Practice amps often have an auxiliary line-in jack, so that the bassist can plug in a recorded music signal (often via an 1/8" jack), to practice along with a recording. The line-in jack can also be used to plug a drum machine into the amp, also for practice purposes. Some practice amps have a level control knob for the line-in input. Practice amps often have a headphone jack, with a feature that turns off the power amplifier when headphones are connected. This feature enables bassists to practice silently at night, to avoid disturbing others in adjoining rooms or apartments. Higher-priced practice amps aimed at pro bassists may have a DI out jack, so that the amp's preamplifier signal can be connected directly to a mixing board for a live show's sound reinforcement system or for a sound recording session. DI out-equipped units effectively turn the practice amp into a preamplifier unit.

The Fender Tele Jr. is a variant of the Fender Telecaster electric guitar that the Fender Custom Shop produced in a limited run of 100 units in the early 1990s. It uses a Telecaster body shape, scale length, and electronics controls (albeit, with a reversed control plate). However, many of its construction and electronic features—for example its set-in neck and P-90-style pickups—are similar to those of a Gibson Les Paul Junior (hence the name) and Gibson Les Paul Special electric guitars.
I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL.

Or course, you have a repulsive snobs on here that can't acknowledge the truth that the list above correctly consists of quality, popular choices. I'd never play a Dean, a Parker, or a Godin. I'm so glad you love them, but you're a minority. The Gibsons and Fenders are tried and true designs. That's why the majority play them. They're actually good guitars, at least the equal of the snobs-are-us suggestions above. Having limited funds to spend, and wanting to ensure that a quality guitar with quality tone is aquired, I would go with a Fender or a Gibson without hesitation. I'm not a snotty nosed rich brat like most of the above put-downs and belly achers; I'm a 50+ mature adult who knows how to play and I play good, thank you. Not because I say, but because that's what others say. Fender and Gibson are overall the best guitars on the market for the average person of means and talent, unless you're rich and can afford something above $5000.00. Otherwise, calm down, remove the pentangle from your rectum, and relax. Is it really that important to you? THEN OPEN YOUR OWN WEBSITE AND PREACH ABOUT IT. This has been a public service message...Billy


While it may sound like a good idea to place a booster pedal towards the front of your chain in order to send that added voltage out from the get go, some pedals can’t handle high levels of voltage which can cause feedback and other problems. Also, you don’t want to simply place it at the end as there is not much benefit in adding voltage when the signal has already lost much of its clarity. It would be like enlarging an already fuzzy picture when what you really want is to keep it from getting fuzzy in the first place.
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Ultimately, be aware that the key to sounding the way you want lies in your hands and your head more than anywhere else. The way a player attacks the strings — the nuance, dynamics, and subtleties of the playing technique — usually has a bigger influence on how he or she sounds than any other single ingredient in the rig. Try to play mindfully, being keenly aware of the variations in sound produced when you simply play the guitar differently, and you will quickly develop an original voice.
Unless it's broken and will need to be replaced, start with obtaining a new nut that is anything to your liking, preferably a blank nut rather than a pre-cut to avoid improper string height. If cutting a blank try copying your old nut and make adjustments if needed using the neck as a guide after cutting out the nut. To do this take a sharp blade that is easy to work with such as an X-acto and cut the finish that holds the sides of the nut. Make sure to cut all of the finish as it will break apart when you take out the nut.
The two ’71 piggyback bass amps included the 1060 Bass Amplifier System ($530), featuring seven tubes, 105 watts, two channels, four inputs, volume, bass, middle and treble controls on each channel, presence, variable impedance, and a cabinet with one Univox 15″ speaker with 22-ounce dual diameter Alnico magnet and 2″ voice coil, plus a fully loaded reflex cabinet with true folded horn principle (you ampheads may know what the heck that means!). The grille had two large square cutouts with rounded corners. The 1245 Bass Amplifier System ($385) offered five tubes, 60 watts, two channels with the same controls as the 1060, and two 12″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets and 2″ voice coil.
well it does not effect the strings electronically. however. each pickup depending on its position on the guitar is designed to pick up a specific range of tones. the pickup closes to the neck is meant to pick up the bass range whereas the one closest to the bridge is meant to pick up the treble(higher) end of the tonal spectrum. all that aside when you actually move the switch it might have a reverberation throughout your guitar because the switch is just really hard or stiff. it might need to be broken in no worries there.
Gretsch is one of the oldest manufacturers on this list. It was founded in 1883 in New York City by Friedrich Gretsch. He was an immigrant from Germany and was only 27 at the time he founded the company. Gretsch has a wide selection of both acoustic style and electric style guitars. They have models in just about everyone’s price range. You can buy a Gretsch for under $500 or over $2000. Their style is fairly unique. They have an almost “classical” look to them. Keep in mind that the older Gretsch guitars were not as consistent in quality as they are today. So if you’re looking to buy used, try to keep it so you’re buying guitars that are made semi-recently. On the other hand, you might get lucky and snag a great deal. As expected, their sound is excellent.
Just like in a conventional guitar, an electric guitar also has 6 strings with tuning knobs and frets. However, unlike the hollow body and cavity of an acoustic guitar, a solid body usually forms the lower part of an electric guitar. The long neck of the electric guitar consists of magnetic pickups, parts which produce the magnetic field and which are located just below the metal strings. The magnetic pickups are connected to the amplifier with an internal electrical circuit. The long neck of an electric guitar also consists of knobs for adjusting the elasticity of metal strings.

The very first production electric guitar was the Stromberg Electro, developed by Hank Kuhrmeyer and introduced in 1928. It was pretty much a kludge. It was an acoustic guitar with a magnetic pickup fitted to the soundboard... Stromberg/Kay Instruments made a resonator version of this, too. The weight of the pickup, though, destroyed the guitar's soundboard over time.
I have a Fender Chinese made Telecaster from the Modern Player Series. The finish is spectacular, and while it sometimes feels like they just used a lot of gloss to cover it, it plays and sounds well. I have played it through many amps and it does the job of both a Telecaster and a Strat style. With a humbucking pickup, a lipstick and a strat pickup, this is a satisfying guitar and moddable for people looking for something they can work on without fear of screwing up and wasting a thousand dollars.
Some bass amps may have additional controls for onboard effects such as bass chorus or a knob for controlling a multi-effects unit (which might include a suboctave generator, chorus, reverb, fuzz bass etc.). Some 2000s-era amps may have a knob to control digital amp or speaker emulation settings (e.g., emulating the tone of a huge 8x10" speaker stack or a vintage tube amp by famous makers, such as the Ampeg SVT).

Here we have a cool vintage piece. Made in USA and is highly Possible this is a Gibson Archtop. Great Original condition make this a great find...this one is a Solid 8.5/10 condition. This one still has the original tuners and pick guard too. The neck is straight and the frets are still OK...and wow what a supprise this one plays great!..nice vintage tone...no repairs or damages just natural play wear and dings etc associated with a true vintage player....EZ on the eyes see the great detailed bindings! and wow this baby sounds very nice...great for Jazz .


Particularly if you want to get into recording and production, this Blackstar model is ideal. With six distinct “voices” from Clean Warm to OD2, as well as 12 stereo effects, there is a huge range of tones and options to play with. Together with the patented ISF control it allows for a nuanced choice of timbres, allowing you to immerse into exactly the sound you are after in gloriously deep Super Wide Stereo.
But the biggest difference between the American Special Strat and the Highway One model is in the pickup configuration. This guitar comes equipped with three Texas Special single-coils, which are overwound Alnico V pickups known for their tight bass, clear highs and pronounced mids. Famously, they’re also found on the Stevie Ray Vaughan signature Strat. And significantly, these pickups retail for about $200 for a set of three.
In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335 as part of its Electric Spanish line of guitars, and it was the world’s first commercially released semi-hollow guitar. Featuring a solid center block in an otherwise hollow thinline body, the then-radical design effectively combined the round, airy tone of a traditional archtop with the sustain and feedback-fighting benefits of a solidbody. Its groundbreaking design is one of the most imitated around.
The 5-position switch controls which pickups are activated. On a standard Strat, the position closest to the neck activates only the neck position pickup. The position next to that activates both the middle pickup and the neck pickup. The middle position activates only the middle pickup. The next position activates both the middle pickup and the bridge position pickup. The last position activates only the bridge position pickup.
When guitarists who play jazz and other more complex styles improvise, they use scales, modes, and arpeggios associated with the chord progression. The must learn how to use scales (whole tone scale, chromatic scale, etc.) to solo over chord progressions. Soloists try to imbue melodic phrasing with the sense of natural breathing and legato phrasing used by players of other instruments. Jazz guitarists are influenced by trumpet, saxophone, and other horn players. Celtic fingerstyle players are influenced pipes and fiddles.
“Tone that emulates the human voice is always more accessible,” Waara continues. “Otherwise, purely electronic music would have taken over, and we wouldn’t be making guitars anymore. There are some absolutes in human DNA about wanting to feel connection and that’s probably a fuller frequency tone, that’s tone that is more reminiscent of the human voice. Or, for instance, a violin or organic instruments that have been around for hundreds of years. When we talk about guitars having an organic quality, it’s because that’s rooted in what human beings know. Which is air moving, wood vibrating, people speaking.”
Many amplifiers have effects built in, but even those that do are no substitute for a well-equipped pedalboard. There are literally thousands of effects to choose from, some of which (like the Boss TU-3 Chromatic Pedal Tuner) are more like accessories that don't directly impact your sound. Others will transform it completely. For example, two of the most popular effects are the Fulltone OCD Obsessive Compulsive Overdrive Guitar Effects Pedal and the Ibanez TS9 Tube Screamer Effects Pedal - these are both overdrive pedals, and together with a good amp, they'll take an electric guitar's sound from its default, vintage-like tone all the way to the high-powered distortion of a modern rock anthem.

I have a similar guitar to the one you bought. It was my grandmothers and I'm estimating it at over 30 years old. Very folk style. She told me she actually had the original strings from when she bought it! I believed her when i tuned the thing and the day after found that the 4th and 6th had snapped. From what i know, Decca just made guitars around that time, 60's to 70's. Mine says it has a steel reinforced neck and it is really heavy compared to others. its still in really good shape and I actually play it. I'm not planning on selling it but I know its well worth its age. It has a hand chissled Ser. # on the bridge.


Don’t feel like you have to spend a fortune either. While there are some very pricey boutique pedals on the market that get outstanding reviews, there are also affordable pedals that will do the job just fine. Consider brands like Boss, DOD and MXR for some great pedals at affordable prices. If you end up with a pedal you don’t like as much as you thought you would, you can always trade it in and get something different.
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From what I've been able to find out (as a proud owner of a mint W-415 'Dove' model acoustic), Lyle guitars are actually Gibson seconds, that for whatever reason didn't pass muster to be sold as a Gibson (bad finish, scuff, imperfection in the wood, etc.). The Lyle company was out of Portland, OR (I believe) and was started by former Gibson employees who would fix the flawed Gibsons and resell them under the Lyle name. Made in Japan was because Gibsons were made in Japan at the time(?). A damn fine instrument; considered rare now, I guess. I don't ever want to get rid of mine!
One of the biggest hits of all-time, this song incorporates everything that is 80’s pop and is performed in the key of F# major, in 4/4 time. Lauper originally didn’t want to sing it since the original version was written by Robert Hazard, who wrote it from the perspective of a man. Eventually, the singer released her version of the song and the rest is history. 
Reverb is one of the earliest effects for guitar players, originally built into the amp itself like the Fender Deluxe Reverb and Super Reverb. Traditional spring reverbs actually send the guitar signal into the springs causing them to vibrate and simulating reverb. With the advent of digital technology reverb units pedals made their way onto the market but mostly as rack units, but as technology improved and shrank many of those units can fit into a pedal now.
Fuzz pedals provide guitarists, bass players and even keyboard players with a hefty amount of distortion that sounds VERY different to regular distortion sounds. Fuzz pedals make your guitar sound like its pushing your amplifier to the point of blowing up. A fuzz pedal completely changes the sound of your guitar signal into a heavy, fizzy, and extremely noisy sound that, depending on which pedal you choose, can provide a bass heavy noise, to a spitting ‘broken’ amp sound. Think Velcro being ripped apart and you’re somewhere pretty close.

Gretsch was founded in 1883 and started out making banjos - it wasn't until the 1930s that they began producing guitars - but during the 1950s their guitars began to take on legendary status. During the 1960s their popularity hit stratospheric levels because George Harrison was playing a modified 1957 Gretsch Duo Jet that he bought second hand for £70 from a ship crew member in Liverpool who had bought it brand new in New York. Most collectors agree that the 50s & 60s are the most sought after Gretsch guitars.


A Chorus effect can help you achieve lush, warm, and rich tones that work well during busier parts of a song. The effect attempts to simulate the sound of multiple performers playing the same part of a song at once. It works similarly to a flanger effect, where a sound is duplicated and slightly delayed. Choruses often use a longer delay than a flanger, and the delay time is also modulated with an oscillator to simulate the natural variations in time and pitch that will occur between several different performers.
We selected this guitar as our Top Pick because it’s an instrument that could suit anybody. It has everything you need from your electric guitar and it’s easy to play. A good classic that will stay with you for many years to come. It suits both beginners and guitarists who have been playing for a while. True, a professional guitarist would buy something pricier, but if you’re not super picky this guitar will do perfectly well!

The list is leaving off some HUGE names. You absolutely cannot leave out Clapton and Van Halen. However, you apparent uninformed people saying that John Mayer shouldn't be on the list should wake up and get in your music. He is on track to waxing this whole list by the end of his career. Clapton is practically handing him the torch. But then again, I guess that Tiger Woods will never be as good as Jack to some.

Another company that dates back nearly a century, Rickenbacker was started by Adolph Rickenbacker and George D. Beauchamp in 1931 with the intention of creating fully electric instruments. Following a long and rocky history that included wild successes (like getting their guitars in the hands of the musicians that played with Bing Crosby) and incredibly tough tribulations (like starting an instrument business at the depths of the Great Depression), the brand eventually sold to F.C. Hall in 1953. From that point forward, Rickenbacker flourished as one of the most iconic brands both in the looks of their instruments and their sound. George Harrison, Paul McCartney, and John Lennon of the Beatles all played Rickenbackers at one time or another. Additionally, Chris Squire of Yes, Tom Petty, Pete Townsend of the Who, and Glen Frey of the Eagles are all Rickenbacker signature artists. Like tech giant Apple, however, Rickenbacker doesn’t give their endorsers anything for free nor do they ask for the advertising, making them an even more admiral brand as a result.
They say good things come in small packages. Well, "they" weren't wrong! The Orange Micro Terror Guitar Amplifier Head is no bigger than a lunchbox, but packs enough power to stand up to some of the bigger amplifiers out there, especially when you connect it to a 2x12 or even a 4x12 cab. It features a combination of solid state and valve technology and throws out 20w of pure power thanks to the 1 x 12AX7/ECC83 pre amp valve. Easy to use, affordable and even easier to carry around, you can easily gig with this or use it as a practice amp at home when coupled with the custom built Orange PPC108 1x8 Closed Back Speaker Cabinet.

Sorry This guitar has SOLD OUT! Here is a wonderfully crafted in Japan 000-18 type acoustic guitar by the great Takamine in the prime time of the lawsuit copys made with Pride in Japan long gone these have been discontinued decades ago over the copyrights to this Headstock design and also the logo looks identical to the Old 50s early 60s Martin from a few feet away looks exactly the same, that said this example is like owning a fairly new Vintage it has aged near 40 years yet is still near mint condition w/ nice OHSC.

We love guitars, they are definitely one of the best instruments of all time. What we don’t love is spending crazy amounts of money. We decided to find out what the best electric guitar under 1000 dollars is. Most often when it comes to musical instruments, you can’t expect budget beginners’ instruments to be as good as the best ones that cost ten times as much, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t bargains to be found. For any skill levels looking for new acoustic guitars click here. If you want the best of both worlds, consider looking at our review of the top acoustic electric guitars.


In any case, by late 1933 or early ’34, Dobro expanded its amp line to include what is probably the first twin-speaker amplifier! This had a football-shaped speaker grille with lyre and Dobro insets, and two 8″ Lansing field coil speakers. Nothing else is known about this amp, but it may have had the same chassis as the single-speaker version. It can be seen on page 104 of Guitars, Guitars, Guitars (All American Music Publishers, 1988).
He has a way about him that makes you stop and listen, but he isn’t in your face. His sound is very melodic, which is why his tone was so perfectly matched to answering the needs of the vocals, yet he still holds his own in every tune. Bright, confident and edgy, he is a serious guitar-player and he has no intentions of holding back! People often say that he carries humour in his music, which is quite a clever characteristic to portray with this piece of equipment.
We're not suggesting you become your own handyman 24/7. If your house roof tiles are falling to bits, you'd call a pro, right? But basic setup can be done, and if you eventually need help from a guitar pro, it's good to be able to explain what your bugbear is. Guitar players and guitars are all different, and it's simply good practice to think about what you do and don't like about your treasured instrument.

The best course of action is to set a budget that is reasonable - right at the get go - while also considering the cost for other important gear like accessories, cables, amplifiers and effects, should you need them. A good rule of thumb to follow is that entry-level to mid-tier instruments are great for beginners, while more experienced players will want mid-tier to premium guitars.
Bought a Tubemeister 18 Twelve about three years ago. Love the size, and options of this amp. Primarily use it at home. Replaced a Fender and a Marshall combo amps with this one. Really like the sound, but recently blew a power tube as well as a fuse, and capacitor as a result. Replaced the Chinese power tubes with JJ's, when professionally repaired. All seems well, but wonder about the reliability of this amp in the long run. My tech recommended changing the tubes every year or two, especially if using the power soak feature. Running it really hard by doing so. Also, read that it generates more heat inside the cab (no vents. closed back). Overall still like the amp, but after dropping $200 to repair, after spending $800 on the amp.. having second thoughts of long term reliability. Not using the power soak very much any longer, and keeping a better eye on the TSC (tube safety control)... not sure if it actually did what it is suppose to. To me... less features and simplicity could be ...more
This guitar sounds tighter and is less loud than a dreadnought. But its construction warms its tone considerably. Its owners say that its tone is well balanced – clear and punchy but still warm. It offers clarity in the higher registers, but some boom in the lower registers. For that reason, the LL16 is suited to almost any style of playing. It will not, however, be as punchy as the Taylor 210 or as round sounding as the Blueridge.
First, Steel String sounds heavenly, and I always love it when my mouth drops the first time I hear a hyper-realistic sounding VST. Steel String has done this completely, in fact, the only time I was ever pulled out from its hyper-realism was on the fret noise that recreates the articulation of finger sliding across the strings when changing positions.
In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
This guitar has a maple neck which is coated with a thin satin finish and has a C-design which is easy for beginners to handle. It features an alder solid body. The vibrato design is enhanced with the addition of block saddles for adding firmness to the tone. They also give a precise breakpoint for the strings. Speaking of pickups, the PAC 112v is equipped with a 5-way blade pickup selector. There are master tone and volume controls for the neatest output. This guitar is available in seven finishes, natural satin, old violin sunburst, raspberry red, sonic blue, black, and silver metal.
The neck contains a metal truss rod that prevents it from bowing and twisting due to string tension and environmental factors. Adjusting the truss rod corrects intonation issues that prevent the instrument from being tuned properly. This truss rod can be adjusted either at the headstock, or just inside the body of the guitar, at the base of the neck.
Before World War II, Epiphone was one of Gibson's fiercest competitors in the guitar market—especially when it came to archtops. With legendary models like the Broadway, Deluxe, Emperor and Triumph, they were a force to be reckoned with on the hollow-body electric guitar scene. In the 1940s, Epiphone went from one of Gibson's competitors to one of its subsidiaries, paving the way for Epiphone Electric Guitars to become synonymous with many Gibson models.  Despite this drastic shift, Epiphone continues to be renowned for their archtop electric guitars even today. Models like the Wildkat Royale and the limited edition ES-335 Pro are worthy throwbacks to that golden era of electric guitars, giving you authentic vintage sound that's perfect if you're into classic rock. Another Epiphone original that's still available today is the solid-body Wilshire. The impact that the Wilshire had on guitar design is so strong that it's still one of the first mental images that comes to mind when we think ""electric guitar.""
Unlike the piano, the guitar has the same notes on different strings. Consequently, guitar players often double notes in chord, so increasing the volume of sound. Doubled notes also changes the chordal timbre: Having different "string widths, tensions and tunings, the doubled notes reinforce each other, like the doubled strings of a twelve-string guitar add chorusing and depth".[38] Notes can be doubled at identical pitches or in different octaves. For triadic chords, doubling the third interval, which is either a major third or a minor third, clarifies whether the chord is major or minor.[39]

The HSS pickup configuration with a five-way switch keeps things versatile and beginner-friendly. Two single-coils and an overwound bridge humbucker provide a good mix of glassy Strat-like and fat Les Paul-esque tones that are capable of straight-up rock, funk and blues. They’re good as far as in-house pickups go, but don’t expect tonal authenticity at this price point.
Guitar-Sunbeam : Precisely transmits the eternal electric guitar, ideally suited for modern production. It combines an extensive library of strum patterns, brute force, arpeggios and real riffs with real-time performance monitoring. An innovative playback engine allows you to create an almost infinite number of variations of chords and you get convincing, musical results.
I always recommend the Cordoba C5 for beginners who are looking for their first classical or nylon string guitar. It’s comes at a very wallet-friendly price, but it sounds and plays exceptionally well for a guitar in its price range. More experienced players can look to other C-Series Cordoba guitars like the C12, which is built for advanced guitarists.
While there are some obvious quality gaps, they do appear to be closing as time passes on. The hardware used on Epiphone is getting better, and the presence of the new ProBucker Pickups helps to elevate the brand to new heights. The fact of the matter is, while Epiphone is viewed as just being a cost friendly alternative to Gibson, guitar players gravitate to the brand anyways for its own special sound. While it may use the same Specs as a Gibson, they are far from equal guitars, including in the sound department (4).
Remember how we said that Ibanez has some pretty rad entry level guitars? Well, Ibanez GRX70QATBB is one that is worth mentioning. It belongs to the legendary GRX family, and brings a well-balanced performance for the money. I actually bought one of these for my nephew, and had to put it through its paces before I handed it over. It’s a bit rough around the edges, but one visit to a guitar shop took care of that.
Color styles – Is this important to you? We know it is for us to an extent, especially if you’ll be performing live regardless of venue size. Even if you’re going to your band-mates place to rehearse, the look of our guitar represents us and our own style. Luckily many of these have awesome options when it comes to makes, colors and designs. Although it wouldn’t necessarily steer us completely in a particular electric guitars direction since sound and feel are still most important.
The classical series includes GA series of which GA 15 series is known for its cedar top with mahogany backs and sides while other ones are famed for their spruce top. The acoustic line comes with perfectly projected design and tone offering. The pick of the lot is AEL, EWP and PF series. As for electrical options RGX, GRG and GRX series make up as the finest of the lot. For other series players around, the RG and AR series are the picks.
For each slot requiring attention, I use a nut file at a slight downwards angle to widen the slot, making sure not to LOWER it (you should do this at a shallower angle than this photo might imply – you want to make sure that you are JUST slightly downwards compared to horizontal). Just take it really easily here, keeping an eye on the front of the slot to make sure you don’t go too far. Repeat this for whichever slots require widening.

For the acoustic guitar player, plugging in to an external amp and effects processor can be quite fun, and can add a lot of 'spice' to your playing, just by virtue of having access to a wider range of sounds. But whereas hauling an acoustic guitar with you isn't a big deal, hauling an amp and accessories with you (and finding a place to plug in) can be challenging.
I got this lyle acoustic (w-400) for $40 at a yard sale - it is THE MOST INCREDIBLE GUITAR you could ever ask for - looks just like a martin d-18 - solid spruce top - sweet figured mahog b&s's - back of headstock even has the valute like a martin - just kicks my buddies real d-18 to pieces - he's so jealous - if you get the chance to own one don't pass it up - it will probably be too cheap to pass up and you WILL regret it later (like I have been kicking my own ass for decades for passing up a 60's Gibson byrdland for $400)

When it comes to buying an electric guitar there are a lot of options available, and choosing one can be confusing. This guide will help you understand the basic differences in electric guitars so you can make an informed decision. And remember, we’re here to help with friendly Gear Heads available at 1-800-449-9128 who can guide you to the electric guitar that best meets your needs.

In 2017, Slash was named Gibson Brands' first Global Brand Ambassador. And to celebrate, Slash has designed his first Signature Firebird for Epiphone! Slash’s Limited Edition Firebird features the classic Firebird profile that has gone virtually unchanged since its debut in 1963 and is made with a AAA Flame Maple top and a 3-piece Mahogany body in a Translucent Black finish chosen by Slash. The traditional Firebird style pickguard is layered white and black and has Slash’s “Skull & Top Hat” log in red. The Mahogany neck is glued to the body with a deep-set neck tenon and has a standard 24.75" scale and a rounded custom "Slash" profile. The Pau Ferro fingerboard has single-ply cream binding with Pearl trapezoid inlays, a nylon nut, and 22 medium jumbo frets along with a 2-way adjustable truss rod. The back of the Firebird's traditional reverse headstock has Slash’s Snakepit logo in gold.

In the fall of 1964, it's generally accepted that hide glue was replaced with white polyvinyl acetate PVA glue (Elmer's) after the move to the new Martin build facility. (But hide glue was still used until the mid-seventies for gluing tops to the rim and in some other situations.) A notation was written in Grant Remaley's personal memos on Sept 29, 1964 indicating Martin was starting to use "cold" glue. It is generally thought the type of glue used does affect the sound of the guitar. Starting some time in the 1980s Martin started switching from white glue to yellow aliphatic resin (titebond).


If you’re one of those “I plug directly into the amp and don’t need no stinkin’ guitar effects pedals” kinda dude, then godspeed and thanks for stopping by. On the other hand, if you own a pedal board upon which you trip the light fantastic, stick around — this list of guitar effects pedals you must have will validate what you might know, illuminate what you don’t know, and quickly help you generate a massive and highly versatile sound palette.
When Leo and the boys at the big “F” ranch developed the Tele, they put a big slab of steel under the bridge-pickup coil. This reflected the magnetic field up and toward the strings. In the words of Seymour Duncan’s Evan Skopp, this gives it more “crack”—which, if you’re addicted to twang, is a good thing. The better news is that you can attach a plate (sometimes called an elevator plate, because of how it elevates the magnetic field toward the strings) to any single coil whose pole-piece magnets are exposed at the back.
As Tom Wheeler writes in The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, "It’s powerful, it’s loud and it’s sensitive to the player’s touch. It sounds great, responding beautifully across the frequency spectrum. It exhibits a sparkling, harmonically rich tone at low and moderate volumes. At louder volumes it thickens with a sweet distortion that only seems to get creamier the more it’s cranked. It is particularly well matched to certain popular guitars, especially the Stratocaster."
The most musically satisfying types of distortion tend to be progressive, where the audio waveform becomes more 'squashed' as the level increases. Hard clipping, by contrast, tends to sound harsh. All these types of distortion introduce additional harmonics into the signal, but it is the level and proportion of the added harmonics that creates the character of the sound. Harmonically related distortion can be added at much higher levels than non-harmonically related distortion before the human hearing system recognises it as such, so there is no way to define a percentage of distortion below which audio is acceptable or above which it is unacceptable. The reason that digital distortion has its own character, which most people find less musically pleasant, is because it is not usually harmonically related to the input signal. For example, quantisation distortion, which results from sampling at too low a bit depth, sounds quite ugly, though many dance and industrial music producers have found a use for it, and some plug-ins deliberately introduce it.
Little data is to be had on Teiscos from the late ’50s, but it’s probably safe to assume the line continued on roughly as before. In 1958 the EP-61 joined the line. This was obviously not numbered for the year of introduction! It’s not known what this guitar was, but shortly thereafter the high-number EPs were fancy full-bodied archtops, so that may have been it.
With analogue delay (and simulations thereof), each subsequent echo is not only quieter, but also more distorted. Dub reggae tracks often make prominent use of this effect -- look out for the effect where the engineer momentarily turns a knob so that the echoes get louder instead of quieter, surging and distorting before he turns it back down again so they can die away.
Next important control knob is usually labeled as time or rate. This defines the length of echoes in a reverb. You can have them short or you can have them last for a fairly long time. Which side you will lean more towards is going to depend on the nature and tempo of your music. Slower, more subtle riffs can easily deal with long reverb times while faster sections usually work best with short reverb. Again, experimentation is the key here.
While it might look identical to the RevStar RS420, Yamaha Revstar RS320 is very different. The shape is the same, along with the most of the hardware. However, the tone is a whole different story. While RS420 comes with vintage humbuckers, the RS320 packs a set of extremely hot pups which are more modern. I personally liked this configuration more than the vintage one, simply because it offers extended versatility.

Let me shoot you some names Mr Pro Guitar player. When those you mention can play with the likes of Jack Pearson you can put them on a list. You didn’t even touch on country or bluegrass so I have to assume you know nothing about them. So let me throw this out there. There is only ONE called Mr. Guitar. Chet Atkins. His protege, Jerry Reed is another great. Let’s try Merle Travis, Jody Maphis and in recent years Redd Volkaert. I think you need to expand your listening radius. Let’s not forget the man who likely has his name on your guitar, Mr. Les Paul. Then I would ask you listen to bluegrass flatpicking. You want speed? These guys can play with Ygnwgie and do it on a Martin D28.
Let’s start off with a guitar’s signal. As the driving force behind the entire effects chain, a guitar’s signal (more importantly, it’s voltage) must travel through the input cables and all of your effects pedals before it can reach the amp. As you can imagine, by the time a guitar’s signal finishes making its way all the way to the amp, the signal will undoubtedly suffer from a bit of degradation, losing its tone and body in the process. It's not your guitar's fault, it's simply the nature of electricity.
One of the very first things you will play is either an open C or and open G in standard tuning. These are chords and serve as the very fundamental unit of song construction. Getting a new player up and running with a few chords they can strum is one of the first sign posts on the way to playing. It’s pretty rewarding to get that G to ring out clearly. That said, the greatest guitar masters use moveable chord forms to construct thoughtful lead work and intricate guitar lines.
All six strings are made from nylon, or nylon wrapped with metal, as opposed to the metal strings found on other acoustic guitars. Nylon strings also have a much lower tension than steel strings, as do the predecessors to nylon strings, gut strings (made from ox or sheep gut). The lower three strings ('bass strings') are wound with metal, commonly silver-plated copper.
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Those aspiring to kill the next-door neighbour’s lawn by the malevolent force of their playing alone would do well to speak to their local dealer about Schecter’s Demon-6. Updated with fresh set of Schecter active humbuckers and a super-smooth wenge fretboard for 2018, the Demon-6 is a mean- looking S-style that’s built for shredding  - and it’s also available as a seven-string for a little extra. It’s one of the most powerful and playable instruments on the market at this price. Its thin-C profile neck, cut from maple with a satin finish, is super-quick. Shredders will love that a light touch is rewarded on the fretboard - that wenge feels slick ’n’ slinky. The bridge’s construction fits the two most important tenets in bridge design: it’s no-fuss and industrial-strength. The Demon-6 feels indestructible. It might make you feel likewise; at least, its active pickups (powered by a nine-volt battery that’s easily accessed via a clip on the rear of the instrument) will ward off most predators if you crank the gain high enough. Tonally, that’s the Demon-6’s wheelhouse. The bridge ’bucker has plenty of grunt but an abundance of top-end that metal soloists will love. Overall, the Demon-6 is a metal guitar, designed to summon something much more sinister, and it delivers in spades.
Our original hand made guitar we’ve been building for 32 years that competes with guitars 3 times its price, the 50 Series has all the prerequisites of the traditional American guitar. Compared regularly to Martin D18 and Taylor 5 Series, but with easier playability and a lower price since you’re buying direct from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska. For 2018 Denny added a more detailed ivory zipper stripe binding and installed the new 2018 Fishman Isys Plus electronics system to make this guitar truly special. Shipped direct from Denny’s hands to yours. 100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.

The role of a pickup is simple. They pick up the sound produced by the guitar and create an electric signal which then travels via an amplifier. For instance, pickups do not relate to getting a partner with your music, but they are actually a characteristic of the electric guitar. They serve the same purpose that frets do on an acoustic instrument, but the pickups will determine the vibrations before sending them to an amplifier.
Coupling an SM57 with a small-diaphragm KM84 condenser finds favour with Bill Price and John Fry, while Mike Hedges chooses his favourite Sennheiser MKH40. Bill Price also mentions the importance of finding a very close phase match between the two microphones. "What one had to do was balance those mics equally, grab a pair of headphones out in the studio that were turned up nice and loud, and fractionally position one of the mics so that they were perfectly in phase at high frequencies, because if you had one mic five inches away and the other six inches away you'd obviously get really bad phase shift that would take the top off the guitar sound."
Electro-Harmonix’s Memory Man was one of the most popular solid-state delays ever, and even with its meager 5 to 320 milliseconds delay time was little short of revolutionary upon its introduction in 1976. At around $150, it was something of a bargain, too, though not dirt-cheap by any means—considering that at that time you could buy a new Stratocaster for just a little over three times that figure. The Memory Man was launched with Reticon SAD1024 chips, but E-H switched to quieter, better sounding and more adaptable Panasonic MN3005 ICs when these became available, and the latter is the chip found in the better-known Stereo Echo/Chorus and Deluxe models.
Hi, it seems like the problem lies in your hands and not in the guitar itself. If you are a beginner, you must start slowly and build up strength in your hands. A good way is to simply buy a "stress ball" or other hand exerciser. A "Gripmaster" one that lets you work each finger individually, which can be very useful, they are available for about $20 at most music stores.
Yamaha continues to rank highly in the entry to mid-tier guitar market, thanks to their student friendly instruments. I for one took classical guitar lessons with a Yamaha classical that still plays and sound great up to this day. As expected, they have an entry in this affordable price range category, in the form of the 3/4 size JR1, which is essentially a smaller version of Yamaha's popular FG acoustic guitar.
Midco International, a former musical distributor, sold the Lotus brand as an exclusive trademark of guitars during the 1970s and 1980s. Like many other distributors, Midco commissioned a manufacturer in Asia to build guitars under a unique brand name. However, many of these factories in Asia received requests to build guitars for multiple manufacturers/distributors, meaning the same guitar could essentially end up under multiple trademarks. This isn’t much different from what Harmony, Kay, and other house-brand jobbers from the Chicago area were doing in the 1940s through the 1960s.

Chorus: Though it can be overused, light distortion works well as a filler for choruses in Christian worship and most other genres.Verse: You won’t typically hear a distorted verse, though at times a two guitar group can make this work. Generally, you’ll want to leave distortion for the higher intensity portions of a song.Bridge: A lot of Christian songs tend to lower intensity during the bridge, which means light distortion becomes a little less usable. Though for bridges that keep the tempo up, it can work pretty well.
Now we’ve moved away from the three ‘main’ shapes of steel-strung acoustics, we start looking at the off-shoots and variants which exist to give players even more options and opportunity to find the guitar which is exactly right for them. First among them is probably still well-known and identifiable in itself; the round-shoulder dreadnought. Again, these are largely Gibson-led creations, and include among their ranks the famous J-45 style famously employed by the Beatles and Noel Gallagher.
Since it was originally introduced in 1975, the Destroyer has become an icon of that era's chapter in rock n' roll history. Over the years it has undergone many incarnations and the perennial classic returns once again. The body and neck of both guitars are made of a tight Mahogany for maximum resonance. The bound rosewood fingerboard is adorned with Jumbo frets. The Destroyer also features Sure Grip III control knobs for no-slip control. It's not called the Destroyer for nothing.
Once you have a board design complete, you can send it out for manufacture. Years ago this used to be the major challenge for the home or small builder, but these days a large number of board manufacturers have a web presence and will quickly fabricate single, or low volume boards for fairly modest cost. Eagle (or whichever CAD software you are using) outputs a set of files called gerber files. These files can be emailed or uploaded over the web to the board manufacturer who will plug these into their manufacturing tools and then send the finished boards to you in the mail.
Overdrive pedals are intended to mimic the sweet sound of an overdriven tube amp. They are generally more subtle, warmer and a bit richer in sound. Overdrive pedals typically don’t produce the kind of heavy distortion needed in hard rock and heavy metal, but they are fantastic for blues, country, rock and anything else where you need warm, textured distortion. A good example of a quality overdrive pedal is the Ibanez Tube Screamer.
On May 1, 2018, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. As part of its debt restructuring, the company will close down and liquidate its unprofitable Gibson Innovations division, which sells audio equipment outside of the U.S. and has been the source of much of the company's financial troubles. The restructuring will allow Gibson to focus on its most profitable ventures, such as musical instruments. No changes will be made to its guitar manufacturing business, and all Gibson and Epiphone branded guitars are expected to continue in production uninterrupted. Additionally, $135 million was provided by existing creditors to provide liquidity to maintain existing operations.[57][58]
Pickup selectors can wear out over time. The lugs and the rotating switch can loose their tight connect with years of use. Also, many inexpensive guitars made today use cheap electronic parts. You may just want to upgrade your switch for more control and better selections. It is fairly easy to install a new pickup selector. Here are a few simple steps to replacing your pickup selector.

Launch price: $1,499 / £1,419 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood/maple (dependent on finish) | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 3x V-Mod Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge and middle tone, 5-way selector | Hardware: 2-Point Synchronized vibrato, Fender standard staggered tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Antique Olive, 3-Color Sunburst, Black, Candy Apple Red, Natural, Olympic White, Sienna Sunburst, Sonic Gray
The design of this guitar probably makes it stand out from the “crowd.” This is another awesome six string acoustic guitar from the brand Juarez available in sunburst and black . It is designed for the right handed and mostly comes in Sunburst color without a bag. The body is made from blackwood with the top laminated with Linden Wood. The entire structure has a natural gloss finish, with the fret board having up to 18 frets. The hardware structure has a chrome finish. Prices are quite fair, ranging from INR 2,790. Find more details below.

With a body shape that looks like it could have been cut out by hand using a saw in your garden shed, this Kay Old Kraftsman Sizzler guitar manages to be crude and quite fantastic at the same time. "Old Kraftsman" was actually a brandname used on Kay guitars sold by Spiegel stores. The maple neck gives it a rather Fender-like appearance, but this is in fact a set neck and not a bolt-on.
This guitar follows after the tried and tested formula of old Stratocaster design, from the double cutaway alder body to the bolt-on maple neck, down to its triple single coil pickup configuration. The scale length follows after traditional builds at 25.5", while the neck profile (modern C) and narrower nut width of 1.65" makes this guitar viable for modern players. While it doesn't have vintage voiced pickups, the default pickups are not so bad either, and will give you the distinctive Strat tone that almost everybody loves.
Based on Mesa's flagship Mark V, the Mark Five: 25 head is small, perfectly formed and typical of Mesa's superlative design and attention to detail. Two independent channels, each with three very different voice presets, combine with Mesa's iconic five-band graphic EQ for a choice of 12 sounds. You can footswitch between the channels, with the graphic on or off for quasi four-channel operation and preset 25 or 10 watts per channel. One of the best features lives on the back panel: a CabClone speaker-emulated direct output, with a speaker defeat for silent recording or practice, using the built-in headphone socket. Despite the Mark Five: 25's long feature list, it's very easy to use and its tones are sensational. The rhythm channel covers the shimmering clean tones of the modern Boogie and the fatter 'blackface'-inspired midrange of the fabled Mark I, while the Mark V crunch voice is so deep and three-dimensional you could record an entire album with it. The lead channel is equally inspiring, with a perfect rendition of the Mark IIC's overdrive tone (arguably the most coveted Boogie sound), along with more modern distortion effects that sound unbelievably good when tweaked with the graphic. The Mark Five: 25 is one of the best small Boogies we've ever heard, which means it's one of the best small amps there is.
Compression/Sustain – a dynamic effect that smooths out the highest and lowest volume levels of your guitar signal to a more consistent level. A compressor also has the side effect of increasing the sustain of your guitar signal. Compression boosts the overall level of your guitar while clamping down on the volume of the loudest parts to prevent clipping. Compressors usually have an attack knob that allows you to control how fast it takes the compressor to start effecting the tone and a threshold knob that sets the volume level that the compressor starts clamping down on peaks.
Roger McGuinn's sparkling, chordal 12-string Rickenbacker riffs on the Byrds' early hits were the sonic bridge between folk and rock – and an irreplaceable color in rock's palette: Every indie band who's more interested in beatific strumming than screaming solos owes him a debt (the striking break in "Bells of Rhymney" could be on a Smiths record). McGuinn could do a lot more than chime, however, as demonstrated by his still-astonishing psychedelic-raga-Coltrane licks on "Eight Miles High."
Agreed too that almost any guitar will benefit from a good setup, but there's no getting around plywood and cheap pickups. If I pick up a guitar and the action is so bad you need vice grips to play it, it can't speak well for the manufacturer. Yes, you can make plywood sing I suppose, but I can make mahogany, adler, korina, maple or just about any other wood sing a heck of a lot easier than plywood.
Body Body shape: Double cutaway Body type: Solid body Body material: Solid wood Top wood: Not applicable Body wood: Swamp Ash body on translucent and burst finishes, Basswood on solid finishes Body finish: Gloss Orientation: Right handed Neck Neck shape: C medium Neck wood: Hard-rock Maple Joint: Bolt-on Scale length: 25.5 in. Truss rod: Standard Neck finish: Gloss Fretboard Material: Rosewoo
This mod works great for Strat-type pickups or aftermarket Tele-style reproduction pickups that don’t already have a plate. Some pickup companies make P-90s that don’t have a metal base plate, and these can be twang-ified in this way, too. The best part is that, if you don’t like the sound, you can just peel the plate off and be right back where you started.

1991 saw the introduction of guitar designer Jol Dantzig's first truly workable acoustic-electric hybrid guitar design. The instrument, called the DuoTone, was conceived while Dantzig was at Hamer Guitars. (Dantzig was also the designer of the first 12 string bass.) Adapted by players like Ty Tabor, Stone Gossard, Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy, the DuoTone was a full "duplex" instrument that could switch between acoustic and electric tones. Recently there have been many entries in the hybrid category (capable of both acoustic and electric tones) including the T5 by Taylor, Michael Kelly's "Hybrid," the Parker Fly and the Anderson Crowdster.
Uh, Roland. I don’t know when was the last time I read about the best amplifiers and one of Roland’s models was not there. That’s not due to their ability to market their instruments to everyone (well, they are good at that too, probably) BUT the main reason why they are always a talk of the town (of a very musical and amplifier obsessed town) is their quality of production. With a lot of expensive amps, they are also graceful enough to give us the MERE MORTALS ability to bath in the glory of what is Roland tone. This CUBE‌-10GX amp is a 10-watt little combo amp with one 8 inch speaker that is ideal for home practice or anyone who needs an inexpensive model that will not ruin their performance. With built-in effects, heavy-duty cabinet design, and a compact construction the CUBE‌-10GX amp might be your best choice for a practice amp that also works as a traveling amp.
While the company officially started by importing Spanish guitars, the Ibanez that we know really started in the late '60s when they began copying popular American guitar designs. As expected they got flak for their unofficial "lawsuit" copies, but this ultimately inspired the company to improve on existing designs and develop their own. Soon, virtuosos and big name guitarists like Steve Vai, Joe Satriani and more took notice, propelling the Ibanez brand into world wide renown. Now Ibanez is as big as it gets, with a wide variety of instruments, pedals, and amplifiers under their name. They make it to this list with the high ratings that their amps are receiving, headed by their Tube Screamer Amplifier series, which comes with the circuit of their popular boost/overdrive pedal built into the amplifier section.

By the late 1950s, the Les Paul was considered “staid and old-fashioned” as well as too heavy and expensive, no longer competitive with the Stratocaster, and by 1961 Gibson stopped producing the traditional Les Paul in favor of a lighter redesign called the SG. The mid-1960s, however, brought a resurgence of interest in the Les Paul, a development credited to one man and one album: Eric Clapton, using a Les Paul plugged into a Marshall Bluesbreaker amplifier as recorded on Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton (the “Beano” album, 1966),[13] set the standard for tone for a new generation of guitar players in blues and rock and roll (see Keith Richards’ contribution to the Les Paul legend below in the section ‘Renewed interest in the Les Paul models’ below). [14][15] Clapton was initially followed by American guitarist Michael Bloomfield and British guitarist Peter Green, and the subsequent rise in the instrument’s popularity was such that by the late 1960s Gibson reintroduced an updated Les Paul and a variety of other instruments “in its mold”, including a bass guitar.

Try to keep the amp relative to the quality of your pickups. For example, if you’re spending under $50 on a transducer pickup for an acoustic guitar, a basic acoustic amp will do you fine. But if you’re dropping around $300 on a hybrid system, there’s little point unless your amp can deliver the power and natural sound the pickup is capable of producing.
The BOSS ME-80 gives you all of the effects needed to create that elusive signature tone. The multi-effects unit is a great way to learn how different effects interact with each other to provide you with crystal-clear tones to fuzzy, thick walls-of-noise. If you have an ME-80, download BOSS Tone Studio for an easy way to experiment and learn these effects, have fun and use your ears to build your best guitar sound.
This is a really cool program. It let's you fiddle with a lot of cool effects, without having to spend a lot of money. The program works really well, after a bit of fiddling with the Jack server, and it far exceeds some of the commercial programs I have tried. I hope that this project gets some attention :) If I wasn't a "coding dyslexic", I'd be the first to sign up.
The single keys at the beginning of the keyboard (C2-C3 white notes only) contain a variety of percussion instruments (2 wood blocks, an Irish bongo, a mini rain stick, a mini swinging drum, a tambourine, a mini hollow wood log and a mini wooden scraper). Then the black keys further up are groups of instruments that cut each other off. For instance the first group of black notes (F#3,G#3,A#3) are all samples from the big conga but with different hit types. The next 2 black notes are a dear skin bongo. The next 3 black notes are the little conga. The next 2 black notes are a little metal bongo. The next 3 black notes are the medium conga and the next 2 black notes are a home made plastic shaker. This makes it easy to know the grouped instruments. It is also easy to whack a way at the congas (like real congas) as they are all the black keys in groups of 3 and each conga cuts its own keys off if another is played. I mainly recorded this for the 3 congas and then added the other bits as I had them laying around (some are even from my childrens musical instruments bag, i.e. wood blocks from the early learning centre and a home made plastic shaker). The congas are boomy when played hard but with a lot more delicate hand sound when played softly. It is possible to get a variety of sounds and styles with these conga samples.
The better-quality Japanese guitars of the mid 1970s to the present have rivaled the quality of many new American guitars of the same time period. It is worth considering, however, that the 1970s were almost without a doubt the worst period in the history of American-made guitars as well as numerous other American manufactured products. I am firmly of the opinion that no Japanese maker has equaled the quality of pre-World War II Gibson and Martin acoustic instruments or electric guitars by Gibson and Fender of the 1950s through the mid 1960s, but I would be quick to agree that a Tokai or Fuji Gen Gakki top-line instrument of the mid 1970s would be in many cases every bit as good and in some cases superior to Norlin-era Gibson and CBS-period Fender guitars. While "Made In Japan" had a connotation of cheap and mediocre quality in the 1960s through the early 1970s, by the end of the 1970s "Made In Japan" was often viewed by consumers of guitars and other products such as automobiles as being as good as if not superior to American. Some of the Japanese instruments have gone on to be viewed not only as being of fine quality but worthy of consideration by collectors. While I personally do not collect Japanese made guitars and do not deal large numbers of these instruments, I would certainly agree that many of them are of excellent quality and provide good value.
About 30 years ago, a fellow co-worker began teaching me how to play electric guitar. I believe it was an Aria Pro Strat. He had been playing for 20 plus years at this time and was a very good teacher, he owned a 1958 Les Paul. I have not played since he was in a car wreck in 1990 as he could not return to work. He was however able to continue to play, its just our schedules never allowed the time to take lessons. He passed away in 2011, and since I retired last year, I’d like to take up lessons. I found your article very helpful in selecting an electric guitar. It mentions a lot of things most people do not consider when buying.
In most cases, the neck will sit tightly in the neck cavity hard up against the edge of the body. But if the scale length isn’t correct from this position you may need to make minor adjustments to the neck position. If the bridge holes aren’t yet drilled, it’s better to adjust the bridge position than the neck. The saddles will also allow you approx. 10mm adjustment.

In ’41, the old Avalon Hawaiian was renamed in the No. 88 Supro Clipper Hawaiian Electric Guitar. This instrument would become a mainstay of the Supro line for many to come, and marked the debut of pearloid plastic coverings for Supro guitars. This was very similar in shape to the Baton. The body was still roughly rectangular, but now with a curved lower edge. The shoulders now had two symmetrical scalloped “cutaways.” The head had a curve with a slight peak; despite the Regal look, these were made by National Dobro. The fingerboard was genuine rosewood with dot inlays. This was covered in “sparkling brown plastic,” i.e. pearloid. The pickup was the new exposed-pole unit with the handrest, contained in a large square metal plate complete with tail slots for fixing the strings, otherwise similar to the plate on the Baton. One volume and one tone control knob sat on either side of the strings. The back was done up in non-slip grey suede. It could be had with a curly, plush-lined, grey shark Servitex case. In April of ’42, the Clipper cost $54.50.
There are many different kinds of pickup selectors. The most common forms of pickup selectors are 3-way and 5-way switches. Obviously, a 5-way switch gives you more pickup combinations than a 3-way switch. Below are some diagrams of what 3-way and 5-way pickup selectors can do. In choosing a pickup selector, I suggest that you try to replace your pickup selector with the same kind of selector. Refer to the manufacturers website and wiring diagram to get the right specifications. Notice I said to get the same “kind” — not the same one. It would make no sense to replace a cheap selector with another cheap selector. Find out the specs on the old selector and buy a nice one.
Electro-Harmonix’s Memory Man was one of the most popular solid-state delays ever, and even with its meager 5 to 320 milliseconds delay time was little short of revolutionary upon its introduction in 1976. At around $150, it was something of a bargain, too, though not dirt-cheap by any means—considering that at that time you could buy a new Stratocaster for just a little over three times that figure. The Memory Man was launched with Reticon SAD1024 chips, but E-H switched to quieter, better sounding and more adaptable Panasonic MN3005 ICs when these became available, and the latter is the chip found in the better-known Stereo Echo/Chorus and Deluxe models.
Yamaha’s also excel in terms of their playability, which is an especially important characteristic for beginners. Too many players sacrifice quality to save money on their first guitar, with the result being that they now have to deal with difficult playability that poses extra challenges to the learning process and can sour the learner’s experience with the new instrument. Yamaha offers an enticing balance between cost and quality.
All I can say is 5+ STARS, holy smokes and WOW!!!! ALL that for $140 SHIPPED!!!! AMAZING DEAL!!! The guitar plays GREAT! The color is very beautiful! The sound is quite impressive for the little money spent!!! The little AMP is adorable and works perfectly. All the accessories are great and are the perfect 'icing on the cake'!!! You will need a better gig bag than the one the guitar is shipped with, the gig bag that comes with it is thin and good to keep the dust off but not much more. So, buy a nice gig bag that will fit and your guitarist will be travel ready! I highly recommend this guitar ensemble to everyone! For $140 SHIPPED, you truly won't be disappointed!
Similar to Jackson guitars, B.C Rich is famous for their sharp jagged edges and heavy metal sounds. The influence of their hard rock and heavy metal sound spans decades. Bands such as Motley Crue and Slayer are just a few of the bands that made B.C Rich guitars such a huge staple in the world of heavy metal. When you see the shape of B.C Rich guitars, there is no doubt as to what kind of music is going to come from them. B.C Rich offers a decent selection of guitars ranging from beginner up to pro-level instruments. They even have models that don’t have that signature “heavy metal” jagged style. Most B.C Rich guitars have a mahogany body and at least some of the components are made from rosewood. Obviously, the quality depends on the price, but even their highest priced models could still use a few upgrades to really bring up the sound quality.
The EB-18 was not all that popular among bass players, and total production has been estimated at 874. The more expensive follow-up model, the EB-28, was even less popular with a total production of 217 units.[16] See also: E-18 series guitars[17] Martin did not resume building basses until 1989 (during the MTV Unplugged era), in which their approach was more consistent with company history:
you put in a lot of work, its not biblical correct, pretty good...but take with a grain of salt. but some guitars are made in Korea. I bought a Yamaha 3 piece back like a Kiso Suzuki, I would it was made in Japan The tuners said made Japan. I thought the pawn shop was crazy. I got it for $100 Love this guitar and then one day I looked at the the decal in the sound hole and in the tiniest print "Made in Korea" I felt a pang like o' crap I bought a Korean guitar. But I have a few Acoustics High end a Guild made in the 80's and this Yamaha is incredible. better or just as good as my old Suzuki
Lolol lame azz I knew if I kept reading your BS comment you would start nameing all your crapy azz guitars haha lol no one cares or gives a flying fuck what you have or own.... (What you must of sounded like when you were 12 and lame as today) Oohhh I'm sooooo cool I have jimi's guitar and eric's guitar cause I'm their nephiew ya there my uncles hmm mm both of them I own and play with there guitars all the time woooo hooooo...............
An "effects chain" or "signal chain" is formed by connecting two or more stompboxes. Effect chains are typically created between the guitar and the amp or between the preamplifier ("preamp") and the power amp. When a pedal is off or inactive, the electric audio signal coming into the pedal diverts onto a bypass, an unaltered "dry" signal that continues on to other effects down the chain. In this way, a musician can combine effects within a chain in a variety of ways without having to reconnect boxes during a performance.[10] A "controller" or "effects management system" lets the musician create multiple effect chains, so they can select one or several chains by tapping a single switch. The switches are usually organized in a row or a simple grid.[11]
The Fender brand is the parent company of other good guitar brands like Jackson, Charvel, and Gretsch. While all of these are owned by Fender, they each have very unique playing styles and sounds. Fender also produces their Squire series of value guitars. These guitars are entry-level instruments, with decent sound for an incredibly reasonable price.
An enduringly popular effect, with all sorts of uses for vocals, drums, guitars and synths, is genuine reverse reverb. This is where a reverb tail appears to increase in volume ahead of the sound that gives rise to it — a completely unnatural sound and something that's impossible to create in real time. It's easy enough to do in a DAW application though. First, find the section of audio you want to treat and reverse it. In the DAW I use, Digital Performer, there's an offline plug-in for this. Now apply conventional reverb to this 'backwards' audio — either by playing it through a reverb plug-in and recording it to another track, or by rendering it using an offline process (if your DAW offers this). In either case make sure you allow enough additional time at the end of the audio to capture the full, final reverb tail. In the screen grab I've done this by allowing 1500 milliseconds of post-roll processing.
Another application of a fuzz pedal is available when the user has control over the the amount of feedback signal routed back into the transistor loop while the pedal is engaged. By configuring the feedback to more sensitive levels, the pedal will feed back into itself causing oscillation*. As the pedal oscillates, certain frequencies will be produced, causing a singing sustained note without the guitarist playing anything at all. The player can consequently play over the note produced to cancel out the feedback loop, but once the player stops the pedal will feed back into itself producing the configured signal once again.
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Add your vote to this list of the top guitarists ever and help to pick the best guitar player in the history of music. These roock, jazz, blues guitarists have all had long careers filled with success and failure. Some are still jamming out today, which other rock stars died too young, before their talents could be fully appreciated. Now is your chance to give the best guitar players in the world some recognition.

If you are trying to find the best electric guitar for beginners but you lack the time to do the necessary research in order to find a quality product, this short introduction should help you out. After reading plenty of electric guitar reviews and after comparing top-notch products, we have reached the conclusion that Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD is the model that you should have in mind. This device has a beautiful mahogany body and a maple top that is said to deliver an easy to distinguish classic tone. As a plus, the model comes outfitted with Alnico Classic humbucker pickups that secure a subtle and warm tone. If the Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD is out of stock, we recommend that you check out the Epiphone Les Paul STANDARD Electric as it is a reliable alternative that you might equally enjoy.
I don't remember if it was actually an LP special II, but the first guitar I bought with my my own money at about the age of 15 was an absolutely beautiful Epi Les Paul. Black, with a really nice quilt maple top. I fell in love with the way it looked. Well, it turned out that guitar sucked. I mean it really sucked. Bad intonation, bad tuners, bad pickups, bad bridge, everything.I saved up my money sacking groceries for like 6 months and I ended up spending that hard-earned money on a crap guitar. I put it on layaway and my dad would drive me up to the store once a month and every time he would try to talk my into other guitars, Fenders mostly (he is a musician also). Nope. I really liked the way the guitar looked. I was young and stupid.
In 1956 Jennings was shown a prototype guitar amplifier made by Dick Denney, a big band guitarist and workmate from World War II. The company was renamed Jennings Musical Industries, or JMI, and in 1958 the 15-watt Vox AC15 amplifier was launched. It was popularised by The Shadows and other British rock 'n' roll musicians and became a commercial success.

“Move up to Alnico IV and the power rating comes up and the frequency response flattens out – you get a balanced and natural- sounding response from the coils, but not so it’s boosting the treble. The mid-range stays quite constant as well. And then you go to Alnico V, which has the highest power. Then the bass and treble do get boosted and the sound starts to get more aggressive – more ‘rock ’n’ roll’, for want of a better term.
Hello. I am trying to find out more about my Hohner electric guitar. I've been trying to research it online but cannot find ANY information or reference to this particular model. Some people have told me that it may have been a prototype sample that never went into production. The only reference number I can find on the guitar is a label that says Sample by Nanyo CG300G and Made in Japan. I bought this guitar around 1980-1982 when I was 13-15 years old and it is still in mint condition. I would really love to know more about it's origin.
Starting from the body, we see the standard Les Paul shape. The tonewood of choice is mahogany, as expected, but this time it comes with a maple top. The top of the guitar arches slightly just like the original Les Paul does. In terms of details, we see a white binding around the top section that really stands out on the dark matte finish.  It's something to behold.
Maybe it's time for you to start to think about what is comfortable for you to play. 10-46 is probably the most standard size used by players. Although, I'd put money on the fact that your Mockingbird came with 9s. Mine did, and they were the first things to go (very fast, but too floppy). While there is some merit to staying with 9-42 for familiarity's sake, making the move to a 10-46 set should be pretty easy to do while you're still learning.
Parts made for the Kay Vintage Reissues may not fit or lineup with the original and we do not guarantee that our part will fit your guitar. We do sell SELECTED parts and hard shell cases for the following: K161V Thin Twin, K775V Jazz II, K162V Pro Bass, K5970V Jazz Special Bass, K1700V Barney Kessel Pro, K6700V Barney Kessel Artist and K8700V Barney Kessel Jazz Special.
You've Changed.  Yep, you still LOVE your guitar, but man, you are now playing through a sweeet pedal board and amp that has way more gain than you could ever use.  The days of plugging straight into a Twin Reverb and trying to bully her into distortion is (thankfully) long gone.  Plus, you're older and wiser now, you no longer judge a pickup's value simply in it's output level ... you have now acquired a taste for true tone.  You want rich complex harmonics and touch sensitivity.  Face it, those EMG's did what needed to be done in 1991, but it's time to move on! 

Chorus pedals can provide a nice subtle doubling effect to the guitar or an extreme “watery” effect when maximized. Famous tunes that use chorus is “Come As You Are” (1991) by Nirvana, and “Brass in Pocket” (1979) by The Pretenders. But basically almost any clean guitar sound in the 80’s had some chorus on it! Certain effects are timeless such as overdrive, reverb and delay. Other effects like chorus can evoke certain time periods such as the 80’s so that is something to keep in mind when using an effect.


hey i have a decca guitar 2 pick ups sight body damage. i bought it for 7 us dollars included amp (amp doesnt work).i put probably 50 dollars into repairs on other thing such as new strings. another repair i made was where the neck connects to the body of the guitar someone unscred that plate pulling the guitar apart shoved "wallpaper or tissue box pieces" in it screwed i back together. i cant find any similar guitars like this in shape. but it has the decca trademark. no model numbers or anything. my guess is someone took a fender body and replaced the neck, becausee the neck doesnt line up with the body. there is 1 tone dial 1 volume control 2 pick ups 6 strings a "whammy bar" which is held up by a thick spring about an inch long. the whammy bar does fold back to the guitar wich caused most of the scratches before i recieved this guitar. please email me if you understand what im saying and have something nice to say especially if it is worth more than $7.50. aain my email adress is nuckthebuck@aol.com. my name is Craig Nuckles.
The GE-7 Graphic Equalizer is good to have after the overdrive in case you want to use it to scoop mids or bump certain frequencies for solos. (To show that these are not hard rules, it also works pretty well if the EQ is after the compressor but before the overdrive. But this changes how the EQ sounds, since you would be distorting it with the overdrive, so try it in the suggested position first.) Also, it’s good to have the EQ before the noise suppressor, since EQs can add noise as they boost tone at various points in the frequency spectrum, including any noise that is already there.
With the Orange Terror series, you can have premium high-gain tube tone without having to lug around heavy equipment. The Orange Micro is among the smallest in the Terror series of amps, following the same streamlined design of its siblings, but with a different "dark" tonality. This lunchbox amp combines a 12AX7 preamp tube with a solid-state power amp, all packed in a compact and lightweight profile.

Some more advanced models, like the Wampler Latitude Tremolo Deluxe, bring a much more complex set of features, which include choosing the waveform and more. Whether you are looking for a good way to spice up your tone without impacting the nature of your signal, or you are just in need of a great vintage style effect, tremolo is the one to go for.
Gibson dates back to the late 1800s, when Orville Gibson patented a mandolin design that was much more durable than other instruments at that time. He sold these instruments out of a one-room workshop in Kalamazoo, MI, until his death in 1918. The designs lived on, however, as the company hired designer Lloyd Lear to continue creating new instruments.
Excellent condition Traveling Wilbury's solid body electric guitar. Each Gretsch TW-100T is unique in it's graphics. Featuring a solid maple neck and an ebony colored finger board w/ dot inlays and no fret wear. Fully adjustable "Strat-style" tremolo / bridge including whammy bar. One single coil pickup and a volume control. Only the most minor of wear to the finish.
For 70 over years, Kiesel Guitars has been building the highest quality guitars, basses, pickups, replacement necks, kits and accessories for pro and hobbyist musicians alike. We offer a complete lineup of instruments, including carved top guitars, multiscale fanned fret guitars & basses, MIDI synth access guitars, headless guitars & basses, extended-scale baritone guitars, acoustic/electric guitars and basses plus signature models from Jason Becker, Allan Holdsworth and more. Our Custom Shop builds instruments in the USA from the highest quality materials, at a direct price that can't be beat, along with build times of around 10 - 12 weeks. Hundreds of options, including exotic woods, inlays, fretwire, hardware, pickups & electronics and more allow you to order an instrument perfectly suited to your playing style and personal tastes. click for more...
You know Eddie Van Halen, that legendary guitar player who pretty much knocked the music world on its ear with his innovative sounds and playing style back in the late ‘70s. For years he partnered with brands such as Kramer, Ernie Ball and Peavey to create signature models of his guitars, as well as the real guitars he used onstage. Now he has his own company: EVH.
Roland has come a long way from its humble beginnings back in the early '70s as a rhythm machine manufacturer. The company grew to produce various other instruments and amplifiers, and is now one of the biggest music gear manufacturers in the world. With so many guitar brands under their name that could produce amps for them - like Boss and Line 6 - they still take the effort to build their own branded amps, and the success that they are enjoying is proof that they are doing the right thing. Their most popular amp is still the Roland Jazz Chorus, as used by artists like Albert King, Andy Summers, Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, Robert Smith of The Cure, Jeff Buckley and many more. These days they have a variety of amplifiers in the entry to mid-tier market, most of which continue to garner great reviews.
While audio feedback in general is undesirable due to the high frequency overtone, when controlled properly, it can provide true sustain of the sound (instead of using a distortion/compressor to make quiet notes louder, or a feedback of a signal in a circuit as in a delay unit). Several approaches have been used to produce guitar feedback effects, which sustain the sound from the guitar:

My first Custom was a Charvel/Jackson Star body with a custom white paint with bullet holes and dripping blood from the holes ! My friend and Guitar teacher Randy Rhoads helped me get started on the right track in 1980 ,before I was playing in clubs and headlining shows later in the 80s and 90s,I was set with the perfect guitar! Gibson is just a brand name,Epiphones are better then Gibsons ,your just paying for a name,same with Fender! Remember,one of the greatest guitars was made for less then $300,so you should never really spend more then that unless it is a custom ,then you can do what you have to!

I bought my Norma accoustic in 1971 from a lady dealer who bought-out other stores going out of business. I paid $50. for guitar,case and strings. Best $50. I`ve ever spent. The sound gets better everyday. I have played the local market a lot, and fronted a Jamboree stage for 12 years (did the microphone work and sang), where I saw many a performer and their guitars come and go. Everyone was envious of my good sounding guitar. I applied a Dean Markeley electric pickup into the round hole and "wow" what a sound. Wouldnt take nothing for it. I own 7 accoustics,4 ele and three ele bass` guitars. I take my Norma everywhere. I am in the Georgia Music Hall of Fame and get lots of opportunities.
Now I'm talking to the owner of my local mom & pop shop who sold me my Affinty (which is great but the string spacing sucks). Guy is leaning toward making a deal for an Austin. Maybe I'm dead wrong, but I don't like Austins, they are crap IMO. I told him I have some extra cash and maybe we could work something out, but I just feel like this guy has a lousy inventory of cheap guitars and I will be hard pressed to escape with a decent instrument.
After lowering the bridge (usually in a failed attempt at getting lower string action), the owner will eventually realize this is not the best solution. When this happens and a neck reset is preformed, the original bridge will now be *useless* (because it is too low!) The repair guy won't reset the neck to a low bridge, so a new replacement bridge will be installed. At this point the originality of the instrument is compromised.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 6 frets (sometimes pearl, sometimes ivoroid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
Developed by Martin in 1916, the dreadnought shape changed the landscape of acoustic guitars. Thanks to its punchy sound, loud volume and improved bottom end, dreadnoughts quickly rose to popularity and has since been copied by virtually every acoustic guitar manufacturer. Today, if you're thinking acoustic guitar, the most probable image in your mind would be of a Martin Dreadnought or one of its many clones.
The C3M comes with Savarez Cristal Corum high-tension strings, but you can always change them out for something different if you prefer. Aesthetics-wise, the guitar has a matte finish (the “M” in the model name), but it really has no bearing on the way the guitar sounds.All the same, you’ll want to protect your guitar from nicks, cuts and other damage.
Overdriven speakers create one of the most desirable distortion characteristics: crunch. The best way to test for this is to dial in a clean setting and turn the volume way up. Low-wattage speakers break up at lower volumes, but they have a tendency to turn to mush at excessive volume levels; high-wattage speakers may not break up at all. Choose a speaker that sounds lively, defined and harmonically rich at volume and distortion levels you’ll normally play at.
Bassists pairing an amplifier "head" of a certain wattage and a speaker cabinet (or speaker cabinets) with a certain wattage power-handling capacity may require advice from music store amplifier expert or an audio engineer. One of the reasons that many beginning bassists choose combo amps when they are starting is because with a combo amp, the manufacturer has ensured that the speaker and power amp are compatible from a power handling and impedance perspective. While there is a widespread belief that an amplifier with a rated wattage that is higher than the rated wattage on a speaker cabinet will harm the speaker, in fact, a clean, un-clipped power amplifier signal can be above the rated wattage of a speaker without damaging the speaker, as long as the power amp is sending out a clean, unclipped signal. There is a much higher risk of damaging a speaker when a clipped (unintentionally distorted) power amplifier signal is sent through it, even if the wattage is far below the rated wattage of a speaker. For example, a bassist could use a 700 watt power amp which is running with zero power amp clipping through a speaker cabinet rated at 500 watts without damaging the speaker; however, if a 100 watt power amp that is heavily clipping is plugged into the speaker cab, this could blow the speaker.
We answer this with a resounding, “Yes!” While electric guitars depend solely on pickups to be heard and to change or distort sound, acoustic electric guitars just provide the ability to amplify the sounds of an acoustic. The acoustic electric guitar construction is still built the same way as an acoustic but with pickups added in the design. You now have the ability to play plugged-in to amplify the natural acoustic harmonics of your tonewoods, or you can play unplugged when jammin’ it at a Summer bonfire.
The company was within three months of going out of business before it was bought by Henry E. Juszkiewicz, David H. Berryman, and Gary A. Zebrowski in January 1986.[18] Gibson's wholesale shipments in 1993 were an estimated $70 million, up from $50 million in 1992. When Juszkiewicz and Berryman took over in 1986, sales were below $10 million.[19] New production plants were opened in Memphis, Tennessee, as well as Bozeman, Montana. The Memphis facility is used for semi-hollow and custom shop instruments, while the Bozeman facility is dedicated to acoustic instruments.[20]

Danelectro's new '59XT guitar was an exciting announcement at NAMM 2018, and we're stoked to have a chance to test out this sharp-looking axe. Control-wise, the guitar keeps it simple, with a three-way pickup selector switch stacked above tone and volume control knobs, but it ups the game with a Wilkinson tremolo and a lipstick pickup. Watch along as Andy tests out the Dano's sound, and look below for more information about how to get one of your very own.
I'm looking for a similar guitar. My first electric in 1969, purchased used for $50.I lost it sometime in the 70's, but still have a picture of it. It was a sunburst finish cutaway violin shaped body with Bigsby type tailpiece and a tunable bridge with a flip up mute bar. The headstock is similar to a Gibson but the neck was thinner.I can't remember how it played or sounded.I'm just looking to replace it for nostalgic reasons. I also recently purchased a Kent Les Paul copy I found on e bay while searching for kenr guitars.I have seen the framed ads but I have yet to find that model.
Today, Van Halen is one of rock’s most influential and imitated innovators. As unpredictable and flamboyant as Hendrix, Van Halen has had an unmeasurable impact on the guitar community. By the mid Eighties, his self-described “brown” sound, over-the-top techniques (including two-handed tapping), and revolutionary trem-bar effects inspired a generation of aspiring guitarists who bought the one-pickup, one-volume-knob, Floyd Rose–equipped Strat-style guitars that Van Halen made famous.

Most people who use this alternate tuning method change the pitch of the sixth string only, the low E, from E to D. This is frequently used for Rock songs when you want a darker tone, such as with Heavy Metal. In addition, dropping the E string two steps to D means that you can play power chords with one finger. Some people also drop the first string (high e) down to D, resulting in D-A-D-G-B-D.
With that in mind, we need to point out something about this piece of content, and others like it that we have written: These recommendations are based on the knowledge and opinion of real musicians. We are not marketers or internet gurus trying to make a buck off Amazon. Now, we do use affiliate programs to support this site and those who run it, but we are not simply throwing pedals up without knowing why we're suggesting them. The point is to provide a proper context for your purchase, which we believe is the best way to make a sale, anyway.
A Flanger simulates the sound effect originally created by momentarily slowing the tape during recording by holding something against the flange, or edge of the tape reel, and then allowing it to speed up again. This effect was used to simulate passing into "warp speed," in sci-fi films, and also in psychedelic rock music of the 1960s. Flanging has a sound similar to a phase-shifter, but different, yet is closely related to the production of chorus.
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History aside, modern-day Ibanez guitars are amazing instruments. They offer a very distinctive value and bang for your buck that is simply hard to match by other manufacturers. Ibanez has become huge in shred (fast lead playing) guitar and metal circles. High profile virtuosos like Joe Satriani, Steve Vai and Paul Gilbert have been greatly responsible for securing Ibanez’s place in super-fast, incredibly technical, shred guitar playing. Not to mention that Ibanez electric guitars simply feel “easy” to play, fast and comfortable. As far as ergonomics and playability, Ibanez guitars are hard to beat. Plus, you can get some very good inexpensive models too. If I where going to call a brand, “the Toyota of the guitar industry,” it would be Ibanez.
Though some sophisticated processors combine pitch detection with pitch-shifting, to generate musically correct harmonies in user-defined keys, simple pitch-shifters always change the pitch by the same number of cents or semitones. In musical terms, that means that only the octaves, parallel fourths and fifths are very useful. Other intervals tend to sound discordant, as they don't follow the intervals dictated by typical musical scales.
During the late Middle Ages, gitterns called "guitars" were in use, but their construction and tuning was different from modern guitars. The Guitarra Latina in Spain, had curved sides and a single hole. The Guitarra Morisca, which appears to have had Moorish influences, had an oval soundbox and many sound holes on its soundboard. By the 15th century, a four course double-string instrument called the vihuela de mano, that had tuning like the later modern guitar except on one string and similar construction, first appeared in Spain and spread to France and Italy. In the 16th century, a fifth double-string was added. During this time, composers wrote mostly in tablature notation. In the middle of the 16th century, influences from the vihuela and the renaissance guitar were combined and the baroque five string guitar appeared in Spain.[33] The baroque guitar quickly superseded the vihuela in popularity in Spain, France and Italy and Italian players and composers became prominent. In the late 18th century the six string guitar quickly became popular at the expense of the five string guitars. During the 19th century the Spanish luthier and player Antonio de Torres gave the modern classical guitar its definitive form, with a broadened body, increased waist curve, thinned belly, improved internal bracing.[34] The modern classical guitar replaced an older form for the accompaniment of song and dance called flamenco, and a modified version, known as the flamenco guitar, was created.

The Very Best Rock Vocalists All-Time Best Rock Frontmen Greatest Drummers Insane Rock Rumors That Are Actually True Druggiest Rock Stars of All Time What Their Kids Look Like Now Incredible Songwriters The Rockingest Women Singers Undeserving Members of the Rock HoF Great Guitar Rock Albums All-Time Best Rock Bassists Our Rock Hall of Fame Nominees Huge Stars Who Stepped Out of the Spotlight Old Rock Stars Who Still Look Pretty Good Rock Guitarists of the 1970s Rock Stars in Love Triangles The Greatest Living Rock Songwriters Mononymous Singers Greatest American Rock Bands Rumors That Were Never True


Grover Jackson became a partner with Wayne Charvel in the Charvel's Guitar Repair shop in California in the 1970s then Grover Jackson took over the entire business in 1978 and at that time they were making guitars under the name Charvel. Their guitars were tailored to the heavy metal and hard rock genre's of the day. Then a relatively unknown Randy Rhoads, who had just joined Ozzy Osbourne’s new band, contacted them in 1980 with the idea to create a highly customized guitar. That guitar, a new take on the Flying V called 'Concorde' became the first guitar to carry the Jackson brand and the company has been popular with shredders ever since.
This depends on a number of things. Are you looking for placement in a series of pedals? If so, it should go towards the end of your chain. Are you looking at it as a functional point? If so, using an octave lower can give some hugeness to heavy guitar or might pull a fatter sound out of some higher solos, whereas an octave up is almost always great for a layering effect.
Billie Joe Armstrong‘s two signature guitar models are Les Paul Juniors. The first has been in production since 2006 and is based on the ’56 Junior he uses that is named ‘Floyd’ which was used on every Green Day album since 2004’s American Idiot. The second is a TV Yellow double-cutaway model which began production in 2012 and was used on Green Day’s ¡Uno! ¡Dos! ¡Tré! album trilogy. Both models have one Billie Joe Armstrong signature pickup, the H-90, a humbucking version of the P-90 pickup. In 2011, Gibson released a limited run of Acoustic signature Gibson Billie Joe Armstrong J-180s.
Open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., the Visitor Center showcases a diverse selection of Taylor guitars, including standard models and seasonal limited edition offerings, for players to enjoy. To enhance the playing experience, two sound rooms are equipped with amplifiers, enabling players to plug in and play in a private environment. The Visitor Center also houses the Taylor Guitars store, where guests can purchase items including guitar parts and accessories, along with Taylor-branded clothing and other items from the company’s TaylorWare line.

The greatest all time innovative guitarist to come out of the UK. Such a distinctive style and sound which is most important. Many guitarists have a similar sound and tone to others. This guy got me hooked on the sound of the guitar from a young age and I have tried to find others in a similar vein to no avail and I own over 2000 rock/metal CD's and have followed the scene since the mid 80's. A totally under estimated guitarist in my opinion. Long live The Cult.


Finally, have you ever heard a definitive answer to the question “how long does it take to learn guitar?” Us neither! Learning your first chords can take a few hours, but the instrument can take a lifetime to master. But that’s the joy of playing guitar – you never stop learning. It’s down to you to practise and progress, because practise makes perfect!
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Tune-O-Matic - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, 2x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Humbucker - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Black, Red
Compressors are available as footpedal controls and can be used as an effect on electric guitar signals, for example. They can be used to obtain greater sustain for a string by setting the gain high and allowing the compressor to keep the output signal at a more-or-less constant level until the natural sustain of the string drops the signal below a certain threshold.
Another piece of advice most experienced guitar players will give you is to keep your reverb pedals near the end of your signal chain. The reason for this is simple but requires a more colorful explanation. Imagine your signal chain as a conveyor belt for ice cream. As the signal leaves your guitar, it is just a plain vanilla mass that gets another layer of flavor as it hits different pedals. Distortion might add a nice chocolate glazing, then we have the modulation with its meticulous icing, and so forth. A reverb pedal in this context are sprinkles. You don’t want to add them at the beginning since they can completely change the way every other ingredient that comes afterward behaves. You add sprinkles at the end. In appropriate amounts only.
Modulation is where we step away from the more subtle (relatively) effects which serve to colour an existing tone, and into areas where you can truly begin to add flavour and texture to your tone. There are a few main types of modulation; chorus, phase, tremolo, wah and flange. Chorus subtly mimics your tone with a microscopically detuned duplicate, which when played together adds a nice warm layer to the sound. As an example, play the ‘e’ note on your second string (fifth fret) and the open ‘e’ first string at the same time. Naturally, there is a cent or two difference in the tuning. But you can see that two virtually (but not exactly) instances of the same note makes everything sound a bit bigger and a bit wider. That, in an admittedly basic form, is the chorus effect.
Wherever you play you're going to run into one of three sound setups: a full PA, a partial PA, or no PA capacity beyond vocal mics. The PA (Public Address system) is the primary sound system in any venue. A full PA has the board space and amplification capabilities to allow a sound engineer to apply a dedicated microphone to every instrument, amplifier, and drum head, as well as the cymbal spaces.
I bought my 10 year old son a digitech RP355 multi effects pedal to use. It's cheap and simple to edit patches for different sounds and you can download patches to get the sound used in some popular songs but the thing I like best about it is the amplifier emulation. After using it for a while my son found he liked the sound of Vox amps so we bought a AC4 and it sounds great. I liked the fender deluxe and bassman amps so I had a deluxe amp circuit built by a local amp guy. Later on you will find that you want to move on to real pedals as they sound better so a multieffects pedal is a good way to sample a lot of different effects in one package. Most multi effect pedals have a sampling function so you can record a short song segment and then the unit will replay it while you solo along. Some also have the ability to record from an outside source and then play it back at slower speed so you can learn tricky licks. Lastly, most units have drum tracks which is a great way to play along and stay on time.

Modeling pedals use a host of methods to make your guitar sound like it’s coming from a specific sound source. For example, there are many pedals out there that are designed to model the sound of classic amps. This allows you to plug your amp and pedal straight into a PA system or even a pair of headphones, while maintaining the characteristics of the amp the pedal is modeled after. This also helps you avoid having to carry your amp with you everywhere you go.


Jazz guitar playing styles include rhythm guitar-style "comping" (accompanying) with jazz chord voicings (and in some cases, walking basslines) and "blowing" (improvising solos) over jazz chord progressions with jazz-style phrasing and ornaments. The accompanying style for electric guitar in most jazz styles differs from the way chordal instruments accompany in many popular styles of music. In rock and pop, the rhythm guitarist typically performs chords in dense and regular fashion to define a tune's rhythm. Simpler music tends to use chord voicings focused on the first, third, and fifth notes of the chord. In contrast, more complex music styles of pop might intermingle periodic chords and delicate voicings into pauses in the melody or solo. Complex guitar chord voicings are often have no root, especially in chords that have more than six notes. Such chords typically emphasize the third and seventh notes of the chord. These chords also often include the 9th, 11th and 13th notes of the chord, which are called extensions, or color notes.
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