This is the point where the neck meets the body. In the traditional Spanish neck joint the neck and block are one piece with the sides inserted into slots cut in the block. Other necks are built separately and joined to the body either with a dovetail joint, mortise or flush joint. These joints are usually glued and can be reinforced with mechanical fasteners. Recently many manufacturers use bolt on fasteners. Bolt on neck joints were once associated only with less expensive instruments but now some top manufacturers and hand builders are using variations of this method. Some people believed that the Spanish style one piece neck/block and glued dovetail necks have better sustain, but testing has failed to confirm this. While most traditional Spanish style builders use the one piece neck/heel block, Fleta, a prominent Spanish builder, used a dovetail joint due to the influence of his early training in violin making. One reason for the introduction of the mechanical joints was to make it easier to repair necks. This is more of a problem with steel string guitars than with nylon strings, which have about half the string tension. This is why nylon string guitars often don't include a truss rod either.
When you’re just starting out you generally play in less than ideal conditions and your soundman, if one is present at all, isn’t going to be as well versed in his/her craft as someone who works in larger venues. Because the guitar is resistant to feedback and gives you the option to sculpt your tone without having to rely on a console, it will prove to be a valuable asset.

The switches and jack sockets are important in a reliability sense first and foremost I feel. In a play-ability sense, you want a firm feeling, accurate switch and one that lasts well with regular use. You want a jack socket that doesn't fall apart or get too crackly over the years of years, they take a lot of abuse! So here there's no 'magic vintage tone' secret, I would just recommend quality switches from the brands renowned for their years of producing reliable items. I trust and use those from Switchcraft, Pure Tone, Oak Grigsby & CRL. All very solid, well made items that last really well. In particular, I've been predominantly using a multi contact jack socket made by a company called 'Pure Tone'. Please forgive their brand name, as this isn't some tone transforming jack socket, but it is a common sense improvement of an old design which is great. It features 4 points of contact for the jack connector, two for the hot, two for ground. 100% greater surface area, giving it a firmer seat on the jack connector and a sturdier, more reliable connection which is a no brainer upgrade in my opinion.
Our flagship guitar. Customers have been asking Denny to build this instrument for such a long time that he finally gave in and designed what many are calling the best acoustic on the market today.  We’ve had players put this guitar up against the best from Taylor, Martin, Gibson, Fender, Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, and we never get them back, even with our 100% money back guarantee. If you’re looking for your last guitar you can pass onto your children this is our #1 guitar. We’re sold out and back ordered on them most of the year so when you see one grab it as Denny builds only a few annually.

The 1964 TRG-1 was a slightly more asymmetrical variant of the WG body style, with offset double cutaways and offset waists. It had the squared-off Bizarro Strat head introduced in ’63 and rectangular-edge fingerboard inlays. The tail was a primitive top-mounted trapeze. Most of the face of the guitar was covered with a large metal pickguard, which had one two-tone neck pickup. The volume and tone knobs were above the strings, as was a small sliding on/off switch for the amp. In the off position, the guitar played out as a normal electric guitar. Horizontal grill slots were cut into the pickguard, behind which sat a 3-inch speaker. The amp operated on two 9-volt batteries installed in back. The TRG-1 shown in the subsequent ’64-65 catalog had a new, hooked headstock, but all the examples I’ve seen have the squared-off Bizarro Strat head. Also, the model I have has a TRE100 designation on the back sticker, so at least some were called this.
Fuzz – A dynamic distortion effect that sounds just like the name. Fuzz was originally created by putting a pinhole or cut in the speaker of an amplifier. Original fuzz pedals use a transistor-based circuit to create the sound. Compared to distortion, fuzz is more raw, abrasive and doesn’t compress the tone. These pedals typically perform best at the front of your effects chain into a clean amplifier.
When used with the human voice, it is important that the pitch correction doesn't happen too quickly, otherwise all the natural slurs and vibrato will be stripped out leaving you with a very unnatural and robotic vocal sound. If only a few notes need fixing, consider automating the pitch-corrector's correction speed parameter so that it is normally too slow to have any significant effect, then increase the speed just for the problem sections. This prevents perfectly good audio from being processed unnecessarily.

Probably also new in ’39, though it could have been available as early as ’38, was the Supro No. 50 amplifier. This was a typical Supro rectangular cabinet, now with a round grillcloth broken by two horizontal strips of wood. A Supro logo plate sat on the upper left corner. It had a flat leather handle and five tubes putting out 12 watts through a 10″ speaker. There were two inputs, an on/off switch and volume control. Cost was $50.
Here I'm going to look at all of the different kinds of pedal available on the market. Hopefully this will help act as an effects pedal guide to beginners who are looking to buy their first pedal, and just don't know where to start. We'll look at the name of the effect, what it does, and an example of the pedal (mostly Boss and MXR pedals as they're probably the best known). Oh, and I won't be looking at any of the niche boutique pedals; that would take ages!
Jazz guitarists need to learn about a range of different chords, including major 7th, major 6th, minor 7th, minor/major 7th, dominant 7th, diminished, half-diminished, and augmented chords. As well, they need to learn about chord transformations (e.g., altered chords, such as "alt dominant chords" described above), chord substitutions, and re-harmonization techniques. Some jazz guitarists use their knowledge of jazz scales and chords to provide a walking bass-style accompaniment.

Ease of Use: Multi-effects pedals are inherently more complicated to use than individual stompboxes. As such, we value multi-fx units that are not overly complicated, and require hours with the user manual to understand. Look for pedals with intuitive layouts and interfaces. Technology has come a long way, and most multi-effects pedals have good quality sound. To us, ease of use is a huge selling point (probably the most important behind price), and can differentiate the good from the great.



Based on the MaxxFly body style, this guitar features a 22-fret rosewood fingerboard, a maple neck, and to top it all off, has a mahogany body. Possibly the best part of this guitar is that it comes equipped with Graphtech Ghost piezo pickups. These pickups turn your guitar into a full-blown midi instrument. You can learn more about the Graphtech Ghost pickups and other awesome guitar innovations at GraphTech’s site. Expect to pay slightly under $500 for this guitar. 

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Cool guitar! And you’re right— most Harmony guitars aren’t worth much, or in other words, they aren’t very collectible. That said, I wonder how many guitarists reading this column started out learning to play on a Harmony. There are hundreds of thousands of Harmony guitars out there, and though these are mostly entry-level instruments, they’re very much a part of guitar history.
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In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.
Our pick here is the PAC112V version, for a few reasons. First off, the solid alder body offers you the same tonewood you’ll find in a lot of higher end S-style guitars. The maple neck and diecast tuners will feel really premium in your hands, too. But the 112 series further boosts its value with two Alnico V single coil pickups and an Alnico V humbucker. The addition of the humbucker in the bridge position will open up a whole other world of tones for a budding musician, giving the option for both clean, crisp single coil sounds and thick, high-output humbucker growls.
Certainly low action makes a guitar easier to play, and for some styles it really is a necessity. What I would like to address here, though, are the high incidences of guitarists who perpetually chase “the perfect tone”, while continually focusing on string height purely as a function of playing feel, rather than as a factor of tone, which it most certainly is. The old set-up rule that you “get your strings as low as you can without buzzing” seems to make perfect sense. Set up to that criteria, however, while your strings might not buzz noticeably, their vibrational arc is more than likely still inhibited by the proximity of the frets. Also, play harder than usual — which, if you’re like me, you will often find yourself doing in live situations, even if you’re not aware of it — and that set up does also lead to a little unwanted buzzing, though your amp settings, the energy of the live gig, and any effects in the chain might help to mask it.
Tribute Legacy Electric Guitar Candy Apple Red Rosewood Fretboard. The G&L Legacy blends contemporary refinements from the Leo Fender-designed S-500 and Comanche models with classic Alnico V pickups. If your holy grail is faithful Alnico single-coil tone with modern refinements and superb craftsmanship, the Legacy makes for an excellent choice. The Legacy's vintage-spec CLF-100 Alnico V pickups have that unmistakable chime and quack reminiscent of the best examples from the late ˜50s, thanks to the work of Paul Gagon, G&L VP Engineering. Gagon found his inspiration reviewing original prints stored in Leo's private laboratory at G&L, but that was just the start. About 30 years ago, Gagon was an R&D engineer at another company when he was tasked with finding out what was so special about the early bolt-on guitars many players raved about. Gagon tirelessly analyzed many examples of what were considered holy grail guitars, spending time out on the shop floor talking to builders still working in the pickup department since the ˜50s, all on a quest to discover where the real mojo was - and wasn't. What he learned from the builders matched his own engineering analysis. You see, back in the day, the actual spec of pickups coming down that old production line varied considerably. That meant coming up with the right specs for the Legacy pickups was more challenging than simply following the prints. Gagon's persistence paid off as the Legacy garnered rave reviews from both players and magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World. This axe is no slave to the past, however, starting with Leo's PTB (Passive Treble and Bass) system which functions on all three pickups for dramatically more variety than the vintage setup. What's more, the Legacy features a Leo Fender-designed Dual-Fulcrum vibrato, a work of engineering art which allows bending up or down with unsurpassed stability, while offering a silky feel through its beefy aluminum vibrato arm. The Legacy is...
Chorus is an effect that doubles and detunes your signal. It can add an otherworldly effect to your tone, as well as add emphasis to your playing. Chorus adds shimmer and depth to your signal. While it shines in making clean playing more lush, many players, Zakk Wylde included, use chorus to add a doubling effect to their solos, which really will bring it to the forefront of a song. When used carefully, you can even approximate the sound of a 12-string guitar.
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.
Replace components. From plugging in and unplugging my guitar so much, the stock input jack lost its grab. So I had an extra Radioshack one lying around, and I soldered it in. Now all my cords are held tight. I also had a problem(common with Teles as I understand it) with my input jack "cup" coming out with wires and all. Once you take a look at how it's held in there, it's an easy fix.
Gretsch aggressiveness in the entry level market is at an all time high, churning out a wide selection of affordable alternatives to many of their premium guitar models. Continuing this theme is the Gretsch G5426 Jet Club, which is essentially a more affordable stop-tail piece version of the Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby above. It features the same chambered body and high quality looks but with a basic humbucker and without a Bigsby.

All of these soundfonts can be opened with most zip programs, but if you are not sure or you haven't got a zip program you can use 7zip in windows or xarchiver in linux. I chose the SF.tar.bz2 format as it compressed to almost half the size of the original. Let me know if you have any problems downloading or extracting the files. These samples have been tested in SFZ free player in windows (check this forum for download details) and Qsynth in linux.
Choosing the right strings for your instrument and your style of playing might not seem like the biggest deal. After all, the Delta bluesmen of the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s often bought used strings at dry good stores for a few pennies, or boiled old strings to brighten them up. And the proliferation of brands on the market can be overwhelming to the point of leading a player to assume strings are as generic as picks – which aren’t really generic at all, but that’s another story.

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For many people who pick up the guitar for the first time, learning scales is often not at the top of their priority list. This is normal and as a beginner guitarist, there is other more important foundation knowledge that should first be acquired. However, at the point when you start learning scales as a guitarist is when you know you’re starting to get serious about playing. Learning guitar scales is a fantastic way to practice your technique and theory. Scales also come in handy for a variety of purposes such as: Writing music Improvising/jamming with others Understanding how music

The PRS SE Standard 24 is one of the stand outs in this line, a straightforward dual humbucker guitar with the same attention to detail as more expensive PRS instruments. It starts off with a mahogany body that is elegantly carved double cutaway shape that PRS has made their own, paired with a 25" scale length mahogany neck. The 24-fret rosewood fingerboard has a slightly wider nut width of 1.6875", while PRS' distinctive bird inlays serve as fret markers. Other features include PRS-Designed Vintage humbucker on the neck and PRS-Designed HFS humbucker on the bridge, both of which are wired to a volume and tone knob, as well as a 3-way pickup selector.

In 2017, Slash was named Gibson Brands' first Global Brand Ambassador. And to celebrate, Slash has designed his first Signature Firebird for Epiphone! Slash's Limited Edition Firebird features the classic Firebird profile that has gone virtually unchanged since its debut in 1963 and is made with a AAA Flame Maple top and a 3-piece Mahogany body in a Translucent Black finish chosen by Slash.


The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
Electrical impedance is like two different sizes of hose. High impedance is like a garden hose, Low impedance is like a fire hose. The amount of water pressure coming through a garden hose is great for reaching your garden but if you need to run a long length of hose up the street, the pressure from a garden hose will give out after a certain distance. You definitely need that high pressure fire hose.

What is the best acoustic guitar brand? That's subjective, and often based on a consumer's past experiences with a specific brand. This list includes a vast majority of the most recognizable good acoustic guitar brand names that are currently on the market. This list includes those acoustic guitar brands that consumers might wish to learn more about.


Coming to its making, it has full-size dreadnaught body for big sound. The top is made up of laminate spruce whereas sides and back are nicely finished with basswood. This Fender Guitar is the reason it lacks a little bit of sounding because solid wood guitars can provide high-end sounding. As far as handling is concerned, kids might find it difficult due to its full size. Teenagers with right heights will find it quite comfortable. Just make sure that your fingers go down to fretboard pretty easily.
Does anyone know anything about Palmer based Magnum Series PGA-65 guitar amps? I live in Costa Rica and bought one new from a music shop but with the amount of moisture here the original box was destroyed along with any manuals, paperwork, etc.. The amp says it is manufactured in China and is solid state. It is supposedly 65 watts with 2 channels, clean and dirty with EQ sections on both channels. It also has send and returns and a spot to plug in your Cd player, etc.. It has a big badge on the front saying Magnum Series, Palmer Guitar Company, Fl Usa. I didn't pay alot for it and for the price it is a decent sounding amp although I probably will replace the speaker with a Celestion.

In order to keep your guitar clean, there are some tips that you should be aware of. When taking the strings off to clean the system, do so two or three at a time. If you are not changing strings, wipe them with a dry cloth after every session. Wiping down the fretboard with a damp cloth occasionally is enough to keep it in good shape. The pickups, tuners, bridges, and nuts can be cleaned in much the same way. The pickups on your guitar should be cleaned with a dry cloth. Be sure to only use gentle cleaning products on your guitar.
Next, squirt your cable and rub it using a clean cloth. To cleanse the amplifier and guitar inputs, compress an area of the clean magazine around a Q-tip. Next, apply a bit of contact cleaner to the cloth, and push it in and out of the inputs to all your guitar gear such as effects pedals, amps, guitar. A point to take note here is that you should use a fresh new section of the cloth for each jack input.
The design goal of these hybrid micro heads was to provide usable power from a compact digital power amp section combined with a real analogue preamplifier in a very small and light metal chassis. The amps each weigh about 1.1 lbs, and fit in one hand (Dimensions (W x D x H): 135mm x 100mm x 75mm/5.31” x 3.94” x 2.95”). These amps are advertised as 50 watt heads, so the power section is a special Class D design as might be expected. What is unexpected is the preamp design that includes a new type of vacuum tube (valve) called the Nutube 6P1, which is the result of Korg working with Japanese vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) company Noritake Itron Corp.(Ise Electronics Corp). As such, the Nutube is a dual-triode vacuum tube packaged similarly to a VFD "chip" which makes it mountable on a circuit board using holes and pads not unlike a DIP. The miniaturised flat package topography, low power consumption, and low heat, long life attributes of the Nutube are key contributors to deploying an analogue tube preamp in such a small, lightweight footprint. Power consumption is only 3.43 Amps which is provided by a DC19VAC adapter, but Vox rates the MV50 power output at 50 Watts. However, note the 50W rating is for a 4Ω load; power output specs are as follows: Max 50W RMS at 4 Ohms, 25W RMS at 8 Ohms, 12.5W RMS at 16 Ohms.
Description: Body: Maple - Top Wood: Spruce - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Ebony - Frets: Medium - Inlay: Acrylic & Abalone Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Ebony - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control - Pickups: GB Special - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case
Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.
But there are two things in which latency matter. Latency is time. Every digital thing ever adds latency. If you’re a well trained musician or studio rat, you can hear about a millisecond of latency if you’re listening closely. You won’t likely be bothered by 1ms latency, but 10ms might be a bit of an issue, and 100ms makes some things completely unworkable.
Although originally founded in California in 1979 as a company that made replacement parts for guitars, Schecter now produce many models of their own – both mass-produced and custom shop guitars. Like the others on this list, Schecter provide guitars for some big names and have a range of signature models including the guitars of Dan Donegan, Keith Merrow, and Jeff Loomis.
With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!
Stripped holes: small holes without much tension on them (i.e. pickguard screws) can be repaired with super glue (gel stuff). Put some glue in the hole and screw the screw in about 1/2 way. The glue will not stick to the plated screw, and will form threads. More severely stripped holes or holes w/ more tension on them (i.e. strap button screws) require pieces of toothpick be glued in w/ wood glue. Larger holes w/ alot of tension (i.e. neck mounting screws) require the hole be drilled out and a hardwood dowel glued in place.
Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).
CAUTION: If you find that the truss rod is very difficult to turn, then stop now and take your guitar to the guitar shop. It may be that there is a problem with the neck or the truss rod and you may damage the guitar by forcing it. Believe me, you do not want to damage the truss rod. If, instead of tightening the truss rod, you need to loosen it, do so by turning it anti-clockwise (counter-clockwise). Again, a quarter turn at a time. Once you have got the gap to 0.012” (or whatever gap you prefer), you will have finished this step. Feel free to remove the capo at this stage if it is attached.  
The Wave is a versatile stand-alone, tube driven analog spring reverb unit kit. It can be used in front of your guitar amp or as a line-level analog reverb effect for the recording studio. Two controls allow you to serve up a wide range of wetness from just a touch to over the top psychedelia. The "dwell" control adjusts the input signal level driving the tank and the "reverb" control adjusts the level of output reverberations from the tank.

You honestly could get a single multi-effects unit that will already have thousands of the most popular stompboxes built in, plug it into your PA or headphones, turn on one of the many built-in amp modelers, and you’re good to go. This is actually a solution that many touring musicians have gravitated towards, as it is so much easier to just carry around a single multi-effects unit compared to a pedalboard with several different pedals and a separate amp.
In 2007, Gibson announced the idea to create a computerized Les Paul, dubbed the “Robot Guitar” which was released on December 7, 2007. The guitar has a computer integrated into the body with a “master control” knob next to the volume knobs, which can be pulled out, turned, or pressed to issue different commands to the guitar. One of the more notable features is the ability to tune the guitar to standard tuning simply by pulling out on the master control knob and strumming the guitar, while the tuning pegs adjust themselves to standard tuning. Another use of the master control knob is to be able to tune the guitar to alternative tunings, such as drop D, by pressing on the control knob to fit the setting. The new Les Paul has a new custom silverburst blue finish.[30] While the product was advertised in the American popular press as a “world’s first”, similar systems, some external, have been in use for decades.
Potentiometers (Pots) for audio are used to adjust tone and volume. Pots are resistors with three terminals and a sliding contact (the wiper) that creates an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used (one side and the wiper), it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Potentiometers are most commonly used as control devices, such as volume control on audio equipment. A potentiometer for Audio applications would feature very low to no introduced noise.
@Carl – Sorry to hear that you are having trouble. I am not clear on why this would be happening from the info you have provided. Can you please shoot us an email with details on the input and output connections and how each pedal is being powered when you experience this problem? Also, please also include a video that clearly shows this behavior, your connections, and how each pedal is being powered so that we have a better understanding of what you are experiencing. support@strymon.net
Coming from Martin's Travel Series, the LX1E Little Martin has smaller proportions, with a total length of 34", body width of 12", shorter scale length of 23" and 1 11/16" nut width. While it can be a bit too small for some, it is easy to appreciate its impressive workmanship, bearing the same build quality and materials as found on their more expensive models. With the LX1E, you can own an affordable Martin guitar that has been proven to be a true workhorse instrument.
Gibson’s electric guitars generally sport humbucker pickups, known for their thicker, rounder tone. You also get less feedback, which limits the types of delay and overdrive tones you can experiment with, but ensures a cleaner and more consistent sound. Gibson mainly uses mahogany for their guitar bodies, which is what gives it that slightly darker sound.
In 1964, The Rolling Stones‘ Keith Richards obtained a 1959 sunburst Les Paul.[19] The guitar, outfitted with a Bigsby tailpiece, was the first “star-owned” Les Paul in Britain and served as one of the guitarist’s prominent instruments through 1966. Because he switched guitars often enough in that period (using models ranging from the Epiphone semi-hollow to various other guitars made by Guild and Gibson), Richards is sometimes forgotten as an early post-1960 Les Paul player.[20][21] In 1965, Eric Clapton also recognized the rock potential of the late 1950s Les Paul guitars (particularly the 1958–1960 Standard sunburst models), and gave them wide exposure. He began using Les Pauls because of the influence of Freddie King and Hubert Sumlin, and played a 1960 Standard on his groundbreaking album Blues Breakers – John Mayall – With Eric Clapton. At the same time, Mike Bloomfield began using a 1954 Les Paul goldtop he apparently purchased in Boston while touring with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and recorded most of his work on the band’s East-West album with that guitar. A year later, he traded it to guitarist/luthier Dan Erlewine for the 1959 Standard with which he became most identified. Concurrently, such artists such as Peter Green, Mick Taylor, Jeff Beck andJimmy Page began using the late-1950s Les Paul Standards.
Before I start, I want to mention a few things about this particular guitar. It looks and (potentially) sounds great. The neck plays well too, but it has some tuning problems and buzzes a bit more than I’d like. The tuning problems are coming from two areas. Firstly the nut slots are too tight, made evident by the strings making a pinging noise when they are tuned up or down. This means that it is difficult to fine tune, as the string’s pitch tends to “jump” up or down. The second reason for the tuning issues is that the intonation is way out. By that I mean that the saddles’ forwards/backwards positions are not set up well, and so when the open strings are correctly tuned, and we then play up the neck, it suddenly seems out of tune again.
Palmer is a Miami, FL based guitar maker. They have high end models made in the states and cheap models contracted out to the highest bidder like most guitar maker today. I would say that if you tried to sell one of these, you would most likely not get what you paid for it new because they are simply made cheaply in huge numbers. They eventually turn up at used music shops and garage sales around the country. I wouldn't pay more than $50 for one myself and did just that. They make good campfire guitars.
What I am saying that we should look at the first three or four on each persons list and discard the rest. Then we’ll have a better estimate. Of course we always forget some fabulous guitarists and often some that deserve number two even number one on the list. Thats what statistics is good for. HOwever that said statistics is often a pillow for people. Faith and loyalty to true values is what brings success and fucks statistics. THings untoched statistics works but its the respect of god that changes things.
I am sorry to hear this, Andrew. Rear shifted bracing should help protect against the kind of top bulges normally seen behind the bridge. Unfortunately, when it comes to guitars made by hand out of organic materials like thin, solid wood, some pieces of wood will misbehave. The old saying is a guitar takes about two years before the wood stops trying to turn back into a tree.
In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.
Gibson's factories were raided in 2009 and 2011 by agents of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In November 2009 authorities found illegally imported ebony wood from Madagascar.[37][38] A second raid was conducted in August 2011,[37] during which the FWS seized wood imports from India that had been mislabeled on the US Customs declaration.[39][40] Gibson Guitar Corp. filed a motion in January 2011 to recover seized materials and overturn the charges, which was denied by the court.[41][42]
We are recording between June and July our new album entitled "Brutal Agression" which should be out in October/November, also we were recently invited to Rock al Parque in Bogota, which is one of the biggest festivals in Latin America, joining Cannibal Corpse, Havok, Symphony X, Internal Suffering and many more. After that we will play at other festivals such as Mamut Fest y more to be confirmed, then we will concentrate on album release and touring, which will be accompanied by one or more videos.
Number of Effects: All multi-effects units have a number of effects to choose from; that’s the entire point of them! However, make sure the pedal you go with has plenty of selection that will meet your needs. Typically, the more effects there are to choose from, the better. Chances are over time you’ll narrow the selection down to a few of your favorite ones. The top 5 multi-effects pedals on this list all have plenty of effects to choose from (the lowest has around 40, and a few have 100s).
Read Full Review If you’re looking for a lightweight guitar aside from a Stratocaster. You prefer the quality of tone produced using humbuckers than a single-coil can deliver. This SG model from Epiphone meets that requirements on the overall sound, playabilty and price that fits the under two hundred dollar budget of a beginner. As well as for seasoned players looking at the market for an affordable studio or back-up guitar to bring on stage.
The descriptions that follow are very broad, but if you look around the guitar world you can usually pin any solid-body guitar down to one of these general categories. Of course you’ll see wild shapes like the Gibson Flying V, Ibanez Destroyer, Dean ML and Jackson Rhoads. They may look like they’re from another planet, but if you check their specs you’ll see they follow the same basic design principles as any other solid-body electric guitar.
Little-known manufacturer from Osaka, Japan, this company is responsible for the oddly named John Bennet badge. Nakai has been mentioned as a possible Matusmoto Musical Instruments Association member in the past. The company still exists and is producing musical instruments, quite a feat in light of so many manufacturers who faded after the golden electric guitar age.
When Charlie Christian got on the bandstand with Benny Goodman in 1939, he single-handedly propelled the electric guitar into the mainstream. Though he wasn’t the first guitarist to plug in and play electrified, Christian’s performances as a soloist on Goodman tracks like “Flying Home” and “Honeysuckle Rose” document the first instances that the electric guitar was used effectively as a lead instrument in a Big Band setting.

Jump up ^ The Guitar (From The Renaissance To The Present Day) by Harvey Turnbull (Third Impression 1978) - Publisher: Batsford (ISBN 0-7134-3251-9) - p113 (Chapter 3 - The Twentieth Century) - "Segovia's visits to South America also inspired new music. The Mexican composer Manuel Ponce (1882–1948) responded by producing a greater number of extended works than Turina and Torroba had achieved."
One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not present their Gibson Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public, as they did not believe the solid-body style would catch on. Another early solid-body Spanish style guitar, resembling what would become Gibson's Les Paul guitar a decade later, was developed in 1941 by O.W. Appleton, of Nogales, Arizona.[27] Appleton made contact with both Gibson and Fender but was unable to sell the idea behind his "App" guitar to either company.[28] In 1946, Merle Travis commissioned steel guitar builder Paul Bigsby to build him a solid-body Spanish-style electric.[29] Bigsby delivered the guitar in 1948. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender Esquire and Fender Broadcaster (later to become the Fender Telecaster), first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[30] Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and more comfortable ergonomics than other models.

The Epiphone LP Special II has a mahogany body and neck. The fretboard features dotted inlays and is made of traditional, unfinished rosewood – a standard choice that yields a sound consistent with the aesthetic standards of a Les Paul. If you want a Les Paul but you don't want to pay a fortune for it, this mahogany beauty is worth your consideration.
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Signature guitars in India provide a convenient way to cherish the same guitar experience, reminds you of your favorite artist. These are specified guitar models named after the top guitar players, and designed with their instructions to make them a real emblem of their signature music. In fact, some signature guitar brands are directly created by your favorite artists to ensure precision.

Unless you get the guitar that is great for all types of venue, knowing your venue is highly recommended as you might be buying a guitar that has features not suitable or useless to your venue, not only will you be wasting great features for not using it, but you will also be paying for the said features which you will not be using anyway—not practical at all.
I am a fan of inexpensive guitars. Why but something so valuable you can’t take it out or afraid it will get damaged. Get an inexpensive guitar that is closest to the expensive ones you desire. Basically the construction and woods are the same just made inexpensively to sell to the masses. Watch who plays the secondary brands and get full cred. I have a squire cabronita, squire telecaster with upgraded coil tapped humbucker/single coil pickups, gretch electromatic single cutaway soildbody, and 2 Harley Benton les pau l type guitars with p90s and coil tapped tumblers for less than 175.00 each. Every guitar is a beauty and a joy to own.
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite.
Along with the Dobro name, OMI was acquired by the Gibson Guitar Corporation in 1993. They renamed the company Original Acoustic Instruments and moved production to Nashville. Gibson now uses the name Dobro only for models with the inverted-cone design used originally by the Dobro Manufacturing Company. Gibson also manufactures biscuit-style single-resonator guitars, but it sells them under names such as Hound Dog andEpiphone. The Dobro was first introduced to country music by Roy Acuff.

Try different gauge strings. As you know, guitarists can be creatures of habit. But heavier strings can help both your tone and fingering strength, while lighter strings may suit bigger bends. Experiment! Billy F Gibbons has the thickest tone but his top E is only a .007. Stevie Ray Vaughan’s top E was a .013. Changing string gauge may just bring out your best inner-self.
The two most prominent electric guitar brands overall are Fender and Gibson. Although you won't find guitars with those labels on the headstock in this price range, both of them have sub-brands under which they sell their entry level models: - Fender owns the Squier brand and Gibson owns the Epiphone brand. Other well-known brands that have guitars in this price range include Dean, ESP, Ibanez, Jackson, Kramer and Yamaha and Washburn.
If you are looking for a simple and old school way to spice up your guitar sound, tremolo is a great option. Tremolo lowers the amplitude of your signal at a regular rate. It's like having a machine move your volume knob back and forth rhythmically, and it's one of the first effects that were built into early amplifiers. While simple in concept , tremolo adds a great movement to you tone, in either a subtle or intense way. The choice is yours. On low settings, a pleasant motion effect can add some ear candy to your tone. Set on high, a “stutter” or “chop” effect can add emphasis to a song or riff. Some pedals will even split the repeats in stereo, which adds a genuine vortex to your tone.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.
Madbean Pedals provides schematics and circuit boards so you can create your own pedal kits. As the creator, Brian, describes it, “I love making music and I love making things, so pedal building is a happy accident for me. Mostly, it came from being too broke to buy any gear. I owned and used only two pedals for about a decade: a TS-10 and a Digitech PDS-1000 Digital Delay. I used those for both my bass and guitar gigs. Even my drum gigs, I think. Anyway, rather than spend money I didn’t have, I decided it would be more fun to take a “peek under the hood” and see what the whole effects thing was about. That was about six years ago, and the obsession grows a little more every day! “
Lou Reed has been blowing traditional guitar styles to bits since his Velvet Underground days. A fan of Ike Turner's R&B and Ornette Coleman's free jazz, he created epic bad-trip psychedelia on songs like "Sister Ray." "He was rightfully quite proud of his own soloing," wrote fellow New York guitar luminary Robert Quine, "but resigned to the fact that most people weren't ready for it." As a solo artist, Reed kept on ripping up the rulebook: See 1975's Metal Machine Music, a noise opus that took feedback further than Hendrix could have imagined.
Extremely eclectic, Page has a diverse array of guitaristic influences, which includes blues guitarists Otis Rush, Buddy Guy and Hubert Sumlin as well as early rockabilly guitarists Cliff Gallup and Scotty Moore. He combined these influences with a strong interest in the occult and plenty of his own studio savvy to paint a musical landscape within every Led Zeppelin song. Page’s landmark use of echo effects in tracks like “How Many More Times” and “You Shook Me,” bizarre tunings in cuts like “Friends” and “Bron-Y-Aur Stomp,” and excursions with a violin bow in songs like “Dazed and Confused” yielded textures that were unparalleled at the time.
Another classic yet quite rare tone wood, Korina, has a lengthy Gibson pedigree. This elegant, fine-grained wood, also known as African limba, was chosen as the wood for the super-collectible Modernistic Series guitars of the late 1950s, and lives on in the ’58 Explorer and ’59 Flying V available today from the Custom Shop. Korina possesses some similarities to mahogany, particularly in its warmth and resonance, but it also yields degrees of clarity, definition, and sustain that are all its own.

Once you have the essential elements in place-a great amp, guitar, and guitarist-you almost can't help but get a great guitar tone. Crank the amp up to the appropriate level and begin with some mic comparisons. It's especially telling to audition different types of mics: for example, dynamics, ribbons, and large-diaphragm condensers. (I rarely use small-diaphragm condensers for miking guitar amps; on the other hand, I've found that almost any microphone will strike gold once you find the right spot for it.)


Ibanez is a Japanese guitar manufacturer which was founded in the year 1957. Ibanez was the first Japanese company to gain a foothold in exporting guitars to United States and Europe. They were the pioneer to produce the seven- strings guitars. Ibanez has produced several guitar models including the Electric Guitar Models, the Signature Models, Bass Guitar Models, and Acoustic Guitar Models etc. The Ibanez guitars are one of the best in the world.
For some performances - those well controlled performances of an orchestral guitarist, let's say - machine notation can get a lot closer to producing a true sound than it will to the variations offered by a virtuoso jazz guitarist, blues master or metal thrasher jamming outside the box. In some cases, the machine sound might already fool some of the most discerning listeners -- if the performance does not test the limits of the mechanical emulation.
Flat tops from 1970 to present are considered to be excellent utility instruments, but are not collectible. Staring in 1976, Martin has been undergoing many changes with numerous reissues, new models, limited editions, etc. Workmanship has improved greatly from the early 1970's, and Martin is now producing some of its best guitars in over 20 years. While not currently collector's items, these intruments have excellent workmanship, sound, and playability.
In the guitar’s electronics, the potentiometer and capacitor form a path to ground. The capacitor presents lower impedance to higher frequencies, and vice-versa, so the tone control works by “throwing away” high frequencies. How much of the highs get thrown away is determined by the tone potentiometer, which presents an equal resistance to all frequencies. As you turn down the tone, you decrease the resistance presented by the pot. Low frequencies still find this path to ground to be a difficult one (high-impedance) because of the capacitor, but high frequencies see an easier path than the one into the amplifier (which traditionally has a fairly high impedance load in the transistors of the “pre-gain” stage, around 1Megaohm), and to they take the easier path, reducing the presence of high frequencies that are amplified and output as sound.

Played by people such as Paul Simon and Richie Havens, Guild has been a top-of-the-line Acoustic guitar manufacturer since 1952. While they originally stuck to archtops, they branched off into more complicated builds. They also make solidbody electric guitars and even some semi-hollowbodies. Guild is known for their commitment to quality and tone. They were bought by Cordoba recently, but the general consensus is that the buyout is a good thing. When owned by Fender, their electric lineup was neglected and now they’re making a comeback. An additional aspect of Guild guitars is their durability. They have a very solid build and can easily shrug off some wear and tear while still sounding like it was when it was brand new.
Possessing great look and feel, the LyxPro, the amp is small and would work best for headphone, something that is normal with beginner instrument. It also features a digital clip-on tuner that is so perfect for tuning the 6 strings that are designed on the rosewood fretboard. The Canadian maple neck also compliments the rosewood fingerboard and the overall solid wood body finishes for greater sound quality.
But Harmony produced a lot of instruments other than guitars: ukuleles, banjos, mandolins, violins etc; the company was proud of it's history, proudly American, and as proud of its skilled workforce, as it's use of modern technology "We've produced millions of instruments but we make them one at a time". This long history of instrument manufacture explains why Harmony had the expertise to produce so many well-built acoustic and hollow-body electric instruments; guitars like the Meteor and Rocket were very well received. They were slow, however, in committing to the solid body market; although they released the H44 Stratotone neck-through solid body in 1952, it was gone by 1957, and there were only hollow bodies until the release of the Silhouette in 1963.

First of all we have to make special mention for the build quality of the RP500. It has a cast-metal chassis and vacuum-style footswitches like on an actual stompbox, and it just feels like it’s built better than any Line 6 or Boss multi-effect we’ve tried. On the rear of the RP500 you’ll find a ¼” input for your guitar, stereo output, headphones jack, AUX in, balanced XLR stereo out, and a USB port. A power supply is included, so points for DigiTech over Boss for doing users that courtesy. A look at the front panel layout reveals it’s pretty unique. It doesn’t have the side-by-side stompbox look we love so much in the Zoom G3X, it has fewer knobs than the Boss ME-80, and yet it looks more straightforward to use than the Line 6 POD HD500X. The dimensions and weight are almost exactly the same as the Boss ME-80 (about 20 inches wide, and weighs approximately 8 lbs).
The pickup itself consists of a long magnet, or a number of cylindrical magnets in a row, around which is a wire coil. The vibrations of the electric guitar’s strings cause changes in the magnetic field of these magnets, which in turn is able to induce a current in the coiled wire. This current is then passed on to the amplifier, which produces the sound. The stronger the magnets used in the pickups, the more sensitive they are to the string’s vibrations.
In the mid-1950s, guitar distortion sounds started to evolve based on sounds created earlier in the decade by accidental damage to amps, such as in the popular early recording of the 1951 Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm song "Rocket 88", where guitarist Willie Kizart used a vacuum tube amplifier that had a speaker cone,[12][13] slightly damaged in transport.[14] Rock guitarists began intentionally "doctoring" amplifiers and speakers in order to emulate this form of distortion.[15] In 1956, guitarist Paul Burlison of the Johnny Burnette Trio deliberately dislodged a vacuum tube in his amplifier to record "The Train Kept A-Rollin" after a reviewer raved about the sound Burlison's damaged amplifier produced during a live performance. According to other sources Burlison's amp had a partially broken loudspeaker cone. Pop-oriented producers were horrified by that eerie "two-tone" sound, quite clean on trebles but strongly distorted on basses, but Burnette insisted to publish the sessions, arguing that "that guitar sounds like a nice horn section".[16]

At the onset, we decided to stick to DIY electric guitar kits that can be bought from online retailers in the mainland US, to ensure that the ones we list are accessible. We then took note of popular and highly rated kits, which for this updated required us to gather around 700 relevant user and expert reviews and ratings. All these data are then fed into the Gearank algorithm, which gave us the scores that allowed us to narrow down the list to just the top 6 kits. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.
If you haven’t heard Colin Hay’s acoustic version of “Overkill” from his solo album ‘Man @ Work’, you haven’t really heard this song. This has been my favorite acoustic guitar song for some time now. I like the mainstream version, but this one blows it away. For a taste, try listening to it as a sample on iTunes or amazon. BTW, if you decide to download it, DO NOT get the much shorter edited version off of the ‘Scrubs’ soundtrack.

From the standpoint of theoretical perfection, the Baxendall tone control is the opposite of the Fender tone stack. With bass and treble variations that are mostly independent, the frequency response is quite flat when both controls are set to the middle of their range using linear pots. Using the opamp/feedback form of the controls means that there is no signal loss that needs be made up elsewhere. This is virtually the standard for hi-fi tone controls. However, there are some guitar amps which use this form of control, tweaked a bit to match the guitar frequencies. 

Considering a brand is only really important to a certain extent. Generally, certain top brands will have a reputation for being better at things than others, but given that most guitar brands now have a very wide offering, it’s really best to consider individual models. It’s worth doing a little extra research in some areas though, because there are interesting brand relationships that mean some more budget guitar brands have actually been designed by premium ones. Epiphone and Squier for instance are more affordable sub-brands of Gibson and Fender respectively, which means that you can often get a very high quality product that’s been made in Taiwan rather than the USA for instance. The Dove Pro is a good example of this.
On the whole, Decca sold a lot of these guitars but the timing was awful.  By 1968 the demand for electric guitars had decreased dramatically.  MCA was about to bankrupt Danelectro, and CBS was cutting all sorts of corners on Fender instruments.  Darker times were coming folks, but for a moment, let’s rejoice in the mid 60s era of records and guitars!
Ibanez Mikro GIO Electric Guitar in Black w/ Bag. The guitar is in good working condition does have few marks and one nick. Does not include stand just used to take pictures. Includes guitar strap and Ibanez bag. Please contact me if you have any problems with your purchased item and I would be Happy work with you to help make your Transaction a Pleasant Experience.           Please check photos carefully and use the enlarging tool. Some photos are taken with a flash and may cause the image to appear darker in some areas. Photos are an important part of the description and the condition of each item.Thanks for Looking!!           Also please verify the correct shipping address before bidding. Payment is expected within 48 hours.    
Dismantled Fender Telecaster neck pick-up, showing the exposed enammeled, very fine, copper wire, wound on a bobbin around 6 magnets sitting below each string. From Mojo Pickups - 50's Telecaster Rewind. In case you are wondering the metallic case (used to be high-chrome content alloy) acts as a hardware low-pass filter, dispersing the magnetic field of the high frequency vibrations of the string across all 6 poles, but allowing long wavelength, low group velocity, bass frequencies to be captured relatively unhindered— the reason for this is quite complicated and the subject of a solid state physics class which we will not go into here.
Power-valve distortion can also be produced in a dedicated rackmount valve power amp. A modular rackmount setup often involves a rackmount preamp, a rackmount valve power amp, and a rackmount dummy load to attenuate the output to desired volume levels. Some effects pedals internally produce power-valve distortion, including an optional dummy load for use as a power-valve distortion pedal. Such effects units can use a preamp valve such as the 12AX7 in a power-valve circuit configuration (as in the Stephenson's Stage Hog), or use a conventional power valve, such as the EL84 (as in the H&K Crunch Master compact tabletop unit). However, because these are usually placed before the pre-amplifier in the signal chain, they contribute to the overall tone in a different way. Power amplifier distortion may damage speakers.
More theory: pickups have a couple of properties, namely phase and polarity. Depending on whether the pickups are in or out of phase and polarities are reversed or not, pickups can have properties such as hum canceling (this is utilized by humbucker pickups) hollowed-out sounds where out of phase pickups cancel out certain frequencies. Pickups also have output ratings. Higher output pickups generate hotter signals, and usually are less glassy. This is why guitarists prefer high out put pickups for rock and metal and others prefer low or medium output pickups. That is also why guitars in hard rock sound midrange heavy and other electric guitar styles have glassy and bright sounds.

OK, I’ve put a new set of strings on now. We’re now going to carry out the following steps, just like we did in the general electric guitar setup post. 1. Check and adjust neck bow (how straight the neck is) 2. Check and adjust saddle height 3. Check and adjust the intonation (how far back or forward the saddles need to sit at the bridge to keep your guitar as in tune as possible no matter what fret you’re playing)


Just starting your electric guitar journey? The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar is specially designed to cater to the needs of beginner guitarists. With the Epiphone named attached to this instrument, you know you're getting top quality. The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar comes with Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups which give a lot of warmth to this guitar's sound. The neck and body are made of mahogany which gives the best sound quality. The slim design makes for fast learning.
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The solid body electric guitar was a major design advance introduced by Leo Fender in the early 1950s. The solid body guitar helped remedy the feedback problems of hollowbody instruments. They were also easier to make, which led to mass market production. Fender introduced the iconic Telecaster and Stratocaster. Soon Gibson also introduced their first electric guitars in a partnership with Les Paul to produce what would become the equally iconic Gibson Les Paul.

The cool thing about this setup is the EQ bypass feature. In other words, you can completely nullify any effects of the EQ and tap into the raw tone of the guitar. That works great for those who want that authentic tone or to let the mix engineer handle the rest. Overall, this Takamine is rock solid in all aspects. It is a great alternative for anyone who's looking to extract the most out of their money who wants to try something other than a Martin.
Thanks for the post on ’66 Deccas and the video. I have a red sunburst DMI-203 with the chrome pick guard as in your picture. My first electric guitar in 1966 was the same instrument with no name on the headstock but with paperwork saying GHI/Heit. Bought it in a department store plus a Concordia amp for $50. Sold it in ’69 when I needed cash for a car (for $75!). I picked up the Decca about 10 years ago. Vintage Guitar magazine did an article of some work done on it in it’s Jan. 2014 issue.

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One of these was the 14-fret neck, which allowed easier access to higher notes. Martin intended it to appeal to plectrum banjo players interested in switching to guitar for increased work opportunities[citation needed]. Martin altered the shape of its 0-size guitar body to allow a 14-frets-clear tenor neck. This was in response to specific requests from tenor players including Al Esposito, the manager of the Carl Fischer store in New York City. The “Carl Fischer Model” tenors were soon renamed 0-18T[citation needed]. This was the first time Martin altered one of their original body shapes to accommodate a longer neck with more frets clear of the body. A 1955 version of the 0-15 is the favorite guitar of artist Leroy Powell. He tells American Songwriter “It’s my main axe that I play with around the house…I even took it out when I toured with Kid Rock … it’s held up pretty good for how old it is.”[4]
Mikko, spot on. Even light wood has density, and there comes a point in solid body electric guitars where how dense any piece of wood is only makes a difference acoustically. The point you made about how a guitar feels when you're playing it is sound, though. Its weight and acoustic resonance will affect how you respond to it and how you attack it (same for neck thickness and profile), and that will account for the preference we have for one guitar over another of the same model.

Fortunately I did some research, performed some trial and error experimentation on my own semi-hollow (a very nice Epiphone Dot) and found what I consider to be the best way to wire up a hollow body guitar. You won’t need any uncommon tools or equipment – just a wrench set (or an adjustable wrench), plenty of wire, a pair of needle-nose pliers, a soldering iron, and a bit of patience. I’ve included plenty of pics to help illustrate each step.


First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.

As technology for manipulating VSTs improves - such as piano roll editors replacing step sequencers and more advanced GUI's allowing faster access to more expressive voicing collections -- and as increased processing power eventually paves the way for simulated rather than sampled guitar sounds -- guitar VSTs will inevitably play an ever increasing role in music production and musical enjoyment. They will never be guitars, never offer the original expressive inspiration of a guitar strapped over the shoulder, powering a wall of sound or launching delicately nuanced resonances through waves of wood-fired warmth in the serene, silent air of a snow-covered mountain cabin, but it's a safe bet guitar VSTs will become just as much a force in music as pitch correction and lip syncing have become major players in the large-venue live performance business -- and in amateur musicians' collections of creative panacea for the stress and toil of daily life.
This multi-effects pedal lets you setup your virtual rig with up to five effects that include various modulation, distortion, compressor, delay, reverb and other effects. They can also run alongside the Zoom G1Xon's built-in amp modeling, which lets you choose between 22 different amps. Those are a lot of features in a small unit, thankfully Zoom implemented an interface that makes tweaking and configuring easier. As expected although you are still limited by two footswitches, it comes with an expression pedal, which adds even more to its value and usability.
Double bass players performing in genres where the bass is slapped, either by pulling the string until it snaps back onto the fingerboard or striking the strings, such as traditional blues, rockabilly, psychobilly jazz, folk, and bluegrass often blend the sounds picked up by a piezoelectric transducer with the sounds picked up by a small condenser microphone mounted on the bridge. The microphone picks up the resonance coming from the body and the sounds of the strings being plucked, bowed, or slapped. The two sound signals are blended using a simple mixer and then routed to the amplifier. While many upright bass players use combo amplifiers, bassists in genres that use high stage volume, such as the punk-rockabilly genre of psychobilly use "bass stacks". Some jazz bassists and other bass players who play in small venues use specialized, expensive upright bass amps, like the Acoustic Image combo amplifier.
The advantage of this specific package is that you’ve got everything you need to get started right away: guitar (duh), amp, strings, tuner, guitar cable, picks, gig bag, strap, and instructional DVD. Those of you who just wanna get a guitar and start, this is your choice. Squier also makes similar package, but I recommend this over the Squier because the parts (electronics) are higher quality, although the Yamaha costs a little bit extra.
As the first blues guitarist to pick up an electric guitar and play single-string solos in the late Thirties, T-Bone Walker didn’t just lay down the foundation for electric blues and rock and roll—he also built the first three or four floors. John Lee Hooker credits T-Bone Walker with making the electric guitar popular, claiming that everybody tried to copy T-Bone’s sound.

Harmony almost wrote the book on guitars and responsible for so many rock stars. Youngsters all over the world ordered guitars from Sears, Montgomery Ward, and later by JC Penny. These affordable guitars are now very sort after and have become very expensive. Many of these models have been copied and reissued over the years. In their heyday, Harmony was the largest manufacture of guitars in the USA. In 1964-65 they sold over 350,000 instruments. The pickup used during and around those years were made by DeArmond Company. Today Vintage DeArmond Pups are still valued and sold. Look into years of bands, and you will find VIP's of the Rock World, with a Harmony in their hands.
The Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo also features USB connectivity allowing you to hook it up to your computer or DAW software for easy recording. If you don’t already have a DAW, you can utilise the free downloads of Fender FUSE and Ableton Live software suites to create your own music and take advantage of all the great features within the amplifier when recording. An intuitive, easy to use control panel allows you to see and change your sounds and footswitch connectivity (sold separately) ensures you can have complete control without the need for a pedalboard. A fantastic amplifier for beginners and players of all levels.
Our basic no frills guitar Denny designed to go head to head with $1000+ guitars. Magazine reviews and customer testimonials say it actually outperforms many well known $1500 models. If you want the look, feel and sound of a high dollar acoustic with 50% easier playability this is the best guitar we offer. Shipped wholesale direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
Enlarging/ Drilling Holes: Often required to upgrade tuners, or occasionally to change control pots. Enlarging a hole in wood seems simple enough, and it is. But it's also an easy way to ruin the finish of the guitar and worse. The problem is because there is no wood in the center of the hole, the edges pull upwards instead of cutting. It often results in large ammounts of chipout or worse. The answer is to run the drill BACKWARDS. This will ream the hole out without the risk of chipping. If the hole needs to be made significantly larger, it is often best to use a bit one size up from the desired hole size and run it backwards till the drill has gone just below the surface. Now you can drill the desired size hole normally relatively safely. The washers or dress rings will hide the slightly larger starting bevel that remains. Whenever possible, drill half way through from both sides or clamp a "backer board" in place. Do NOT use much pressure on the drill, let it do the work, excess pressure is usually due to dull bits, and almost always results in some king of damage. If you must drill through the finish where there is no hole use the same method as described for significantly increasing the size of a hole, but apply masking tape over where the hole will be drilled prior to starting.
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This aim of this site is to provide high quality SoundFonts (virtual musical instruments in sf2 format) that can be played using a midi keyboard connected to a computer, tablet or smart phone. Emphasis has been placed on real or acoustic instruments particularly piano and other favourites for keyboard players (pads, strings, electric pianos, organs and orchestral) but some SoundFonts here also include high quality guitars, some synths and ethnic instruments. There is also a nice GM set for playing general midi files. The SoundFont format sf2 is widely supported by lots of programs/apps and devices.
• Why size matters: Fret width and height affect playability considerably. Fret wire measures at .078 to .110 at the crown, or top, and runs between .035 and .055 high. Taller frets, at .45 and up, tend to make for easier string bending and produce clear notes without much pressure. The latter makes them ideal for high speed playing. The furthest point of that concept is the scalloped fretboard, employed most notably by Yngwie Malmsteen and John McLaughlin, who played a specially designed Gibson J-200 with scalloped frets and drone strings with the group Shakti.
The AF75 also has an ART-1 bridge and a VT60 tailpiece for increased resonance, improved tuning stability, greater sustain and an enhanced tone. It is also equipped with Classic Elite humbucking pickups at the neck and bridge, producing a rich and nuanced tone with just the right low-end heft. Tone shaping is an easy affair with the Sure Grip III control knobs, which are designed for non-slip, precise control.
Vibrato design is slightly changed and enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding a fair amount of firmness to the tone. Likewise, they also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Talking about pickups, pac 112v is equipped with 5-way blade pickup selector. Similarly, master tone and volume controls are also provided for the neatest output.
@Ricardo – I recommend placing tuners as close to your original signal as possible at the beginning of your signal chain. An EQ pedal can be placed where you would like to filter your signal to the settings of the EQ which is technically at any point in your signal chain. Try the EQ in different locations and use the setting that works best for your.

The Sweetwater Used Gear Marketplace is a lot like Craigslist or eBay, only it's exclusively for gear, and it's 100% free — there are absolutely no charges or fees involved. Buying or selling, you'll be interacting directly with other musicians and audio enthusiasts, so we've included some tips below to help navigate your transactions. Learn More | Safe Shopping Tips
After your design has been properly plotted out on the poster board you can cut it out with an exacto knife. Make sure you stay as true to your lines as possible so you have a nice clean line to trace once your ready to. Then lay out the template on body blank and trace away. I like to cut the piece of poster board the same size as the body blank I am using. It makes it a lot easier to line everything up that way. Now you're ready to move on to the next step.
A little lighter than the On-stage but equally sturdy is the Gator GFW, at only 8 lb of weight. This doesn’t mean it won’t be able to offer proper support to the heftiest amplifiers, however, since it is rated to hold as much as 176 lb before showing any signs of stress. At this capacity, most people would be able to use it as a chair without any worries.
To me the easiest way to learn to play songs on the guitar is to learn a few basic chords. You can even start with power chords. It may be helpful to set a goal of learning the I - IV and V chord of a particular key and then learning to transition between those three. In the key of C that would be I = C IV = F and V = G. Once you learn the basic I - IV and V chords and develop the ability to transition between them, you will know how to play all the chords required to play literally thousands of songs.
Best acoustic I've owned. It's an Oregon dreadnought, an all round stunning looking guitar. The sound is beautifully balanced, clear with nice defined bass, sits perfectly in the midrange and projects well without being too bright. It's light weight with meticulous craftsmanship and beautiful timber. When you look at these guitar it's obvious that they are built with a lot of care and attention to detail.
Some guitarists use identical pickups in each position and still get contrasting sounds from each pickup. Others use different types of pickups, often to balance the tonal tendencies of a particular pickup position. For example, a guitarist might choose a moderate-output pickup in the neck position and use if for clean-toned chords, but opt for a high-output bridge pickup for a louder, more distorted, solo sound. A pickup of that type will probably sound darker than a single-coil, but a player who finds the naturally twangy bridge position a little too bright would welcome that change.
Revamp the entire company staff from the C.E.O. down to the lowest level managers. Give workers raises. Treat them like human beings. Be nicer and friendlier. Reduce stress levels and not have such a toxic atmosphere. Make the daily numbers actually feasible and actually attainable without having to work 15 hrs. to achieve them. Have accountability on all levels - checks and balances- from C.E.O. down to lower management. Recognize the workers are human, and not robots!

All the connections are conveniently grouped together on the back of the unit. You have a mono 1/4” input for your guitar and a stereo output which allows you to listen to your playing on headphones, speakers, or a guitar amp (there’s also a balanced XLR output if you need it). Zoom also includes a USB connection, which not only can power this pedal via USB, but also turns the Zoom G3X into an audio interface! This way you can easily record in your favorite DAW. The USB connection also means you can use Zoom's free Edit & Share software so you can easily manage your patches on your computer. Just like everything else on the Zoom G3X, the input and output options are just right and provide plenty of flexibility. There’s really no major omission we can think of.
Launch price: $1,427 / £999 | Body: Mahogany with maple cap | Neck: 3-piece mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, Seymour Duncan Jazz humbucker (EMG 81/60 reviewed) | Controls: 2x volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: EverTune bridge, Grover tuners | Left-handed: Yes (without EverTune) | Finish: See Thru Black, Dark Brown Sunburst
A multi-effects device (also called a "multi-FX" device) is a single electronics effects pedal or rackmount device that contains many different electronic effects. Multi-FX devices allow users to "preset" combinations of different effects, allowing musicians quick on-stage access to different effects combinations.[16] Multi-effects units typically have a range of distortion, chorus, flanger, phaser and reverb effects. The most expensive multi-effects units may also have looper functions. Pedal-style multieffects range from fairly inexpensive stompboxes that contain two pedals and a few knobs to control the effects to large, expensive floor units with many pedals and knobs. Rackmounted multieffects units are typically mounted in a rack. Guitarists and bassists may mount their rackmounted multieffects unit in the same rack with their preamplifier and power amplifier.
Not everyone's ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. Now, I'm not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it's probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts.
King V has got to be one of Jackson’s most iconic guitar families. The one we are looking at here is a but underpowered compared to the original King V, however it also comes at a much lower price. The whole package is well made and quality control is top notch. It takes some time to get used to the Flying V body shape, but once you do you’ll refuse to go back. Aside from looking good, this thing also brings a mighty sound.
It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings, because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. But nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.
The Vox T-60/AC-100 bass amplifier uses two 15-inch cabinets and thirty-to-forty watts of solid-state power using "germanium transistors".[5] The Sunn Model T was used by The Moody Blues, Kiss, Queen, The Who's John Entwistle and Rush's Geddy Lee.[5] The Sunn used a 150-watt amp with "four 12AX7WA tubes, followed by two 12AX7A tubes, and powered by four 6L6GC tubes".[6]
Due to the acoustic, aesthetic and processing properties (workability, finishing, joints) the wood and the ligno-cellulose composites are the most valued materials for the musical instruments' construction. The guitar is made up of a complex structure, formed by a vertical wall in a curve shape (technologically named "sides") and two faces made up of ligno-cellulose plates, so that it should... [Show full abstract]
Chords are an essential component of playing the guitar. When you first start out, it’s best to make a habit of learning one or two new chords a week, and with each chord you learn, practice playing it with the previous chords you’ve learned. Not only does this help you commit the chords to memory, it helps you learn how to move from chord to chord smoothly, so you can start applying your new chord vocabulary to playing actual songs. After all, isn’t that why we all start playing in the first place?
In a nutshell: Lowell Kiesel is the name of the guy who founded Carvin. He originally sold guitars under his own name, but later changed the company name to Carvin, a melding of the first names of his two sons. So, when Carvin changed the name on their guitars to Kiesel, they were actually reverting back to their roots. Kiesel is Carvin, and Carvin has always been Kiesel.
So, to make a successful guitar company, you need to beat the best brands out there. But how would you do that? Brands like Fender and Gibson advertise themselves as the original inventors of the two most popular electric guitar models, the Stratocaster and the Les Paul. This is one of their biggest selling points. Unfortunately, you can’t reinvent something that’s already been invented, hence you can’t really beat them at brand name, especially when you’re starting a guitar company. You have to try to beat them at quality, price and novelty (i.e., introducing something new that improves a guitarists experience). Eventually, you’ll have to get some artists to try out your models and sign deals with them. If you get all of this right, I think you should be able to make it big.
: : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!! Hello, The Vox "plank" guitar I had was EXACTLY like yours! I don't have it now (January,2005). I sold it on eBay this last Spring on Ebay to a collector that works at Warner Bros. studio. He bought it for $460.00 !! There were a few bidders, so I would hang on to that 1950 skiffle guitar if I were you. They are very RARE! Peace! Rory
The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.
Fender:  These guys have also been around for a long time and are just as iconic as Gibson. Especially for the creation of what could arguably be the most popular electric guitar of all time – The Fender Stratocaster. The Stratocaster may be one of the most popular guitars of all time, but it’s what led to it that really changed the guitar world forever. It’s the fact that the man responsible, Leo Fender, a visionary and dedicated workaholic, invented the first commercially successful solidbody electric guitar –an invention that has led to the incredible array of amazing electric solidbodies of today. It’s important to note that Rickenbacker had created a somewhat solid-body guitar back in 1935. However, it was small, kind of awkward and not completely solid or even actual wood. Some consider it the first solidbody, but by other standards most people still credit Fender for the design. There where still other semi-solidbody experiments at the time created by Les Paul himself as well as Paul Bigsby for Merle Travis but none of those actually caught on commercially the way the Fender (Esquire, then Broadcaster) did. Fender’s original solidbody guitar went through a number of refinements and name changes until it finally came to be known as the, Telecaster.
In SPIN’s May/June “Loud Issue,” Paul Saulnier, frontman for squawking indie-punx PS I Love You, mused, “I’m getting comfortable with self-indulgence.” Hopefully, not too comfortable: Saulnier’s yelping guitar-driven blurts cast him as a Clark Kent too shy to ever fully embrace his Superman side. Endearingly knock-kneed riffs lurch along with their heads down before briefly unbuttoning their shirts to reveal the brawny licks underneath. Virtuosity is rarely so endearingly bashful.

Pick-Ups – The pickup is preset underneath the strings, on the body of the electric guitar and it works as a magnetic field. When the metal strings are plucked they vibrate and generate a current that is transmitted by the pickup to the guitar cable and to the amplifier. These may is just a single pickup in a guitar or 3 to 4 pickups depending on the guitar.
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Variable caps used for radio tuning have about 1000 times smaller capacitance than needed for guitar tone controls. The advantage of a variable cap, could one be made in the right range for guitar, or those many-caps-on-a-rotary-switch, is that the resonant peak is maintained regardless of setting. With Joe’s “cap fader”, that peak gets flattened out in the middle of the pot rotation. Doesn’t mean it’s a bad sound, but certainly different.
Back again! I sold the Eagle Jazz bass copy, but have acquired a hollow body 3/4 bass that we believe said Lyle or Aria on the peg head (badge gone). Interestingly it seems like possibly a copy of a Kay design, florentine cutaway with a sunburst. Three of the tuners are missing the bushings, and I'd love to know how to get replacements! I may have to manufacture something, but don't own a metal lathe. Also found a Strat copy that says Mark II on the peg head, nice mahogany neck, in a dumpster along with a Jackson Dinky. Stole parts off the Dinky to make the Strat copy whole, and I like it better than the Mexi-Strat and Squier Affinity start I had, so I sold those, and the Jackson after replacing the bridge parts I'd stolen off it. Besides, I still haven't got all the magic marker off the pick guard on the Mark II (recently heard they were made by Cort, or whoever makes Cort). I bought a Telestar (believe it was made by Teisco) in a thrift store for maybe $12.99 or something like that. I love the pickup sound, but the neck doesn't get any wider as it approaches the body and the frets get closer together. I also have a San Antonio made Alamo like that, and sold off a Silvertone (made in Japan) tiny hollow body with that issue. The necks are hard to play! But I like that pickup on the Telestar so much I can't part with it.
Our flagship guitar. Customers have been asking Denny to build this instrument for such a long time that he finally gave in and designed what many are calling the best acoustic on the market today.  We’ve had players put this guitar up against the best from Taylor, Martin, Gibson, Fender, Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, and we never get them back, even with our 100% money back guarantee. If you’re looking for your last guitar you can pass onto your children this is our #1 guitar. We’re sold out and back ordered on them most of the year so when you see one grab it as Denny builds only a few annually.
On round hole martin guitars, the serial and model numbers are stamped on the neck block inside the instrument. The number can be seen by looking inside the sound hole. Look at an angle towards the neck. All f-hole Martin archtops have their serial and model numbers stamped on the inside center of the backstripe, roughly under the shadow of the bridge (and best seen from the bass side "f" hole).
Benefits of this system are fairly obvious. You get to choose which source to use based on the venue you are playing at. Let's say the stage you are about to perform on has a number of large monitors pointed directly at you. In that case, you'd definitely want to stick with a piezoelectric pickup. On the other hand, if there are no monitors around, you can use both or only the microphone. Alternatively you can mike your acoustic guitar with external mics, which is great in isolated situations such as a recording studio.
Processors, on the other hand, comprise an entirely different water heating appliance filled with piscean vertebrates, as they tend not to need any of the dry sound, other than in a few specialist applications. As a rule, processors such as EQ and compression are connected only via track, bus or master insert points — at least until you have the necessary experience to understand why you might want to break the rules once in a while. Having got that off my chest, let's look at some specific effects (we'll look more closely at processors another time).
Hopefully, that explains the basic components and tools. As mentioned guitar electronics can be a little daunting and my best advice if new to guitar electronics is to avoid seeking out information on guitar related forums as you may leave your head spinning, feeling more daunted than you did in the first place. We will cover the basics here and in most cases that will be more than enough to help you put together a great guitar.
In terms of tone, a smaller dreadnought body will be slightly lacking in projecting the low-end frequencies. That doesn't matter here thanks to being an acoustic electric. With that said, the trebles and mids give away its origin, tone-wise. Play a few chords and you'll immediately hear that classic 'Taylor sound' even from a lower mid-range guitar like this one.
Volume pots are wired as simple voltage dividers. Higher settings have higher resistance to ground and lower series resistance, so more signal passes through. When maxed, volume pot has zero series resistance and full pot resistance to ground. Signal takes the path of least resistance and most of it will go though. However, some signal, mostly treble will be lost. With low pot values (250K) it will be more noticeable than with higher (500K and 1M) pots. That’s why typical pot values for brighter single coil pickups is 250K and for warmer humbuckers 500K or sometimes even 1M.

A question which causes much thought and divide! Catch 22 to a degree: you can't play songs till you've learnt some chords, but just knowing some chords will mean you actually can (though you are not aware of it) play loads of songs. There is a plethora of songs out there with only three chords (some with only two!). Their differences are that the order of chords is slightly different for each - with the exception of the thousands of 12-bar tunes!
Someone recently posted one of my pedal demos in a thread on a guitar forum and stated that he really liked the sound of the pedal in the demo. Another forum member chimed in and said that for some reason, everything I play through usually sounds good. Shortly after, forum member “Squank” replied, “It’s a talent. Most gear can be dialed in to sound at least decent.”
AGE CAN’T HINDER YOU – Working off of muscle memory and visual assistance, ChordBuddy is designed for players of every age. In fact, ChordBuddy is well-suited for those looking to play guitar with arthritis, offering a pain-free method of playing your favorite song. Utilizing ChordBuddy also allows you to learn the guitar on your own, eliminating the need for long guitar lessons with an instructor, which can result in prolonged joint pain.

Stratocasters also feature tremolo systems, where the Les Paul, SG and Telecaster have fixed bridges. Epsecially in the budget price range, tuning is typically a little more stable for fixed-bridge guitars. If you really want a Strat with a tremolo it’s nothing to be super concerned about, but newbies should be aware of the difference. A good guitar tech at the local music store should be able to set your Strat up so it stays in tune just fine.
You're headed in the right direction - don't stop! yes, the keyboardist should control vibrato directly with the fingers, not automatically with an LFO. The more you rely on the technology to play the music for you, the worse your results will be in the long run. Is your intention to emulate a guitar, or to achieve a similar kind of lead expression and sound control during playing? Because these two are very different.
Heck, if you decide to pay for a setup when you buy a guitar they'll set it up right then and there. They're not gonna have you buy a guitar and have you wait a week or two to take it home just for a setup. Everyone else has brought in personal guitars that weren't just purchased and most times not purchased there, and they have their own waitlist. But they make more money prioritizing a setup to make a sale rather than doing a stand alone setup.
I've been an on/off guitar player for at least 15 years now. Never really good, but steadily improving. My hardest thing is consistent motivation. I go through spurts where I study theory and practice like crazy and then, suddenly I just stop. I got this both because I was exceited about it's teaching potential (lessions were $20/30 min when I was a kid, got this for $25) and it has got me playing again and is a lot of fun.
Make sure the notes you do want to play actually come out well-audibly. Good technique and dynamics go a long way here. Listen to your playing and take care that important melodic notes really come out, whereas accompaniment is often better subdued. Palm mute is useful so you can give notes a distinct loud attack without causing an indistinct muddle of cross-ringing notes. Also, make sure you play well in time and with good intonation.

click on the red highlighted portion of instrument that you want to download then click win 32 for 32 bit operating system..then copy the dll file and paste it into c:/program files 86 :/imageline /flstudio/plugins/vst and paste here refresh the fl studio by going add then channel and then more plugins and start scanning ..find that instrument by name and enjoy
The standard tuning, without the top E string attached. Alternative variants are easy from this tuning, but because several chords inherently omit the lowest string, it may leave some chords relatively thin or incomplete with the top string missing (the D chord, for instance, must be fretted 5-4-3-2-3 to include F#, the tone a major third above D).

When Jimi Hendrix came on the scene in the late 1960s, he was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. His ability to use volume, feedback, wah pedals, and other sonic devices to their maximum effect was awe-inspiring. Eric ‘God’ Clapton saw Hendrix for the first time and thought he would be the end to his career. There may be more technically impressive guitar players, but it’s hard to find anyone who played with more adventure or spirit than James Marshall Hendrix.


The actual key that this song was written in is Bb (B flat) and can be a bit difficult for beginners; I prefer using a capo for this song and playing it in the Key of C. Using the capo to play this song doesn’t change how the song sounds, but it makes playing the song a lot easier. Using your capo on the third fret, you chord progression will look like C – G – Am (A minor) – F.
Once you have the essential elements in place-a great amp, guitar, and guitarist-you almost can't help but get a great guitar tone. Crank the amp up to the appropriate level and begin with some mic comparisons. It's especially telling to audition different types of mics: for example, dynamics, ribbons, and large-diaphragm condensers. (I rarely use small-diaphragm condensers for miking guitar amps; on the other hand, I've found that almost any microphone will strike gold once you find the right spot for it.)
By the way, the Dobro Hawaiian lap steel shown in Gruhn/Carter, with volume and tone and the rectangular string attachment, is a slightly later version probably from early to late ’35. Volume controls were added to these electrics early on, but tone controls and adjustable height pickups weren’t introduced until early in ’35, although tone controls don’t appear on Supro guitars until ’38.

It is a popular technique in which the player's thumb or index finger on the picking hand slightly catches the string after it is picked, canceling the fundamental of the string, and letting one of the overtones dominate. It is used by popular guitarists such as Eddie Van Halen, Steve Vai and Joe Satriani who utilize the tremolo arm and high gain amps together with the pinch harmonic to produce horse-like wails from the instrument. - winner333

Coming to its making, it has full-size dreadnaught body for big sound. The top is made up of laminate spruce whereas sides and back are nicely finished with basswood. This Fender Guitar is the reason it lacks a little bit of sounding because solid wood guitars can provide high-end sounding. As far as handling is concerned, kids might find it difficult due to its full size. Teenagers with right heights will find it quite comfortable. Just make sure that your fingers go down to fretboard pretty easily.
This is our new cross-reference between classic pedals (e.g. a Fuzz Face) and who makes kits or boards to build it yourself. In some cases the kit or board is for an exact clone. In others, it is for a circuit based on the original but with improvements or combinations with other pedal designs. Read the description specifics by clicking the link and visiting the maker’s site.
I have a Fender Chinese made Telecaster from the Modern Player Series. The finish is spectacular, and while it sometimes feels like they just used a lot of gloss to cover it, it plays and sounds well. I have played it through many amps and it does the job of both a Telecaster and a Strat style. With a humbucking pickup, a lipstick and a strat pickup, this is a satisfying guitar and moddable for people looking for something they can work on without fear of screwing up and wasting a thousand dollars.
A common acoustic body style that makes use of a very large soundboard is the dreadnought. Dreadnoughts are distinctive for their square bouts, wide waists, and 14-fret necks. The first dreadnought was developed in 1916, and it has been gaining in popularity ever since. Dreadnoughts are very popular among bluegrass guitarists due to their powerful, driving sound.
Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
We supply different variants of Electric Bass Guitar, which is just an extension of the Electric Guitar. The only difference between the two is that the former comes with a longer neck and scale length. It also comes with an option of 4, 5 and 6 strings. The four string bass guitar is tuned in a way similar to tuning a double bass guitar. It is capable of
Engineers invented the first loud, powerful amplifier and speaker systems for public address systems and movie theaters. These large PA systems and movie theatre sound systems were very large and very expensive, and so they could not be used by most touring and gigging musicians. After 1927, smaller, portable AC mains-powered PA systems that could be plugged into a regular wall socket "quickly became popular with musicians"; indeed, "...Leon McAuliffe (with Bob Wills) still used a carbon mic and a portable PA as late as 1935." During the late 1920s to mid-1930s, small portable PA systems and guitar combo amplifiers were fairly similar. These early amps had a "single volume control and one or two input jacks, field coil speakers" and thin wooden cabinets; remarkably, these early amps did not have tone controls or even an on-off switch.[1] While we do know that these late 1920s portable PA systems were used by guitarists and singers, it is not known whether upright bass players used these PA systems.
It was late 1969 early 1970. I was 13 years old and had been learning guitar for about a year when I was given what I considered to be the key to a world of freedom. Mum & Dad said it was ok for me to setup my room in a shed inside Dad’s garage. The shed was the size of a small bedroom, about eight by ten in the old measurements. It was originally built from scraps of recycled building material from a 100 year old house and was initially used as a tool shed.
Takamine has been known for their high quality and highly affordable guitars for years. Their GD51CE comes in just under $500, and is a cutaway dreadnought. It is my top pick if you are looking for the best cutaway acoustic guitar under $500. It has a slim neck for great playability, something that beginners and experts both love. It has a spruce top with rosewood back and sides. You will also be able to amplify this guitar, as it is an acoustic electric. It comes in natural or sunburst finishes. Owners describe it’s sound as loud and balanced, which is expected of a dreadnought cutaway. You can’t go wrong either, as it has an onboard tuner. See more pictures and reviews of the guitar here.
While other Univox brand amps may have existed during this period, these are the only ones on our radar scope. The brand was still being put on amps as late as 1976, and all of the later amps were still in a 1980 binder, though by ’79 only two Univox amps were listed in the price list. Most likely, when the Univox guitars went away in ’77 or ’78, so did the Univox amps, but supplies probably continued to be available as late as 1980. Anyhow, this sets the stage for the next development in amps to which we’ll come back…
If your instrument receives regular maintenance, then you are likely to avoid any unneeded guitar setup cost. A properly cared for guitar will be regularly cleaned, oiled, and treated gently at all times. Of course, this is not possible for all people, as their preferred style of music may negate the ability to treat a guitar gently (metal and punk are good examples). Having the guitar setup can be thought of as maintenance in itself, as it is an invariable need in environments that have inconsistent weather patterns (which would be virtually all of them). The cost of a guitar setup can be insignificant if you maintain it on a regular basis.
Originally, distortion of the guitar signal happened accidentally when tube amps were turned up too loud. While distortion was first considered undesirable, players soon came to recognize that a distorted signal increased the amount of sustain they could get out of each note. This essential discovery created a fundamental shift in guitar soloing styles to include extended notes such as those produced by a wind instrument or organ. Used on rhythm guitar parts, distortion thickens up the signal and allows for a much heavier, chunkier sound.
this is a really cool product. at first i thought i was disappointed in the drum loop sounds becsuse i thought they sounded too cheesy and not real but when i recorded some music using them along with the songs ive been working on, it turned out sounding pretty good and im happy with it. Also, my bass that sounds to cheap and not so great recording in through my irig2 without any effects module , is drastically improved when i plug it into this NUX-MG20

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The Tune-o-matic bridge was the brainchild of legendary Gibson president Ted McCarty in 1954, setting the standard for simplicity and functionality that has never been bettered. The 2008 Les Paul Standard features TonePros locking Nashville Tune-o-matic in a chrome finish, which has saddle adjustment screws on the pickup side, and pre-notched saddles for quick installation. The chrome locking stopbar tailpiece is also from TonePros. These parts come with locking studs designed to secure both components firmly to the body so that there is no lean, yielding a great union between the strings and body which results in excellent tone and sustain.

Anyway, here’s how you adjust the truss rod. This must be done with the strings tuned to whatever pitch you usually use. If your neck is too bowed (the gap you just measured is too big), you tighten the truss rod by turning the socket clockwise. It is recommended that you only turn the tool a quarter turn at a time (or even one eighth) and then give the neck some time to settle. You will also need to make sure the strings are still properly tuned after each adjustment.

Ovation guitars are produced in the U.S. as well as in Korea and China. Those models in general have a wooden top. Recently Ovation significantly reduced the production of U.S. made Ovation models. From 2010 on better models (e.g., Legend, Elite, Custom Legend, Custom Elite) used to be available, both, made in the U.S. and made in Korea. Before that, the mentioned models were U.S. made. In recent years many U.S. made guitars could be identified by the LX in the product name (e.g., Legend 2077LX), whereas the Korean-made version of the same guitar had AX in its model name (e.g., Legend 2077AX). Again, this name-system has not been used throughout the whole guitar model range (e.g., Ovation 1617ALE). Nowadays only a few U.S. made models are being produced, mostly signature and limited edition models (e.g., Custom Legend 1769-ADII Al DiMeola). Production of the standard model range of Ovation guitars in the U.S. has been seized.[24]
Although there have been several copies of Gibson guitars in Epiphone, yet their quality, tone, and artisanship suffice to attract and retain more customers. During the past few years, Gibson has adapted some modifications in their lineup. This includes restoring their classic Les Paul Studio design as Studio T, and the Les Paul Studio Faded, which is an affordable variant.
This is a more muffled bass, suited for blending in or behind distorted guitars but useful for any situation when a bass sound without so much clarity is needed. It is also a much smaller file than the rest. Originally I made this just for my own personal use but decided it might be useful to others as it fits some pieces where the washburn bass doesn't.

1W 1x6 1x8 acoustic Amp Amplifier Amplifiers Amps Battery Powered Amps Beatles beginners combo amps Danelectro Disclaimers Effects Pedals Electric Guitars Epiphone Fender Fender Amps Fender Mustang Gretsch Guitar guitars Ibanez Les Paul Marshall modeling amps Orange Amplifiers Orange Micro Crush Peavey Amps pignose Portable Amps Practice Amps Review Reviews Rogue Solid State Amps Starter pack stompboxes Stratocaster Telecaster Tube Amps Vox Vox Amps Yamaha
In 1952, Alfred Dronge – co-owner of small New York City music shop Sagman & Dronge – registered the Guild Guitar Company. The following year, they began producing deep hollow body guitars, a reflection of Dronge’s love for jazz music. The brand grew steadily through to the 70s – when Alfred Dronge died unexpectedly in a plane crash – getting their instruments in the hands of musicians such as Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, and Bonnie Raitt. In the 80s, Guild began producing signature guitars for musicians Hank Williams Jr. and Brian May of Queen. The brand moved around frequently and it wasn’t until 2014 that they settled in their present headquarters in Oxnard, California – where all of their line of USA made guitars are now produced. To this day, they still produce a wide variety of hollow, semi-hollow, and solid body guitars that look as beautiful as they sound.
This comprehensive set contains the most detailed version of the Yamaha C5 Grand plus a full compliment of performance sounds to cover all your needs from pads, strings, EPs, orchestra, synth, organs, guitars and many other instruments. At 971mb in size (with 592mb dedicated to one outstanding piano with five brightness levels to choose from)  it is designed for the fussy pianist who also wants a full bank of sounds at their fingertips.
I bought this kit for myself. I wanted the satisfaction of building and playing my own guitar. The price was well within my budget. I did upgrade the electronics, put on a Bigsby tailpiece, a new roller tune-o-matic bridge, and planet waves self trimming tuners. The items in the kit were fine to use, but i wanted a one off guitar, that would have the sound and the look I wanted.
A batch of 20 to 30 guitars featuring Ripley’s electronics was assembled using Japanese bodies and necks. The one in our possession is a GS2-R (#28949) with a standard (no German carve) Strat-style body, bolt-on multilaminate neck made up of red-dyed 1/16″ maple strips glued end-to-end, pointy-droopy carved bi-level six-in-line headstock, Gotoh tuners, black hardware, 24-fret ebanol fingerboard, faux-pearl pennant inlays and locking Ovation Floyd-Rose-licensed vibrato system. Two plastic-covered humbucking pickups (no exposed poles) featured individual output controls for each string, with six individual three-way mini-toggles for selecting pickups combined with six fader pots directing string/pickup output to a stereo jack.

The first thing to do is to cut out a piece of copper foil slightly larger than the bottom of the electronics cavity.This way the edges of the foil will go up the sides of the electronics cavity a bit. Next cut out strips of copper foil slightly wider than the depth of the cavity, and form them along the sides. When you are finished, it should look like the photo on the left.
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• Why size matters: Fret width and height affect playability considerably. Fret wire measures at .078 to .110 at the crown, or top, and runs between .035 and .055 high. Taller frets, at .45 and up, tend to make for easier string bending and produce clear notes without much pressure. The latter makes them ideal for high speed playing. The furthest point of that concept is the scalloped fretboard, employed most notably by Yngwie Malmsteen and John McLaughlin, who played a specially designed Gibson J-200 with scalloped frets and drone strings with the group Shakti.
Proceed to the next two chords. The next chord you would play would be a power chord on the fifth fret of A three times. So you would play with your index finger on the fifth fret of A, your middle finger on the seventh fret of D, and your ring finger on the seventh fret of G. Then, simply shift this finger shape down one string so that your index finger is on the fifth fret of the E string with your other fingers on the seventh frets of the A and D strings. Play the chords in the sequence that they're highlighted with parentheses below:
Amp: Gain- increases and decreases how much gain your sound has. Treble- increases and decreases high frequencies in your sound, AKA the brightness of your tone. Mids- increases and decreases the middle frequencies in your sound, AKA the 'punchiness' of your tone, if that makes any sense. Bass- increases and decreases the low frequencies in your sound, AKA how much 'thump' it has.
i've got a a Ricky Tom Petty model (same as the 660-12) that I've had for almost 20 years. Plays great and the sound difference compared to a 360 is minimal, and I like it better because it has the old toaster pickups. The only thing I had to do it was pull off some of the windings on the pickups. They were up to 12K ohms, which is very high and makes the guitar sound too thick. Unwound to about 8K and they sound much better. I had a different Ricky with the narrow neck and it was painful to play at best with my fat fingers. The wider neck is a dream to play.
• Don’t always blame the frets: Buzzing doesn’t necessarily mean there’s a fret problem. Some guitar players set their bridges for super-low action in their quest for speed, and that can makes frets buzz. For beginners unfamiliar with how accurately tuned strings sound or more experienced players exploring dropped and open tunings for the first time, buzzing can also be a buzz kill. Low tunings like dropped D and open D and open C may prompt guitars with normal action to buzz due to the slack in the strings unless a guitar is set up properly to accommodate such tunings.

Nothing sounds as good as a tube amp turned up to 10. You can do this with some old amps, and they will sound fairly clean; others will explode. Use caution and keep an eye out for plumes of smoke. Newer tube amps generally have separate preamp and master-gain controls that can duplicate the gritty anarchy of yore, minus the lease-breaking SPLs. For jazz and other clean guitar styles, it's okay to turn the volume down a bit, as long as you don't "underdo" it.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Diamond - # of Strings: 6 - 12 - Scale Length: 25.5" (65cm) - Bridge: Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Custom - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Natural, Brown

SOLD OUT: Here we had a 40+ year old 1972 Alvarez 5080 Acoustic guitar that was built by the master guitar builder Kuzio Yairi. He used 30 year old vintage aged tone woods when they built this guitar over 40 years ago.. that would make this wood arround 70 years old... Thats right...you can say that about a new Martin can we... not going to get tone like this from a new Martin either. This is one high class example replica of the Martin 000-28 this model is quiet rare and beautifully adorned with exotic tone woods plese refer to the pics. Just have a look at the beautiful exotic old growth Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back, sides, fingerboard...headstock overlay .., ebony pins with MOP and brass ring all high end classic detailed appointments... notice the real patina this guitar plays real well and has been played and it shows... in a good way to my eyes.. I love it. So will you just have a look... no visable issues, no cracks to be found, inlays, bindings, pickguard, tuners,frets.....all good..and sound is rich and has a nice sustain and is a pleasure to play... fresh from the JVG shop with a fresh bone saddle & nut & new Martin Marquis strings sweet! A must HAVE 40 YEAR OLD VINTAGE YAIRI 000-28 STYLE, Claptons favorite for good reason... SORRY THIS GUITAR HAS SOLD gr8bids@comcast.net Thank you for your interest.


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The fretted instrument market is in many ways an excellent leading edge indicator of world economic conditions as a whole. China is not only rapidly advancing in the fretted instrument market but in all areas of manufacturing. Furniture factories in North Carolina are closing due to competition with imported Chinese products of equal quality for far less money. Numerous other industries are moving offshore. As you have all noticed the price of gasoline has risen dramatically in recent months. It should be noted that China now consumes approximately an equal amount of petroleum to Japan. This was certainly not the case five years ago. If OPEC and other producers pump the same amount of oil as they used to, but China emerges as a new player consuming this much fuel, it should come as no surprise that prices will go up. China now is a major importer of fuel, wood and agricultural products. Commodity prices in general are rapidly rising. China is not only becoming a world leader in manufacturing but it is becoming one of the world's leading consumers of all sorts of raw materials and commodities. While the per capita income in China and the per capita consumption of fuel is much lower than in the USA, their population is well over a billion people. At the rate they are going it will not be long before they consume fully as much fuel and other raw material as we do and have an economy which could rival the annual GNP of the USA. Not only are they an economic and manufacturing powerhouse, but they have a huge army. As their manufacturing capability increases not only quantitatively but qualitatively they become more and more of a super power. While the USA may have won the cold war with Russia, at the rate things are going as much as American consumers may benefit from inexpensive but high quality-guitars, furniture and other products from China, we may find ourselves in the uncomfortable position of no longer being the only world super power.
Engl has to be the most underrated amplifiers on the market. I have an engl gigmaster 15 and it is pure awesomeness. No fender cleans but if you want fender cleans buy a fender. The gain section is where this thing shines. I haven't used any kind of distortion pedal since getting this amp. More gain on tap than any Marshall I've ever owned or played. Getting ready to upgrade to the ironball and can't wait. If you like metal, hardcore, punk, grunge, sludge, doom you should look at an engl. This thing will even do blues extremely well without a ts9. It will take pedals very well as this is a 15 watt amp with an effects loop. Wow, right. Won't get that with a tiny terror. Plus these are German designed and built unlike the terror series built in China.
I am a learning myself Shreya.I purchased a Fender Model CF60 (£100) .This is a high quality "Folk guitar" from a reputable long standing company.It's got a lovely mellow tone and the size is not to big.Buld quality is excellent.At the end of the day it's all subjective.I recommend you go to your local musical instrument shop and try a few.All the Best Dean
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: None - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 707 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Tribal Purple, Black flame, Tribal Green, Blue Quilt, Satin Natural, Blue Flame
Been in my attic for 20 years...kinda dirty...Rare Vintage Electric Guitar that i have never found an exact pic of on the web...seems like a Teisco Del Rey,but looks earlier than the 60's models ive seen...obviously needs cleaning an repair...but man this thing is cool...a great restoration project...the only marking is the patent number 31-4127 on the truss rod cover...or a Norma or Guyatone version...or just hang it on your wall as a great conversation piece

Bought an ovation a couple of years ago and it hasn't failed me yet. Mine's a fairly lower in the range Ovation Celebrity, but it's excellent. One of the most comfortable feeling guitars I've ever held, good projection, nice tone, even been known to out do a Gibson further down the neck. Plus bonus feature is that it does sound so much clearer and warmer out of the amp

Launch price: $2,799 / £2,399 | Body: Laminated maple | Neck: Maple | Scale: 24.6" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x Full'Tron humbuckers | Controls: Bridge volume, neck volume, master volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: Anchored Adjusto-Matic bridge, Gotoh locking tuners, Graph Tech TUSQ XL nut | Left-handed: | Finish: Cadillac Green


By 1939, Supros had grown again. The ’38 line was essentially intact with the addition of a number of new resonator acoustics. New was the No. 23 Supro Arcadia Guitar, a sunburst birch-bodied resonator made by Harmony. This had a simple nickel coverplate with two concentric circles of round holes, a slightly-rounded head with an oval Supro metal logo plate. The fingerboard had four dot inlays, the body two f-holes. Cost was $22.50.


For me, the hardest part of mixing is getting the vocals to sit properly. There are a lot of tricks you can apply that can help, but I think one of the most useful is to send the vocal to a bus and insert a compressor there, with a high ratio of around 10:1 or more. Set a low threshold, and a medium attack and release, then, in the next slot, load a distortion plug-in with a warmish sound. Use high- and low-pass filters, set to around 100Hz and 5KHz respectively, and mix a small amount back in alongside the lead vocals. You don't need to add much — it should be almost 'subliminal' — but it can really help to fit the vocal in the track. Nicholas Rowland

Barely used in my home, NUX Cerberus multi pedal. Not a modeler, it has true bypass distortion, overdrive, modulations(chorus,flange, phase, univibe and trem) as well as delay and reverb- all completely programmable and can be used as a pedal board or as presets. Built in tuner and cab simulator- great multi pedal can be used as a fly rig or in front of an amp- Comes in the original packaging with power supply. US buyers ONLY- I will not ship internationally- No returns accepted
How to Adjust Amp Settings for the Best Blues Electric Guitar Tone. The tone settings on an amp are as important as the settings on the guitar for producing the blues sound. The amp settings are a personal style preference. Blues guitar has a distinctive sound and tone which can be enhanced by the amp settings. Focus on the drive and reverberation settings for a good full-bodied blues sound.

As you can see, this is simply a case where the Les Paul Custom is a feature-rich product, with more qualities that Epiphone can highlight as buying incentive. All the same contextual advice applies, as the LP Custom is every bit as versatile as the Standard (if not more) and can hang in just about any musical style. When deciding between them it's more a matter of price and aesthetics than any kind of style or playing scenario.

In 1942, Valco unveiled a new Hawaiian lap steel, the Irene, which was offered as a Silvertone in the ’42 Sears catalog. Clearly inspired by the Supro’s first wood-bodied Hawaiian with the pear-shaped body from ’36-37, the Irene had a slightly narrower body and more squared-off corners, and was covered in white pearloid. It also featured a light-colored, painted-on pickguard with dark position markers. Basically, this had the same pickup and control plate as featured on the Clipper.
Hi - I am looking for a new amp for small to medium venues. I quite fancied the Marshall Mini Silver Jubilee combo, but then noticed several companies selling JVM 50 watt combos in the same price range. It seems that the JVM's are a Swiss Army knife whereas the MSJ seems to be capturing a small version of a classic amp and is more of a one trick pony . Any way you could help me make the right decision. On the other hand , how reliable are the JVM's considering their sophistication?
Actually, company founder Leo Fender's first business was repairing tube circuitry equipment including radios, phonograph players, and home music amplifiers. He noticed the growing popularity of amplifiers for home music systems and branched out into selling music records and renting out PA systems he had designed from his repair shop. Then he got even more involved in music by making and selling Hawaiian lap steel guitars containing a proprietary pickup system which he bundled with his own newly designed amplifiers in 1945. The following year he changed the company name from Fender’s Repair Service to Fender Electric Instruments Company.
The whole point of having a DIY guitar kit is to build a guitar that you like, so make sure that you get one with you're preferred shape and profile. Kits with classic guitar body shapes are the safest choice, as evidenced by their continued popularity in the market. But don't limit yourself with just the familiar, spend time looking at other designs to see if you're missing out on something cooler, something that better matches your personality.
While you can learn on any of these, we recommend a solid-body guitar, which includes all the models featured on this page. The main advantage of a solid body guitar for beginners is that they are easier to control in front of an amplifier. By this we mean you are unlikely to experienced squealing feedback from the amp, which can be a big annoyance when it happens all the time. Solid body guitars are often simpler to hold as well, as hollow models tend to be a bit bigger in size.
Now that you have made it through, if you chose to build a guitar, you are probably going to want to make more. Hopefully some of the info as well as links I have provided has helped to get you started in the right direction. Guitar building is fun and chalenging at the same time, and if your like me you will always want to improve your skills and find something else to try out on your next project. I have added some pictures of some of the guitars that I have made down at the bottom so you can see my progression. So here's to having fun and building a piece of art that you don't just have to look at. Though they do look good hung on a wall!
The transparent overdrive is the most natural sounding overdrive. Unlike the most commonly used multi-processing type overdrives, the transparent overdrive does not alter the tone of the input signal. The transparent overdrive's output signal will sound exactly the same to that of the input signal tone wise, just with added drive and boosted signal (dependent on the users settings). Which means there is no tone loss for more natural sounding drive. The transparent overdrive is typically priced higher due to it having nothing but the purest of sound and smooth drive.
If you haven’t heard Colin Hay’s acoustic version of “Overkill” from his solo album ‘Man @ Work’, you haven’t really heard this song. This has been my favorite acoustic guitar song for some time now. I like the mainstream version, but this one blows it away. For a taste, try listening to it as a sample on iTunes or amazon. BTW, if you decide to download it, DO NOT get the much shorter edited version off of the ‘Scrubs’ soundtrack.

When it comes to buying an electric guitar there are a lot of options available, and choosing one can be confusing. This guide will help you understand the basic differences in electric guitars so you can make an informed decision. And remember, we’re here to help with friendly Gear Heads available at 1-800-449-9128 who can guide you to the electric guitar that best meets your needs.


Terry Kath and Stevie Ray Vaughan for me over anyone on that list but Jimi. I’ve seen Page, Clapton, Billy Gibbons, Brian May, David Gilmour, Steve Howe, Eddie Van Halen, Buddy Guy, Keith Richards, Pete Townshend, Mick Ronson, Kerry Livgren, Joe Walsh, Don Felder and Carlos Santana among others. Totally subjective as is all art and I have weird taste.
Umm, no. Jimmy Page and Hendrix have both alluded to the fact that without Robert Johnson, they would never have existed. His albums were released before the 50's and 60's. To think that most of these guitarists (and by effect the people influenced those artists as well) didn't have their hands on Robert Johnson or Mississippi John Hurt albums which they learned from is preposterous. Please stop typing.
This is another invariable question that you should be asking yourself if you are going to buy an acoustic guitar. This is because you also have to consider your comfort level with the guitar body so that you do not have any problem playing it. Be it the one with a shallow body or a full body or be it an Ovation guitar, you will have to make the right kind of choice.
A better way to get distortion, of course, is to use guitar effect pedals. Got your hands on some pedals and starting to play around with the sounds you can make? Well, you can still use these tips to further enhance your distorted tone, since the same theory applies. Most distortion pedals have a volume, gain, and distortion knob in addition to whatever additional controls they give you. If you're simply not satisfied with your pedal's guitar distortion, you can turn the gain up and adjust the other settings, just like you'd do on your amp.
Some types of wood that were commonly used in the 1950s are close to extinct today, and can no longer be used for mass production. For instance, import and usage are restricted for certain types of Mahogany, Rosewood, and Ebony, and large guitar manufacturers in the US have been raided by the justice department on suspicion of using illegal materials.
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“Take a humbucker wound with 42-gauge wire as a benchmark. With an Alnico II magnet, it would have a warm, soft bass response, a very sweet high end and a slightly pronounced mid- range. Alnico III, funnily enough, is not quite as strong as Alnico II. So, the highs tend to be more muted and rounded. Probably the best way to imagine the sound of Alnico III is to think of the early 1950s when this form of magnet was very common. Think of the sounds of the jazz and clean guitar tones from that time – that plummy roundness.

This will only matter to some players (I’m looking at you, lefties), but if you happen to play guitar the non-traditional way (strumming with your left hand and fingering with your right) you may want to pay close attention to brand. Because left handed players are in the minority by a long shot, it can be difficult to find quality guitars of that orientation. If you are on the market for a left handed guitar, you may want to stick to Fender or Epiphone, as they are known to produce quality offerings in that category.
Alongside the Stratocaster, Les Pauls have defined rock ’n’ roll. Everyone from Jimmy Page to Slash to Zakk Wylde has wielded one of these, and the guitar’s fat, creamy tone with near-endless sustain is instantly recognizable. Not everyone can afford a bona fide Gibson, though, but the Epiphone Les Paul Standard makes those sounds accessible to most of us.
Audiffex Guitar Pedals was one of the first professional guitar software packages, with its original version released more than a decade ago. It has since been upgraded but continues its legacy of providing stompbox effects in software form. The latest version is an all in one guitar effects software package - which includes 36 plug-ins that also works for bass, vocals and other instruments. Features include consistent interface with all effects having similar controls, modular plug-in configuration for easier and flexible routing and intuitive preset management. Current retail price: $49
The Seismic Audio SADIYG-15 JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit gives you the ultimate shredder guitar. Originally designed by Steve Vai, this style is built for speed. Innovative features like a Monkey Grip Handle and Floyd Rose Tremolo complete the unique design. All the parts needed for a finished guitar are included. This guitar kit is suitable for the aspiring or established luthier and all guitar players. A truss rod adjustment hex wrench, two Floyd Rose tremolo adjustment hex wrenches and solder are included. You will need a phillips head screwdriver and a soldering iron to fully assemble the guitar. A pack of six nickel alloy strings and a right-angle guitar cable are also included.With your purchase, you will receive one DIY JEM Style Electric Guitar Kit pictured and described above.
Great post a lot of useful information here I found this old acoustic guitar made by lotus I have never heard of this brand and have been trying to research it for about a month now and haven't gotten any closer to finding out the history of it if anyone know anything about them I'm all ears it has a tag on the inside model no. LW 65 or g5 lotus made in japan thanks in advance for any information I can get
So to get the most from your book, it’s important that you respect the intent of the author in how you approach it. That doesn’t mean you have to work through parts of the book that are below your skill level, it just means that you should always work through the book in a linear fashion. If you need to skip to the middle of the book to find something that applies to you that’s fine, just work chapter by chapter (or exercise to exercise) from that point on. It will help you retain the information that you learn in the book if you work through it gradually as opposed to skipping through it.
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Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.
the guitar was made for gretsch by Tokai Gakki in the very early 70's.they sound sweet play great, i have one also .at age 40 it needs very little more then a frett job to fix it back to like new. mine is a model 5989. is 6028. I don't hink it is worth much. It''s just an old japaneses import. It is a well made guitar and I enjoy playing it since my other guitar got stolen....
Yamaha is well known for the quality of their mass produced and affordable guitars, and they continue to be the brand of choice for students and even for teachers. The Yamaha FGX800C is tasked to represent brand in the sub $300 price range, and judging from reviews, it is doing very well in the market. Everything about this guitar is conventional, from its familiar dreadnought cut-away shape to its comfortable neck and string action. It also comes with built-in electronics that give you 3-band EQ control and a tuner. But what makes this guitar a bit more special is the use of solid spruce with scalloped bracing for the top, which ups the value of the instrument.
As cool as these little amps are, they only have a fraction of the features you’ll find in their larger, more powerful big brothers. But, they are more than enough for a newbie to get started on, and they meet and exceed the criteria I outlined in the beginning as what to look for in a good starter amp: They sound good, they are flexible with good overdrive, multiple channels, solid EQ sections and some even have built-in effects.
This mod works great for Strat-type pickups or aftermarket Tele-style reproduction pickups that don’t already have a plate. Some pickup companies make P-90s that don’t have a metal base plate, and these can be twang-ified in this way, too. The best part is that, if you don’t like the sound, you can just peel the plate off and be right back where you started.

Most reverb pedals fall into the ambient effect category, similar to delay and echo in the way it manipulates your signal. It's likened to the delay effect because it's technically a timing effect which, in the world of signal processing, can be described as "sound after sound." In other words, the original sound is produced and another sound follows.
Hawaiian lap steels are not in the American Teisco Del Rey catalog, however, five laps remained in the ’66 Japanese Teisco catalog. Still available was the Harp-8, an 8-string console with two pickups and some sort of electronics controlled by four floor pedals. Still around were the H-39, the H-905 and the self-amplified TRH-1. Also available was the H-850, a single-pickup 6-string very similar to the H-905.
Here we have a Taylor guitar for under $500. Taylor is known for their high quality, and expensive guitars. It’s great that they are offering a lower priced model so more players can enjoy their great sounding guitars. The Big Baby is a 15/16 dreadnought sized guitar which is slightly smaller than a full sized. Perfect for those that want that dreadnought sound but want a little smaller body. The top is sitka spruce and the back and sides are sapele. Owners are saying that the guitar has a very warm and full bodied tone, and that it does not sound like a cheap guitar. This is no surprise given that it is made by Taylor. This is another great choice for those with smaller hands, as Taylor’s are known for their great necks and amazing playability. See more info including more pictures here.
Martin Guitars has a storied history that dates back as far as the mid-1700s when Christian Frederick Martin was born to a family of modest German cabinet makers. At the age of 15, Christian Frederick traveled to Vienna and took up an apprenticeship with a renowned guitar maker, where he flourished in his craft. Years later and after a feud with the Violin Makers Guild, Martin decided to move his business to the United States, opening up shop in New York City. More than 100 years later (and through many trials and tribulations), Martin introduced their signature Dreadnought acoustic guitar, the same shape as the one pictured above. Funny thing is, it was actually based on a defunct style created by another company years prior. Now the standard for acoustic guitar shapes, nearly every manufacturer offers a version of the instrument made popular by Martin. Currently, the brand is run by Christian Frederick Martin IV, the 6th generation of the Martin family – and they’re still making some of the best instruments in the world.
:I purchased a Dorado Model 5990 in 1972 new and it was DISTRIBUTED by Gretch, made in Japan. This is a low price "starter" guitar that equals many higher priced brands. I can let it sit for weeks and it stays in tune. Age has mellowed the sound and it plays as well as any fender, Gibson, or even Gretch, of equal construction all things considered.
The first popular humbucker was introduced by Gibson in 1955, and the world of music was never the same again. In general, the humbucker offers a thick, rich tone, with a medium to high output, which is why they are staple of heavy rock and metal (although equally popular in jazz music). You will find that humbuckers are used by everyone from Eddie van Halen and Dave Mustaine, to Jimmy Page and Dimebag Darrell. Humbuckers feature two coils wired out of phase with each other, and – as the name suggests – are used to eliminate the unpleasant 60-cycle hum that plagues many single-coil pickups. Gibson’s ’57 Classic Plus is a legend in the world of humbuckers, although be sure to check out our humbucker page for more excellent models.
Few instruments are as versatile as the electric guitar. Widely heard in most types of music, the guitar's sound can be customized in virtually limitless ways to suit the genre and the player's individual style. Multi effects pedals put all of that personalization within your reach, allowing you to change your soundstage with the push of a button while you play. Many guitarists achieve multiple effects by chaining pedals together. This gives the ability to mix and match different effects to create unique combinations, but it can also be a source of frustration to keep track of so many pedals. A multi-effects pedal avoids this confusion by converting the mess of individual pedals into one discrete unit that's easier not only to use, but also to transport from venue to venue. Multi effects pedals can offer hundreds of onboard distortion, filter, modulation and dynamics effects to transform the sounds of your guitar. With as many or as few features as you prefer, the selection offers a multi pedal for every guitarist's needs. If simplicity is your thing, a basic stompbox can provide a handful of effects with minimal complications. On the other end of the spectrum, you can satisfy your inner technophile with a cutting-edge digital pedal featuring MIDI support and USB connectivity so you can save seemingly limitless library of effects. There are three things to look for in your ideal multi effects pedal: the range of available effects and features, the ruggedness of its construction and the available inputs and outputs. The more effects that are supported, the more the pedal has to offer to your sound. The more durable it is, the more the pedal can withstand being moved from venue to venue. And the more connection options it has, the more versatile it is for studio recording or connecting to additional stompboxes and accessories. Whether you're playing hard rock or smooth jazz, the range of tone alterations offered by a multi effects pedals enables you to deliver a personalized sound that complements your band and your musical style. There are two things that get guitarists into the history books: developing their skills to perfection and crafting their own distinct sound. With a multi effects pedal, you've got the gear you need to start shaping the tones you aspire to be remembered by.

But we can't forget that Rocksmith 2014 is designed like any other game, and as satisfying as it is to be able to pick up a guitar and play, all I wanted to do was try and level up on some of my favorite songs. I quickly found that Foo Fighters' "Everlong" was beyond my grasp, and Oasis's "Don't Look Back in Anger" would never become my jam, but I quickly got my fix trying to nail down The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop."

I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.


Potentiometers (Pots) for audio are used to adjust tone and volume. Pots are resistors with three terminals and a sliding contact (the wiper) that creates an adjustable voltage divider. If only two terminals are used (one side and the wiper), it acts as a variable resistor or rheostat. Potentiometers are most commonly used as control devices, such as volume control on audio equipment. A potentiometer for Audio applications would feature very low to no introduced noise.
The Little Lady is very similar to the 38C, but on a pearwood comb and with different cover plate art. It is technically a playable harmonica, but it is generally regarded as a knick-knack piece that can be used as personal jewelry. It is also available as a keychain. The Little Lady holds the distinction of being the first musical instrument to be played in outer space.[30][31]
Paul Reed Smith’s offering to pro musicians with exacting standards, the PRS McCarty 594 takes its name from two things. The first is its scale length of 24.594 inches and the second is that it’s a 1959-spec guitar with four knobs. According to Paul Reed Smith, this vintage-inspired instrument aims to recreate the most desired classic Gibson tone, that of a ‘59 Sunburst.
Also new in ’66 was the SM series, a variation on the E-100 and ET-100 introduced in the previous year, very similar to the Ks except the cutaway horns were flared outward in the classic Teisco “tulip” shape which would dominate later in the decade. These had fairly flat rectangular chrome-covered pickups, with a rectangular indentation stamped in the center and six flat round poles, plus to long half-slots along both outer edges. The SM-2L (Teisco Del Rey ET-210) had the hooked headstock, small striped metal pickguard along the lower body, two on/off sliders, volume, tone, roller bridge and Bigsby-style vibrato. The SM-2L retained the German carve relief of the K series. A plain-Jane SM-2 (Teisco Del Rey ET-200) followed, sans German carve, and with a bridge/tailpiece assembly. The SM-1 (Teisco Del Rey ET-110) had just a neck pickup with volume and tone controls, bridge/tailpiece assembly, no German carve or striped metal pickguard, and the Strat-style head of the previous ET-100.
Barely used in my home, NUX Cerberus multi pedal. Not a modeler, it has true bypass distortion, overdrive, modulations(chorus,flange, phase, univibe and trem) as well as delay and reverb- all completely programmable and can be used as a pedal board or as presets. Built in tuner and cab simulator- great multi pedal can be used as a fly rig or in front of an amp- Comes in the original packaging with power supply. US buyers ONLY- I will not ship internationally- No returns accepted

The Duo-Sonic is a short-scale student model that has become highly prized for its excellent playability and tone, making it one of the best electric guitars for beginner guitarists with cash to spare. This updated model - with its slab alder body, flawless in sparkly Surf Green - features the classic offset Fender waist that gives the series its name. The three-ply white/black/white scratchplate also plays host to a chrome-tipped three-position pickup selector switch and knurled (aka easy-grip) volume and tone knobs servicing two pickups, a neck single coil plus a bridge humbucker. The latter is also coil-splittable via the push/pull tone knob. We've encountered guitars at more than twice the price that don't play anywhere near as well as this thing does. Oh, and it doesn't matter what size your hands are. If we had to use a song to describe the tonal range of the bridge pickup, we'll have Smells Like Teen Spirit, please. A clean setting here echoes the clattering rhythm voice of the song's intro while a fuzz box unleashes a racket not unlike the heavy sound Kurt craved. If it sounds like we're typecasting this guitar then rest assured the Duo-Sonic is versatile enough to handle country picking, surf, indie, classic rock, whatever. Plus, the neck pickup warms things up perfectly for clean or dirty blues lead or jazz chords.


ACT TRMOLO REPLACING THE STRINGS ACT tremolo allow two styles of string installation. 1) The strings are installed by putting the ball end into the string slot and hooking the ball end below the string catch at the rear of the tremolo unit. 2) The strings are installed by putting the ball end into the string slot and hooking the ball end in the string catch at the bottom of the tremolo unit.
Just starting your electric guitar journey? The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar is specially designed to cater to the needs of beginner guitarists. With the Epiphone named attached to this instrument, you know you're getting top quality. The Epiphone Les Paul Beginners Electric Guitar comes with Alnico Classic Humbucker pickups which give a lot of warmth to this guitar's sound. The neck and body are made of mahogany which gives the best sound quality. The slim design makes for fast learning.

The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable."

This JEM is an entry level version of the 7V we mentioned earlier. While it doesn’t have the same range as the guitar it was inspired by, Ibanez JEMJRWH still brings you a good portion of Steve Vai’s core tone. In a lot of ways, it’s a great substitute for those who are on a tight budget. I compared the two and the playability was almost on the same level.


The SG started out as a lighter alternative to the Les Paul - which Les didn't like and eventually opted out of. But what seemed like a failure turned out into a success story because many rock and metal guitar players loved the SG's sharp look, faster neck and comfortable upper fret reach. These days, the SG continues to dominate in the realm of rock and metal with modern production models like the Epiphone SG Special, which is meant to be as affordable as possible for future rock stars to learn on.
Reliability is one of these. There are many different parts to an electric guitar. In addition to the body and neck being put together solidly, there are the components to consider. The pickups, controls, circuitry and output jack all need to be well made and connected securely, while the bridge and tuners should function correctly, with nothing too loose or too stiff.
@Christos – As mentioned in the article above, wherever they sound good to you is the best place to put them! However, traditionally people tend to put filter pedals near the beginning of the chain (like wah pedals), and volume pedals as well. An EQ can go first if you just want to EQ your guitar signal before running into your effects, or last if you want the EQ applied to your entire signal chain, or somewhere in between. It really depends on what you personally are going for.
Regardless of the invention debate, it is clear that former radio repairman Leo Fender was the first to mass-produce and sell a successful solid-body Spanish-style electric guitar. His company’s simply constructed 1950 Fender Broadcaster (renamed Telecaster as the result of a trademark dispute), with its flat body and a neck bolted onto it, was initially derided by competitors as too simple and lacking in craftsmanship. Gibson’s president Ted McCarty dismissed it as a “plank guitar.” Yet everything about its patented, practical design was optimal for mass-producing an inexpensive solid-body guitar, earning Fender the moniker “the Henry Ford of the electric guitar.”
Position 4 (inner coils, parallel connection): This is similar to position two just inverted. Pole 1 connects bridge pickup coil tap to the output through pole 2. Pole 3 grounds neck pickup coil tap and pole 4 connects neck pickup hot lead to the output. That leaves us with bridge pickup coil from ground to coil tap and neck pickup coil from coil tap to hot lead. Again, they are paralleled.
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Schooled in flamenco and jazz, Robby Krieger pushed beyond rock at a time when most players were still bound to the blues. In the Doors, he had the improvisatory flair to follow Jim Morrison's wildest journeys, wrote some of their biggest hits ("Light My Fire"), and picked up the slack in their keyboard-drums-guitar lineup. "Not having a bass player… made me play more bass notes to fill out the bottom," he said. "Not having a rhythm player also made me play differently, to fill out the sound. I always felt like three players simultaneously."
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