Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
Add your vote to this list of the top guitarists ever and help to pick the best guitar player in the history of music. These roock, jazz, blues guitarists have all had long careers filled with success and failure. Some are still jamming out today, which other rock stars died too young, before their talents could be fully appreciated. Now is your chance to give the best guitar players in the world some recognition.
Electric guitars are fantastic fun — as long as you can hear them (and your neighbors can’t). That’s one drawback. Some kind of amplification is needed or software with a decent audio interface and headphones. It has to be said, too, that electric guitars are in one way much easier to play with their low string action. At the same time, the narrow fret boards require a higher level of skill to allow precise fingering and avoid inadvertently muting some strings. But hey, your dream is to be an electric guitar playing rock god, so shouldn’t you learn with one? I reckon there’s a better alternative.
Many modern players use the first joint of the thumb against the back of the neck, and almost on the upper binding, sort of like gripping a baseball bat, so they can reach over the neck with their thumb tip to play bass notes on the E and A strings while picking melodies out with the other fingers. Tommy Emmanuel, and Andy McKee are particularly adept at this. You’ll need to experiment some to find what works best for you.
Taper – the ratio of wiper travel to the resistance between the wiper and the outer lugs. Logarithmic pots (also known as "log" or "audio" pots, and designated with the letter A) are generally used for volume controls, due to the human ear's response to sound pressure being roughly logarithmic, whereas tone controls can employ both logarithmic and linear pots (designated with the letter B), depending on personal preferences and wiring arrangements.[5][6] Reverse audio pots are sometimes used for volume controls on left-hand guitars, but this is not widespread due to the relative rarity of such pots.
Silk strings and Steel strings are described as a mixture of classical and steel strings, and are also called “compound strings.”  They have a mellow sound and lower tension that provide the feeling of a classical guitar, while still providing the brightness of the metal of a steel stringed acoustic.  The term silk is referring to the nylon used to make classical guitar strings, which we will learn about next.

Guitar -> G-Lab True Bypass Wah Pad -> Keeley Mod Vox Wah -> INTO GIG RIG (and send to Strobostomp tuner) -> Keeley Compressor -> Ibanez Tube Screamer -> MXR Phase 90 -> MXR Distortion+ -> Zen Drive -> TO AMP FRONT INPUT (red cable) -> FROM AMP SEND (purple cable) -> Uni-Vibe -> Tape Delay -> EH Deluxe Memory Man -> G-Lab Dual Reverb -> TO AMP RETURN (blue cable).


CLEAR COATStew Mac sells nitrocellulose lacquer that works realy well for guitar finishing but if your like me you can't afford $10 a can for paint. Or you can check out reranchthough I haven't used any of their products they are a little cheaper. I use Deft spary lacquer. You can get it at Wal-Mart for under $5 a can and it works great. Use the same basic steps that you used when you sprayed you color coats, keeping in mind that you want enough coats so you don't cut through the clear top coat when wet sand and polish it out. Now comes the waiting. The paint has to set for several days to a month to let the solvents that are in the paint to rise to the top and harden. The paint will feel dry but you will notice that it might feel a little sticky or soft when you touch it. I like to do a "nail" test on mine. I use my finger nail and push it into the painted area in the neck pocket to see if it is still soft. No one will see the inside of the neck pocket so it's ok if you scratch it. Once it has cured completly you shouldn't be able dent the finish. It could take longer than a month for certain finishes to harden completely but trust me, you will be glad that you waited. For more information about all the different types of lacquer or clear coats products that are out there and how to choose what may be right for you, check out the drum foundry they have some great info.
-have any of you ever heard of chet atkins. he could play anything the guys you mention but, they could not or can,t play any thing he played-hell non-finger style players you have to go with nokie edwards from the ventures. you guys are obviously rock only players and listen to only them only -do yourselves a favor and get his albums-mister guitar and workshop-they show just how good he was and then make a comment here
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-220 "Strat-Style" Electric Guitar. Both original, single coil, "Spectrum" Pickups. Great, original Candy Apple, Metallic color. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Laminated maple neck. Separate ON / Off switch for each pickup. Overall Rhythm / Solo tone switch. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. No case included.
Gold Plated strings are really just 80/20 Bronze & Zinc wound nylon strings.  They are also used to produce the bass wound strings of a set of classical strings.  They maintain their place in the market due to having a much brighter tone than silver plated strings and are used by many professionals due to their capability to project louder and sharper.

I think this is one of the better done tests. Any musical instrument is subjective, so there is no “this one sounds ‘better’”, but having an understanding of how individual components interact in the overall sound is important in a luthier. Too often players are too quick to label one guitar as sounding “good” or “bad” instead of quantifying what characteristics they do or don’t like. Building this sonic vocabulary helps a musician work their way towards their ideal instrument instead of haphazard trial and error.

As a result of the improvements to PA systems and monitor systems, bass players in the 2000s no longer need to have huge, powerful bass amplifier systems to play stadiums and arenas. Instead of playing with two 8x10" bass stacks and one or more huge, powerful bass heads, in the 2010s, many bass players perform at large live venues with relatively small and less powerful bass amplifiers. The reason they can do so is that most higher-priced 2010s-era bass amplifiers usually have DI output jacks that can be patched into the audio snake cable, and then plugged into the mainstage mixing board and amplified through the PA system or sound reinforcement system.


High frequency tweeters, typically horn-loaded, are included in some bass instrument speaker cabinets. Vox's 1960s-era "Super Beatle" amplifier was an early enclosure that used horn tweeters. During the late 1960s Acoustic's 260 Series guitar amp used a treble horn in the dual 15" loudspeaker 261 guitar enclosure, and Kustom's nearly 5-foot-tall (1.5 m) 2J + 1H guitar enclosure used two 15" speakers and a 15" diameter treble horn. Horn-equipped cabinets were not available for bass players until much later.
Get your beginning guitarist started with an affordable electric or acoustic guitar pack priced for any budget from Music123. Chances are the major brand you respect the most has a guitar model with all the accessories you need to get started learning the guitar. Most value guitar packs include a guitar strap, picks, and guitar instruction materials. Electric guitar starter packages feature a guitar amp to help your start rockin'. Score the best deal on a guitar package from Music123 where you benefit from the Music123 45-Day Lowest Price and Total Satisfaction Guarantees with risk-free shopping, quick shipping, and the best prices found anywhere!

The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
Ironically, the sound of certain synthetic reverbs is now such an established part of music history that most convolution reverbs come with some IRs taken from existing hardware reverb units or from old mechanical reverb plates. Also, if you have a convolution reverb, it is worth checking the manufacturer's site, as additional IRs are frequently available for download.
Billie Joe Armstrong‘s two signature guitar models are Les Paul Juniors. The first has been in production since 2006 and is based on the ’56 Junior he uses that is named ‘Floyd’ which was used on every Green Day album since 2004’s American Idiot. The second is a TV Yellow double-cutaway model which began production in 2012 and was used on Green Day’s ¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré! album trilogy. Both models have one Billie Joe Armstrong signature pickup, the H-90, a humbucking version of the P-90 pickup. In 2011, Gibson released a limited run of Acoustic signature Gibson Billie Joe Armstrong J-180s.
The Supro aluminum Hawaiian lap steel was similar to Beauchamp/Electro’s “frying pan,” with a round body and guitar-like neck, very similar to the Rick, but with the top carved away to allow a little more access. Given the close nature of the L.A. guitar world, it’s entirely possible that all these aluminum guitars were cast at the same place. The head was three-and-three with a single cutout in the middle. The Supro had dot inlays on the fingerboard, with an alternating two/one pattern and four dots at the octave. A rectangular Supro logo plate sat between the pickup cover and the fingerboard. The pickup – the single-coil version of the Stimson design – was mounted under a raised cover (part of the casting) with a slit to reveal the bar polepieces. It had one volume knob on the treble side and was housed in small form-fit hardshell case. This was closest to Beauchamp’s patented electro guitar design, making the Supro brand a direct descendent of George Beauchamp. An important point to remember is that these cast aluminum guitars were made in Los Angeles.
The lower strings of a guitar (E, A & D) will often have a nickel winding over their steel core. Nickel also makes an appearance in the frets of most guitars, which are commonly made from nickel-silver. Despite the name, this alloy doesn’t actually contain any silver, but is named for its silver appearance. It’s actually an alloy of copper, nickel, and zinc. These nickel-silver frets aren’t as hard-wearing as steel, so some guitar manufacturers use stainless steel instead to give the frets more longevity.
Launch price: $1,427 / £999 | Body: Mahogany with maple cap | Neck: 3-piece mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, Seymour Duncan Jazz humbucker (EMG 81/60 reviewed) | Controls: 2x volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: EverTune bridge, Grover tuners | Left-handed: Yes (without EverTune) | Finish: See Thru Black, Dark Brown Sunburst
In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335 as part of its Electric Spanish line of guitars, and it was the world’s first commercially released semi-hollow guitar. Featuring a solid center block in an otherwise hollow thinline body, the then-radical design effectively combined the round, airy tone of a traditional archtop with the sustain and feedback-fighting benefits of a solidbody. Its groundbreaking design is one of the most imitated around.

This list would have been incomplete without us mentioning the Shure SM57-X2U. Because it is a plug and play device, as it uses USB connectivity, this microphone enables its user to record itself/herself while jamming to his/her favorite songs.  As its manufacturer claims this unit is capable of offering a frequency response that is tailored for vocals. What is more, the model also has brightened midrange as well as bass roll off.
New in ’64 were the TG-64 (named for the year) and a matching series of solid basses. The TG-64 was essentially a Fender Jazzmaster shape with a slightly extended bass horn, the new, hooked four-and-two headstock (usually with a metal plate on the front), and best of all, our old friend the “monkey grip” handle in the lower bass bout, handed down from the old T-60. The pickguard was two-part, with one large piece under the strings and a little extension on the lower bout for knobs and jack. These had three single-coil pickups, usually the chunky, metal-covered kind with a black insert and exposed poles, although some have smaller oval metal covers with exposed poles, all controlled by three on/off rocker switches above the strings. A small sliding switch served as a rhythm mute, or lead boost, depending on your point of view.
This guitar is simply phenomenol and the build quality, materials, and attention to detail are just mind blowing! I have a collection of vintage Golden Era Gibsons, Fenders, Gretschs, and Martins, so it takes a very special guitar to impress me. The Kraus OM delivers in every way! Just check out the rosette: Paua shell bordered by curly Koa wood inlayed into a red Spruce top-simply amazing! And the curly koa fretboard binding is a sight to behold! The Honduran Rosewood is becoming exceeding hard to find, and will probably go the way of Brazilian Rosewood as a protected wood soon. The Honduran Rosewood used on this guitar took months to source, and it looks spectacular! The guitar itself took 16 months to build, and the wait was well worth it, and well beyond expectations!
The transparent overdrive is the most natural sounding overdrive. Unlike the most commonly used multi-processing type overdrives, the transparent overdrive does not alter the tone of the input signal. The transparent overdrive's output signal will sound exactly the same to that of the input signal tone wise, just with added drive and boosted signal (dependent on the users settings). Which means there is no tone loss for more natural sounding drive. The transparent overdrive is typically priced higher due to it having nothing but the purest of sound and smooth drive.
This guitar was first introduced in 2014, and has since been one of their more popular acoustics - thanks to its USA hand-crafted quality which you can own for a relatively accessible cost. The guitar is built using North American tonewoods that include solid walnut back and sides, along with a solid Sitka spruce for the top. This configuration, along with Gibson's premium build quality results in a balanced and full sounding acoustic voice, that elegantly matches the vibe of the instrument.

So, to make a successful guitar company, you need to beat the best brands out there. But how would you do that? Brands like Fender and Gibson advertise themselves as the original inventors of the two most popular electric guitar models, the Stratocaster and the Les Paul. This is one of their biggest selling points. Unfortunately, you can’t reinvent something that’s already been invented, hence you can’t really beat them at brand name, especially when you’re starting a guitar company. You have to try to beat them at quality, price and novelty (i.e., introducing something new that improves a guitarists experience). Eventually, you’ll have to get some artists to try out your models and sign deals with them. If you get all of this right, I think you should be able to make it big.
Gibson, like many guitar manufacturers, had long offered semi-acoustic guitars with pickups, and previously rejected Les Paul and his "log" electric in the 1940s. In apparent response to the Telecaster, Gibson introduced the first Gibson Les Paul solid body guitar in 1952 (although Les Paul was actually brought in only towards the end of the design process for expert fine tuning of the nearly complete design and for marketing endorsement [2]). Features of the Les Paul include a solid mahogany body with a carved maple top (much like a violin and earlier Gibson archtop hollow body electric guitars) and contrasting edge binding, two single-coil "soapbar" pickups, a 24¾" scale mahogany neck with a more traditional glued-in "set" neck joint, binding on the edges of the fretboard, and a tilt-back headstock with three machine heads (tuners) to a side. The earliest models had a combination bridge and trapeze-tailpiece design that was in fact designed by Les Paul himself, but was largely disliked and discontinued after the first year. Gibson then developed the Tune-o-matic bridge and separate stop tailpiece, an adjustable non-vibrato design that has endured. By 1957, Gibson had made the final major change to the Les Paul as we know it today - the humbucking pickup, or humbucker. The humbucker, invented by Seth Lover, was a dual-coil pickup which featured two windings connected out of phase and reverse-wound, in order to cancel the 60-cycle hum associated with single-coil pickups; as a byproduct, however, it also produces a distinctive, more "mellow" tone which appeals to many guitarists. The more traditionally designed and styled Gibson solid-body instruments were a contrast to Leo Fender's modular designs, with the most notable differentiator being the method of neck attachment and the scale of the neck (Gibson-24.75", Fender-25.5"). Each design has its own merits. To this day, the basic design of many solid-body electric guitar available today are derived from the original designs - the Telecaster, Stratocaster and the Les Paul.
In many studios, the guitarist can play in the control room while the amp is mic’d up in the live room. It feels less natural at first, but this way, you can more accurately monitor how your guitar sits in the mix through the studio monitors while you track. Some players prefer to be in the same room as their amp for reasons of feel and response, but if you are using a hollowbody or pickups that are succeptible to microphony, separating the guitar and amp can help. Of course, if feedback is desirable, you are better off in the room with the amp.
Ibanez: Ibanez is a Japanese company whose origins date back to the early 1900’s with a company named Hoshino. They where distributing Spanish guitars with the name Ibanez around the middle of the century and in the 60’s where shipping guitars to the USA. Back in the 1970’s, they became quite known for making copies of famous guitars, putting the Ibanez name on them and selling them for considerably less than the original models they emulated. During that time, Ibanez got really good at making guitars so they started creating some original models of their own. The production of copies finally ended in the late 70’s after a big lawsuit by Norlin (Gibson parent company) against Ibanez. This is the reason why the Ibanez Les Paul copies with the iconic “open-book” headstock are called “lawsuit” or “pre-lawsuit” models. Interestingly enough, although not very expensive, those lawsuit models are quite desirable today fetching interesting prices on eBay.
One of the most important things when choosing your guitar is of course the sound - read the study on electric guitar sounds. It’s best if you’re able to try different guitars out in a music shop, and the staff there will most likely be happy to present you with different options that are good for beginners. There you will also have the chance to see how the different guitars feel to play, and have the opportunity to ask the staff if you have any questions or need any advice.
The most common route for absolute beginners will likely be a good, old fashioned guitar instruction book. We’ve all seen at least one of these kicking around. They tend to have a guitar and some interesting 80s-inspired graphics emblazoned on the front. The typical format is either an encyclopedia of scales and chords (indeed, some on this list follow that formula), or a series of songs broken down into digestible theory tidbits often accompanied by an ancient information vessel known as a Compact Disc.

For many engineers, a simple one-mic technique gives them all the recorded electric guitar sound they need. Dynamic types, such as the ubiquitous Shure SM57, are ideal for capturing loud sounds, as they can handle high SPLs. For a more accurate representation of the amplifier as the human ear hears it in the room, a condenser or ribbon mic can be employed, although care must be taken not to damage the mic with very loud signals. Pointing the mic at the centre of the speaker cone produces the brightest sound, with the sound becoming increasingly warm the further off-centre it’s placed. It’s common to position the mic quite close to the speaker grille, unless a degree of room sound is desired. A good starting point is to place the mic just off-centre, at a distance of between two and six inches.
The problem is that most of those beginner guitar books just don’t have enough information to give you the tools that you need to advance past the curriculum in the book. They won’t tell you about some of the more important aspects of theory, and they generally won’t give you exercises or warm-ups that will help carry you into becoming an intermediate or advanced musician.
In this section we look at the overall performance of the guitar. How does it feel to play and what does it sound like? The ultimate sound you achieve will largely depend on the amp you play through, but the guitar itself will play a huge part in sounding good. Do the pickups give enough clarity? How comfortable is the neck to get up and down? Is it built for speed? The more expensive a guitar, the better the performance should be, and this is taken into consideration when rating it.
Gibson has produced three Jimmy Page signature models. The first was issued in the mid-1990s. It was based on a stock Les Paul Standard of the time (rather than the more prestigious and historically correct 1958/1959 re-issues issued by the Gibson Custom Shop). The modifications were based on Jimmy Page‘s “#2” 1959 Les Paul, which had been modified with push-pull potentiometers on all four control knobs, as well as mini push-pull switches under the pickguard. This first version of the Jimmy Page Signature did not have the mini-switches under the pickguard, nor did it replicate the custom-shaved neck profile of Jimmy Page’s guitar, but it did include the four push-pull pots. With all four pots pushed down, the guitar operated as normal. Pulling up the volume pot for the Bridge or Neck pickup turned the respective pickup into a single coil, rather than humbucking pickup. Pulling up the tone pot for the Neck pickup changed Bridge & Neck pickups wiring from series (stock) to parallel. Pulling up the tone pot for the Bridge pickup put Bridge & Neck pickups out of phase with each other. The first iteration of the Jimmy Page Signature utilized Gibson’s then-current high-output humbuckers: a 496R in the neck position and a 498T at the bridge.
While it won’t necessarily get you to Hendrix levels, it is a useful approach for beginners who want the focus to be on keeping enough fun and practically in practicing guitar. And while you still absolutely have to practice, this method shows tips and tricks up front to keep learning theory fun. It will also include enough information around traditional arpeggios, tunings, and scales to make sure you will learn music theory.

The term overdrive refers to when a tube amp is driven past its range to supply a clean tone. This is something we as guitar players have come to love and seek out. A common question is “what is the difference between overdrive, distortion, and fuzz as the terms have become interchangeable?” The short answer is not a lot, just one is more extreme as we go down the line.


The first “production” electrics were made by Stromberg-Voisinet in Chicago in 1928 under the direction of Henry Kay “Hank” Kuhrmeyer, soon to be president of the company which would shortly be renamed the Kay Musical Instrument Company. S-V developed the first commercially viable (more or less) pickup and amplifier. The pickup – we’ve yet to see one so an accurate description is impossible at this point in time – was probably a quasi-transducer which probably adapted phono cartridge or telephone receiver technology. It was placed on S-V’s two-pointed Venetian-shaped acoustic guitars and was greeted with great ballyhoo in the music trade press. The amp was produced before the development of preamp tubes, and was undoubtedly very primitive (there is no mention of even volume controls), and probably not particularly loud (though, of course, listeners had nothing to compare). Apparently, the reality didn’t live up to the hype, because Kuhrmeyer later suggested than only a few hundred of these guitars were actually made, and mention of them evaporates after 1928, likely done in by a combination of lack of performance and the upcoming Great Depression, which descended in 1929.

I have a Schecter S-1+ (which I believe is close enough) so I'll try my best to answer. There should be 3 knobs and 1 switch. The toggle switch is the pick-up selector. When it is in the middle the sound is coming from both pick-ups. When you flip it left the sound is coming from the neck pick-up. When you flip it right the sound is coming from the bridge pick-up. Next the 3 knobs. The left knob is the volume for the neck pick-up I believe. The middle knob is the tone. And the right knob is the volume of the bridge pick-up. If you are playing a left handed guitar the switch the directions (Ex. Left would now be right; right would now be left; middle stays the same.) So there ya go. Hope that helped!

Which brings us to this 1985 DT-250. While it sports the tail notch, the shape is a little more sleek and diminutive than the comparable Dean ML. The lower front bout is extended to be almost symmetrical with the diagonally opposite bass wing. The treble-side lower bout is shortened, giving the whole guitar a tasteful offset-X shape… X Series. To add dimension to the shape, Fuji Gen Gakki added “crystal cuts” to the edges, basically code for angled bevels.


It’s ironic that Leo Fender, the creator of the most influential instrument in rock music, wasn’t actually a fan of rock ’n’ roll; he preferred country and western. But it goes to show you that once something new is out there, you can’t stop makers and players from reinventing it, adapting it for new purposes, taking it apart and putting it back together in new ways. The electric guitar is a prime example of unintended consequences. Initially, it just wanted to be a bit louder, but it ended up taking over and reinventing popular music and culture. Will we even recognize the sound of the electric guitar 10 or 20 years from now? I, for one, hope not.
You might have read our review about the C40 GigMaker kit from Yamaha earlier on. This is a similar guitar, but it’s the C40II, and the black color makes it a limited edition instrument. The inlay is less “traditional” looking. Instead of an ornate “rosette” style, the inlay is a stripe pattern all the way around the sound hole, making the guitar look somewhat “jazzy,” to use a more descriptive term. So if this is the look you prefer, read on for more details.

Reverb is one of the earliest effects for guitar players, originally built into the amp itself like the Fender Deluxe Reverb and Super Reverb. Traditional spring reverbs actually send the guitar signal into the springs causing them to vibrate and simulating reverb. With the advent of digital technology reverb units pedals made their way onto the market but mostly as rack units, but as technology improved and shrank many of those units can fit into a pedal now.
Bill Collings dropped out of medical school in the early 1970s[3] and instead worked in a machine shop for five years.[4] At the same time he built his first guitar. In 1975 he moved to Houston, Texas, where he worked as an engineer with a pipeline and oil field equipment company by day and a guitar builder by night. Three years later he met renowned musician Lyle Lovett and built him a guitar.
On September 6, 2018, the company announced that a global settlement has been reached with respect to the company’s reorganization plan upon emergence from Chapter 11. Under the plan, the company will be focused on its core musical instruments business with "essentially no debt." Current Chairman and CEO Henry Juszkiewicz will step down as CEO and assume the role of consultant. With immediate effect, Brian J. Fox, the company’s CRO, will oversee daily operations until a new CEO is appointed.[59]
While all acoustic guitars share the same basic construction and design elements, there are important differences that affect their sound and playability. Each guitar shares those basic characteristics above, but now that you know how an acoustic guitar is designed and built, you will want to consider some of the variables that change how each guitar feels and plays. These variables include:
OK, our math isn't so great, so we've gone ahead and included an 11th amp in this list of 10. Although it's way too soon to be declared "iconic," PRS Guitars' brand-new Sonzera series of amps have been hot topics in gear land since they were introduced at the 2017 Winter NAMM Show. Let's just call them "instant classics." Featuring a rugged steel chassis, custom transformers and road-ready construction, each Sonzera model delivers serious tone with maximum reliability.
The Fender Blues Junior III has quickly become an industry standard amplifier for those chasing that coveted creamy Fender Blues tone. You have 15 watts of pure tube warmth in an easily transportable package and gorgeous sounds emanating from the 3 x 12AX7 preamp tubes and 2 x EL84 Power tubes. A perfect amplifier for small gigs and practice rooms as well as those in need of a quality amp to record with.
Fender vs. Gibson is really not the issue. It has more to do with the weight factor as well as hard-tail vs. vibrato bar. A Telecaster will probably give you the same tuning stability and basic tonal range as an SG, but you might just as well consider an Ibanez or Charvel and get the result you want. A good guitarist can play ANY guitar and get a good result. A bad guitar, conversely, will sound awful no matter how well it’s played if the intonation, electronics, and tuning stability are bad. A Telecaster can be a large guitar. A Les Paul will generally seem lighter, maybe be more comfortable with a shorter scale length, but cost more. A Stratocaster will sound lovely to Strat fans, but then you have a lot of tuning and quirky pickup issues you won’t get with a hard-tail. You may find the Ibanez with a Floyd Rose vibrato bar may give you the best of both worlds, stability and dive bombs. The guitar I recommend for beginners is the Gibson SG, because it is comfortable in size and scale length, achieves both bright and thick tones, and is generally affordable. For prospective Whammy-bar shredders, I would lean towards a Charvel or Jackson at first, and maybe consider a MusicMan. The premium Strat or Les Paul is very desirable and very playable for anyone who has the fingers to bring out the sounds, but if you don’t have the fingers, imo, wait until you do.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","eVar5":"shop: guitars: electric guitars","pageName":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars: ibanez","reportSuiteIds":"musiciansfriendprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop1":"[mf] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"brands","prop11":"gretsch guitars","prop5":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop6":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop3":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","prop4":"[mf] shop: guitars: electric guitars","channel":"[mf] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,musiciansfriend.com","prop7":"[mf] sub category"}
SOLD OUT : in AMAZING Top vintage condition, Plays with ease with nice low action. Solid Sitka Spruce Top amazing Brazilian Jacaranda Rosewood back - sides -Fingerboard - bridge & headstock overlay, bindings are figured and flamed maple wow what a classic beauty. if you have been thinking of getting the late model Glen Fry F360 for $1700+ think again...OWN Vintage , matured aged exotic woods is what make the greatest sounding guitars this baby has it at a great price.. buy the new Tak and 2 years later its worth %%% less, not these exotic tone woods vintage guitars they are going up...mark my words you will do well with this baby... in top all round condition really well cared for and maintained. This guitar is in the upper percentile quality & workmanship just about as good as it gets and dare I say it ...this will give a Martin a real good run for its money folks... Get this RARE beauty before she's gone.. you will not be disappointed. Email Joe at JVGuitars@gmail.com .

The Les Paul Traditional 2019 is one of the latest iterations of this iconic guitar, bringing over the same pleasing aesthetics and rock friendly tone using modern production methods for improved reliability, consistency and expanded tone options. The body features a classic mahogany body with no weight relief, and a AA grade figured maple arched top. The 24.75" scale length mahogany neck is topped by a 22-fret fingerboard that has a nut width of 1.695". Giving this guitar its classic voice are Burstbucker 1 & Burstbucker 2 humbuckers, with Orange Drop capacitors that replicate the ones found inside vintage Les Pauls.


The first trick is the most obvious one: to double a crunch or heavily distorted guitar with a clean one. By sub-mixing a clean sound, you will be able to retain some precision, which is no minor detail considering that distortion has the annoying tendency of blurring sound. For this trick to be as transparent as possible, the crunch and clean performances must be as similar as can be. That being said, if you have a hard time getting that perfection, you can always "cheat": be it by editing the clean sound to make it match the original performance or simply doing some reamping with the first take, as discussed previously. In both cases the trick ought to work wonders because the clean take is only meant to be "felt" but not distinctively heard by the listener.


The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   
A simplistic design and an affordable price make the Squier Bullet Stratocaster SSS an ideal guitar for those who are just beginning their foray into the musical world. Here’s a huge drop in price and mentioned halfway in our list just in case you wanted to find a budget-friendly and cheap electric guitar to start with. With a basswood finish and a ‘C’ shape design, this electric guitar is lightweight and comfortable, making it ideal when just beginning to learn basic chord progressions and needing long periods of time to practice. The twenty-one frets that are included come in a medium-jumbo size, making it easier to learn the basics of strumming and moving from chord to chord. The string pickup is only a single coil, which provides an adequate sound and balanced tone when utilizing the 5-position pickup blade. With three different color options to choose from (Candy Apple Red, Sea-foam Green, and Lake Placid Blue) the Squier Bullet is one of the best electric guitars for those who are looking to begin their musical journey in style.
Tremolo is the gentle art of making your signal subtly cut in and out of volume. Think of all those old surf records. Phase and flange are quite similar in essence; phase emulates the sweeping of the frequency band, alternating between cutting the bass and treble frequencies, while flange does a similar thing but with a slightly more extreme sound. Wah is perhaps more well known; the Jim Dunlop Cry Baby wah pedal has been used for decades by players of all genres. Adding a highly distinctive wah-wah sound can elevate a solo into something infinitely more interesting. Or it can add a bit of that classic wakka-wakka sound you hear on classic funk records.
The ghost Hexpander MIDI interface system adds MIDI capability to almost any guitar or bass.  Plug your guitar into pitch-to-MIDI converters by Roland or Axon and enter the MIDI sound universe.  The Hexpander MIDI interface provides responsive and accurate tracking unequaled be any other system on the market today.  Check out how affordable and easy it can be to make MIDI part of your music making.
ESP Guitars are among the very best guitar brands on the planet. The firm was set up by Hisatake Shibuya in the year 1975 in Tokyo, Japan. They developed lots of reputation as providers of the most effective quality replacement parts for musicals. After 1976, Shibuya began developing his own guitars and since then the ESP guitars are known for great service and its quality. The ESP LTD EC Series EC-10 is a popular Electric Guitar of the company.
A basic tone control consists of a capacitor and a potentiometer (the tone control itself).  The illustration below if the basic wiring for a tone control.  The view is as you would see it from the bottom of the potentiometer, wired for a right-handed guitar.  The oval "blobs" on the potentiometer casing are solder connections.  The ground wire should be soldered to the potentiometer casing for this tone control to work - and it helps shield out unwanted noise (really noticeable if not done this way and you use metal knobs).
Some bass amps may have additional controls for onboard effects such as bass chorus or a knob for controlling a multi-effects unit (which might include a suboctave generator, chorus, reverb, fuzz bass etc.). Some 2000s-era amps may have a knob to control digital amp or speaker emulation settings (e.g., emulating the tone of a huge 8x10" speaker stack or a vintage tube amp by famous makers, such as the Ampeg SVT).
But note that guitars in this price range aren’t likely to be without their faults. You will probably need to take them to a local guitar pro for a set-up if buying online, as fret edges may be sharp and the action may be too high or low. Finishes can be a little rough in some places, and you won’t get anything in the way of luxury looks or features – there’s a lot more plastic used in the under $150 range!
Overdrive pedals are intended to mimic the sweet sound of an overdriven tube amp. They are generally more subtle, warmer and a bit richer in sound. Overdrive pedals typically don’t produce the kind of heavy distortion needed in hard rock and heavy metal, but they are fantastic for blues, country, rock and anything else where you need warm, textured distortion. A good example of a quality overdrive pedal is the Ibanez Tube Screamer.
Maybe the pickups that came with your guitar are just cheap and not up to your standards. At that point, an upgrade might be less of a stylistic issue and would done for the purpose of improving the overall sound quality of your instrument. In most cases, upgrading the pickups on your guitar are the single most effective way to improve the overall tone and sound quality.
The primary means of identifying the model number of Kent guitars is via a label on the back of the headstock. Through the years many of those labels have fallen off or been peeled off. They do not add anything to the appearance of the guitar. The 700 and 800 guitars had a round foil sticker with the model number and sometimes serial number pressed into it, kind of like Dymo tape labels. The look a lot nicer than the white paper one used on earlier models, but they still can fall off over the years, and they are harder to read.
After the Beatles 1965 summer tour, Paul McCartney frequently used a left-handed 1964 4001S FG Rickenbacker bass, as its tone was better suited to recording than the lightweight Höfner basses he had used previously. The instrument became popular with other bassists influenced by his highly melodic style, as it produces a clear tone even when played high up the neck, its deep cutaways allowing easy access to the higher frets.

Without a doubt, dont even entertain the idea of getting one, I was given one by an unfortunate friend who bought one, to try and get it to at be semi playable.. the necks are not even straight, in fact , you could ski off them.....the frets stick out from the side of the neck, the strings are so far off the neck you cannot even fret them down.... There must be no quality control whatsoever in the factory..
Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
In addition to the 1/4" input for your guitar, you may want to consider amps with better connectivity features like those with built-in USB output for direct recording, footswitch input, aux input for jamming with tracks, and headphone output. Speaking of headphone out, there are some amps that come with built-in speaker cabinet simulated outputs, this subtly changes the resulting sound much like the amp cabinet would without having to actually use the speaker. There are also a number of newer guitar amplifiers that come with Bluetooth connectivity for streaming audio and for software control.
Berklee College of Music professor Thaddeus Hogarth thinks the hands and the human element accounts for almost all of what we consider guitar tone. “Providing the instrumentation and the amplifiers are above a certain quality and in the general ballpark, I think it’s safe to say that we’re talking 90 perecent,” Hogarth says. In his classes and on his blog, The Quest for Good Guitar Tone, Hogarth argues that much of a guitar player’s tone is based upon the attack more so than the sustain. “If you take away the first second of the attack of a note played on any instrument, it is often very difficult to determine what that instrument is and certainly impossible to identify who played it,” he writes on the blog.
The Fender Stratocaster is a model of electric guitar designed in 1954 by Leo Fender, George Fullerton, and Freddie Tavares. The Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has manufactured the Stratocaster continuously from 1954 to the present. It is a double-cutaway guitar, with an extended top “horn” shape for balance. Along with the Gibson Les Paul, it is one of the most often copied electric guitar shapes.[2][3] “Stratocaster” and “Strat” are trademark terms belonging to Fender.
The Japanese guitar industry in the '60s and '70s followed an interesting trajectory. At first, Japanese factories were tasked with building cheap emulations of American designs. As time went on, their output grew more unique and bizarre due to a particular Japanese artistic flair combined with an impulse to out-do mainstream American guitars they were emulating. This resulted in wild models from the likes of Teisco which featured exaggerated body angles and totally unique finishes and pickup configurations. Moving into the mid-'70s, the craftsmanship found at Japanese factories like the Fujigen plant rivaled that found in the US. This ushered in the controversial "lawsuit era" where Japanese brands like Ibanez built extremely close replicas of Fender, Gibson and other guitar brands.
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
Having got the technicalities out of the way, it's time to look at recording methods. The traditional method, and still the most satisfactory in many cases, is to mic up a really good amplifier, but where this isn't appropriate, we have a choice of physical modelling guitar preamplifiers, complete guitar/pickup/amp modelling systems using Roland's VG series of products, or the slightly lower-tech approach of using analogue guitar recording preamps (solid state or valve). The latest option is to plug the guitar directly into the computer and use a software plug-in to handle the amp and speaker modelling, but I'll start at the beginning with the miking options.
While musicians intentionally create or add distortion to electric instrument signals or vocals to create a musical effect, there are some musical styles and musical applications where as little distortion as possible is sought. When DJs are playing recorded music in a nightclub, they typically seek to reproduce the recordings with little or no distortion. In many musical styles, including pop music, country music and even genres where the electric guitars are almost always distorted, such as metal and hard rock, sound engineers usually take a number of steps to ensure that the vocals sounding through the sound reinforcement system are undistorted (the exception is the rare cases where distortion is purposely added to vocals in a song as a special effect).

Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo
While you don’t have to mortgage your home to buy a good guitar, price will still be a key factor in deciding which guitar to purchase. When buying for a beginner—especially younger players—you may be hesitant to spend too much without knowing if the recipient will stick with the guitar. That’s perfectly reasonable. There are guitars to fit just about every budget. Just keep in mind that the better the guitar the new player starts with, the more likely they will be to continue learning and playing. An instrument that’s hard to play or won’t stay in tune will deter even the most enthusiastic beginner.

Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.
"It seems a waste to me to work and work for years," Rory Gallagher told Rolling Stone in 1972, "and just turn into some sort of personality." Instead, the Irish guitarist, then only 23, became legendary for his nonstop-touring ethic and fiery craft. Playing a weathered Strat, often wearing a flannel shirt, Gallagher electrified Chicago and Delta styles with scalding slide work and hard-boiled songwriting. His fans included the Edge and Bob Dylan, who was initially turned away backstage at a 1978 show because Gallagher didn't recognize him.
If you are a beginner, you may have heard of electro-acoustic models. In the future you may want to consider one of these, as they will allow you to plug into an amplifier and project your sound across a room, concert hall or stadium (well, you have to dream big!). However, for now it’s wise to stick with a solely acoustic model, which will be cheaper and less complicated to use.
Similar to five-string bass guitar tuning, seven-string tuning allows for the extra string a fourth lower than the original sixth string. This allows for the note range of B standard tuning without transposing E standard guitar chords down two and a half steps down. Baritone 7-string guitars are available which features a longer scale-length allowing it to be tuned to a lower range.
Nothing sounds as good as a tube amp turned up to 10. You can do this with some old amps, and they will sound fairly clean; others will explode. Use caution and keep an eye out for plumes of smoke. Newer tube amps generally have separate preamp and master-gain controls that can duplicate the gritty anarchy of yore, minus the lease-breaking SPLs. For jazz and other clean guitar styles, it's okay to turn the volume down a bit, as long as you don't "underdo" it.

To ensure 100% customer satisfaction Bajaao offers 10 day return policy and we also pay for the return shipping to help you be free of the online shopping anxiety. Our content rich page is your one stop to get all the required information about the products be it the product description or the user generated hands on reviews. A friendly and knowledgeable staff is there to help you out with your queries should there be anything else you wish to know about the product, process, payment or after sale service. Our dedicated team will help you to select from the best of the products within your range. Call our experts to find out the best product to suit your style and need and buy Electric Guitars at the lowest prices in India.


It is a popular technique in which the player's thumb or index finger on the picking hand slightly catches the string after it is picked, canceling the fundamental of the string, and letting one of the overtones dominate. It is used by popular guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani who utilize the tremolo arm and high gain amps together with the pinch harmonic to produce horse-like wails from the instrument. - winner333
Because most “top 10 guitar posts” throw a bunch of guitars up there, tell you they’re “the best” and give you little information about them. That’s unhelpful on its best day and dangerously misleading on its worst. Because “best” and “top” are not concrete terms in this sense, unless you’re talking about sales figures, which they almost never are.

DIY Pedal Kits – supplies hand made guitar effect pedal kits from the UK. All you need to complete their kits are a small number of basic tools. These are a soldering iron, screwdriver and wire cutters/strippers. In addition, needle nose pliers make things a LOT easier but they aren’t essential. Included in each kit is a pre-drilled metal enclosure, 3PDT true bypass) switches (if applicable), high-quality quarter inch jacks, all wire, solder, heatshrink, components, etc needed for the build, 2.1mm center npower supply socket and full color build guide.
Admit it. You’ve slow danced to Stairway To Heaven before. Page’s playing have influenced so many guitar players of today, and Led Zeppelin revolutionized Rock and Roll blending acoustic guitars, banjos, and mandolins while still staying with the same gritty rock image. His guitar riffs are forever etched into Rock and Roll’s hall of fame. How influential was he? Step into a guitar store, and you’ll see. Thousands of 12 year old kids across the globe are playing the intro to Stairway. Now that’s how you know you’ve made it.
Hi! In this instructable I will be showing you how to fix and/or upgrade guitar electronics. This is applicable to most electric guitars, but I will be using a Fender Stratocaster. It is easier than most people think, especially if you know how to solder. Before you start, find a wiring diagram for your guitar and purchase the parts that are needed.
Coming in as the fourth-most recommended multi-effects unit is the Boss ME-80, which is the upgrade to the older Boss ME-70. This is probably most comparable to the Line 6 POD HD500X in terms of having an all-in-one, full-featured multi-effects and amp-modeling unit. But the great thing about the Boss ME-80 is that it costs nearly half what the Line 6 does! Furthermore, the Boss is a very different animal in how you interact with it, which you can pretty much tell just by looking at the two pedals side by side.
For someone who’s been playing for a while, your options are a little different. Perhaps they’ve got a certain guitar in mind. If so, get them what they want! Chances are they’ve already done their homework and have their eye on their next guitar. If they’re not sure, you can still make an educated purchase. There are many popular options that should satisfy most experienced players. And there are many lesser-known models that can be the right fit for someone with more specific tastes.
Chorus pedals actually make your guitar sound like there are a variety of different guitarists playing the same thing that you are playing, but with a different guitar and slightly out of time with you. This effect makes everything you play sound a little bit ‘warbly’ and thickens up your guitar or bass lines. We recommend experimenting with these as you can use them subtly to add weight to your sound or as a full-blown effect that completely takes over your signal.
{"eVar4":"shop: guitars","pageName":"[gc] shop: guitars","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop1":"[gc] shop: guitars","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"guitars","prop5":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop6":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop3":"[gc] shop: guitars","prop4":"[gc] shop: guitars","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] category"}
Yet you’d never find a punk rocker who didn’t want to be just like him. Whereas most punk guitarists found inspiration from the same hard rock and proto-metal players that they pretended to despise, Strummer was influenced by reggae, rockabilly, soul, ska and even early New York rap music when most of the world still hadn’t heard of the Sugarhill Gang.
The neck and fretboard (2.1) extend from the body. At the neck joint (2.4), the neck is either glued or bolted to the body. The body (3) is typically made of wood with a hard, polymerized finish. Strings vibrating in the magnetic field of the pickups (3.1, 3.2) produce an electric current in the pickup winding that passes through the tone and volume controls (3.8) to the output jack. Some guitars have piezo pickups, in addition to or instead of magnetic pickups.
×