharpened by a semitone, which is called a "sharp 9th"); 11ths (sharpened by a semitone, which is called a "sharp 11th"); 13ths (typically flattened by a semitone, which is called a "flat 13th").
In January 2017, Vox introduced the MV50 amp head and amp sets. Described by Vox as a hybrid amp, the amp heads are called the MV50 AC, the MV50 Clean, and the MV50 Rock. When paired with the BC108 cabinet, each is then described as the MV50 AC set, the MV50 Clean set, and the MV50 Rock set respectively. Vox states the MV50 AC is designed to provide the sound of a VOX AC30, and that the MV50 Clean is designed to provide clean tones with a lot of headroom as inspired by the sound of American amplifiers. Vox states the MV50 Rock is designed to provide the more aggressive high gain sound of vintage British amps. In January 2018, Vox announced two new MV50 amp heads: the MV50 Boutique and the MV50 High Gain.
Hi Torch, appreciate the work gone into this , fantastically informative piece. Good to see such a following as well , too many Gibson / Fender fanatics out there that dismiss Jap / Asian guitars as inferior. Having played god knows how many guitars over 50 years I've had good and bad in both top and lesser known brands. Started off at 15 years old with a Tiesco ( cost me £15 S/H at the time. lol ). Admittedly it was a piece of junk, but hey it got me started. Just picked up a Strat copy made in China for £10 ( as new condition) Branded Excell , out plays my Aria by a country mile. I have an old acoustic here about 40 years old, cost £62.50 at the time. No place of origin , serial No or anything. Imported by Rose Morris with the brand Avon on the head stock. This baby out plays any acoustic I've ever played, including a couple of Martins, As any guitarist should know a guitar is how it feels and plays not it's name. Nothing wrong with Jap / Asian guitars , could be made in Iceland for all I care it's the guitar that counts. Keep up the good work. Regards and thanks.
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Body: Maple & Mahogany - Figured - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Cocobolo (Nicaraguan Rosewood) - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: 24 - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 4 - Headstock: 2+2 - Bridge: Adjustable - Bridge Construction: Carbon Fiber (Graphite) - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 1x Volume Control - Pickup Configuration: Dual - String Instrument Finish: Oil
Strumming Patterns: Rhythmic strumming patterns are rarely coupled with delay.Chords: In some cases, swelling chords that are strummed once can work well with a delay effect, but generally this is avoided in favor of a less-saturating effect, perhaps a kind of light modulation.Short Arpeggios: A five to 10 note arpeggio is the perfect spot to dial in a smooth delay to help fill in the sound.Quick Solos: Speedier solos can work with delay and make sense, but the faster you’re playing, the harder it is to get delay to sound clean and not muddy.
As the name implies, TheFretWire DIY 175 kit is based on the popular ES-175 hollow body guitar, following its shape and configuration, but using more cost effective materials. More importantly, it lets you customize your own archtop as you prefer - you can make it into a classic jazz box, or add some cool paint jobs to turn it into a rockabilly style instrument.

The electric guitar ("El Gtr" in engineer shorthand) is one of the easiest instruments to record. Even a modest rig-a good guitar coupled with a decent amplifier-makes the engineer's job a cinch, offering plenty of level, a variety of easily adjustable tones, and-with most modern amps, at least-an assortment of "flavor enhancers" such as tube saturation, overdrive, and compression. In addition, the limited bandwidth of a typical electric-guitar track is ideally suited to the frequency response of affordable dynamic microphones. But that doesn't mean that using the age-old standard of miking guitar amps-a Shure SM57 shoved up against the grille cloth-is the best way to get El Gtr to stand out in a mix.


Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
In general, using an acoustic electric guitar expands your possibilities. You are no longer limited to the volume the guitar itself is capable of producing, which can come in pretty handy at times, nor having to mic an amplifier either. With an acoustic electric, you can perform in just about any venue that's worth its salt, without dealing with close miking and a lot of post-processing like equalizing out the boomy low-end.

I got this lyle acoustic (w-400) for $40 at a yard sale - it is THE MOST INCREDIBLE GUITAR you could ever ask for - looks just like a martin d-18 - solid spruce top - sweet figured mahog b&s's - back of headstock even has the valute like a martin - just kicks my buddies real d-18 to pieces - he's so jealous - if you get the chance to own one don't pass it up - it will probably be too cheap to pass up and you WILL regret it later (like I have been kicking my own ass for decades for passing up a 60's Gibson byrdland for $400)

If you have any comments about what you see in this web site,  we would love to hear from you.  Our E-Mail address is below.  Of course we are particularly anxious to talk to you about our repair services or our handcrafted guitars.  But  --  don't let that limit you.  We would love to hear your ideas about any guitar related topic.  (One such e-mail led to the harp guitar project)   We WILL respond, generally quite soon.    If you have a question that you would like to see addressed in our Q& A page, let us know.  Our E-Mail Address is: hoffmanguitars@qwestoffice.net
The history of Electric Guitars is summarized by Guitar World magazine, and the earliest electric guitar on their top 10 list is the Ro-Pat-In Electro A-25 "Frying Pan" (1932) described as 'The first-fully functioning solid-body electric guitar to be manufactured and sold'.[31] The most recent electric guitar on this list is the Ibanez Jem (1987) which featured '24 frets', 'an impossibly thin neck' and was 'designed to be the ultimate shredder machine'. Numerous other important electric guitars are on the list including Gibson ES-150 (1936), Fender Telecaster (1951), Gibson Les Paul (1952), Gretsch 6128 Duo Jet (1953), Fender Stratocaster (1954), Rickenbacker 360/12 (1964), Van Halen Frankenstein (1975), Paul Reed Smith Custom (1985) many of these guitars were 'successors' to earlier designs.[31] Electric Guitar designs eventually became culturally important and visually iconic, with various model companies selling miniature model versions[32][33] of particularly famous electric guitars, for example the Gibson SG used by Angus Young from the group AC/DC.
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