Every beginner guitarist deserves to learn on an instrument that's built by experienced craftsman who use only the finest materials. However, for many novice players, it's difficult to know for sure what's considered a high quality instrument. To make things easier, many popular guitar brands offer guitar value packages. These packages consist of all the essential pieces of equipment that a learning guitarist would use in the developmental stages of their playing. Within this section, you'll find more than enough guitar value package options to choose from.
The same bracing system and pickups in chrome covers are also included within the Vintage Reissue Series, with individual volume and tone controls, and a 3-way bat-style selector switch. Hardware includes individual chromed saddle-style mounted bridge with height adjustments, and a chrome trapeze tailpiece. The one-piece, Canadian maple set neck features a 20 fret, bound rosewood fingerboard, with pearloid block position markers.
We've already shown you one of Epiphone's Les Pauls. However, that guitar and this model we're looking at here are simply not comparable. Les Paul Standard features a much better set of pickups as well as hardware. Each of the four available finishes on this thing is superb and includes a number of subtle details which really add to the beauty. Most importantly, Epiphone's Les Paul Standard will give you a true taste of what a legit Gibson Les Paul tastes like without breaking the bank.
Join the "Cigar Box Revolution"! This La Vox Cigar Box Electric Guitar is built from a decidedly uptown-looking round box. Neck-through construction means it is heavier than most cigar boxes, and it performs more like a standard electric guitar. Play some raw, smokin' blues, back-alley funk, or whatever else wells up from deep down inside.  More details...
Rickenbacker has produced a number of uniquely designed and distinctively trimmed acoustic guitars. Although a small number of Rickenbacker acoustics were sold in the 1950s and were seen in the hands of stars like Ricky Nelson[9]and Sam Cooke,[10] the company concentrated on their electric guitar and western steel guitar business from the early 1960s onward. From about 1959 through 1994, very few Rickenbacker acoustic guitars were made.
Mother-of-pearl rosette inlay. If you’ve had acoustic guitars with mother-of-pearl accents, you’ll appreciate the beauty of the mother-of-pearl inlay around the sound hole. This particular rosette pattern is inspired by the 1920’s Domingo Esteso design, which will be a treat for those who love specific historic details like this. Even if history isn’t your concern, the mother-of-pearl colors enhance the pattern.
Taylor does produce a more budget friendly line of instruments with the 200 series, which is ideal for beginners looking to capture their famous sound at a fraction of the price. Taylor also produces small bodied guitars such as the Baby, Big Baby and GS Mini, which rival their full bodied instruments at a lessened price and are perfect for kids and beginners to learn on (6).
Orange make great amplifier cabinets that work with a wide variety of heads. In fact, there are many artists out there who like to mix and match their amp+head combinations to get the specific sound out of their head combined with the classic sound of an Orange speaker cab. The Orange PPC212 Guitar Speaker Cabinet - 2x12 has been designed to bring the best out in your Orange amp head by utilising 13 ply, high density 18mm Baltic Birch plywood in a closed back construction partnered with 2 x celestion vintage 30 speakers. This Power Projection Cabinet (PPC) has been designed to last the test of time thanks to the rugged construction.
In the late 50s, McCarty knew that Gibson was seen as a traditional company and began an effort to create more modern guitars. In 1961 the body design of the Les Paul was changed due to the demand for a double-cutaway body design.[17] The new body design then became known as the SG (for "solid guitar"), due to disapproval from Les Paul himself. The Les Paul returned to the Gibson catalog in 1968.

With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!


In 1981 Fender-CBS hired William Schultz, John McLaren, and Dan Smith away from the U.S. division of Yamaha. Schultz became the president of Fender-CBS, McLaren the managing director while Smith was appointed the director of marketing for Fender electric guitars. In a drive to rejuvenate the quality control and Fender’s market position, Dan Smith oversaw an upgrading of the basic production model Stratocaster and by late 1981 the new production model was unveiled as the 1982 Stratocaster. It featured a pre-CBS smaller headstock (compared to the 1980 “Strat”), a four bolt neck plate, an overwound X-1 pickup (introduced on the 1980 “Strat” model) in the bridge position and a body end truss-rod adjustment without the Bullet nut. These are known today as “Dan Smith” Stratocasters and prized by collectors for the attempted, albeit brief, return to pre-CBS stylings.

As early as 1924 or so, Lloyd Loar had experimented with amplifying acoustic instruments, though it would not be until the ’30s that his efforts would pan out (without great commercial success). He was undoubtedly ahead of his time. The only amplifier technology available to Loar was primitive radio amplification, hardly adequate for cutting through the horn section. As the ’20s progressed, Hollywood invented “talkies,” and huge valve amplifiers were developed to fill theaters (the music trade press at the time repeatedly published essays assuring musician readers that talkies would have absolutely no effect on the jobs of theater organists!). Part of this technological development included the invention of more and more tubes and the improvement of older designs, which increased the possibilities for instrumental amplification.
Where can you find one? My guess is that FIDELITY was a housebrand (like Holiday or Silvertone), and these might be Valcos or some other maker. But I have since seen 2 or 3 of them on Ebay, not going for too much money. Also, there are several other brands (and no-brands) that look much like these, so keep your eyes peeled, don’t pay too much, and score a little gem that will have other guitar players saying “what the hell is that” and have your significant other shaking his or her head when the UPS/Fedex people come knocking.
The Headload may be the ultimate tool for gigging electric guitarists. It has the same features as the JDX 48, but allows the player to adjust the phase of their signal to be matched with a microphone and comes with equalization controls to further sculpt the sound of their direct signal. Most importantly, the Headload is a “load-box”, meaning that it can absorb the energy of the amp’s head and produce a lower volume through the amp’s speakers. This is crucial, since most guitarists only like the sound of their amp when it is driven hard at high volumes. Unfortunately, amps being pushed to their full volume is not as enjoyable for the audience. The Headload also allows guitarists to play through their favorite sounding amp heads without even needing guitar cabs!
Replacing or repairing knobs. Knobs are covers for your pots so you can easily turn them, if any of your knobs are unable to be correctly placed on try due to broken or enlarge holes, place a good amount of tape around the pot's shaft that covers it and try to keep the the knob on the tape. If you cannot do so then you may need to replace your knobs.
For many people who pick up the guitar for the first time, learning scales is often not at the top of their priority list. This is normal and as a beginner guitarist, there is other more important foundation knowledge that should first be acquired. However, at the point when you start learning scales as a guitarist is when you know you’re starting to get serious about playing. Learning guitar scales is a fantastic way to practice your technique and theory. Scales also come in handy for a variety of purposes such as: Writing music Improvising/jamming with others Understanding how music
I, too, am searching for more info on my Kent. It's a Model 834, violin shaped with a cutaway. Mine is red with "racing stripe" binding on the edge. It's sounds INCREDIBLE (very vintage) and plays well, though I find the neck very narrow. There was an E-Bay auction for a couple of framed ads which featured this model, plus the 833, 835 and 836 from 1967 (one of the pictures, from what I could tell, looked exactly like mine). I also tracked down a picture of one that is a Yellow 67 with a Bigsby-Style vibrato (mine lacks this). If anyone finds a source for more Kent info, I'd love to hear from you...
Either way, the results in the Descent Reverb are nothing short of phenomenal.  If you watch the demo video below, you'll hear some of the most unique sounds capable of being produced by a guitar pedal. Pigtronix did something similar with delay and pitch shifting in the Echolution 2 Ultra Pro, but we think the combination is even better in the Descent.
got my dad's guitar after he passed away. its electric solid wood has a tone knob and volume knob next to the cord plug in and two little black slider buttons. I don't know anything about guitars but it only has one marker on the back its on the silver plate and it just says Japan in all caps. there is no brand name on the headstock or anywhere else on the guitar that I can find and I've looked at over many times.

Guitar amplifiers vary in wattage. If you're playing to a massive audience, you'll want several 100-watt amps; however, for everyday use, that is overkill. If you merely want it for practice, a 10-watt solid state guitar amplifier will do, and if you're playing to a small venue, you'll probably want to consider a 20-watt valve amp. It's surprising how much sound a little amp will produce.
Conventionally, guitarists double notes in a chord to increase its volume, an important technique for players without amplification; doubling notes and changing the order of notes also changes the timbre of chords. It can make a possible a "chord" which is composed of the all same note on different strings. Many chords can be played with the same notes in more than one place on the fretboard.
Fender’s quality is as widely known as their steep prices. It’s no secret that not everyone can afford one of their guitars. This is why they acquired Squier a long time ago, and tasked the company to build more affordable versions of their guitars. In the beginning the quality was iffy at best, but today the situation is completely different. Squire of today is a trustworthy brand that brings cost effective Fender style guitars to those on a budget.
You may love only one style of music. And that’s fine. But try playing some other styles. Funk maestro Carlos Alomar went through hell on David Bowie’s Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) album, being asked to play more “grinding” guitar alongside Robert Fripp. “It was very interesting,” says Alomar. “I learned a lot and when I came back to my more natural style, I felt really fresh about it.”
Yamaha is known for focusing, in modern years, on band instruments. But at one point in their tenure in the early 90s, they owned a good share of the student model market with their beautiful Pacifica line. Thankfully, in the past few years, they’ve reintroduced mass runs of this guitar, and it is a great option for a first-time guitar player. Why? Well if you ask any older player who once started on a Pacifica, most of them will tell you that they still have it in their collection somewhere, both for sentimental value, and because it’s built like a tank and plays well.

While high action is a concern, I see more people on guitar forums who bought Authentics, including the 1941, who say the action and playability is “like butter” more than I see people mentioning high action being a problem. Also, a lot of players rarely go beyond the fifth fret without a capo, so they may not even notice if their 10th fret would seem high to some players.
The value of the guitar will also be an important factor that will contribute to the overall score – because spending $200 on a model that sounds like a $2000 guitar is always something that can’t be ignored! We rate the best acoustic guitars and the best bass guitar list in the same way. With every new model we add and review, we update the top 10 rankings.

Here we have a truly wonderful sounding example By Yamaha its an OM / 000 style and this guitar is really nice playing FG170 and is from Yamaha Japan Nippon Gawki factory and these 170’s were produced in smaller numbers from 1972 to 1974 and this guitar was made in 1973 and it sounds impressive at twice this price point .This guitar is pretty good and LOUD too because of its being so well made as well as from Quality woods TIME aged woods over the past 40+ years. Its All original too and has been taken excellent care of here in California’s nice climate due to this no checking or weather type of issues we see elsewhere… its neck is great in the hands feel to it and neck structural angle is excellent to this day as a result its action is still good making this guitar fun to play for hours at a time…with excellent resonance and response associated with a very good 40+ year vintage guitar so I believe this guitar is recording worthy it has really well aged tone… someone will be very pleased. Its Construction: Solid Spruce Body top (Solid Spruce laminated with thin layers of Spruce just like Yamaha FG180 Red Label), Mahogany (Sapelli is Japanese Mahogany) back and side Rosewood Fingerboard/Bridge Mahogany (Sapelli) Neck is nice medium profile, and is comfortable for many styles and very easy to play Its Head stock has the Old Three Tuning Forks Logo The Tuners in my opinion are the best original Yamaha design tuners on these vintage Yamaha this one tunes so nice and smoothly and effortlessly and keeps this guitar in tune well as you might be able to tell I really like this old Nippon Gakki Yamaha. This guitars JVGuitars condition ….. used - very good - excellent vintage ]and better than average for near 45 years old. Frets have some play but are excellent used Body back and side has some superficial minor scratches or drinks - overall Beautiful Under the nut placed a 0.4mm sim 43mm nut width and soft V neck profile, importantly Action is very good and is easy on the fingers and is a Pleasure to play. This guitar is absolutely JVGuitars approved and is ready to play for another 45 years!! JVGuitars has thoroughly cleaned and inspected which include: detailed cleaning, strings replaced with a new set, cleaned frets and fret board, set up neck, checked playability and polished entire guitar and have been playing it myself in my office for a few weeks now Oh ya …..Love it! Check all our high res photos out and feel free to ask Joe any questions, You can email me at: JVGuitars@gmail.com thank you for your interest in our Vintage Guitars .


The short-lived Elite Telecaster of 1983 incorporated two specially designed humbucking pickups powered by an active circuitry that featured a “TBX” guitar expander and an MDX midrange booster with 12 dB of gain. Other features included a “Freeflyte” hardtail bridge and die-cast tuning machines with pearloid buttons. This guitar was among the latest CBS-era Fenders to feature a BiFlex truss-rod system, low-friction EasyGlider string trees and active electronics. After CBS sold Fender to a group of employees led by Bill C. Schultz in 1985, production ceased on the Elite Telecaster and other Elite models. Fender Japan made its own version of the Elite Telecaster in late 1984, which featured a 22-fret neck with medium-jumbo fretwire and a modern 9.5 inch fingerboard radius. Notable Elite Telecaster players include Johnny Hallyday and Dave Davies of The Kinks. Michael Houser w/ Widespread Panic and Andy Summers of The Police.
Dean has always had the reputation of making fast, loud and articulate guitars and is famed for its wide range of eye-catching models, including the ML Series and the iconic Razorback. Signature models are also a specialty and they produce guitars for the likes of Dave Mustaine and Michael Angelo Batio, as well as huge line of Dimebag Darrell signature guitars.

SOLD OUT: ASK we may have another in stock Here we have a wonderful example of the Alvarez answer to the classic Martin 000-18 now famously linked to the Eric Clapton version from Martin om guitar today. Imported to the US by Saint Lewis Music 36 years ago. This fine example of the Alvarez 5014 is in excellent vintage condition you will not believe that she is over 36 years old when you see this in person you will realize it has been amazingly well cared for these past 3.6 decades. Its fit and finish is excellent as is its play action / neck angle ... this guitar is a pleasure to play and is truly EASY on the eyes... The neck is 1-11/16" at the nut and very comfortable to play with very little visible play wear to fingerboard or frets one will notice that this example is WELL above average condition for this age of guitar its really rare to see. Its beautiful SITKA SPRUCE top is solid and the back and sides are excellent grade Mahogany as is the neck please refer to the pics ... with nice details like its herringbone rosette, celluloid tortis pick guard, exotic Brazilian Coral Rosewood headstock overlay this guitar is more fancy than the other 5014's we have had and is in near mint vintage condition. The woods are well aged and the tone and volume has nicely opened up and aged like fine wine it takes time... a lot of guitar for this kind of price. Crafted in Japan over 36 years ago and kept in Amazing condition all these years just for you... Nicely set up with a NEW Martin Bone Nut & compensated bone saddle here at JVGUITARS. get this gem before she's gone! questions let me know... jvguitars@gmail.com .


Additionally, Gibson’s president Ted McCarty states that the Gibson Guitar Corporation merely approached Les Paul for the right to imprint the musician’s name on the headstock to increase model sales, and that in 1951, Gibson showed Paul a nearly finished instrument. McCarty also claims that design discussions with Les Paul were limited to the tailpiece and the fitting of a maple cap over the mahogany body for increased density and sustain, which Les Paul had requested reversed. However, according to Gibson Guitar, this reversal would have caused the guitar to become too heavy, and Paul’s request was refused.[12] Another switch: the original Custom was to be all mahogany and the Goldtop was to have the maple cap/mahogany body. Beyond these requests, Les Paul’s contributions to the guitar line bearing his name were stated to be cosmetic. For example, ever the showman, Paul had specified that the guitar be offered in a gold finish, not only for flashiness, but to emphasize the high quality of the Les Paul instrument, as well.[12] The later-issue Les Paul models included flame maple (tiger stripe) and “quilted” maple finishes, again in contrast to the competing Fender line’s range of car-like color finishes. Gibson was notably inconsistent with its wood choices, and some goldtops have had their finish stripped to reveal beautifully figured wood hidden underneath.[citation needed]
Taylor 214ce A ‘best acoustic guitar’ list would be incomplete without a Taylor in it. This Grand Auditorium guitar with a cutaway from Taylor projects plenty of volume and has a bright and defined tone that many fingerstyle players love. If you’ve always wanted a Taylor, this one with a solid top will surely stick with you for many years to come.

I have a Fender Chinese made Telecaster from the Modern Player Series. The finish is spectacular, and while it sometimes feels like they just used a lot of gloss to cover it, it plays and sounds well. I have played it through many amps and it does the job of both a Telecaster and a Strat style. With a humbucking pickup, a lipstick and a strat pickup, this is a satisfying guitar and moddable for people looking for something they can work on without fear of screwing up and wasting a thousand dollars.


I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.
With the massive range of options available, you'd have to spend the whole day here to go through every one. There are six and twelve-strings, models specifically made for beginners, limited edition double necks; you name it, you'll find it! For a real classic, strap on a Rickenbacker 330 electric guitar. A staple in 60's mod culture, the unique hollowbody construction, slim neck and contoured body make the Rickenbacker 330 so easy to play that it has held the status as one of the all-time greatest guitars for decades.
The first signs that the times they were a-changin’ began to appear in 1960 with the debut of the T-60 and the EB-1. The T-60 (named for the year) was a more-or-less Jazzmaster-shaped guitar with an extended upper horn and backward-sloped lower cutway. Even the pickguard was similarly shaped, although not tripart, bearing three pickups, the bridge pickup angled slightly like a Strat. Controls included one volume and one tone and a chicken-beak rotary selector. This had a covered bridge/tailpiece assembly. The headstock was a long, extended variation on a Fender Strat head, with six-in-line tuners, with a round sticker Teisco logo on the round tip. Fingerboard inlays were the soon-to-become-signature rectangles along the upper edge. However, the most striking detail was the so-called “monkey grip,” a handle-shaped cutout on the top of the lower bout. This design would continue through the ’60s (two decades before Ibanez would introduce it on its JEM guitars!).
If you're looking for one of the best Strats Fender has to offer, be sure to check out the Fender American Professional Stratocaster. Developed with pickup master Tim Shaw, its brand-new V-Mod single-coil pickups are voiced specifically for each position, mixing alnico magnet types to produce powerful, nuanced tones with original Fender sonic DNA. For metal guitarists, have a look at the Jackson JS32 DKA electric guitar. Swift, mean, and easy to play, this guitar offers classic Jackson tone and playability at a more than affordable price. If you're looking for a Les Paul guitar, a great choice is the Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO electric guitar. If you're ready to step up to a Gibson Les Paul, the 2019 Gibson electric guitar lineup is in-stock. 

The majority of favoured mic pairs seem to include the trusty SM57, but its most popular partner appears to be the larger-diaphragm MD421 — users include Bob Rock, Bruce Fairbairn, Alan Winstanley, Joe Barresi, Simon Dawson, Stephen Street and The Matrix. Also high on the list is the pairing of the SM57 with a large-diaphragm condenser of some type, and Steve Churchyard, Toni Visconti, Jim Scott, Stephen Street, and John Leckie all name-check the U87 in this role.
Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.
{ "thumbImageID": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst/516629000027000", "defaultDisplayName": "ESP LTD Deluxe EC-1000 Electric Guitar", "styleThumbWidth": "60", "styleThumbHeight": "60", "styleOptions": [ { "name": "Amber Sunburst", "sku": "sku:site51273887999423", "price": "869.00", "regularPrice": "869.00", "msrpPrice": "1,241.43", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst-1273887999423.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst/516629000027000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Amber-Sunburst/516629000027000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Black", "sku": "sku:site51273887999449", "price": "869.00", "regularPrice": "869.00", "msrpPrice": "1,241.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Black-1273887999449.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Black/516629000001000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Black/516629000001000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "Vintage Black", "sku": "sku:site51273887999287", "price": "899.00", "regularPrice": "899.00", "msrpPrice": "1,284.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Black-1273887999287.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Black/516629000011000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-Vintage-Black/516629000011000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } , { "name": "See-Thru Black Cherry", "sku": "sku:site51273887999131", "price": "899.00", "regularPrice": "899.00", "msrpPrice": "1,284.00", "priceVisibility": "1", "skuUrl": "/ESP/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-See-Thru-Black-Cherry-1273887999131.gc", "skuImageId": "LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-See-Thru-Black-Cherry/516629000127000", "brandName": "ESP", "stickerDisplayText": "Top Seller", "stickerClass": "", "condition": "New", "priceDropPrice":"", "wasPrice": "", "priceDrop": "", "placeholder": "https://static.guitarcenter.com/img/cmn/c.gif", "assetPath": "https://media.guitarcenter.com/is/image/MMGS7/LTD-Deluxe-EC-1000-Electric-Guitar-See-Thru-Black-Cherry/516629000127000-00-60x60.jpg", "imgAlt": "" } ] }
×