Well technically, the floor and the ceiling do shape the tone, post amp. Room acoustics are a major factor in the quality of sound recordings. Also Dan isn't wrong. Each thing that vibrates that eventually moves the pickup (while a note is being played or sustained) will disrupt the magnetic field. In physics there is hardly ever an instance where things have absolutely zero effect on the things around them. It comes down to the significance of the effect. For example, if something moves the pickup .05 picometers six times a second, then it likely has a negligible effect on the sound (i.e. our ears are not capable of detecting any difference. There does come a point where other variables do begin to change the characteristics of the sound. Additionally, as a string is struck, due to the rigidity (or slight lack thereof) the neck and body will vibrate, changing the distance between bridge and nut. The shortening and lengthening of this distance will then change the vibration frequency of the string. This can result in the dampening of vibration or potentially slight amplification of frequencies or overtones. Overall, it is impossible to say with absolute certainty that something does not have an effect on something else in this case. The truth, however, is that the degree to which the change is noticeable may not be detectable by the human ear.
The Fender T-Bucket 300 is a cutaway dreadnought guitar that comes with a stylish design and an incorporated pickup system for easy amplification. This instrument comes with a laminated maple top that features a Trans Cherry Burst finish. With quarter-sawn scalloped X-bracing, this guitar offers superior resonance and playability even as time goes by.
Matt Heafy, of Trivium is working on a signature 6 string and 7 string Les Paul with Epiphone. Heafy has said that ‘(I) chose Epiphone, because I have to work my way up, from an Epiphone, Gibson USA, then a Gibson Custom. The thing is if it was a Gibson Custom, the kids would be paying $6000 for it, and they can’t afford that. I want it to be affordable but something I will use on stage”[citation needed]
The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]
The stringed, chord-playing rhythm can be heard in groups which included military band-style instruments such as brass, saxes, clarinets, and drums, such as early jazz groups. As the acoustic guitar became a more popular instrument in the early 20th century, guitar-makers began building louder guitars which would be useful in a wider range of settings.
CF Martin & Company was established by Christian Fredrick Martin in 1833, is an American guitar manufacturer. It is highly regarded for its guitars with steel strings. Martin Company is a leading manufacturer of flat top guitars that produce top quality sound. They fabricate classic and retro styles of guitars with varied body type and sizes available in 12, 14, and 15-string styled guitars. Top quality tonewood is used after testing the sounds and vibrations produced within a pattern of a time frame. Choose the strings based on the genre of music and style you will play this guitar. The starting price of an acoustic Martin guitar is 23,000 INR approximately.
The President was produced by Hofner in Bubenreuth, Germany, specifically for Selmer, who distributed the brand in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and other commonwealth nations. The President was a hollow body electric acoustic, available as a full body or thinline, and with blonde or brunette finish. It was a great playing guitar that sold fairly well in the second half of the 1950s, throughout the 1960s, and into the very early 1970s. The example shown here is a full-body depth guitar in blonde - and as a 1965 guitar, one of the last to feature the rounded Venetian cutaway. From late 1965 until 1972, the President sported a sharp Florentine cut. Naturally, such an electric acoustic suggests jazz and blues, but many of the original British Hofner President players were part of the rock 'n roll, skiffle and beat scenes of the late 50s and early 60s.

I've been a lazy person in terms of writing product reviews, but had to chime in on the Epiphone LP purchase. First of all, I did research on new guitar options at the local Guitar Center website and settled on this instrument. They had it for $199, so for kicks I looked on Amazon two nights before I had planned to test and buy at our GC on a Sat. Amazon had it for $159 and $199 for lots of extras. I already had a case and nice Marshall Amp, so only needed the guitar. The best part, it arrived on Sat about the same time I would have purchased locally. The reviews were so good, I was not worried about testing live before purchase and it was a great choice.
Price guides can be used by both sellers and buyers. Sellers can generally use websites to get a ballpark figure on the value of their model of guitar or bass. They can then deduct for dings, scratches, and other injuries the guitar may have sustained in its lifetime. After-market modifications, such as new pickups or repair work, can increase the value of the guitar.
Hey Johnny, have just been reading your article which I found very interesting. My 11yr old daughter, a great ukelele player & an extremely quick learner, I am thinking of stepping her up to a guitar. The delimar is an acoustic or a bothie acoustic-electric, as she hasn’t established her style of music yet, thought a bothie would give her both options. Am hoping you could express some advise on what could be the best way of approaching this transition and a list of guitars to check out for her. I don’t want to be fooled and purchase a sh*t one so to speak! Greatly appreciate your time and advise. Thanks Jules
Guitarists have their own special system of music notation called guitar tablature, or "guitar tabs" for short. Using guitar tabs, a guitarist can play a wide variety of music without ever having to learn how to read standard sheet music. Though guitar tabs aren't a perfect way of describing music, they've allowed newer generations of guitarists to quickly and easily share information about how to play songs across the globe via the internet. Every guitarist should have at least a basic understanding of how to read tablature - it's the de facto shorthand for much of the guitar music you'll find written out online.
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Much like booster pedals – where its placement depends on what exactly you’re looking to boost – the location of compressors and wah-wah pedals in a signal chain will vary depending on what type of sound you are trying to create. In this case, you are encouraged to experiment with their order and see what you like best. Although as mentioned above, try to keep the wah-wah after tier one effects as they generally do not sound that usable in that order. Compressors, on the other hand, can be placed before any pedal, even distortion, as it shapes the signal rather than modifies it.
Bridge craft USA musical instruments presents the exceptionally designed Glen Burton GA204BCO Acoustic Electric Cutaway Guitar in Black by Glen Burton. Perfect for the beginner or the expert, the full package comes with Strings, Picks, Gig Bag, Strap, Digital Clip-On Tuner, Truss Rod and a 10 Watt Amplifier . This excellent Acoustic Guitar also includes: Flame top; Basswood back and sides Catalpa Neck and Bridge; Rosewood Fingerboard Steel String; Sealed Gear Tuners EQ: Active 4 Band 7545 .
Epiphone finds it right to imitate Gibson for their guitars. Now owned by Gibson, the brand still brags about its Gibson-like style, especially when it comes to Les Pauls, SGs, Flying Vs., Explorers, and other Gibson classics. For greenhorns, the Epiphone Les Paul Standard comes in as the best choice offering quality specs in an affordable range. From then onward, you can get your hands on the Les Paul PlusTop PRO and the Les Paul Custom PRO without burdening your pocket.
The first Touch Guitar Invention started in 1959 with the filing of patent #2,989,884 issued in 1961 as the first touch tapping instrument which could be played on two separated necks Simultaneously by muting the strings at the distal end of the neck along with numerous other claims. Until 1974 it was known as the DuoLectar and with a new patent "the "Electronic Mute" has been known as the "Touch Guitar. It is held in the normal way over the shoulder and design with the left hand playing the lower bass neck in a traditional way and the right hand playing over the top on a neck which has a wider string spacing allowing the hand to be used in both vertical and horizontal angels to the strings. It is absolutely off at all times, until Touched or picked.

All guitars need to be tuned to play properly and sound on pitch. This is done with the tuning pegs (also referred to as tuning machines) on the headstock. On the top side of of the neck is the fingerboard, also called a fretboard, over which the strings are routed. Pressed into the fingerboard are small metal ridges called frets. They help delineate individual notes along the fretboard and also make it easier play on pitch.

Yamaha FG700S: Yamaha makes a lot of guitars that affordable for beginners with decent sound. FG700S is my best-loved. It is a general or versatile guitar, this is very great for beginners who are not very clear what music style they want to learn firstly. The guitar body top is solid Sitka spruce. The solid wood top makes better sound than laminate top. You can check out the price and features of FG700S here.
Most people think of Roy Orbison as the super-smooth crooner who sang songs like “Crying,” “In Dreams” and “Only the Lonely.” But Orbison was also a wicked guitar player, who ripped out several impressive solos on early Sun Records singles like “Ooby Dooby.” In fact, Sun owner Sam Phillips was more impressed with Orbison’s guitar playing than his singing during the early days of the rocker’s career.
Of course, no-one says you have to use the same mic on each speaker cone. For example the SOS interview with Toby Wright shows an SM57 and an MD421 on separate speakers, and Don Smith mentioned using an SM57 and an AKG C451 on separate speakers when recording Keith Richards. Sylvia Massy Shivy also uses the SM57+MD421 combination, but sounds a note of caution when deciding on the exact positioning of the mics: "You have to be very careful with phase, just check it until the signal is the strongest."
With guitar companies continually coming up with new models or refreshed versions of their bestsellers, guitar players can feel both excited and overwhelmed to try out and buy the latest shredders and jazz boxes. Will these really be better than their vintage archtop or not? Are the new humbuckers any good? Will the new version of an old favorite be a good buy? – And the list goes on.
So what is the point of getting a small guitar amp? I mean you can get a whole lot of sound out of a medium sized amp without all of the sound issues that the small amps have. And yeah they are more ungainly and harder to lug around, but at least they have the sound and power required to handle a live performance and even band practice. Plus you can turn down the sound and practice at home just as well, right?’
what about Ernest Isley – he is easily in the top 3 of all times – no one can match this guy's riffs in songs like summer breese – who';s that lady – who loves better – hope you feel better – voyage to atlantis, and liquid love just to name a few of many powerful guitar riffs – y99u guys are missing a treat is you haven't heard Erney Isley get down

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At some point, I'm guessing near the end of the Buegeleisen & Jacobson ownership-era, a few hollow and semi-hollow body guitars were sold. They shared some of the hardware and necks of the 7-800 series guitars but had symmetrical bodies and no tilted pickup. The bodies resembled the Gibson ES-335 and ES-175T. They appeared to be equiped with humbucking pickups. I'm not following those, but I'd love to have that 175T copy. See the very end of the Varieties page for some photos.

I agree that you should spend more on the guitar than the amp, but if you have a nice guitar and a cheap amp, you aren't giving the guitar enough width and breadth of tone capabilities to warrant spending $1500 or more on a guitar. So, if you're going to spend over $1200 on a guitar, don't buy a lousy amp. A Peavy 30 is a decent amp, but is short on breadth of tone as compared to a Fender Deluxe Reverb 22 watt. Marrying the guitar and amp is an important part of the process, they are symbiotic. My advice, as a player for over 40 years is to buy as good a guitar as you can. For beginners, a bad guitar will not get you playing, in fact, the most common reason young novices stop taking lessons is that the cheap junker they got is unplayable, even by professionals. It's hard, not fun, seems like a world of work and they quit. That's not how it's supposed to be. It's a fun thing, so get out there, get a good playable instrument and you are on your way to a lifetime of good times.
Guild began in New York in 1953 but eventually moved to Rhode Island. Fender purchased Guild in 1995. Fender seemed only interested in Guild as a brand of acoustic guitars. The classic Guild electric guitars were not being made at first. But then some of the classic electric models were re-introduced. Cordoba Music Group (makers of classical guitars) purchased Guild and sells both electric and acoustic models based on the old designs.
Really loving this bit of kit. The thing that surprised me most wasn't the fourth position (which is great!) but the overall sound improvement I get from quality hardware. I have 2017 American Professional Tele and I'm amazed at the clarity that this upgrade has given me. TBH - I don't understand why Fender don't fit quality parts like this straight from the factory. Thanks guys!" - Max
When you shop the huge selection of combo guitar amps at Musician’s Friend we make it easy to hone in on what you’re looking for. Just select the type ( tube, solid state, or hybrid), brand(s), and price range, and voila—up pops a selection fine tuned to your specs. To really fine-tune the process you can also dial in the wattage, type (combo or stack), and speaker size/configuration.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers always knew how to rock a party; it took John Frusciante to turn them into an arena-packing band with a sound they could call their own. Frusciante is a remarkably elastic stylist and a gifted sculptural arranger who pushed the Chilis to explore new worlds without getting in the way of their funk-pumped energy; he beefed up their sound with both well-placed fire (the volcanic, Hendrix-style solo on “Dani California”) and remarkable elegance (the indelible opening chords of “Under the Bridge”).
10% of our readers voted for brands that were not listed in the survey. So, besides G&L, Jackson, Yamaha, Danelectro, Charvel, Cort, Washburn, Framus, Parker, Dean, B.C Rich, and Aria, you might also want to check Duesenberg, Wild Customs, Mayones, Caparison, Reverend, Blackat, Hagstrom, Peerless, Carvin, Guild, Cole Clark, Seagull, Meloduende, Suhr, Nik Huber, Feline, Ozark, Burns, Ruokangas, and Eko.
Recently picked myself up a second J28SCDL Jumbo, which was set up beautifully and I have to say it truly is an amazing guitar. It could give some of the higher priced guitars a run for its money. Lovely sound, creative design and clearly a lot of guitar for your money. I seriously encourage you not to over look Washburn when looking for a good guitar at an affordable price. Might end up your favorite guitar!
As his Tuareg brethren continue their separatist insurgency in northern Mali, the leader of Tinariwen again can lay claim to being one of the world’s few literal rebel rockers. Ibrahim gets credit for inventing the modern Tuareg electric guitar style adopted by Etran Finatawa, Bombino, and other Saharan musicians. He generates this gritty, grungy, churning sound by hammering open strings on his Fender axe in a laid-back desert boogie reminiscent of his late northern Mali peer Ali Farka Touré.
What most of us know as the classic ’60s Teisco line began in 1964. The year marked both the debut of many new guitar models, noted by a transition to a new headstock designs (which can help you date a particular guitar). As already noted, Teisco headstocks through the ’50s were mainly variants of the Gibson three-and-three. Indeed, these remained into the ’60s on Teisco hollowbodies.

There was a time when Yamaha were thought of as just a guitar maker for students and beginners - but those days are long gone and Yamaha now produce quality acoustics that compete favorably with the best in this category. The LL16 is a great example, with it's all-solid wood body and built in pickups with preamp, this is a true workhorse instrument. Having premium level specs at mid-tier pricing is like a dream come true, the main reason why we consider the LL16 as the best value for money acoustic in this section.
It’s the knob that controls a potentiometer (informally a “pot”) which acts as an inhibitor of sorts (when used in conjunction with a capacitor), bleeding off the high end frequencies of a guitar’s pickup (or pickups) signal that has passed through the volume control and is on it’s way out of the guitar, giving it a “warmth” (think muffled-ish) sound.
I must confess -- I am horrible at soldering. So after messing up another wiring harness with my soldering skills, I came across ObsidianWire and purchased out of desperation. Now I wish this would have been my first choice. The wiring sounds awesome, it was a breeze to install and the included switch and input jack completed the upgrade. I would HIGHLY recommend ObsidianWire harnesses." - Ross G Vintage 50s Wiring for Les Paul
You might recognise this in the tone knob above. The only difference is that R11 is a variable resitance from 0 to 250 Kohm, and C4 is a fixed value. Several guitars have several combinations of R11 and and C4 to achieve different cut-off points. When R11 is 100% position, the resistance is maximised, so there is little incentive for eelctrical current to flow to C4. The signal is not affected as much.
With the advent of belly bridges in 1931, Martin started to compensate their saddle placement. What this does is make for better string intonation. However early pyramid bridge have straight saddles, mounted 1/8" back from the front edge of the bridge. (with the center of the pin holes 3/8" from the back of the saddle.) The 1931 to 1933 belly bridges have a compensated saddle placed 1/8" from the front of the bridge on the treble side, and 3/16" from the bass side. Then on belly bridges in the mid 1930s Martin moved the bass end of the saddle back to 1/4" from the front of the bridge.
Tremolo is a regular and repetitive variation in gain for the duration of a single note, which works like an auto-volume knob; this results in a swelling or fluttering sound. This effect is very popular in psychedelic and trip-hop music. The speed and depth of the flutter are usually user-controlled.This is a volume-related effects pedal. This effect is based on one of the earliest effects that were built into guitar amplifiers. Examples include:
I ordered this item from their ebay store, roughly the same price with shipping, very easy to read point to point instructions, this was my first diy pedal, I've fooled around with a soldering iron but not enough to speak of. I bought it because I was not pleased with my Peavey Valveking 112's boost sound, it not only boosts the signal, it changes the tone, from the reviews I watched on youtube, it sounded like this pedal would do the trick, for the price, and the fun of a first time build, I love it, it boosts the signal with no change in tone, I'm not super impressed with the pedal's distortion tone, but I am spoiled with that saturated tube tone, there is some extra hum when I turn on the pedal, I don't know if this is my fault from the build, or what, but I would ... full review
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Excuse me for interrupting but I think that it's not properly to complain about who Clarence didn't added and who he didn't..if you search another site the top 10 will be different..i bet there are no sites who have exactly the same top 10 artists… I found this site because i just wanted to know names of great guitarists.Since you already know some you can create your personal Top 10 for yourself or for a blog or anything. I don't think it's right to influence others with your own opinion. I'm not really that expertised but I thought it would be nice to react. Thank you and no flames intended ^^
The godfather of all that is sought after in rack gear; behold, the Soldano SLO Rackmount Amplifier. Those of you that have heard of the SLO (Super Lead Overdrive) already know that this thing can be brutal when it comes to lead tones. Possessing one of the tightest crunch and overdrive channels known to man, the SLO Rackmount is hailed as a grail piece of gear for many guitar players. The SLO-100 offers two channels, Normal and Overdrive, each with independent Preamp gain and Master Volume controls.  A footswitch is also provided for effortless noise-free switching between the two channels.  The Normal channel has a Bright switch and a Clean / Crunch gain selector switch.  Standard features include a tube-buffered effects loop and a slave output.  Bass, Middle, Treble, and Presence controls provide the tone shaping.  From Clapton to Van Halen, from Warren DeMartini to Lou Reed – and from you to Mike Soldano himself, the SLO is simply the player’s choice.

Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Mother Of Pearl - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Custom - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red

Some emulator designs include switchable filters, enabling them to simulate open or closed-backed speaker cabinets, and can come very close to the sound of a close-miked amp, while ambience can be simulated using a reverb processor or plug-in. Even if the amp has a good spring reverb, a little additional digital ambience (mainly early reflections) will help create the illusion of the amplifier being recorded in a room.


One of the most important attributes of boost pedals is their transparency. In other words, they need to able to boost the signal without changing the signal itself. As easy as it sounds, achieving good transparency is pretty hard and not many pedals are capable of doing so. With that said, a good booster pedal is a pretty powerful tool in the right hands.
It has been stated repeatedly that the CEO is a challenge, toxic whatever and yes, all of it is true. Many if not most people who take a management position here don't last a year. This is especially true at Corporate where at any given time half of the positions are open because employee turnover is off the charts and they are horrible at recruiting talent to get replacements hired. That's a really bad combination to have in a company. So the first question you have to ask yourself is: do you want to show a job that only lasted six to twelve months on your resume with a company that has a positive, almost cult like global brand image? Or another way, how will you explain your short tenure to the next company you interview with and make them believe you weren't the problem? When I was outside Nashville and told people I worked for Gibson 100% of them said "that's a great company" even though they had no clue. It's highly likely your next potential employer will think that way as well.
Introduced around the same time as the White Falcon, the Duo-Jet (6128) became another hit for Gretsch, especially after a young George Harrison played one with The Beatles in the early sixties. While finding an original Gretsch is very expensive, the brand still makes faithful reproductions of most of its historic models and are popular with guitarists with a penchant for vintage.

Peerless hollowbody guitars are excellent at this price range. Both of these brands manufacture from factories in South Korea. PRS SE is made by World Instruments Co. and they have consistently high standards - all brands made in this factory will be exceptional. Peerless is a company which used to manufacture high end guitars for other brands such as Gretsch and Gibson, and then launched their own brand. They are exceptionally good guitars.

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Fender has shown the spec sheets of its popular Mexican-built Deluxe Series Roadhouse Stratocaster model some love to create a reboot that comes seriously well appointed. The upgraded model features an alder body and bolt-on maple neck, with the option of maple and rosewood fingerboard, finished with satin polyurethane. Keep sniffing around and you'll find other features like the 'Modern C' neck profile, 22 narrow/tall frets, a contoured neck heel, synthetic bone top nut and a set of locking tuners with vintage-look buttons. While the previous editions of the Roadhouse and came with a 241mm (9.5-inch) fingerboard radius, the new model packs a flatter 305mm (12-inch) camber. Yes, the same radius as a Gibson Les Paul, making for easier string bends and lower action. The new Roadhouse features three Vintage Noiseless (1st generation) single coil-sized humbuckers wired to a five-way pickup selector blade switch, and master volume and tone controls. Lurking between the volume and tone knobs is the V6 preamp control, a six-position rotary switch that gives you access to a series of tweaked single-coil tones. Plugging in the Roadhouse reveals a slew of classic Strat tones. The pickups exploit the natural tone and woodiness of the guitar, while the Noiseless aspect lives up to their vow of silence, making them indispensable in a recording situation. As a result, bar metal, this is the best Fender electric guitar for just about all scenarios.
The Kay guitar company's origins date back to the 1890's, starting with the Groeschel Mandolin Company of Chicago, Illinois. The company's name was changed to "Stromberg-Voisinet" in 1921, and shortlyafterwards, in 1923, Henry Kay "Hank" Kuhrmeyer (the origin of the name "Kay") joined the company and quickly worked his way up to the top. By 1928, Kuhrmeyer had bought the company and that same year the company started producing electric guitars and amps.
While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.
A well-reviewed electric guitar with a high-quality design, the ESP LTD EC-1000 is the best electric guitar for the musician looking to upgrade their sound and achieve an exaggerated tone associated with the world of rock-and-roll. Both the body and neck of the guitar are made from mahogany with a rosewood fretboard, making this guitar lightweight in feel and balanced in design. The 24 frets come in an extra-large size for ease and comfort in chord changes, while the tailpiece and locking bridge make tuning  both easy to achieve and maintain. Output of the sound is well controlled with the toggle switch, and the model comes with two volume controls for different modes of play. Designed for the musicians with years of experience and a desire to play with a harder edge to their sound, the ESP LTD EC-1000 offers high-end features for a reasonable price. We’re huge fans of their entire EC series.
Depending on how you count them, there are 23 types of guitar pedals out there that can take you from "just another guitar player" to being that guy with the definitive tone and stage presence that everyone knows of around town. The only problem is it's a lot to wade through. But we've got you covered with quick summaries of what each pedal does, examples you can hear, and some visual examples for each of the guitar pedal types...

Washburn was founded in 1883 in Chicago. The company was founded by George Washburn Lyon and Patrick J. Healy. Lyon and Healy were sheet music publishers who expanded to musical instruments. The current Washburn guitar company was formed in 1964 when Rudy Schlacher began importing guitars under the Washburn name. Washburn guitars are no longer made in the USA. Lyon & Healy is still in existence as a manufacturer of harps in Chicago.


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Different people have different opinions on what makes a vintage guitar. For the purposes of this site, a vintage electric guitar or vintage bass is one that was produced in the golden age of rock and roll. From the very early 1950s when Fender first produced the Esquire and Broadcaster, and Gibson the Les Paul; to the early 1980s, when both of these companies sold to their current owners.
If you like to run all your effects into an amp set clean and get your gain sounds from pedals, you probably don’t ever need to consider using amplifier effects loops or a wet/dry/wet rig. If your amp(s) are set relatively clean, you will be able to use any of the effects listed above straight into the front of the amp—and they should sound really good.
I’m sorry you were disappointed in the videos. I guess your definition of lesson and mine differ. I would define lesson as something that teaches the viewer a new skill or provides them with information they didn’t already possess. I certainly learned a lot from Clapton talking about how he achieved that great tone, from Angus Young explaining his style, and from Slash explaining how he plays American Man.
But in general, there's nothing wrong with Decca electric guitars, especially for indie musicians today who are looking for a vintage guitar with some character to it. Since most vintage guitar fans have seen every model that Gibson, Fender, et al, have ever made, many of the Japanese guitars of the '60s have a fresh look that stands out from the crowds. In 20 years, the M-i-J electric guitars of the '60s are going to be worth 4 or 5 times what they sell for now, and smart collectors who either can't afford Fenders, Gibsons and their ilk from that period, or who are interested in something more unusual, are already snapping them up.
This is a great DVD, and Keith's style is very laid back, and easy to listen to. You can't help but like the guy, and once you start watching the DVD, you don't want to stop. He is extremely knowledgable, and it is like having an instructor right there with you. The DVD begins with the very basics, and works up to some quite complicated playing, so there would be something in this for everyone, from complete beginners (like me) to those looking for more challenges with their playing. For the price, I don't think you can go wrong.
Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.
A lot of users described the Line 6 Helix Floor as something amazing and too good to be true. Commendations for it's incredible versatility and sound quality are common place, with many describing it as the best guitar multi-effects processor in the market today. There's simply no denying its continued success in the market, along with the high review scores that it continuous to attain. Premiere Guitar properly summed up what most people feel about the Line 6 Helix Floor: "Great sounds. Cool design. Solid construction. Extraordinary connectivity. Good price."
There are so many great things about the small guitar amps that we miss out on. While it is no shame to admit that some issues persist in the sound and ability of smaller amps, it is also worth saying that they have a whole lot of benefits that might be the reason some people decide to pick them up. I have had many amps over the years and my small amp is possibly my favorite piece of equipment (other than all the guitars on their own). I have taken it on many a trip when I had to stay somewhere that was not my home, and it has helped me keep my workout hours up to the standard that I had gotten used to. One of the very first amps I ever had was actually a small amp, nestled in my tiny little room in between my bed and my wardrobe inside which my guitar stood. My point is, whether you are just starting out or you have been playing for a while, you will find a use for your small guitar amp, especially if it is one of the best available on the market.
Fender’s arm when it comes to affordable quality guitars is the Squier. The Affinity Stratocaster is no push over. It has an ergonomically design contoured double cutaway body made of alder and has the C-shape all maple or with rosewood fingerboard neck patterned over an original Fender which contributes greatly to the guitars comfort and playabilty.
Marty is another player who’s built up his videos and YouTube Channels over a number of years and it’s become a vast resource for lessons at all levels. There’s a lot of stuff about how to play particular songs or how to mimic a certain musician’s style, but mixed up with these are plenty of absolute beginners’ lessons that teach the basics. There are some guest artists explaining different techniques, but mostly Marty’s The Man. The good thing about Marty is his great patience during the videos—he takes plenty of time to explain things and demonstrates them nice and slow, so you hardly ever have to stop and rewind the videos. Marty has a quirky sense of humour, too. It takes the hassle out of the harder lessons to master. He has a good website linked from his YouTube channel and a few cool, free giveaways. Check that out at www.guitarjamz.com

If you can afford to go to a store and drop $3000 on the latest, greatest Les Paul Gibson or vintage Fender Stratocaster, this is a very different question. But let’s assume your budget isn’t quite that big. Many affordable guitars are very similar, but come in a variety of packages that include lots of extras and even an amplifier. In case you are looking to buy the amp separately, here is an amazing list of 10 Best and Affordable Guitar Amps for Beginners: 2016 and while you are it, check out: Top 5 Guitar Plug-Ins You Need to Know: AmpliTube, Guitar Rig & Others.
My first Custom was a Charvel/Jackson Star body with a custom white paint with bullet holes and dripping blood from the holes ! My friend and Guitar teacher Randy Rhoads helped me get started on the right track in 1980 ,before I was playing in clubs and headlining shows later in the 80s and 90s,I was set with the perfect guitar! Gibson is just a brand name,Epiphones are better then Gibsons ,your just paying for a name,same with Fender! Remember,one of the greatest guitars was made for less then $300,so you should never really spend more then that unless it is a custom ,then you can do what you have to!
Johnny Marr is an iconic and influential guitarist best known for his work in the Smiths, which broke up in 1987. His guitar phrases and his genius for crafting textured and tonally rich rhythmic leads has influenced countless rock guitarists of the last quarter-century. Since leaving the Smiths, Marr hasn't exactly been idle or resting on his laurels.
There are an awful lot of boutique guitar effects manufacturers out there who make pedals designed to create all kinds of twisted and bizarre sounds. Sadly, their products are often very expensive, often prohibitively so — so what about the more budget-conscious would-be sonic terrorist? Well, one option is to 'circuit bend' more conventional (read 'cheaper') guitar effects. The basic idea behind circuit bending is that you experiment with short-circuiting the pedal until it makes a noise that you like, and then solder in a connection, with a switch or potentiometer in place if you think you may want to turn the noise off again at some point.

This set has all three of the best pianos available in a size that can be handled by most modern devices devices (PCs or recommend iPhone 8/iPad Pro). Needlessly long samples have been shortened but looping only happens at almost inaudible trailing ends of samples (many after 20s).  If you are looking for a quality set with different piano types to choose from then this is the one. This set is already included in the Nice-Keys-CompletePlus and Nice-Keys-Extreme.
Ovation acoustic-electric guitars are unique, innovative and, for some players, almost addictive! Once you’ve played an Ovation, no other guitar may do. They have a different look and feel than most other acoustic guitars due to their design, which incorporates a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides.
Another popular modification is to reverse the electric polarity of one of the pickups (or one coil of a dual-coil pickup). When two pickups are selected, this produces a very thin and weak sound, due to phase cancellation between the pickups.[21] The closer the pickups are to each other, the greater the cancellation and thus the weaker and thinner the resulting sound. In case of a humbucker this results in a sound that is so weak as to be almost unusable, as well as the loss of the pickup's hum-cancelling properties (due to the coils being magnetically out-of-phase, but electrically in-phase with each other).[22]
Basic distortion boxes can be built around a simple network of transistors and clipping diodes, to both boost the signal and alter the waveform. Most units, however, very roughly resemble the standard mass-production overdrives detailed above, with the heavy work done by opamps, some tone-shaping stages, and input/output buffers. The ProCo Rat set the standard for heavy distortion sounds above and beyond the capabilities of the MXR Distortion + and the Ibanez Tube Screamer, although in fact its design is surprisingly similar to the former (discussed above), with silicon diodes in place of germanium, and an added tone control.
GuitarsJapan.com respects the intellectual rights and property of the owners, luthiers and salespeople at the Rickenbacker, Gretsch, Gibson and Fender Guitar Corporations. Registered trademarks/designs of these corporations include, but are not limited to, 325, 330, 360, Jetglo, Stratocaster, Flying V. GuitarsJapan.com is not affiliated with these corporations in any way. The guitars above represent instruments built in Japan for the Japanese domestic market only. They are no longer being made or distributed, which makes them rare. This page was created for collectors and enthusiasts; for the sole purpose of providing information, photo documentation and research tools.
A more advanced technique with the volume knob is called swelling. Play a chord or note with the volume knob off and gently roll it back (many players use their pinky on the side of the knob) to let the sound pass through again. Experiment rolling up the knob fast or slow and see what happens. This takes practice but can produce awesome sounds when used while playing.
@Josh – Changing the order of the effects in your signal chain can drastically change the sound you get from each pedal depending on where it was before and where it is now. Can you please send us an email to support@strymon.net with further details including a video recording of what you are experiencing so we have a better idea of what is happening?
At the end of 1931, Beauchamp, Barth, Rickenbacker and with several other individuals banded together and formed the Ro-Pat-In Corporation(elektRO–PATent-INstruments) in order to manufacture and distribute electrically amplified musical instruments, with an emphasis upon their newly developed A-25 Hawaiian Guitar, often referred to as the “Frying Pan” lap-steel electric guitar as well as an Electric Spanish (standard) model and companion amplifiers. In the summer of 1932, Ro-Pat-In began to manufacture cast aluminum production versions of the Frying Pan as well as a lesser number of standard Spanish Electrics built from wooden bodies similar to those made in Chicago for the National Company. These instruments constitute the origin of the electric guitar we know and use today by virtue of their string-driven electro-magnetic pick-ups. Not only that, but Ro-Pat-In was the first company in the world specifically created to manufacture electric instruments. In 1933 the Ro-Pat-In company’s name was changed to Electro String Instrument Corporation and its instruments labeled simply as “Electro”. In 1934 the name of Rickenbacher” was added in honor of the company’s principal partner, Adolph Rickenbacker. In 1935 the company introduced several new models including the Model “B” Electric Spanish guitar which is considered the first solid body electric guitar. Because the original aluminum Frying Pans were susceptible to tuning problems from the expansion of the metal under hot performing lights, many of the new models were manufactured from cast Bakelite, an early synthetic plastic from which bowling balls are made.[2]
I have 12 years whit my SL3 Jackson and 12 years whit my RG7420, so far I have replaced both POTs on the jackson, the frets are really worn out and FR chrome is peeling.. great guitar crappy components. oh, I havent had to replace anything on the Ibanez yet other than the stock pickups for something better. both are made in Japan =). So dont tell people that Ibanez sucks before actually owning one...
I got the idea for this column while reviewing Universal Audio's Ox Amp Top Box for the May 2018 issue. Ox is an ingenious hybrid of speaker load box/power attenuator and cabinet/mic/room/effects modeler. You use your regular amp, but instead of miking it, you send a direct signal to the DAW or mixing board. You record the sound of your amp, while Ox simulates speakers, mics, and effects.
Searching 'guitar' on YouTube, Google, etc can be overwhelming. Ten billion results come up. I wish we could just be nice to kids with questions. I noticed this answer mentioned "pickups" several times. Kid probably has no idea what a pickup is. My brother showed me the switches, pickups, and explained them to me in five minutes, in person on a real guitar. It was like being taught magic.
Sorry it has sold: Here we have a rather nice rare vintage 1970 Yairi & Son Classical acoustic guitar It's Label reads... Hand Crafted in Japan by Yairi & Son Model # 300 Serial # 177 Pretty darn low serial number 1970 remember she's 45 years old! Condition overall is very good - excellent used / vintage Not new or mint of course... Regarding its build quality She exhibits beautiful workmanship and superior materials Aged woods of over 30+ years old in 1970 when it was built! Tone-Woods now are in the 75 year range on this example looks like a Vintage masterpiece with its patina and look and feel I love these oldies funny thing is It still shines like glass to, amazing really when you think about it. This guitar has very good deep base tone and excellent volume and plays easily and comfortably the neck is nice and big 2" at the nut nice and wide feel to it. The neck is made of a high grade mahogany see pics, back and sides are also beautiful mahogany, with black or very dark brown bindings for a very classic look, the on the business end she has a wonderful quality solid spruce top with lots of bear claw figuring a really nice sound box it projects very well in deed... As you look at its back side in its entirety top to bottom it's hard to find a blemish I'm sure there are a few minors but it's really looking very clean and with a surprisingly shiny original finish... The front the headstock is pretty clean as well!...notice a bone nut has been fit, frets show little to no wear what so ever more than 90% remaining fret life, the fingerboard shows a little play action remember it's a 1970! ... The top as several chips and drinks and I have addressed them a touch up lacquer pen and just dabbed the tiny chip to prevent further chipping there it as a result after I polished it up turned out pretty darn good looking too, This guitar came to us as a partial trade with its bridge pulled nearly off by a ding dong previous owner that put regular gauge dred heavy gauge strings on it for long term and it lifted off in time, I removed all that cleaned up the woods & prepped it for a new vintage period correct Jacaranda rosewood classical bridge and glued it with hide glue clamping it up for 2 weeks & set her up with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Dean Markley strings... This beauty comes with its original hard shell case black Tolex with a plush Marigold lining one bad latch but still functions well good hinges and handle so it's still ok. This is rock solid now as the Yairi & Son label says use only nylon strings. If you just use what Yairi suggested this would have never happened not Yairi's fault just the wild eyed idea gone wrong. Anyways she's back in action and sounding better than ever so if you like these old Yairi & Son classical guitars this may be a good consideration for you.... Let me know if you likeeee. Email Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .

In 1959, with sales under pressure from the more powerful Fender Twin and from The Shadows, who requested amplifiers with more power, Vox produced what was essentially a double-powered AC15 and named it the AC30. The AC30, fitted with alnico magnet-equipped Celestion "blue" loudspeakers and later Vox's special "Top Boost" circuitry, and like the AC15 using valves (known in the US as tubes), helped to produce the sound of the British Invasion, being used by The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and the Yardbirds, among others. AC30s were later used by Brian May of Queen (who is known for having a wall of AC30s on stage), Paul Weller of The Jam (who also assembled a wall of AC30s), Rory Gallagher, The Edge of U2 and Radiohead guitarists Thom Yorke, Jonny Greenwood and Ed O'Brien. The Vox AC30 has been used by many other artists including Mark Knopfler, Hank Marvin who was instrumental in getting the AC30 made, Pete Townshend, Ritchie Blackmore, John Scofield, Snowy White, Will Sergeant, Tom Petty, The Echoes, Mike Campbell, Peter Buck, Justin Hayward, Tom DeLonge, Mike Nesmith, Peter Tork, Noel Gallagher, Matthew Bellamy, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Dustin Kensrue, Tame Impala, and many others.
Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.
The GuitarTricks instructors are working professional guitarist and great teachers. With more than 45 instructors you have plenty of choice to find the ones you like best. There is a structured, best practice, teaching approach to every lesson, song and the entire curriculum which beats the hap-hazard approach of picking free lessons on YouTube. I also like that the I can learn not just what something does but WHY it does it and how to apply it to other parts.
Since there is little difference outside of the individual guitars featured in this series, I will nitpick a bit and say that RealLPC has the worst GUI of the four.  Where there was never any difficult-to-read text on RealStrat, there is some here, and the weird navy green parameter boxes along with a black Les Paul with gold trim doesn’t sit well for me.  
Classical guitars have nylon strings, which are softer than steel strings, and easier to press down. However, the neck is much wider on a classical guitar, which can be a struggle for beginners. The action is likely to be higher, as well. In general, they are softer-toned and don't project as well as a steel string acoustic, which makes for quieter practising, which could be a consideration.
If a love of flamenco and salsa music sung by the Gipsy Kings brought you to the best classical guitar, then you are going to want to read this review. The Cordoba company, as you can now see, has quite the reputation for quality guitars, and their GK Studio Negra left-handed model—a Gipsy Kings signature instrument—could easily be the right one for you (no pun intended).
OK some people will know this already but let’s just be clear about switch terminology. A switch as you see it on the bench in front of you will often be a set of switches, mechanically connected within a single assembly. Wikipedia explains. The important thing to remember is the number of ‘poles’ is the number of switches that you have ganged together off a single lever in the component and the ‘throw’ or ‘way’ part describes how those switches operate.
Recording? The best amps for recording WON'T be big, 100-watts Marshalls, for instance! On the contrary, small amps are the best choice. We're talking about small valve amps, here. That's because, unlike with bigger, louder amps, you can crank up small valve amps, pushing them to tone heaven. If you did the same with bigger amps, it wouldn't work - you'd sound so loud you wouldn't be able to make a good recording! This technique has been used by many, many top artists. Despite using big & loud marshall amps onstage, Jimmy Page used a small Supro valve amp on the early Led Zeppelin albums. Likewise, the Arctic Monkeys used an old Fender Champ on most of their debut album.

Ibanez is the pioneer to launch the first 7-stringed guitar. They are the creators of the 7-stringed instrument in 1990 with the collaboration universe. Most Ibanez guitars come with a full-size frigate shape having a top of laminated select dapper. Ibanez guitars have mahogany neck, back, and sides, along with 20 frets on a rosewood fretboard. The Ibanez-branded headstock came with attractive quality and closed chrome die-cast tuners. These all features make the Ibanez guitars suitable for every kind of style and genre of music. However, heavy music is mainly the field where metal crowd flock and let the Ibanez guitars unbeatable.
I had gotten rid of all my effects pedals a long time ago because I wasn't using them. So when I saw this little processor and the price I thought I would give it a Try. I was amazed at all the sounds and tones this thing puts out. For the little money you spent it is deff. worth it. I have not yet messed around with the drum settings but I will. This will be loads of fun to play around with. A deff. 5 star rating.
Analyzing the notes you are playing plays an important role while you are performing. The built-in chromatic tuner in these pedals shows you the live feed of your notes whether they are sharp, flat or dead. Similarly, one can bypass the currently selected sound fx for maintaining a pure sound when tuning or completely mute the signal for a uniform silence.
SOLD OUT Here we have a great 45 Year old Japanese Vintage 1971 Yamaha FG180 Red Label Nippon Gakki Martin like vintage tone for a fraction shes a Boomer low action plays easily WoW! ... Just in and AVAILABLE JVG- Fresh Release: I can tell you this is a real good one folks! No structural cracks or checking in finish, its a beautiful Solid Spruce Top and it is pretty flat with no noticeable bellying and its bridge is tight, action is excellent within Martin specs... This guitar received the JVGuitars SET -UP upgrade to bone nut and compensated martin saddle as well as the brifg pins upgraded to very nice Rosewood with abalone dot detail as well as a new set of Martin Marquis strings ( 12’s ) 80/20 Phosphorus bronze . The neck has a classic feel to it with an excellent vintage finish still shines like glass …excellent with a classic Martin like feel in a soft V Medium Profile and has the correct relief set to within M spec frets are still good - we leveled and dress them. We first took off the old strings and fully clean the fingerboard and re-hydrate the woods before polishing all surfaces and lubricating the excellent upgraded Ping Deluxe tuners, Not to be confused with the similar model made in Taiwan this the famous Nippon Gakki made in Japan one and this is a really good one at that folks. Never abused, well cared for, no cracks, great neck alignment to this day, action excellent, plastic tone robbing parts - GONE! Bone & Rosewood sustains better than ever…. these are know for great “ M” Like vintage tone and is in great vintage condition,
Someone is going to be very pleased. For a Song Any questions or to contact Joe to buy this contact Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com Thank you for your interest Joe ..
Smaller players, musicians who travel frequently, and parents shopping for children, may also want to consider travel and mini-acoustic guitars. These guitars were designed for the comfort of smaller players, and for convenience when traveling, but many guitar manufacturers have invested significant time and resources into creating smaller-scale acoustic guitars that don't compromise quality or sound.
Playing Small Gigs? If you play small gigs, such as at pubs, clubs etc, small places with capacity of 200 persons or less, you won't need a massively loud amp. A 15-Watt Valve amp will be more than loud enough, such as the Fender Blues Junior or Vox AC-15. You can use louder valve amps, such as a Vox AC30 or Fender Hot Rod DeVille, but in most cases you won't need to set the volume more than halfway up (or less!) Valve amps sound louder than solid state amps, so even though a 15-watt valve amp is loud enough fro gigs, a 15-watt solid state amp will be only recommended for home practice. Good solid state amps include the Orange Crush 20 RT and Blackstar ID:30TVP 30W. Both are loud enough for mid-sized venues and sound superb.

This is called a ‘Rectifier’ or diode. Grid: A fine helix (spiral) wire called ‘Grid’ is placed between the Cathode and Anode. A small variable voltage (music signal) on the Grid varies the large current between the Anode and Cathode. The small varying input signal is now amplified to a large varying current. The result is very linear. Why this happens is a mystery. The fact that it works and the universe exists is a miracle. It pays to be humble. Transistors: (emitter base collector) are complementary to valves (cathode grid anode).
The Epiphone Dove Pro continues to work its old school magic into the hearts of guitarists, new and experienced alike. Its classic styling seems to be a major part of its appeal, as most reviewers attest to. Value for money comes in as close second, with many satisfied that they are getting a great looking solid guitar at a very justifiable price point. It is used in many different musical styles, including country, folk and even rock.
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Even with such a lightweight configuration, the Fishman F1 system is still more than capable of rendering the tone of the DCPA4R with a great deal of accuracy due to the superior tight focus on the preamp. This guitar is our pick for the top acoustic electric guitar if price is no object. There are many other awesome models out there and we urge you to check them out as well, but you'll likely find that your search could have ended right here.
I have the Epi SG400. It is very playable, and I think the stock PUP's are fine. It is a very versatile guitar. The only thing about the SG is it has a heavy neck. I mean strap one on, and that long neck just tugs down on my left shoulder. I actually tried to sell mine a while back just because of the heavy neck. I added a strap bolt to the top of the horn thing, or whatever you call it, and that helped. Some like the SG310 which is cheaper, but it has a bolt neck, and I think that will translate into an even heavier neck. Rhonda makes some SG clones as well. My only advice would be try straping one around your neck before you buy if you can.

Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)


These are the settings I use as my basic rack for adding rock guitar sounds in Cubase, and you might also find it handy as a point of departure, so it's worth saving as a track preset. To do this, right‑click in the audio track containing the 'rack', and choose 'Create Track Preset' from the context menu. When the Save Track Preset dialogue box appears, simply name it and save it: now you can call up your rack for any audio track in any Cubase project!
.From its G logo cattle brand on top, to the fence rail pickguard graphic, the Chet Atkins Gretsch cowboy'd up big time with cactus, cattle, rifle and arrow inlays inscribed right into the mother of pearl. This 6120W  Reissue combines many of the most desirable features of this longtime favorite. Twin Filter-Tron pickups offer lively, hum-free performance, with master volume and tone controls for ease of operation. See pics,pricing and info here

Dan Erlewine first saw this Tele back in the 1960s, before Mike Bloomfield recorded with it on Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited album. That was also before Bloomfield and Dylan were booed for going electric at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. And before Bloomfield recorded the first Paul Butterfield Blues Band album with this guitar. There’s a lot of history in this Telecaster!


When recording an electric guitar, the amp is the instrument as far as the mic is concerned, and mic position is important. While a lot of sound comes direct from the speakers as you'd expect, a significant level is also emitted from the back and sides of the box via panel vibrations. Also, an open-backed cabinet throws about as much sound out of the back of the box as it does out of the front. Choosing a mic for recording electric guitar isn't difficult, as virtually any decent mic of any type can be made to produce usable results. If I were to generalise, I'd say that British recording engineers tend to use cardioid, dynamic models while American engineers seem to prefer capacitor microphones. The dynamic mic produces a solid sound with a smooth high end, while the capacitor mic's increased definition produces a brighter, more open sound when used in the same way. However, the mic position has just as much bearing on the tone as the mic itself.
Tone pots are similar to volume pots except they are wired in such a way as to only increase resistance on the high-end allowing the low-end signal to pass through unheeded. As you increase or decrease the amount of high end by adjusting your tone knob, your tone changes accordingly. Tone pots can be better thought of as filters, they filter high-end frequencies that ultimately affect your overall tone.
Power attenuation[when defined as?] can be used with either low-power or high-power amplifiers, resulting in variable-power amplifiers. A high-power amplifier with power attenuation can produce power-tube distortion through a range of listening volumes, but with a decrease in high power distortion. Other technologies, such as dual rectifiers and the sag circuit[jargon]—which should not be confused with attenuation—allow high power amplifiers to produce low power volume while preserving high power distortion.[27]
Presuming it is at least theoretically possible to digitally document in computational language every nuance of Eddie Van Halen's performance, the other aspect on the rendering side of the best-most-real equation is the guitar - from the pick or fingers on the strings, to the resonance of the wood body, the dynamics of pickups, the amps, the effects and such other processing gear.
Gibson's factories were raided in 2009 and 2011 by agents of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In November 2009 authorities found illegally imported ebony wood from Madagascar.[37][38] A second raid was conducted in August 2011,[37] during which the FWS seized wood imports from India that had been mislabeled on the US Customs declaration.[39][40] Gibson Guitar Corp. filed a motion in January 2011 to recover seized materials and overturn the charges, which was denied by the court.[41][42]
[SIZE="2"]Guitar Gear: Gibson '61 RI SG, Dean Cadillac Select, Charvel 475 Special, BC Rich NJ Bich, Gibson Faded V, MIM Strat, Warmoth Tele, LP Copy, Yamaha Acoustic, VHT Pittbull Fifty/ST, VOX VT30, Blackheart BH5H, '72 Hiwatt 4123 Cab, Traynor TS-50, POD XT, 16 ohm THD Hotplate, 80's Peavey Rage combo, Boss ME-50, Russian Big Muff, Graphic Fuzz

1. (n.) A sweet or agreeable succession of sounds.2. (n.) A rhythmical succession of single tones, ranging for the most part within a given key, and so related together as to form a musical whole, having the unity of what is technically called a musical thought, at once pleasing to the ear and characteristic in expression.3. (n.) The air or tune of a musical piece.

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On the way folks arriving soon stay tuned pics of this made in Japan hand crafted beautiful Exotic Vintage Martin copy will be uploaded soon ... in great players condition original and stock Takamine pickup installed you can plug in at the strap pin jack and go electric and sounds amazing or fully acoustic of course unpluged. You know theses are know for the ultimate beauty of them as well as the Rich complex tone they offer well seasoned instrument of this caliber Japan had to offer in the Lawsuit series days 70-85 or so that have been discontinued decades ago as they say they don't make um like this any more... Stay tuned for another exotic Brazilian Rosewood guitar at JVGuitars.com any questions for Joe email: jvguitars@gmail.com.
Most bass amps have only one rated wattage. A small number of amps, such as the Mesa/Boogie Strategy 88 amp head, have switchable wattage. A selector switch on the 88 enables the bassist to choose its full 465 watt power; half power (250 watts); or low power (125 watts). A bassist playing an arena on one night, then a club gig, and then recording in a studio could use full, half and low power for the different volume requirements. The Quilter 800 Bass Block has a "master control" knob which switches between various watt outputs for a similar approach.

The Teisco brand name stands for 'Tokyo Electric Instrument and Sound Company'. Teisco was founded in 1946 by renowned Hawaiian and Spanish guitarist Atswo Kaneko, and electrical engineer Doryu Matsuda. Teisco guitars sold in the United States were badged "Teisco Del Rey" beginning in 1964. Teisco guitars were also imported in the U.S. under several brand names including Silvertone, Jedson, Kent, Kingston, Kimberly, Tulio, Heit Deluxe and World Teisco. While guitars manufactured by Teisco were ubiquitous in their day, they are now very collectable."
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Diecast, Gold, 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black
One full step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as Volbeat, Mötley Crüe, Nightwish, Pantera, P.O.D., Sepultura, Dimmu Borgir, Cradle of Filth, Watain, In Solitude, Agalloch, Inquisition, Drive-By Truckers, Soulfly, Children of Bodom, Symphony X, Oceansize, Death, Decrepit Birth, Dream Theater, All That Remains, Exodus, Gojira, Shadows Fall, Mastodon, Asking Alexandria on their Stand Up and Scream, Ghost, Lordi, and Kreator. Used in a vast majority of songs by musician Elliott Smith. Also used in Nirvana's songs "Come As You Are", "Lithium" and "Drain You", by Metallica in their songs "Sad but True", "Devil's Dance", their cover of "Whiskey in the Jar", some of their covers on The $5.98 E.P.: Garage Days Re-Revisited ("The Small Hours" and "Crash Course in Brain Surgery"),"Dream No More", "The Thing That Should Not Be" and in live performances of "The God That Failed" and "Seek and Destroy"; by Bullet for My Valentine in several songs on Scream Aim Fire, by blink-182 in "Adam's Song", in Doug Anthony All Stars live performances and by John Fogerty.
The earliest boost pedals used a germanium transistor and was often in the form of a treble booster. The most famous treble booster is the Dallas Rangemaster which is rumored to have been used by Eric Clapton on the Bluesbreakers record, often referred to as the Beano record or Beano tone. (This is because Clapton is reading a Beano comic on the record cover). At the time Eric was using a Marshall JTM45 2×12 combo (commonly referred to as the Bluesbreaker because of this recording) and a Les Paul and man does it sound good. Allegedly he was using the Rangemaster to push the front end of the amp into more distortion. This has never been confirmed to my knowledge but is the source of much Internet speculation. But I have played an old Bluesbreaker amp with a Les Paul and it sounded pretty darn close.
As you can see, this is simply a case where the Les Paul Custom is a feature-rich product, with more qualities that Epiphone can highlight as buying incentive. All the same contextual advice applies, as the LP Custom is every bit as versatile as the Standard (if not more) and can hang in just about any musical style. When deciding between them it's more a matter of price and aesthetics than any kind of style or playing scenario.
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The movie is very hauntingly beautiful, and it's especially highlighted by an awesomely haunting score, and some breathtaking visuals. The story is interesting, but it's definitely slow-paced, and the climax is much more of an intellectual payoff than a spectacular action scene (which many viewers might be hoping for). So I can definitely see why some people would hate this film, but I loved it. It's one I definitely won't forget anytime soon too, and it's great to see Natalie Portman (my old favorite actress) back in top form! watch movies online pro

The size of the acoustic guitar body also influences its voice. Larger instruments, with dreadnought or jumbo bodies, generally produce more volume. They also tend to have warmer, rounder tones that accentuate bass notes. Smaller guitars, such as parlor, concert and “000” models, usually have a brighter sound that accentuates their middle and treble ranges.


At 10.8 pounds and 11.4 by 12 by 6.7 inches, the Crush 12 is one of the smallest amps we tested, so it’s easily portable and stashable—although with just 12 watts and a 6-inch speaker, it’s the least powerful of our top picks. It has a ¼-inch headphone jack but no line input, so you can’t connect a smartphone for play-along sessions. While our sample came in the company’s iconic orange color, it’s also available in black—although as Wirecutter editor-at-large Geoffrey Morrison put it, “Buying an Orange amp in black is like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.”

In comparison with an electric guitar equalizer, a bass equalizer usually has a lower frequency range that goes down to 40 Hz, to accommodate the electric bass' lower range. Some bass equalizers designed for use with extended range basses go even lower, to 20 Hz. Equalizers can be used to change the tone and sound of the electric bass. If the instrument sounds too "boomy", the bassist can lower the frequency which is overly resonant, or if there is too much fingernail or pick noise, the higher frequencies can be reduced.
First, remove the knobs of the pots that you want to replace. Some knobs are held in by setscrews. Look around the shaft of the knob to see if there is a screw head then unscrew the screw and remove the knob. Most knob are mounted on split shaft pots. There are no setscrews on a split shaft pot. Friction and pressure hold the knobs on the shafts in this case. You can pull the knob directly off the shaft of the pot since there is no screw. If the knob is stuck on the shaft, I usually use heavy gauges guitar picks to try to pry up the knob. You may also wrap a thin rag around the bottom of the knob and pull the knob off the shaft. Regardless how you get the knob off, be careful not to dent or ruin the finish on the top of the guitar. It is easy to rip the knob off of the pot and accidentally drop it on the guitar. Once the knob is removed, you can unscrew and remove the nut on the top of the shaft.
Note that we paid little attention to the power ratings of these amps. Judging a guitar amp by its power rating is usually a bad idea for many reasons. First, small increases in power have almost no effect on a guitar amp’s maximum volume. All other things being equal, doubling the power gets you only a 3-decibel increase in output, which is barely noticeable. To get double the perceived volume, you need 10 times as much power. A 100-watt amp might be twice as loud as a 10-watt amp, but a 20-watt amp will only be slightly louder than the 10-watt amp.
I have my El Maya EM 1300 ( El Maya Japan, Kobe instruments) since 1989 but it was built during the end of 1982 and EL Maya Strat version, guitars are neck trough body, amazing instruments they are better then any guitars i ever played maybe I'm not objective , only my US Hamer is close or on that level. Does Anybody have any El Maya? and that you maybe wish to sell it? More over what are the fer prices for the almost mint state of those guitars, regards miki.
There is competition for Guitar Tricks and this is a good thing, as this makes sure that they have to keep improving. Prior to starting with Guitar Tricks I bought some lessons from True Fire. While the lessons were good and very well presented they needed to be downloaded onto a PC and could only be played in a special player program. TrueFire also offer an online service that includes group and one-on-one lessons.  Another alternative worth checking out is JamPlay. JamPlay has been continually gaining ground on Guitar Tricks and is worth while checking out. They do not have a free trial period, but you can get started with a very low amount for the first month and they also have some free lessons. Another option is a fairly new program called Infinite Guitar. They seem to be doing a rather good job too and also offer some free lessons.
It's the perfect guitar ... for someone else!  So your buddy just gave you his 7-string death avenger before heading off to college cuz he knew you wanted to learn to play.  Nice, but what he did NOT know is that you hope to be the next string-bending Tele-twangin' Brad Paisley.  It ain't EVER gonna happen with you wielding the death-star, sell her to a metal head and getcha that Tele!
Busker? If you're a busker, you're better off with an amp that does not require a power supply. The Roland Micro Cube is a great little amp, very popular with buskers who require amplification due to its portability, cheap price and the fact it can be powered by batteries! It's pretty loud, too! Here's a great blog on some of the best amps for busking.
A bass equalizer is the most commonly used of these three effects. It adjusts the frequency response in a number of different frequency bands. While its function is similar to a tone controls on an amplifier, such as rudimentary "bass" and "treble" frequency knobs, it allows for more precise frequency changes. A rack-mounted bass equalizer, for example, may have ten sliders to control the frequency range encompassed by a regular "bass" frequency knob.

The first step is to remove all the electronics from your guitar. This includes the potentiometers (volume and tone knobs), the switch, the pickups, and the jack. For most Fender style guitars, most of the electronics listed are mounted on the pick guard with the exception of the jack which usually has its own plate it resides on. For Gibson style guitars, the pickups are removed from the front and the rest of the electronics through the back. 
This category of effects pedals does what the name implies.  It tweaks the volume of your guitar signal in some fashion.  These typically come in this spot in the pedal chain (after everything but the time-based effects) so that any change to your volume is already receiving the effects of all the pedals before it.  You’ll be altering your entire signal minus delays and reverbs.
On round hole martin guitars, the serial and model numbers are stamped on the neck block inside the instrument. The number can be seen by looking inside the sound hole. Look at an angle towards the neck. All f-hole Martin archtops have their serial and model numbers stamped on the inside center of the backstripe, roughly under the shadow of the bridge (and best seen from the bass side "f" hole).
New, used, nylon or steel string — or electric — for your first guitar take your time, choose carefully and never be afraid to ask for advice. Best of all, search for a good music shop near you and actually pick up the guitar, pluck the strings, listen to the sound. The people behind the counter want to help you, so that you come back for another guitar — and another, not to mention strings, string cleaner, capos… Don’t forget, this isn’t just buying any old guitar. This is the beginning of your dream coming true.
The pre-amplifier section of a guitar amplifier serves to amplify a weak instrument signal to a level that can drive the power amplifier. It often also contains circuitry to shape the tone of the instrument, including equalization and gain controls. Often multiple cascading gain/clipping stages are employed to generate distortion. Because the first component in a valve amplifier is a valve gain stage, the output level of the preceding elements of the signal chain has a strong influence on the distortion created by that stage. The output level of the guitar's pickups, the setting of the guitar's volume knob, how hard the strings are plucked, and the use of volume-boosting effects pedals can drive this stage harder and create more distortion.

The humbuckers were smaller than typical, with metal covers and two rows of exposed adjustable polepieces. The pickups and three-way were mounted on a small black/white pickguard, with knobs on the body. Two jacks for mono or stereo output were mounted on the side of the lower bout. The two-octave unbound rosewood fingerboard had dot inlays. Early Preachers had “Preacher” engraved on the lower pickguard and a bridge/tailpiece assembly was similar to that on the Breadwinner/Deacon, with more metal and less plastic. Other versions are seen without the engraving and all-metal bridge/tailpieces, indicating the model evolved. Though no information is currently available on when the transition occurred, based on evidence from later UKs, it happened late, possibly around 1980.


For several years now Godin have been producing some of the most sonically versatile guitars available with their combination of regular pickups, piezo pickups and synth pickups built into their higher end guitars. Note that the synth pickups are 13-Pin and compatible with the Roland GR series guitar synths - if you want MIDI you have to first plug into a Roland synth then take the MIDI out from the synth.


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The vast majority of guitars use more than one pickup, and provide a switch that controls which pickup, or combination of pickups, is active at any one time. This article adds one more pickup to our circuit and shows how we can wire up a selector switch. We look at both toggle and blade style switches. This brings us to the point where we now know how to wire up a Telecaster in the standard way.
Different people have different opinions on what makes a vintage guitar. For the purposes of this site, a vintage electric guitar or vintage bass is one that was produced in the golden age of rock and roll. From the very early 1950s when Fender first produced the Esquire and Broadcaster, and Gibson the Les Paul; to the early 1980s, when both of these companies sold to their current owners.
We have already covered one Behringer reverb, which was the epitome of affordable and functional simplicity. However, this brand has a couple more aces up their sleeve, including the more advanced RV600 (click for full review). What this pedal offers is a significantly more versatile solution that brings you additional flexibility at a bargain price.
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Others are perfect for getting started. In fact, the Epiphone Les Paul Special II is the electric guitar I most often recommend for beginners. This is an instrument that’s modeled on the legendary Gibson Les Paul, with many of the same attributes such as a single-cutaway body, dual humbuckers and tune-o-matic bridge. It is a simple yet versatile setup.
An amp head is an amplifier without the speakers. This is the type of amp that is most often used on stages of all sizes, from small clubs to huge stadiums. The reason is that amp heads tend to offer more power and can be hooked up to several different speaker cabinets. This allows you unrivalled power as well as the freedom to mix and match your favorite heads and speakers. Another plus is that they are much easier to carry around to gigs, especially if the venue has its own cabinet. The disadvantages of heads are that they are generally more expensive than a combo, while you will also have to factor in the cost of a speaker when purchasing one.
The Givson Guitar Corporation makes guitars which sell under various brand names and are considered as among the best guitar brands on the planet. The company is famous to have devised the arch top guitar and created a few of the most iconic instruments in guitar history. Some iconic versions are the SG, Explorer, Flying V, ES 175 as well as the Firebird. The Les Paul Melody Maker is a popular model amongst many guitarists in different countries.
Play power chords easily with one-finger barre'd across two (or three) strings. Simply place your index finger over the sixth & fifth stings at the same fret. (You can also barre the 4th string, which is also a D, and will match the root of your chord one octave higher.) The resulting power chord is named after the note played on the sixth string. At the first fret, it's D#5, at the third fret, it's F5. For tunes blues-rock tunes that use a lot of 5 & 7 power chords, such as those made famous by Chuck Berry, Drop D tuning allows you to play those 7 chords as though they were normal power chords.
Lol I agree I'm a nirvana freak, not a kurt freak.... but dam fender all you can make is the same butt ugly designs that you have made for years come up with a compleatly new body design and I mean COMPLETELY NEW and just use the same components or better for a new guitar called, idk caster lol or DOUCHECASTER lol don't matter to me just hive us something new

Anyway, this little beast didn’t need much work. This is one of the pleasures of working on a Champ-style practice amp. They have so little in them, there’s simply not much to go wrong or fix. This one, it turned out, only needed a filter cap job, a new preamp tube and one coupling cap. Piece o’ cake. Twenty minutes of soldering and one $4.00 7F7 tube later, I had a monster little Champ-esque amplifier (actually it sounds a little more like the Gibson Skylark than a Champ, but that’s cool by me) for under $80.

Most of the guitars, banjos and mandolins my customers use and collect have been made by major manufacturers such as Martin, Gibson and Fender or a few superb handcrafters such as D'Angelico and Stromberg, but over the years, by far the greatest number of instruments purchased in the USA and worldwide have been lower-priced student models. Prior to 1970 most student grade instruments sold in the USA were made here by companies such as Kay, Harmony and Regal in Chicago or Oscar Schmidt of Jersey City, New Jersey, and Danelectro of Neptune, New Jersey. When I started out playing and collecting guitars in the mid 1960s, brands such as Harmony, Kay, Stella, Silvertone and Danelectro were the standards for student use. We saw very few Oriental imports.

The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.


Headphone amps are great for playing in a moving vehicle, at the beach, in a hotel room, or in the airport lounge, and they can even output the signal to tape or disc, suitable for recording. They start at around $200 and are well worth the price if portability, privacy, and authentic tone are important for your practice routine. The Korg Pandora (shown in the following figure), Scholz Rockman, Ibanez Rock ’n’ Play, and Zoom 9000 series are just some makes and models.
Dude, John Mayer? unbelievable. Angus young, Gary moore I agree Eric Clapton you bet. but, it is an opinion. I think Michael Schenker is badass, and what about Steve Morse. I just saw Rush in Rio, and I forgot just how good Alex lifeson is. What about George Lynch? Tony MacAlpine. so I will let you have John Mayer, because he makes you feel something, for me, it's nausea…..Oh, and I forgot Brian May. Doyle Bramhall, I could go on.
Guitars come in two basic flavors: acoustic and electric. From a hardware standpoint, electric guitars have more components and doohickeys than do acoustic guitars. Guitar makers generally agree, however, that making an acoustic guitar is harder than making an electric guitar. That’s why, pound for pound, acoustic guitars cost just as much or more than their electric counterparts. Both types follow the same basic approach to such principles as neck construction and string tension, and so they have very similar constructions, despite a sometimes radical difference in tone production.
In 1972, Ovation introduced one of the first production solid-body electric-guitars with active electronics, the Ovation Breadwinner. The model failed to gain widespread popularity, however, and production of the Breadwinner and the Ovation Deacon ceased in 1980. Ovation made several other solid-body models up until the mid 1980s.[28] Since that time the company’s main focus has been acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars.
A closer look at a 1981 Gibson Victory MV-II electric guitar. The Gibson Victory MV, or 'Multi-Voice' guitars had very wide tonal palettes; with coil-tapped humbuckers they could produce typical Gibson tones, but were also designed to 'out-Fender' Fender. Two models were launched in the summer of 1981. Whilst the MVX, was designed to do everything a Stratocaster could do, the MVII was 'primarily for the discerning country player' - placing it squarely against the Telecaster.

These are the settings I use as my basic rack for adding rock guitar sounds in Cubase, and you might also find it handy as a point of departure, so it's worth saving as a track preset. To do this, right‑click in the audio track containing the 'rack', and choose 'Create Track Preset' from the context menu. When the Save Track Preset dialogue box appears, simply name it and save it: now you can call up your rack for any audio track in any Cubase project!
TonePad – provides ready-to-use layouts and circuit boards for effects and amplifier projects to the do-it-yourself music community. All layouts are provided free of charge and are subject to the limitations set forth on their legal page. Parts are available from Small Bear Electronics, and ready-made PCBs for many projects are now available directly through tonepad.
1. Blackstar ID:15 TVP ($229): This is one of the best combo amps on the market and with good reason: it comes with a variety of options to not only get you playing in no time. It also allows you to record very easily with a built-in USB option. You can select from six different power responses modeled after popular tube amp sounds (via Blackstar’s True Valve Power system) and even when turned down, the amp doesn’t lose its bite. The built-in multi-effects allow you to experiment with the world of effects and the Insider Software allows you to edit up to 128 user storable patches to further your sonic crafting.
When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
Oh but this guitar is beautiful. The PRS SE A50E Angelus is something you would really want to play in front of an audience because of its stunningly good looks and the quality sound it produces. This guitar has a solid Sitka spruce top, figured maple back and sides, mahogany neck, bone nut and saddle as well as ebony fretboard and bridge. It has a distinct and highly playable Angelus Cutaway body shape. The PRS abalone bird inlays on the fretboard are a really nice touch. Yes, it’s a gorgeous, well-built guitar, but that’s not all.
As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
I put the pots into a wiring jig I made for Les Pauls: a piece of pickguard plastic with holes to match the LP control arrangement (cardboard works just as well). This lets me do my wiring outside the body, and everything fits back in neatly.The guitar’s controls were on a metal mounting plate. We decided to ditch the plate, sticking with the ’50s theme.
The very first thing to remember about pickups is that the active option is not necessarily better than the passive choice, and vice versa. Each type brings its own set of drawbacks and benefits. Passive pickups might be limited in terms of signal strength and tone shaping, but they are much more expressive in comparison to the active pickups in terms of picking and strumming intensities.

Headphone amps are great for playing in a moving vehicle, at the beach, in a hotel room, or in the airport lounge, and they can even output the signal to tape or disc, suitable for recording. They start at around $200 and are well worth the price if portability, privacy, and authentic tone are important for your practice routine. The Korg Pandora (shown in the following figure), Scholz Rockman, Ibanez Rock ’n’ Play, and Zoom 9000 series are just some makes and models.
Every guitar player needs a great acoustic guitar – or several – in their collection. Finding the right acoustic guitar for you can be a daunting process even for the most seasoned player. If you are new to shopping for guitars, then it is even more critical that you learn all you can before you make your first purchase. If your first acoustic guitar is not the appropriate choice for you, then it can dramatically reduce the enjoyment you will get out of your instrument. If you are a new guitar player, the wrong guitar can be downright discouraging. You want a guitar that fits you, is effortless to play, and has the rich, beautiful tone you love to make it the instrument you dream of playing hour after hour.
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