Pedalboards are just plain fun. You can mix and match any number of little boxes and really personalize your tone. We are living in the golden age of guitar pedals right now with such a huge variety of effects out there. The majority of effects fit into one of the following categories: gain (overdrive, fuzz, distortion, compression, clean boosts), filter (wahs, auto-wahs, envelope followers), and time-based (delay, reverb, chorus, flange, phase).
Wildwood Guitars is proud to be recognized as one of nine authorized online Gibson dealers. We invite you to browse our extensive inventory and discover the magic of one of the greatest American brands of all time. Located in the heart of Tennessee, the Gibson Memphis factory is known for crafting the majority of Gibson’s incredible semi-hollow and hollowbody instruments. These guitars are overflowing with the soul of the city they’re born in, and they represent the ultimate in both vibe and versatility.
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FRET LEVELING ("Filing", "Dressing"...) $150.00 and up. Worn or uneven frets can he filed level in many cases, if there will remain enough height on the fret to suit the customer. Frets must be lowered to the height of the lowest pit that can be found. Sometimes, replacing the most worn frets is appropriate. Includes "set up" adjustments.Add $25.00 for finished maple fretboards.

Acoustic guitars that have been fitted with a pickup can be recorded using the same techniques as standard electric guitars when plugged into an amp. Interesting sounds can be created by mic’ing up an acoustic guitar and sending the sound through an amp. This can be done live – although you should be aware of feedback – or a previously recorded acoustic track can be re-amped and used exclusively, or mixed with the original acoustic track. You can get some really gnarly and original ‘electric’ sounds with creative use of overdriven acoustic guitar; it’s especially good for slide playing.


I have the Epi SG400. It is very playable, and I think the stock PUP's are fine. It is a very versatile guitar. The only thing about the SG is it has a heavy neck. I mean strap one on, and that long neck just tugs down on my left shoulder. I actually tried to sell mine a while back just because of the heavy neck. I added a strap bolt to the top of the horn thing, or whatever you call it, and that helped. Some like the SG310 which is cheaper, but it has a bolt neck, and I think that will translate into an even heavier neck. Rhonda makes some SG clones as well. My only advice would be try straping one around your neck before you buy if you can.

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One full step down from standard tuning. Used by bands/artists such as Volbeat, Mötley Crüe, Nightwish, Pantera, P.O.D., Sepultura, Dimmu Borgir, Cradle of Filth, Watain, In Solitude, Agalloch, Inquisition, Drive-By Truckers, Soulfly, Children of Bodom, Symphony X, Oceansize, Death, Decrepit Birth, Dream Theater, All That Remains, Exodus, Gojira, Shadows Fall, Mastodon, Asking Alexandria on their Stand Up and Scream, Ghost, Lordi, and Kreator. Used in a vast majority of songs by musician Elliott Smith. Also used in Nirvana's songs "Come As You Are", "Lithium" and "Drain You", by Metallica in their songs "Sad but True", "Devil's Dance", their cover of "Whiskey in the Jar", some of their covers on The $5.98 E.P.: Garage Days Re-Revisited ("The Small Hours" and "Crash Course in Brain Surgery"),"Dream No More", "The Thing That Should Not Be" and in live performances of "The God That Failed" and "Seek and Destroy"; by Bullet for My Valentine in several songs on Scream Aim Fire, by blink-182 in "Adam's Song", in Doug Anthony All Stars live performances and by John Fogerty.

Gibson announced the new 2012 Les Paul Standard at Winter NAMM 2012. The new Standard features two Burstbucker Pro humbuckers with coil splitting, and Pure Bypass. Pure Bypass gives the option of bypassing the volume and tone potentiometers, sending the signal directly from the bridge pickup to the output jack. The 2012 Standard also features Gibson’s “modern weight relief” as opposed to the chambered body of previous Standards. Other changes include a phase switch and compound fretboard radius.
Our first recommendation in this list is the epic Les Paul model by Epiphone. The Special II model of Epiphone is specially made for beginners. If you are just starting to play the guitar and looking for a good quality one from the trusted band, you can buy this one. This one is very low cost and offers a lot more features than other Gibson guitars.
The solid state amp isn’t really new either, but it only came into its own following William Shockley’s world-changing invention, the transistor. Its use for the audio circuitry allows the amp to be more adaptable and easier to tune, but despite innovations in recent years, the overdrive of solid state amps isn’t yet on par with what a tube can offer, and only a few manufacturers can boast of products that come close to sounding as clean as a tube amp.
There’s so many multi effects pedals out there to choose from, that finding the right one that suits your musical style and your budget can be a little difficult. depending on what your style or genre is, you’re could be wondering which multi effects pedal is best for metal, or curious if your multi-effects pedal will work with your tube amp or even which option is right for your acoustic guitar, but fear not as we aim to answer all those questions and more.

I am a guitar player, teacher and composer. I started playing piano at the age of seven. Five years later I had my first guitar performance with a local band. My style was inspired by guitarists like Nuno Bettencourt, Joe Satriani, Jerry Cantrell, Marty Friedman, Zakk Wylde, Steve Vai and Dimebag Darrell. During my career I had many bands and music project, going through different styles of original music and sometimes cover bands. In 2012 co-founded the band Vulgar Bulgar (Pantera tribute band). In 2013 started teaching guitar at Rockschool.bg. Currently freelance guitar teacher, session musician and solo performing artist.


On some amps with a number of input and output jacks, the jacks may be consolidated in a patch bay. Some amps have an input jack for a foot-operated switch which can be used to turn on an effect or switch to a solo channel. Some higher-end amps have a Speakon speaker jack for an extension speaker. In the 2010s, the Speakon jack is often used in high wattage amplifiers, because the design of the connector, which is shielded from human touch, prevents electrical shock from a high-powered amplifier. Some amplifiers have a "tuner out" jack, for sending the instrument signal to an external electronic tuner. Bass speaker cabinets often have two 1/4" jacks. These are provided so that one speaker cable can be plugged into the first jack and connected to the power amp; if the bassist wants to use a second cabinet, a second speaker cable is plugged into the second jack and then into second speaker.
The 5150 III EL34 50-watt head downsizes EVH's high-gain format, and boasts three channels: channel 1 (clean) and channel 2 (crunch) share the same EQ but feature separate gain and volume controls on clever, dual concentric pots; channel 3 (lead) gets its own dedicated EQ. A global presence control on the front panel and a global resonance control on the rear panel tune the power amplifier’s high and low frequency response to taste. The 5150 EL34 also takes MIDI program change commands, so you can sync it to MIDI-compatible effects units and floor controllers. The EL34 version of the 5150 is important because Van Halen’s groundbreaking early work relied exclusively on heavily-modified Marshall Super Lead heads, which used EL34s. Sat firmly in hot-rodded Plexi territory, the 5150’s channel 1 is capable of sparkling cleans, with enough gain for mildly driven blues sounds. Channel 2’s higher gain is perfect for crunch and classic rock leads, while Channel 3 launches into the stratosphere with gain levels that are cheerfully insane, yet works a clever magic trick by retaining most of the dynamics that are often lost at such extremes. This means the 5150 sounds properly cranked up, even at quite low practice levels. EVH’s 5150 III 50W EL34 is a highly-effective weapon for the modern rock and metal player that puts tone before unnecessary complexity.
First, you have so many different types music – flamenco, jazz, country, blues, classical, rock and pop, to name just a few. Then you have musicians performing at different levels – there are the beginners who’ve never held a guitar before, there are experienced guitarists playing in bands, then there are professional guitarists, who make a career out of playing the guitar.

The pre-1945 braces have a scooped or "scalloped" profile, making them lighter in design and weight. Functionally this means a greater vibrating surface (the guitar's top), and provides stronger bass response. Why did the Martin Company change from the lighter scalloped braces to heavier braces? The answer is in the strings. Many guitarists of that time were using heavier gauge strings, and these heavier strings were tough on the lightly constructed scalloped-braced Martins (especially on D-models with the long 25.4" scale). Martin didn't make a heavier guitar to withstand the extra string tension, so they compensated by adding more rigid (non-scalloped) braces to the guitar's top.
To set up guitar pedals, use a short patch cable to connect your guitar directly into the tuner pedal if you’re using one. If you’re using filter effects pedals, like auto-wahs and envelope filters, connect them next. Plug in your compressor pedal after the filter pedals, followed by pitch-shifting, overdrive, and distortion pedals. Set up your modulation pedals, like chorus, flanger, tremolo, or phaser pedals, near the end of the chain so they’ll have a richer sound.
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I found a Decca guitar lying in my woodworks shop at school, and my teacher let me take it home. My friend and I have been restoring it, and we nearly have it finished, the only thing missing is the tremolo spring. However the model of the guitar is kind of odd as we have not found any record of what type of guitar we own. Its a double cut-away archtop, with a tobacco sunburst and 3 single coil pick ups. We have looked everywhere and haven't been able to find any record of a 3 pick up Decca guitar. We're still looking...


The Ibanez GRX20ZBKN is part of the GIO series developed for players who want Ibanez quality in a more affordable package. The guitar is suitable for all types of music, but often a favorite of rock, metal and shred lovers. It features an alder body and a maple neck which feels sleek and fast. Great for moving quickly up and down the neck for those fast riffs and licks. A solid good looking low budget guitar for the beginner and intermediate.
We all have heard that tone starts in the hands of the guitarist.  Different players can play thru the exact same amp and guitar rig and produce sounds on opposite ends of the spectrum.  I like to refer to this base sonic level as the DNA of a player.  Thanks to mad scientists tinkering in their evil laboratories of sound, we now have the ability to alter a guitarist’s tonal genetic code with effects pedals.
Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of...  Click To Read More About This Product

Once everything is assembled, check through the instructions one last time for any additional notes on connections, power etc (don’t waste all your hard work by blowing up the board with the wrong power supply). Then plug in your pedal and give it a try. There’s a good chance it will work first time. If not, go through the instructions again step by step and look to see where the problem might be. Missed, incorrect, or reversed components are the most common causes and can be diagnosed just by checking each step carefully.

*When the item leaves our warehouse, they are generally shipped to EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service and it would usually take 7 – 10 days to United States. We ship our products from Mainland China where our manufacturing factory is located. We will inform you once your order has been shipped and we will be providing you with the tracking number so you can conveniently monitor the shipments progress on EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service website or SF Express and USPS and Parcel Force website.
On the forum there are thousands of people at all stages of playing that can offer advice on new beginner guitars. I have to admit that I play pretty much only top-end gear and don't know the latest on all the new budget guitars, but on the community forum there are people learning that can all give you advice based on personal experience, and there's no substitute for that!
As the ’60s dawned, electric guitars began to increase in popularity again, and many distributors turned to Europe for suppliers. The Italian makers were the most successful, with EKO, imported by LoDuca Brothers, in Milwaukee, leading the pack. German makers were paced by Framus, which was imported by Philadelphia Music Company, located in suburban Limerick, Pennsylvania. The Scandinavian contingent was represented by Levin, Landola and Hagstrom, the latter picked up by Merson.
Harmony was founded in 1892 in Chicago by Wilhelm J.F. Schultz. Sears acquired them in 1916. Harmony made guitars for others under many names, some of which they acquired from other companies due to bankruptcies. These include Oscar Schmidt, Stella and the Sears brand Silvertone. Harmony went out of business in 1985. A new company is currently selling guitars under the Harmony name – many of these are classic Harmony designs such as the Harmony Rocket electric guitar.
It’s hard to conceive a better musical foil for Steven Tyler than his longtime partner and occasional adversary. For more than 40 years, Joe Perry’s monstrous, blues-on-steroids riffs have been Aerosmith‘s bedrock. And his solos, jutting out from “Walk This Way” or slashing boldly through the high-gloss production of later hits like “Janie’s Got a Gun” and “Cryin’,” have a caffeinated energy that’s every bit Tyler’s match. “He had a streamlined style that reminded me of Keith Richards,” said Slash. “And a careless style that’s really cool.”
As the author of the article, I don’t use an Axe-Fx, but a $250 Fly Rig. But if I want to talk to an expert on modeling, I wanted to ask the company that knows it best. Sure, you have to take in to consideration a PA, but you have to do that if you own an amp too, since proper sound sends keeps the volume lower on stage to send everything through the PA.
Hey! I just opened up my 1984 g&l for the first time today and I found a design very similar to this. I had always loved the tone control on it but was too nervous to open it up for whatever goofy reason. I may try to draw it out and share it but maybe include a picture at some point as well. I’m glad someone else has looked at this because it definitely threw me for a loop when I first saw the two caps both headed to ground.
Pickups are complex devices. No matter what we do, we cannot model them with spot-on accuracy. They do have a series resistance (R6), but the L1 and C3 inductor and capacitance, respectively, but these are not real circuit components, but are a simple model placeholder for the complicated interactions that appear due to Maxwell’s equations, when we have a wire wound around magnets (see below image):
SOLD OUT: ASK we may have another in stock Here we have a wonderful example of the Alvarez answer to the classic Martin 000-18 now famously linked to the Eric Clapton version from Martin om guitar today. Imported to the US by Saint Lewis Music 36 years ago. This fine example of the Alvarez 5014 is in excellent vintage condition you will not believe that she is over 36 years old when you see this in person you will realize it has been amazingly well cared for these past 3.6 decades. Its fit and finish is excellent as is its play action / neck angle ... this guitar is a pleasure to play and is truly EASY on the eyes... The neck is 1-11/16" at the nut and very comfortable to play with very little visible play wear to fingerboard or frets one will notice that this example is WELL above average condition for this age of guitar its really rare to see. Its beautiful SITKA SPRUCE top is solid and the back and sides are excellent grade Mahogany as is the neck please refer to the pics ... with nice details like its herringbone rosette, celluloid tortis pick guard, exotic Brazilian Coral Rosewood headstock overlay this guitar is more fancy than the other 5014's we have had and is in near mint vintage condition. The woods are well aged and the tone and volume has nicely opened up and aged like fine wine it takes time... a lot of guitar for this kind of price. Crafted in Japan over 36 years ago and kept in Amazing condition all these years just for you... Nicely set up with a NEW Martin Bone Nut & compensated bone saddle here at JVGUITARS. get this gem before she's gone! questions let me know... jvguitars@gmail.com .
If you’re new to the world of guitar or bass, a looper pedal is a great way to hone your skills. A looper pedal is not an effect, but more a tool that allows you to record chord progressions, notes or riffs and then play it back through your amp. It’s ideal for playing a chord progression or rhythm section, looping it and then playing a lead line or riff over the top – like two guitars playing together.
CALIFORNIA CLASSIC models feature superb playability, distinctive looks and an unmistakable Fender vibe. The fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and natural solid mahogany back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and koa binding and rosette, give them an elegant two-toned aesthetic that was made for the stage. California Special and California Classic acoustic guitars are equipped with a Fender- and Fishman-designed PM preamp specifically tuned to complement the unique shape and voice of each instrument—complete with tuner, frequency and phase controls.
We certainly can’t have a best cheap electric guitars list without the awesome Epiphone G-400 Electric Guitar, Worn Cherry. In fact, this guitar will make most peoples’ “best guitars” lists thanks to the fact they’re built to such high standards and they sound absolutely fantastic. The budget friendly price tag makes it an affordable option for beginner guitarists, but you’ll often see these Epiphone SG models on the professional stages of the world thanks to the sheer playability and build quality.
Semi-hollow guitars are guitars which have an exposed opening, generally in the form of two f-holes on the top of the guitar’s body. The inner chamber of the guitar is then divided into two by a block of wood which runs through the body. A perfect representation of this type of guitar is the Gibson ES-335, which has been used at some point or another by musicians such as: Eric Clapton, Otis Rush, Warren Haynes, Dave Grohl, and B.B. King.
The solid state amp isn’t really new either, but it only came into its own following William Shockley’s world-changing invention, the transistor. Its use for the audio circuitry allows the amp to be more adaptable and easier to tune, but despite innovations in recent years, the overdrive of solid state amps isn’t yet on par with what a tube can offer, and only a few manufacturers can boast of products that come close to sounding as clean as a tube amp.
This is one of the most popular guitar brands bought by the beginner and advanced learners in India. This brand is also one of the top-rated electro-acoustic guitars for beginners. This is the Japanese brand of guitar that is available in acoustic, bass, electric, and classical guitars styles. It flourishes a full-size frigate shape with a laminated select dapper top, and mahogany back and sides. It sports a mahogany neck, with a rosewood fretboard and 20 frets, withal an Ibanez-branded headstock with pretty good closed chrome die-cast tuners. The price of this brand of guitar starts from 13,000 approximately.

According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck.
Frank Bowers Interestingly enough, they have completely different approaches to the job. Bo cranks his Gibson Firebird straight through a Peavey 6505 half stack with nothing in line but a tuner, while Frank rocks out on his Gibson Les Paul Customs through a Digitech GSP-2101 preamp, a Mesa/Boogie TriAxis preamp, a TC Electronics G-Major processor, a Mesa/Boogie 2:90 power amp, and a Marshall 4x12 cabinet. During their show, they each take jaw-dropping solos, and they share the spotlight on some of the best-executed twin leads since Thin Lizzy’s “The Boys Are Back in Town.” 

Midco International, a former musical distributor, sold the Lotus brand as an exclusive trademark of guitars during the 1970s and 1980s. Like many other distributors, Midco commissioned a manufacturer in Asia to build guitars under a unique brand name. However, many of these factories in Asia received requests to build guitars for multiple manufacturers/distributors, meaning the same guitar could essentially end up under multiple trademarks. This isn’t much different from what Harmony, Kay, and other house-brand jobbers from the Chicago area were doing in the 1940s through the 1960s.
Desolder the 9V battery connections and attach a 9V centre-negative DC plug to the correct poles on a 3PDT switch; if you’re not sure where to start, purchase a PCB for this online or search for the correct wiring layout. Lead a live and ground wire out from your switch to your vero, and solder them in place where the 9V battery clip was previously soldered in.

Another technology that is used in Delay units is a feedback circuit, consisting of a tracking oscillator circuit to hold a note of the last interval, and after amplifying the signal, send it back to the input side of the delay. While it was first associated with Boss DF-2 Super Feedbacker & Distortion, currently, the signal feedback circuit is employed by Delay pedals, and if used under "hold" mode (As in Boss DD-3) it will provide a sustain effect instead of a simply delay effect.
Mod® Kits are designed to give both novice and experienced musicians the opportunity to build their own amps and effects pedals. All kits come with easy to follow instructions and use point to point wiring. Pre-drilled enclosure and all parts are included. All you need to provide are hand tools, a soldering iron and solder. All of our kits have a build difficulty rating to help you determine which kit is right for you.

Went here for the first time yesterday to get the strings replaced on my acoustic guitar. Kevin, the owner, completely encompasses the definition of true customer service. He not only was professional, courteous and friendly but also willing to talk me through the process as he was re-stringing my guitar when I asked if I could watch and learn. I highly encourage coming here, especially for a an excellent and personal experience! I will be back no doubt!
The Vintage El Dorado Leather Guitar Strap is meticulously hand-tooled in traditional Western motifs by leather artisans with decades of experience. Each strap is an individual and unique work of craftsmanship that you'll be proud to display on your guitar. The designs date back to late 19th century Western leatherwork, used extensively in the decoration of saddles, saddlebags, belts and holsters.
"Emulating guitar sounds is problematic – or it was until Impact Soundworks launched Shreddage. Version 2 for Kompact 5 is rammed full of chords and articulations to get the most authentic sound possible […] The quality of the samples here is really good. Although aimed at Rock and Metal, it lends itself to any genre. For those more accustomed to keys than strings, it is ideal with its impressive soundset and amount of control." CM Reviews (Computer Music)
Why do these genres not require the use of a tone knob, or sometimes, require a tone knob to be fully open? Well, for metal and hard rock, first of all, most of the tone shaping happens on the amp and/or on the pedals, especially for those who use high gain distortion pedals. The pickups on typical hard rock and metal guitars are humbuckers, which are warmer and have less treble. Couple that with high gain and high output pickups which compress the signal and also take some of the treble away, and keeping the tone knob open becomes that much important so that the tone will not be muddy and keep its cut and punch. For country, well, I guess that’s just *the* sound of the genre, and wide open Telecasters and Stratocasters are the weapons of choice.

One of the first solid-body guitars was invented by Les Paul. Gibson did not present their Gibson Les Paul guitar prototypes to the public, as they did not believe the solid-body style would catch on. Another early solid-body Spanish style guitar, resembling what would become Gibson's Les Paul guitar a decade later, was developed in 1941 by O.W. Appleton, of Nogales, Arizona.[27] Appleton made contact with both Gibson and Fender but was unable to sell the idea behind his "App" guitar to either company.[28] In 1946, Merle Travis commissioned steel guitar builder Paul Bigsby to build him a solid-body Spanish-style electric.[29] Bigsby delivered the guitar in 1948. The first mass-produced solid-body guitar was Fender Esquire and Fender Broadcaster (later to become the Fender Telecaster), first made in 1948, five years after Les Paul made his prototype. The Gibson Les Paul appeared soon after to compete with the Broadcaster.[30] Another notable solid-body design is the Fender Stratocaster, which was introduced in 1954 and became extremely popular among musicians in the 1960s and 1970s for its wide tonal capabilities and more comfortable ergonomics than other models.
In order to trigger these notes, a MIDI guitar controller is needed. Alot of work just to recreate what you can do on a real guitar. The only advantage to this technique, is the ability to take a MIDI track, creating this way, and substitute different guitar models to audition what might sound best. Also, the MIDI guitar track can also serve as an educational tool and how a part is performed.
The Blueridge BR-160 Historic Series dreadnought features classic vintage styling with modern improvements. For its Historic Series, Blueridge took inspiration from guitars made before the Second World War. However, instead of using the rarer and restricted woods such as Brazilian rosewood used in vintage guitars, Blueridge opted to use more abundant tonewoods that produce the same sound quality.
The idea of what actually constitutes a “beginner” amp has changed over the years. Before playing electric guitar became such a widespread hobby, most guitarists had at least some aspirations of becoming a professional at some point. As a result, a good beginner amp needed to be capable enough for live performances and recording, in addition to practice.

You have tonnes of distortion models based on the likes of the classic DS-1 (Dist-1) and Pro Co Rat (Squeak) pedals and more as well as boost, delay and modulation effects. An onboard tuner, stereo/mono looper with up to 80- seconds of phrase recording, tap tempo, stereo headphone output for silent practice and the ability to use up to 7 effects simultaneously.
Pickups convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating string to an electrical signal, allowing it to be amplified, processed and reproduced.[1] Pickups vary greatly in construction, size, types of materials used, as well as various electrical properties, but are generally divided into two categories – single-coil and double-coil (also known as humbucker).[2]
A neat recording solution for when you want the sound of a speaker running flat out, but without being thrown out of your flat by your neighbours!A practical method endorsed by those engineers who don't like to leave their comfortable chairs too often is to combine the above techniques by using two close mics, one on-axis and one off-axis, plus one distant mic a few feet from the cabinet. If the close mics have very different characteristics, for example a capacitor mic on-axis and a dynamic mic off-axis, you'll get an even greater choice of tonality, as you can vary the mic balance being recorded. Switching the phase of individual mics can often yield interesting combinations and, if you really don't want to leave that chair, you can also delay the ambience to increase its effective distance when it is combined with the other mics. Each millisecond of delay is roughly equivalent to 12 inches of added distance.

POWER – amps are created for amplifying the sound (duh) in the first place. Of course, nowadays amps are these versatile things that can do pretty much anything but cook you a scrambled egg (maybe SOON?). But power is expensive. This might sound like some deep statement I make as I look into the sunset but what I mean is wattage is not a cheap thing to come by. That is why most inexpensive models or practice models (which are often the same) do not have a lot of wattages. While this might be disheartening, trust me, as a beginner you won’t need a lot of watts. I mean unless you are a prodigy you will be spending a lot of time practicing on your own whether it be in your room, basement or wherever. You won’t be needing the wattage that much unless you are playing with other instruments or on stage. AND if you are going on stage, then you should be great enough not to need a practice amp, in the first place.
Whether you are a beginner or the pro guitarist, choosing the right guitar brand is always essential. We are sure you will find your desired electric guitar from the range of best electric guitar brands we review above. If you want something different or best acoustic guitar brands, do share with us your thoughts in the comments below. Maybe we missed out something that you would remind us.
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50 jazz blues acoustic Acoustic Guitar artist blues blues guitar lesson business chord progressions chords comping creativity david hamburger fingerstyle greatness guitar guitarist guitarists guitar lesson Guitar Lessons guitars improvisation jamming jazz jazz blues jeff mcerlain Larry Carlton licks live music musician musicians performance phrasing playing power tab producer producers producing recording rhythm rock tab notation truefire tunes video
A small number of bass units do not fit into the "combo" amplifier, standalone amplifier or separate speaker cabinet categorization or typologies. Some bass amp combos have a removable amplifier. With the amplifier unit taken out of the combo cabinet, the user then has an easily portable amp head (which can be taken to a recording studio for use as a preamp, to lay down bass tracks) and a separate bass speaker cabinet, which could be used with another bass amp head. As well, some amp heads have a small built-in speaker which produces enough sound so that it can be used as a practice amp, so that the bassist can practice when she/he has the head, but not the speaker cabinet. This way, a bassist in a touring band could practice electric bass using her amp head, even if her speaker cabinets were still locked up in an equipment van.
Volume pots don’t attenuate all frequencies consistently. Treble gets attenuated faster which results in treble loss when volume is rolled down. Treble bleed circuits (or bright caps) are there to compensate for treble loss and make guitar sound at lower volume as close as possible to sound with volume maxed. There are several different treble bleed circuits used or recommended by guitar/pickup manufacturers. What’s common between them is that they are installed across guitar volume pot (input and output lug).
Ibanez are one of the best known of the more contemporary style guitars with artists such as Satriani and Vai on their books. This particular model, the RG 450 Deluxe, boasts a layout which traditional Fender players will be familiar with, but it's a very different guitar. It is a more compact instrument than the Stratocaster and with two humbuckers separated by a single coil, the pick-up system allows you to create some thick tones. In fact if you play around with the five way selector you can get just about any tone you could want. The body shape is very sharp and clinical and with jagged bolt inlays and the traditional Ibanez pointed headstock the guitar is very recognisably Ibanez. It also features a quality tremolo unit and two full octaves on the fingerboard with wide cutaways for access. This is an excellent alternative to the Gibson or Fender style dichotomy that dominates the market. If you're searching for your own sound, somewhere between the two, it's worth checking out the Ibanez range.
Possibly the most famous of all guitar effects, the talk box has its indelible place in history.  The guitar signal is pushed thru a speaker into a tube that the player holds in their mouth.  This tube is usually run up a mic stand, so that the player can use the embouchure of the mouth cavity to control vowel sounds that are then picked up by the microphone and pushed back through the PA system.

Most lo-fi amplifiers in the 40s and 50s produced unexpected distortion or overdrive tones at higher volumes. Guitarists quickly discovered that the Fender Tweed Champ (originally marketed to beginners as the Champion 800 in 1948) produced a distorted sound at high-volume levels thanks to the Champ’s low power output and simple circuitry. Many of the classic guitar solos in the 1950s were recorded through a Champ, which resembled a wide-panel TV cabinet covered in tweed cloth. Leo Fender even went so far as to manufacture the first 100-watt amplifiers for surf guitar pioneer Dick Dale, who had blown hundreds of Fender amps and speakers from regularly turning up the volume.
For a guitar that sits comfortably in the mid-range segment of the market, Yamaha RevStar RS420 packs a decent punch. Body shape is more reminiscent of a PRS than anything else, but Yamaha definitely infused it with their unique details. The sound is tight, very flexible, and I had no issues dialing in the type of tone I was looking for. A well rounded model, that’s for sure.

One of the best known Kay electric guitars during the 1950s was the K-161 "Thin Twin", most visibly used by blues artist Jimmy Reed. This instrument debuted in 1952, and featured a single cutaway body, a distinctive "fire stripe" tortoiseshell pickguard, and a pair of thin blade-style pickups that gave the guitar its name.[citation needed] Kay used this type of pickups on various Kay electrics dating back to the 1940s.

At least five sunburst hollowbodies were offered in ’61, the PE-7, PE-8, PE-13, PE-14 and PE-51. These appear to have glued-in necks, by the way, with the open-book head, circular sticker logo and rectangular metal-covered pickups. The PE-7 was a non-cutaway thinline with dots, a single neck pickup, elevated pickguard, a fancy lyre trapeze tailpiece and volume and tone controls mounted on the lower bout. ’60s Bizarre Guitars shows a ca. ’61 PE-8 with a single black-plastic-covered pickup with Teisco printed on the top, small strip inlays, wooden pickguard, a fancy harp tailpiece and volume and tone mounted on the lower bout. The following year this model would have two pickups, so whether this is typical or not is unknown. The PE-13 and PE-14 were single-rounded-cutaway archtops, the difference being in finish, the former being blonde and the latter sunburst. Both these were full-bodied jazz guitars, with the small block inlays, twin pickups, chicken beak selectors, elevated ‘guards and two volumes and two tones mounted on the lower bout. Some of these carried fancy Gibson Johnny Smith trapeze tails. The PE-51 was a twin pickup, single-rounded-cutaway thinline archtop, with a chicken beak selector, ordinary trapeze tail and one volume and tone on the lower bout.


The Hoshino Gakki company began in 1908 as the musical instrument sales division of the Hoshino Shoten, a bookstore company. The Ibanez brand name dates back to 1929 when Hoshino Gakki began importing Salvador Ibáñez é Hijos guitars from Spain.[1] In 1933 The Salvador Ibáñez é Hijos cy. was bought by Telesforo Julve and incorporated in his enterprise. Hoshino Gakki started making Spanish acoustic guitars from 1935, at first using the "Ibanez Salvador" name, and then later using the "Ibanez" brand name [2].

It has a wide dynamic range and a 20dB attenuator, which alongside a bass-cut filter should clear out any noise that’s not supposed to get over your guitar track. Add to this an integrated suspension to reduce any vibrations when playing on stage and you get a highly functional condenser microphone that won’t capture anything else than what’s supposed to.

Microprocessor technology allows the use of digital onboard effects in guitar amps to create numerous different sounds and tones that simulate the sound of a range of tube amplifiers and different sized speaker cabinets, all using the same amplifier and speaker. These are known as modeling amplifiers, and can be programmed with simulated characteristic tones of different existing amplifier models (and speaker cabinets—even microphone type or placement), or dialed in to the user's taste. Many amps of this type are also programmable by way of USB connection to a home computer or laptop.[15] Line 6 is generally credited with bringing modeling amplification to the market.[18][19] Modeling amplifiers and stompbox pedals, rackmount units, and software that models specific amplifiers, speakers cabinets, and microphones can provide a large number of sounds and tones. Players can get a reasonable facsimile of the sound of tube amplifiers, vintage combo amplifiers, and huge 8x10” speaker stacks without bringing all that heavy equipment to the studio or stage.


Nowadays, you can find many in-between sets, but you'll want to have a solid understanding of what the gauges are in terms of actual measurement and how they affect your ability to perform with your desired tone.  These relatively open descriptions will also differ from acoustic strings to electric strings, so your experience in handling many types of guitar strings and gauges is paramount in making the right choice.
If the LR Baggs Venue is a little too expensive for your taste, the Acoustimax Sonic Maximizer preamp from BBE gives you a lot of the same controls at less than half the price. Like the Venue, the Acoustimax is ideally designed for the gigging or studio acoustic guitar player who wants to have more control over their tone and be able to adjust for different rooms and environments. BBE delivers this control with a five-band EQ, as well as feedback and frequency dials.
hey guys im just curious as i just got back from a music store that had to basses from two different brands (local luthiers) and they were virtually the same (5 string, j pickups, Aggie 3 band mahogany body, set neck) the only difference was one had a alder tone block, i personally couldn't hear a difference but the owner of said shop said tone wise it makes a huge difference, any thoughts?
Wah pedals can sound eerily similar to a human voice, and they were actually a favorite of Jimi Hendrix, who many have said possessed the most expressive guitar playing amongst all the great guitarists. Wah pedals are great to activate right when you’re about to take a solo and when you really want to make it sound like you’re speaking with the guitar.
Wet Set: If you have a sound that you want to push a long way back in the mix, it can often be better to make your reverb effect pre-fader, and temporarily remove all the dry sound. Then alter the sound's EQ and reverb settings while listening only to the wet reverb sound. Once you've got that sounding good, gradually fade the dry sound back in until you're happy with the wet/dry balance. This approach can often be more effective than simply whacking up the reverb level while you listen to the whole song. Martin Walker

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With a body shape that looks like it could have been cut out by hand using a saw in your garden shed, this Kay Old Kraftsman Sizzler guitar manages to be crude and quite fantastic at the same time. "Old Kraftsman" was actually a brandname used on Kay guitars sold by Spiegel stores. The maple neck gives it a rather Fender-like appearance, but this is in fact a set neck and not a bolt-on.
Make sure you have a sharp pair of wire cutters and a pair of those pointy nose pliers for bending and cutting component leads. Don’t forget solder too. There are a whole bunch of solder specifications covering materials, size, process etc. You’ll need rosin core solder. It comes in different thicknesses. 0.031” diameter is a common size, and will work for most pedal projects. Solder is normally sold in reels by weight. A 1/4lb reel will be enough to last a good few pedal projects. Lastly, get lead free, no clean solder. Although not strictly necessary for personal projects, lead-free solder is common now and safer. No clean, means that you can leave the flux residue behind without having to clean it off, and it won’t damage your board.

Hector Berlioz studied the guitar as a teenager,[10] Franz Schubert owned at least two and wrote for the instrument,[11] Ludwig van Beethoven, after hearing Giuliani play, commented the instrument was "a miniature orchestra in itself".[12] Niccolò Paganini was also a guitar virtuoso and composer. He once wrote: "I love the guitar for its harmony; it is my constant companion in all my travels". He also said, on another occasion: "I do not like this instrument, but regard it simply as a way of helping me to think" [13]
A compressor “compresses” the signal that your guitar produces by normalizing the dynamic range of the audio input signal based on a threshold value. This effect is used virtually everywhere in recording. Everything you hear in music that is produced today is compressed in some way–and it can sound anything from a subtle barely noticeable effect to a thick, dampened squish.
“Back in the fifties and sixties, you could tell what studio they had been recording in just by listening to the song,” Dr. Susan Horning Schmidt says. She is a professor at St. John’s University who has researched and written extensively about sounds and the recording process. During the period Dr. Horning Schmidt is referring to, the recording facilities were also physically bigger and bands often played together in a more live-type setting. Horning Schmidt states that “there’s a lot more space in the recording, a lot more acoustical space and dynamics.” Unfortunately, we’re losing that space with contemporary recording and production techniques.

Artist Studies are available that explain the specific playing style of a guitar hero or band like Van Halen, Albert King, AC/DC, B.B. King, Chet Atkins, Iron Maiden, David Gilmour, Eric Johnson, Freddie King, George Lynch, Jack Johnson, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Joe Pass, John Prine, Keith Richards, Metallica, Megadeth, Randy Rhoads, Ritchie Blackmore, The Edge, Tony Rice, Wes Montgomery
The Vintage Modified Jazzmaster has the tried-and-tested dual circuitry of the original models from the ’60s. The “Rhythm” circuit activates only the neck pickup, while the “Lead” circuit lets you pick between neck, bridge and both at the same time. Each circuit has its own dedicated master volume and tone knobs. (In comparison, the Fender American Professional Jazzmasters don’t have this circuitry.)
The EM-18 came with either a pair of Mighty Mite humbuckers or a pair of DiMarzios. It was otherwise the same as the E-18 with the addition of a three-way mini-toggle coil selector switch which allowed a choice of both or either coil on the lead pickup. This arrangement allowed for a rather remarkable variety of tones, by the way. EM-18 production began in 1979 and some 1,375 were made until the guitar ended in February 1982.

But Zoom also served as the perfect foil for X’s principal songwriters, singer Exene Cervenka and bassist John Doe, who were arty, bohemian denizens of hip L.A. environs like Silverlake and Venice. Zoom was a politically conservative Christian greaser from the notoriously uncool southern L.A. suburbs of Orange County. In the now-classic L.A. punk documentary The Decline of Western Civilization, he is famously shown refusing to get a tattoo.


Fender is a guitar pioneer. Its history of making quality guitars stretches back decades. The Fender Modern Player Telecaster Thinline Deluxe is another classic by Fender. This guitar offers both sweet and aggressive tones thanks to its two MP-90 pickups. With its 9.5-inch radius, this guitar is incredibly comfortable to play. There are 22 medium-sized frets and a six-saddle hard-tail bridge. This guitar is easy to tune and stays in tune.

A better idea is turning to established brands like Maton, Washburn, Epiphone, Fender… there’re plenty of respected manufacturers with long traditions in making guitars. No matter what type of guitar, all these companies have low-priced models that still benefit from the care and craftsmanship you’d expect from well-known brands. Prices start around $150 for basic types, then for $500-700 you’ll find an enormous choice.

Description: Body: Alder - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Wood: Maple - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24 - Inlay: Custom - # of Strings: 6 - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Fulcrum Tremolo - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Pickups: Duncan Designed - Pickup Configuration: S-S-S - String Instrument Finish: Transparent Colors


Jackson is regarded as a manufacturer of electric guitars and electric bass guitars, which was founded in 1980 by Grover Jackson. Their headquarters located in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. They manufacture trendy and stylish guitars. Most of the music players choose a Jackson’s guitar for good performance. It is very apt for sharp and clear music. The price range starts from Rs. 13,380/- onwards (approx). For further details, visit jacksonguitars.com.

Here we are proud to have in stock today is a Cool one she's pretty rare too its a real vintage guitar its actually 42year old in fact. This is a great old Vintage Goya Acoustic Dreadnought Guitar by CF Martin & company. This guitar was built in the early 1970s in Japan when Martin had thought that it was a good way to address the Japanese high quality lower priced Japanese guitars cutting into their bottom line so Martin commissioned Goya of Japan to build their competitive to the US line "import" line ( Japan because no other country at that time was building anything close to the high quality guitars like Japan was making " China , India, Twain was not even a consideration Japan was in another league obviously to those countries... so Goya was commissioned back in the day this pre dates Sigma Japan... This was built durring the time frame when the Japanes builders had some of the best quality woods available to them and were setting out to show the world what they could really do. This is a great example with both fine quality qoods used from the high grade mahogany to the solid spruce top to the rich dark Brazilian rosewood looking fingerboards they selected wow impressive work...Kept in great shape all these years 42 years see the pics it looks more like its 3 years old then 42... here today for a song we believe this example was built in Nagoya by the great Terada, that is pretty much the Custom shop builders in Japan they are responsible for the GB10 George Benson Ibanez line, They made the high end Ibanez Artists, The Gretch reissues, some other fine models as well as their own Tereda guitars. On to this baby The top is book matched SOLID AAA Spruce and the sides and back are mahogany, probably laminated but they seam to match?. either way *AWESOME* The SB model has a beautiful transparent cherry sunburst finish that is still so glossy looking it can pass for much newer but its 36 years old!. The Neck is also solid AAA mahogany with a beautiful rich looking rosewood fingerboard may be Brazilian Rosewood . The neck is RARE with a nicely v shaped which feels really good to me I think you'll be please with the feel as well. Setup done by our in house luthier & plays like butta now with a new set of acoustic Martin 11's, a $150 value. Now how ya gonna beat that! .
Pre-owned, in good condition. Fully tested and works perfectly. Cosmetic blemishes in the form of dings, scuffs, scratches, and discoloration. Supersonic foot switch is a bit dusty (not shown in photos because I hit the photo limit). Spring reverb works well. Tubes work, but could probably stand to be replaced. The Vintage channel contains pre-gain tone controls and 2 switchable voices. The guitar amp’s Burn channel contains dual gain controls and post-gain EQ, allowing tonal experimentation. The Fender Super-Sonic 60 combo also features the long-spring Reverb by Accutronics; Ivory “radio” knobs; and a 3-button footswitch.
New from Stewart-MacDonald are guitar wiring kits with the premium brand pots, switches, jacks, capacitors and cloth wiring used in original Gibson Les Paul and SG guitars. The kits make it easy to order top-quality components for wiring or re-wiring a 4-control / 2-pickup guitar with a 3-way switch. The kit components include Switchcraft toggle […]

The Boss Katana Head is a full featured amplifier head that can handle stage, recording and practice duties. It does this with its built-in power attenuator, which lets you choose between 100W, 50W and a super quiet setting of 0.5W. To complement the 0.5W setting, Boss even added a built-in 5" speaker into the amp head - making the Katana head to be technically a combo amp in head form factor. Complementing its versatile power rating is its built in amp modeling, which gives you five voicings from acoustic, to clean to high-gain. As expected, this amp comes with essential effects from Boss, with over 50 of them to choose from, 15 of which can be loaded to the amp for quick use, albeit limited to just 3 effects running simultaneously. Finally, all these features are packed in sleek looking profile that feels really solid, as expected from Boss.

A Power attenuator enables a player to obtain power-tube distortion independently of listening volume. A power attenuator is a dummy load placed between the guitar amplifier's power tubes and the guitar speaker, or a power-supply based circuit to reduce the plate voltage on the power tubes. Examples of power attenuators are the Marshall PowerBrake and THD HotPlate.


Kramer Guitars is the manufacturer of electric guitars & basses originated from America. Inearly’s off origination in 1970’s, they produced aluminum necked electric guitar& basses & in later 1980’s they started producing wooden-necked guitars catering to hard rock and heavy metal musicians. This is the brand of guitar that challenges the quality of guitars made by Gibson. Made of maple wood and aluminum inlays, this makes one of the finest make of bass and electric guitars. These are highest priced electric guitar which starts from 90,000 to 1.5lacs. These are one of the most powerful ranges of electric guitars used by professional musicians.
There are no frills: a single channel controlled with a Volume, Tone and Gain knob. You can switch between 15 and 7 watts, and don’t forget that for an all-tube amp, that is a lot of volume! While not having effects may sound like a bummer, the stripped-down circuitry helps your guitar signal to maintain its purest tone. Simple, raw and with attitude, cool looks and a mere 5.5kg; be prepared to rattle your brain with an authentic “British” sound.

Slow Gear – A dynamic effect created by BOSS that swells in volume as if you were riding the volume knob on your guitar. The effect is similar to the envelope of a violin with its ability to remove the “attack” or initial transient of the signal and produce gradual volume swells. The compact pedal version of this effect is discontinued but it is found in both the ME-80 and GT-100 multi effects pedals.

"It seems a waste to me to work and work for years," Rory Gallagher told Rolling Stone in 1972, "and just turn into some sort of personality." Instead, the Irish guitarist, then only 23, became legendary for his nonstop-touring ethic and fiery craft. Playing a weathered Strat, often wearing a flannel shirt, Gallagher electrified Chicago and Delta styles with scalding slide work and hard-boiled songwriting. His fans included the Edge and Bob Dylan, who was initially turned away backstage at a 1978 show because Gallagher didn't recognize him.
Washburn - With a long history that dates back to 1883, Washburn makes various types of guitar related products including electric, acoustic, bass, amps, banjos, mandolins and amplifiers. Their old acoustic guitars were involved with Delta blues back in the 1920s, while now, they are recognized mostly for their metal/rock friendly electric guitars.
Anytime you hear a screaming or raunchy sounding harmonic by way of loads of gain come jumping out of your speakers, it’s likely a result of pinch harmonics. Pinch harmonics follow the same basic idea of harmonics, except this time the contact is made with the skin of your pick hand thumb right after picking a note. Where you do this determines the pitch of the harmonic.

Sorry it has sold: Here we have a rather nice rare vintage 1970 Yairi & Son Classical acoustic guitar It's Label reads... Hand Crafted in Japan by Yairi & Son Model # 300 Serial # 177 Pretty darn low serial number 1970 remember she's 45 years old! Condition overall is very good - excellent used / vintage Not new or mint of course... Regarding its build quality She exhibits beautiful workmanship and superior materials Aged woods of over 30+ years old in 1970 when it was built! Tone-Woods now are in the 75 year range on this example looks like a Vintage masterpiece with its patina and look and feel I love these oldies funny thing is It still shines like glass to, amazing really when you think about it. This guitar has very good deep base tone and excellent volume and plays easily and comfortably the neck is nice and big 2" at the nut nice and wide feel to it. The neck is made of a high grade mahogany see pics, back and sides are also beautiful mahogany, with black or very dark brown bindings for a very classic look, the on the business end she has a wonderful quality solid spruce top with lots of bear claw figuring a really nice sound box it projects very well in deed... As you look at its back side in its entirety top to bottom it's hard to find a blemish I'm sure there are a few minors but it's really looking very clean and with a surprisingly shiny original finish... The front the headstock is pretty clean as well!...notice a bone nut has been fit, frets show little to no wear what so ever more than 90% remaining fret life, the fingerboard shows a little play action remember it's a 1970! ... The top as several chips and drinks and I have addressed them a touch up lacquer pen and just dabbed the tiny chip to prevent further chipping there it as a result after I polished it up turned out pretty darn good looking too, This guitar came to us as a partial trade with its bridge pulled nearly off by a ding dong previous owner that put regular gauge dred heavy gauge strings on it for long term and it lifted off in time, I removed all that cleaned up the woods & prepped it for a new vintage period correct Jacaranda rosewood classical bridge and glued it with hide glue clamping it up for 2 weeks & set her up with a bone nut & saddle and a new set of Dean Markley strings... This beauty comes with its original hard shell case black Tolex with a plush Marigold lining one bad latch but still functions well good hinges and handle so it's still ok. This is rock solid now as the Yairi & Son label says use only nylon strings. If you just use what Yairi suggested this would have never happened not Yairi's fault just the wild eyed idea gone wrong. Anyways she's back in action and sounding better than ever so if you like these old Yairi & Son classical guitars this may be a good consideration for you.... Let me know if you likeeee. Email Joe at: jvguitars@gmail.com .
Description: Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body Size: Grand Concert - Top Wood: Solid Mahogany - Back: Solid Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Dovetail - Neck Construction: V-Shape - Fingerboard: Maple - Binding: Ivoroid - Frets: 20 - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Maple - Hardware: Open Gear Tuner, Chrome - String Instrument Finish: Open Pore Natural
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The Yamaha Pacifica has long proved a benchmark for quality and specification, and the 112V remains one of the best electric guitars for beginners. The 112 is far from fancy and simply concentrates on the bare necessities. Yet the construction is of excellent quality. Trust us, if looked after this will be a guitar for life. By design it's an altogether more modern, brighter and lighter take on a hot-rod Strat. But when we say brighter that doesn't mean overly shrill. In fact the bridge humbucker will surprise some, it's beefy without being too mid-range heavy and although the coil-split proves a little bland played clean, with a distortion boost it's a pretty useful gnarly and wiry rhythm voice. It's good to have the choice too when mixed with the middle pickup - switching between the full and split coil here is subtle but, especially with cleaner 'class A' amp voicings, there's enough character difference to be useable. The solo single-coils impress - plenty of percussion and with a little mid-range beef added from the amp these get you to the correct Texas toneland. Neck and middle combined produces a fine modern Strat-like mix - the added brightness will cut through a multi-FX patch nicely.
These two are definitely the most similar sounding of the bunch and this poses a slight problem. While Steel String has more resonance in the low-end and covers fingerpicking, Songwriter is a little warmer/duller sounding but has twice the samples and round robins.  For me, this makes it hard to pick between the two, and while the tones are different, perhaps not quite enough.
The Meisterklasse is a high-end harmonica on the modular system, made in Germany, featuring chrome-plated cover plates, an anodised aluminium comb, and extra thick 1.05mm nickel-plated reeds. One other feature that sets the Meisterklasse apart from most other Hohner harmonicas are its full-length cover plates, which extend all the way to the ends of the harmonica's comb rather than sharply angling down before the ends to form an adjoining surface parallel to the reedplates and comb. The only other Hohner harmonica possessing this quality is the curve-framed Golden Melody.[25]
The weapon of choice for today’s modern recording musician, the Axe-Fx is as good as it gets in terms of modeling amps. Used by countless musician both live and in the studio, this machine has proven to deliver for just about every musical style under the sun. Notable users of the Axe Fx include Alex Lifeson, Steve Vai, Misha Mansoor, and many others famous musicians. The Axe-Fx II features a high resolution speaker simulator with 150+ “Factory” models and room for 512 “User” cab locations.  It contains a vast virtual inventory of hundreds of vintage and modern guitar amps, speaker cabinets, guitar stompbox and studio effects, and more. The options are pretty much endless.
List of electric guitar brands that include the most reliable models available. Electric guitar brands include those from major manufacturers of musical instruments, including Yamaha, Gretsch, Gibson and more. This list answers the question, 'What are the best electric guitar brands?' Users looking for a new guitar will want to research a variety of different brands to find the one that best suits their needs, based on function and features.
In all my years I have never seen filter cct's like this but as tleco tech the filters have never been variable, When I put my guitar together I had a 0.022uF and a 0.047uF and for reasons that I have long forgotten I put in a switching matrix that allows me to get 0.047, 0.022 and 0.015uF. After many revisions to the cct (it had coil taping and variable taping) I almost put in a 0.033uF and taking out the switching, well I ended up getting some single ended 9 Watt amp and all of a sudden this flexibility made scene I have one tone control that I can control the cut frequency a coil control pot and a volume control. Now the funny thing If I put in a single cap 0.015uF (as close as you can get) It doesn’t sound like the two 0.022 and 0.047uF in parallel, Its in the harmonics that get let through from what I can hear. But when all said and done could be something to give it a go.
In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.
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The series features three original Fender body shapes – Malibu™, Newporter™ and Redondo™ – in several colors at three price points: California Classic ($799.99), California Special ($699.99) and California Player ($399.99). These exclusive shapes boast refined geometry and unique bracing patterns designed for responsive, articulate tone. They are diverse body shapes that can give any guitarist a comfortable playing experience– from the small and narrow-waisted Malibu, ideal for recording, to the larger Redondo, suited for ensemble playing. Each model’s personality is also defined by 11 vibrant and slick Fender colors, including some popularized in the electric guitar world: Cosmic Turquoise, Arctic Gold, Aqua Splash, Matte Black (California Special models only), Hot Rod Red Metallic, Candy Apple Red, Champagne, Rustic Copper, Electric Jade, Belmont Blue and Jetty Black.
This book emphasizes tabs with the accompanying music notation. It’s not a long book and one that a beginner will likely outgrow at some point. However, it provides a good introduction to get you playing songs you’ll recognize fast. It does a fine job of explaining everything the newbie needs to know including how to position yourself. Build those good habits early!

The taper of a potentiometer indicates how the output to input voltage ratio will change with respect to the shaft rotation. The two taper curves below are examples of the two most common guitar pot tapers as they would be seen on a manufacturer data sheet. The rotational travel refers to turning the potentiometer shaft clockwise from 0° to 300° as in the previous visual representation drawing.
Adding to their already good value, most multi-effects come with built-in features that are essential to gigging and practicing, first of which is a built-in tuner. Looping is also a good feature to look for, thankfully it now comes standard for most units. Having the ability to record straight to a computer is another handy features that should be considered, as well as the ability to edit the settings via your computer or mobile device. Built-in metronome/rhythm is also a nice plus, especially for those who want to take their skill to the next level.
Fender guitars are made either in the United States or Mexico. There is a limited number of guitars being made in Japan, but those are only sold on Japanese domestic market. The difference in quality between the U.S. and Mexican Fenders is obvious but not too great. No matter which one you go for, you will get the same refined tone that made this company famous.
Designed to restore Fender’s reputation after a group of employees led by William C. Schultz took over ownership from CBS in the early 1980s. The pickups used in early models were dual humbucking Red Lace Sensors in the bridge position and a single Blue Lace Sensor in the neck position. Later models (post 1995 or so) used three Gold Lace Sensors or a Red/Silver/Blue set in a Strat-like configuration, as well as low-friction roller nuts, locking synchronized vibrato bridge and tuners, and a bound contoured alder body with ash veneers. These instruments were discontinued in 1998 with the advent of the American Deluxe series. In 2011 Fender released the Modern Player Telecaster Plus as a part of the Modern Player series. The guitar has a humbucker in the bridge, a Strat pickup in the middle, and a Tele pickup in the neck positions.
You asked, and you shall receive, Sonicbids blog readers. Per multiple requests, here's my guide to, "When the hell do I start turning these knobs, and where do they go?" But before we begin, I offer you the fine print: These references are general ideas for where to begin to look for sonic issues with particular sounds, instruments, and voices. I'm not going to tell you "always notch this 9 dB here and add 3 dB here with a wide boost and, voila, perfect sound!" because it's unfortunately just not that simple. So before you message me, "Aaron, I notched out so much 250 Hz out of my snare, I snapped the knob off the console, and it still sounds muddy!" just know that not all sound sources are created equal.
Taylor, Martin, Gibson all great production brands... Which is better comes done to what you like sonically, visually and of course the feel in your hands. It is also difficult to compare one brand versus another unless you are comparing similar designs using the same tone woods and in the same price range. Anyone espousing one is better than the other without doing this is not being honest with themselves. I own a Martin and two Taylors, all are great and have different voices and feels... Even the 2 Taylors are very different in sound and looks. In the end I vote for Taylor because I like the neck carve and feel that the looks and build quality are a bit better in the $3K - $4 price range. If your looking for something in a lower $500 - $1, 000range you probably should be considering Yamaha or Takamine. Though in the end you get what you pay for.
In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
Bass cabinets are more likely to have thicker wood panels than regular electric guitar amps, and to have stronger internal bracing. These design features help to lessen the likelihood of unwanted cabinet buzzes or rattles, which are more likely with bass cabinets than electric guitar cabs because of the low-frequency sounds that bass cabs have to reproduce.
In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.
Hey Frank i removed the pick guard and discovered why they were so tall.I just bought the guitar the day i asked you about it and it was late very late after midnight and i found out someone used pick guard screws to just secure them to the PG…lol And i have it back together correctly installed now.No pictures yet here is a better detailed description.The body is solid wood stained factory dark cherry.Rosewood fretboard semi-enclosed tuners…SSS P/U arrangement in a 3 ply black PG and 5 way switch and probably weighs 8 lbs.Thanks ….Larry
Fender California Coast Series acoustic guitars are already being used across multiple musical genres by top alternative, indie, punk and grunge artists/bands, such as: Culture Abuse, The Regrettes and Dear Boy, as well as singer-songwriter Aaron Lee Tasjan and guitarist Angela Petrilli – accompanying each on their musical journey toward exceptional artistry.
Featuring a comfortable neck and solid spruce top, the Epiphone Dove Pro Acoustic-Electric Guitar rings out with full, rich sound. Based on a design going back to 1962, the Dove Pro is equipped with a Fishman Sonicore pickup system that accurately reproduces its acoustic tone when you plug the guitar into an amplifier or PA system to play with amplified instruments. A terrific value.
Mic orientation, or the angle of the mic in relation to the speaker, becomes more critical as the mic is moved closer to the amp. Pointing the mic at the center of the cone will yield more active highs and better transient detail but fewer lows. As you move the mic toward the outer rim of the speaker, maintaining a 90-degree angle with the grille cloth, the low frequencies gradually increase because of proximity effect and other factors, resulting in a sound that may be warmer, softer, or more powerful. Many engineers like to blend these complex characteristics by angling the mic between 30 and 60 degrees off-axis from the center of the speaker.
The main purpose of the bridge on a classical guitar is to transfer the vibration from the strings to the soundboard, which vibrates the air inside of the guitar, thereby amplifying the sound produced by the strings. The bridge holds the strings in place on the body. Also, the position of the saddle, usually a strip of bone or plastic that supports the strings off the bridge, determines the distance to the nut (at the top of the fingerboard).

Due to the acoustic, aesthetic and processing properties (workability, finishing, joints) the wood and the ligno-cellulose composites are the most valued materials for the musical instruments' construction. The guitar is made up of a complex structure, formed by a vertical wall in a curve shape (technologically named "sides") and two faces made up of ligno-cellulose plates, so that it should... [Show full abstract]
• Guitar : ELECTRIC SUNBURST captures the sound of a classic guitar, chosen with its rich, warm and versatile sound. The continuous signal path has been retained throughout, including high-quality cables, vintage tube preamps and high-resolution transducers to ensure that every nuance of this legendary instrument was accurately fixed. Since the string holder and neck were recorded separately, you can fully control the balance of the mix. Moreover, a condenser microphone was installed above the strings to capture subtle sound nuances and add punch and realism.
The output transistors of solid state amplifiers can be passively cooled by using metal fins called heat sinks to radiate away the heat. For high-wattage amplifiers, a fan is often used to move air across internal heatsinks.[14] Since transistor bass amplifiers used for large venues need to produce a high output, this usually means that bass amplifiers are very heavy. Most powerful transistorized bass amplifiers use class AB or so-called "push-pull" topology, in no small part because this output circuit scheme can be physically lighter and cooler than an equivalent Class A amplifier. These need heavy transformers and require large metal heat sinks for cooling.
I just recently started to try to" really learn" to play guitar. I've known a few "not too difficult" songs for years. Now at 45yrs. old I bought a couple of cord books and it's bittersweet. It's such a wonderful feeling to play songs all the way to the end with a friend of mine who told me years ago that I had a good natural musical ability. I've learned more in 3 or 4 months than in 25 years. But enough about that... I was handed a jumbo GUILD from I believe around the early 70's. I've never heard anything like it. I must have one!!!
No way can this list be accurate simply for the fact that there are so many styles out there with such important players, having a list of greatest guitar players with BB King and Tom Morello on it is ridiculous. Both are great in their own right but it’s like comparing apples and oranges. There should probably be separate lists for separate genres. Having said that, I think a good start for a top 10 ROCK list, in no particular order, would be: Joe Satriani, Yngwie Malmsteen, Kirk Hammett, Dimebag Darrell, Steve Vai, Eric Johnson, Slash, Jerry Cantrell, Joe Perry, and Angus Young.
The body of the instrument is a major determinant of the overall sound variety for acoustic guitars. The guitar top, or soundboard, is a finely crafted and engineered element often made of spruce, red cedar, redwood or mahogany. This thin (often 2 or 3 mm thick) piece of wood, strengthened by different types of internal bracing, is considered the most prominent factor in determining the sound quality of a guitar. The majority of the sound is caused by vibration of the guitar top as the energy of the vibrating strings is transferred to it. Different patterns of wood bracing have been used through the years by luthiers (Torres, Hauser, Ramírez, Fleta, and C.F. Martin being among the most influential designers of their times); to not only strengthen the top against collapsing under the tremendous stress exerted by the tensioned strings, but also to affect the resonation of the top. Some contemporary guitar makers have introduced new construction concepts such as "double-top" consisting of two extra-thin wooden plates separated by Nomex, or carbon-fiber reinforced lattice - pattern bracing. The back and sides are made out of a variety of woods such as mahogany, Indian rosewood and highly regarded Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra). Each one is chosen for its aesthetic effect and structural strength, and such choice can also play a significant role in determining the instrument's timbre. These are also strengthened with internal bracing, and decorated with inlays and purfling.
You don’t need to be the new Bob Dylan of lyrics to write a song. Writing a song with your own lyrics and vocal melody will help you learn how your guitar fits into songs. Phrasing, space, when to play rhythm, when to think about any solo (see 13), chord changes etc. You don’t have to share it. But do it for yourself. It will help you understand songs much better.
Fuzz – A dynamic distortion effect that sounds just like the name. Fuzz was originally created by putting a pinhole or cut in the speaker of an amplifier. Original fuzz pedals use a transistor-based circuit to create the sound. Compared to distortion, fuzz is more raw, abrasive and doesn’t compress the tone. These pedals typically perform best at the front of your effects chain into a clean amplifier.
As the name implies, RockJam is a guitar capable of giving you the best of rock sound and deep melody similar to the type you only get from the studio and stage. The RockJam RGEG02-BK ST Style Electric Guitar Super Packstands as the highest quality and most accessible full-size electric guitar kit of the modern era, a quality that still outstands many buyers till date.
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The Thunderbird IV was one of the most radical designs to come out of the Gibson and Epiphone Kalamazoo factory in the early '60s, thanks to legendary automotive designer Ray Dietrich, who was asked to put a new twist on solidbody guitars and basses. The sound of the Thunderbird IV was as cutting edge as its design and now the Thunderbird Classic-IV PRO returns with all of Epiphone's first-class quality and a lifetime guarantee, but without the hassles of owning (or hiding) a vintage instrument. Case sold separately.
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Featuring a small scale neck, the Squier by Fender Mini Strat Electric Guitar comes with three single-coil electronic pickups, with solid and intuitive master volume and tone control. The neck of the guitar is made of C-shape maple wood design, whiles the rosewood fretboard holding the strings and containing dot markings is designed in a manner that makes it easy to strum.
What makes the wah so timeless is its versitility, it can emulate a human voice, be a rhythmic device, boost a screaming lead, a tone shaping tool, among other uses.The first known commercial recording of a wah pedal is Cream’s “Tales of Brave Ulysses”. As we know the distinctive sound caught on with just about every guitar player on the planet! There are too many uses of the wah to mention here, almost 50 years later it is still a must have pedal for every guitarist. For an in-depth look at wah history and a great read please check out “Analog Man’s Guide To Vintage Effects”.
My first recommendation is Epiphone. It is not just one of the best but it is the best guitar brand for beginners who are looking to buy a guitar to learn the ropes. I have included a few recommendations from this brand in this post. If you don’t know which one to buy and you are a beginner then buy one from this brand and you won’t go wrong for sure.
PLOTTING OUT THE PEICES Once you have drawn out the shape of the body you can then locate and draw the cavaties that the pickups and electronics will go and set you bridge placement. It is good to know wher the center of the guitars boy is so you can make sure that the pickups and bridge are in good alignment with the neck pocket. I like to take a piece of poster board and trace the fretboard of the neck on it and cut it out, that way I can properly place my bridge according to my scale length.
1960's Teisco Del Rey, Model ET-220 "Strat-Style" Electric Guitar. Both original, single coil, "Spectrum" Pickups. Great, original Candy Apple, Metallic color. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. Laminated maple neck. Separate ON / Off switch for each pickup. Overall Rhythm / Solo tone switch. Volume and Tone control and adjustable truss rod. With the exception of some "Battle Scars" on lower bout of body (see photos) the finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body) and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .010 strings. No case included.

This guitar has a mahogany neck topped by a 20-fret rosewood fingerboard. It has a scale length of 25.62", while the nut width is 1.69". Since the AW54 is from Ibanez, you can expect the neck profile, string action and overall playability to be comfortable and beginner friendly. Wrapping up this affordable guitar's premium-like specs is its Open Pore Natural finish, which gives the instrument an earthy appeal that's easy on the eyes.
Compared to, say, an Epiphone Dot, the Coupe offers a ‘woodier,’ more acoustic timbre. “Sparkly,” “bell-like” and “jangly” are descriptors often associated with the guitar and its stock pair of P-90s, and cranking the gain up elicits more a sizzle than roar. Be careful with the distortion, though—without a center block like those you’ll find on semi-hollows, the Coupe is still fairly susceptible to feedback.
Another company that dates back nearly a century, Rickenbacker was started by Adolph Rickenbacker and George D. Beauchamp in 1931 with the intention of creating fully electric instruments. Following a long and rocky history that included wild successes (like getting their guitars in the hands of the musicians that played with Bing Crosby) and incredibly tough tribulations (like starting an instrument business at the depths of the Great Depression), the brand eventually sold to F.C. Hall in 1953. From that point forward, Rickenbacker flourished as one of the most iconic brands both in the looks of their instruments and their sound. George Harrison, Paul McCartney, and John Lennon of the Beatles all played Rickenbackers at one time or another. Additionally, Chris Squire of Yes, Tom Petty, Pete Townsend of the Who, and Glen Frey of the Eagles are all Rickenbacker signature artists. Like tech giant Apple, however, Rickenbacker doesn’t give their endorsers anything for free nor do they ask for the advertising, making them an even more admiral brand as a result.

There have always been slight variations in the color of the cream plastic parts used on Gibson and other guitars. It's not uncommon to see brand new and vintage guitars with bindings, pickup rings, toggle switch rings and pickguards that don't perfectly match in color. We do our best to match all our cream products, but there's no absolute control from batch to batch, or from supplier to supplier.
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: "Later, in the '70s, a line of low-priced Japanese-made instruments were imported and sold under the Dorado name in an effort to compete with the flood of imports inundating the market. Flattop acoustics and solidbody electrics alike were sold under the Dorado name. None hold much in common with Gretsch's own guitars." Also, that Gretsch had been sold to Baldwin prior to 70's; reacquired


While audio feedback in general is undesirable due to the high frequency overtone, when controlled properly, it can provide true sustain of the sound (instead of using a distortion/compressor to make quiet notes louder, or a feedback of a signal in a circuit as in a delay unit). Several approaches have been used to produce guitar feedback effects, which sustain the sound from the guitar:
Add your vote to this list of the top guitarists ever and help to pick the best guitar player in the history of music. These roock, jazz, blues guitarists have all had long careers filled with success and failure. Some are still jamming out today, which other rock stars died too young, before their talents could be fully appreciated. Now is your chance to give the best guitar players in the world some recognition.
In about 1975, Ernie Briefel and Merson parted company with Unicord/Gulf + Western, becoming Music Technology Incorporated (MTI), on Long Island, taking the Giannini brand with it. Later, in the early ’80s, MTI would import Westone guitars made by the great Matsumoku company, which it would sell until St. Louis Music began its partnership with Matsumoku and, in 1984, transitioned its Electra brand to Electra-Westone and then ultimately Westone, which lasted until 1990, when SLM’s guitars all became Alvarez.
The effect of amplifier coloration can be emulated using a parametric EQ, where you'll probably find you need to add some upper mid-range boost to get the same brightness as from an amp. Note that, if you're using a software amp modelling plug-in, you'll still get the best results if you feed your guitar via a high-impedance DI box — plugging it straight into a soundcard's line input is likely to result in a drop in level and may even affect the sustain and high end of the guitar sound due to the pickups being loaded by the impedance of the input circuitry. This does not apply to active pickup systems which, in effect, function as a combination of pickup and DI box.
Ihave a 12 string dorado. I found a guitar that was sold for $299. It's a 12 string acoustic, Gretsch, 1971. Seems like the right period. The problem is that it is called doraldo. One letter out. Rosewood fret board, dot inlays. Exactly the same as mine but different name. Maybe it could be the same? Go to http://www.rabbithillmusic.9cy.com/id2.htm
The term overdrive refers to when a tube amp is driven past its range to supply a clean tone. This is something we as guitar players have come to love and seek out. A common question is “what is the difference between overdrive, distortion, and fuzz as the terms have become interchangeable?” The short answer is not a lot, just one is more extreme as we go down the line.
These samples are released under the GNU GPL license. The source code being the sf2 files (of which contain the audio samples and settings). The samples and settings can be accessed within Viena and Translator Free on windows or Swami on linux. This license means that you can do what you like with them but if you create any samples from them or improve on them then you have to use the same license in your projects. This way it keeps it open source (and therefore free). This license is only concerned with the source code. Any music you create with them is nothing to do with me (i.e. you take all the royalties and use whatever license you like).
Jazz guitarist Les Paul spent years tinkering with his own electric guitar designs, but his first creations were initially rejected by Gibson’s parent company in 1946. But just a few short years later, on the heels of Fender’s success with the Telecaster and Paul’s growing popularity as an artist, Gibson struck a deal with Paul to play and endorse their new design for a solid-body electric. Gibson released the guitar as the Les Paul signature model in 1952, and since its release, it has become one of the world’s most imitated and sought-after guitars, with late ’50s vintage models being among the most prized instruments in the world.

This D-15M dreadnought features a solid 'genuine' (South American) mahogany top over A-Frame X bracing; the same material is used for the back, sides and neck. The neck profile is a 'modified low oval', and it's hard to imagine anyone having a problem with it. Bone nut and saddle: check. Vintage-style, open-gear tuners check. Super-thin matt nitrocellulose finish all over: check. Tonally, there is a rich and projecting core sound that's complemented by the unmistakable, Martin D-resonance. It's vibrant and ebullient, yet not brash; warm and full without being thick or indistinct. It puts every single cent of its build budget into making the best sounding and playing instrument, with very little concession to cosmetics, electronics or anything else. Solid woods, improved neck joint, bone nut and saddle, no frills whatsoever, save for the 'burst – it's unreservedly recommended.


With a neck made of mahogany and a body of maple, the Ibanez Artcore AF75 is one of the best hollow body electric guitars included on this list. Due to its hollow body design, this guitar has the ability to play well in all genres, ranging from country to hard rock, and is known for its high-quality tone and ability to maintain tune through long periods of playing. This is possible in part due to the pickups at the neck and bridge, reducing excess humming for clarity in tone and pitch.  The knobs at the base of the body have a super-grip design, making it easy to change the volume and tone between the neck and the bridge and utilize the three pickup selector. A pearl block inlay is included on the rosewood fretboard, making this 20 fret electric guitar a strong option to conclude this list.
Next to the great sounds and looks, the most noticeable thing about Seagull guitars is the incredibly reasonable prices. With Seagull, you get a quality guitar made from superior woods and materials for a lot less than it seems like it ought to cost. The Performer CW Flame Maple is definitely one of the best acoustic-electric guitars under $1000 out there.
The solution is pretty simple actually. When setting your intonation it should look like two sets of steps. You should never need to move the saddles all the way forward or turn them around. If you want to adjust something do it in a way that allows you to keep this configuration. You do that and you'll never have to worry about tuning issues period, let alone a g-string.
Well, to be more specific, we're talking about Twin Reverbs made between 1965 and 1967. Throughout the decades, these sought-after tone machines have turned up in the rigs of countless guitarists, including Stevie Ray Vaughan—who used a mid-Sixties 85-watt blackface model during his 1985 tour of Japan—Steve Howe, Johnny Marr, Jack White and Dweezil Zappa. The Fender Twin Reverb is considered a standard model for players seeking a clean sound, and it is especially known for the quality of its built-in spring reverb.
Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
From 1986-1989, “Made in China” Squier Stratocasters carry the “Affinity” decal on the smaller ball of the headstock and have serial numbers as NCXXXX with the first number the year of manufacture, e.g. NC6XXX (Made in China 1986). NCXXXX is also used for Squier Strat Bullets of the same vintage. The Affinities are practically the same as the Japanese-made Squier Bullets of the mid-’80s; the same alder bodies, same rosewood-type fretboard and maple necks. Tuners and electronics are also very similar – not the best but distinctive in sound. Common modifications are more stable tuners, larger potentiometers, better capacitors, and pickups. They had single-ply 8-hole pick guards like the ’50s Fender Strats giving them a classic look. Colors were typically black, white and red.

The HOF is one of the single best examples of a convergence of price and quality features that we've ever been able to find. While we can't mention pricing in this article, we'd recommend clicking through and checking the retail price on the HOF, then comparing it to the other reverb pedals in this list. As far as value, the HOF is nearly a perfect 10.
FX or no FX? Again, it's almost a question of valve or solid state, here. Most valve amps don't come with any effects other than tremolo and reverb, at most. Solid State amps often come with a wide range of features such as digital FX and amp modelling. If you're an have lots of fx pedals, you don't really need a modelling unit, but if you're new to guitar playing, buying an amp with modeling FX might be a good way to get familiar with all those sounds.
Clapton himself has repeatedly called Guy “the greatest living guitarist.” Hendrix literally knelt at Buddy’s feet in the late Sixties, the better to study his riffs. Guy’s secret? He combines an old-time blues feel with the technical facility of a modern guitar player. He was a youngster at the legendary Chess Records in early Sixties Chicago. Fresh up from Lettsworth, Louisiana, Guy was some 20 years junior to giants like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, yet old enough and gifted enough to share the studio with them.
A Wiki is a web page that anyone can make changes to. The job of maintaining accurate information is far too monumental for one person, but a community of enthusiasts can maintain many thousands of pages quite easily, each person adding a bit at a time. That's the idea behind iGuide?s "What's It Worth Wiki". The most famous example of a Knowledge Wiki is Wikipedia, of course. But, our vision is that someday iGuide?will become the Wikipedia of Art, Antiques, Collectibles, Memorabilia....and Guitars.
Look for additional symbols in the tab. As you can see in the example above, many tabs aren't just collections of lines and notes. Tabs use a wide variety of special symbols to tell you how to play the notes in the tab. Most symbols refer to specific playing techniques - to make a song sound as much like the recording as possible, pay attention to these special markings.
There were actually two bolt-neck DT-250s, both with basswood bodies and the very nice locking Powerocker vibratos. The regular model came in black or white and had a rosewood fingerboard. Well, a little boring. But the Transparent Red TRs came with a maple fingerboard stained red. Yes, that’s what we’re talking about! If you’re going to have a red guitar, you ought to have a matching red fingerboard. Hard maple, made slick with the red polyurethane.
You aren’t likely to really know what works best until you get the song a little further along in the mix, when you can hear how the guitar sound sits with the vocals and other instrument tracks. Sometimes, what sounds like the best guitar tone in the room isn’t always the most effective guitar tone in the track, but as ever, at this point you can only take a stab at what you think will work. Through experience, you’ll build a tool kit of go-to mic positions that achieve what you are seeking.
We spent 46 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top choices for this wiki. If you want to become a real guitar hero, you'll need the right ax. Our selection of electric guitars includes something for everyone, from simple, inexpensive options best suited for beginners to top-tier models coveted by amateur and professional musicians alike. We've ranked them all here by playability, tonal range, durability, and style. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best electric guitar on Amazon.
Pitch Bend/Shifting: From a simple octave above the note you’re playing or at intervals in between, a pitch shifter effects pedal will change the pitch of your note or chord. More sophisticated pitch shifters create two or more harmony notes so you can accompany your root note for a fuller sound. Some simulate a chorus effect by providing minute shifts in pitch.
The Hi Flyer was a thin-bodied reverse Strat-type with a German carve around the top, almost always seen in sunburst. This was identical to the Aria 1702T. The bolt-on neck had a three-and-three castle head, plastic logo, string retainer bar, zero fret, 22-fret rosewood with large dot inlays. A white-black-white pickguard carried volume, tone and three-way. Two black-covered single-coil pickups were top-mounted, the neck slanted back like on a Mosrite, with six flat non-adjustable exposed poles in the center. An adjustable finetune bridge with round saddles sat in front of a Jazzmaster-style vibrato. The plastic logo was still in use in 1971, though gone was the string retainer, replaced by a pair of little string trees. Dots had gotten smaller by ’71, and the Hi Flyer was available in three finishes – orange sunburst (U1800), black (U1801) and white (U1802). The Hi Flyer listed for $82.50 (plus $12 for case) in ’71.
Note: as of November 2004, the serial number represents not necessarily the year the instrument was produced but rather the model year to which the instrument belongs. It has long been Ibanez's practice to begin production for the subsequent model year in November (or even late October), but the serial numbering change that was implemented in November 2004 acknowledged and formalized this practice.
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Most Humbuckers are wired in anti-phase, where the opposing polarity of the localised magnetic fields cancel each others out at selective points, creating a lower bandwidth region in the high frequency domain. Less bandwidth = lower noise. If done correctly, with carefully designed pickups, it will not affect the tone, but traditionally it did, because Hillbilly wannabe technicians made the things on their knees.
Our first recommendation in this list is the epic Les Paul model by Epiphone. The Special II model of Epiphone is specially made for beginners. If you are just starting to play the guitar and looking for a good quality one from the trusted band, you can buy this one. This one is very low cost and offers a lot more features than other Gibson guitars.
From top to bottom, this Hummingbird creates a buzz. Whatever your preference in size, colour, tone and playing style, it’s difficult to avoid picking this Cherry Sunburst up. It’s such a simple guitar to play that it’s rare to ever feel like you’re incapable of striking the right chord - especially on a neck that’s just 12” in radius. While the traditionally ornate decoration and blushing finish have been lovingly retained, this modern Montana incarnation offers a discrete LR Baggs Element VTC system for plug-in power. It is unlike many we have seen and produces one of the best sounds we’ve heard from an electric acoustic. Throw in the pleasure of playing such a superb guitar and it’s tough to say anything bad about the Gibson Montana Hummingbird Cherry Sunburst.  
Because of stiff competition in today's low-end market, guitar companies are constantly trying to outclass each other by improving the quality and value for money of their instruments. One brand that consistently tops in terms of sales and feedback is Epiphone, a sub-brand of Gibson that specializes in quality mass produced guitars. The DR-100 is a great example of their impressive ability to balance quality and affordability, garnering nearly perfect positive feedback for its build quality and sound.
Guitar pickups are a vital component of your tone and replacing them is something that most guitarists can learn to do themselves. Using high quality pickups can go a long way to bringing new life and excitement to your playing experience. There are hundreds of pickup manufacturers and thousands of pickups to choose from. Whether you are looking for a hotter pickup, trying to capture a beloved vintage tone or seeking single-coil sound in a noiseless package, brands like DiMarzio®, Seymour Duncan®, Lace®, Porter®, Fender®, Gibson® and many others offer a solution.
Follow your musical vision and express yourself with the unique Fender Newporter Player. The exclusive medium-sized Newporter shape gives it a balanced voice that's both articulate and powerful, perfect for backing up any singer. Designed for performing, the fully-painted gloss metallic solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, matching painted 6-in-line headstock and creme binding give this guitar a shot of electrifying style. Unconventional to the core, the Newporter Player is definitely something different and exciting.
Distortion and overdrive circuits each 'clip' the signal before it reaches the main amplifier (clean boost circuits do not necessarily create 'clipping') as well as boost signals to levels that cause distortion to occur at the main amplifier's front end stage (by exceeding the ordinary input signal amplitude, thus overdriving the amplifier) Note : product names may not accurately reflect type of circuit involved - see above.[38]
These two components work in tandem to influence tone and playability. The bridge is mounted to the lower portion of the guitar body. The strings are routed over it before terminating on the body or on a tailpiece. Bridges are designed to compensate for varying string lengths, gauges, and metals, ensuring that the strings remain in tune with each other. Bridges usually allow adjustment of the string's length to bring each string into tune along the entire length of the fretboard. This process is called intonation, and is an important part of setting up a guitar for optimal performance. Some bridges permit string height adjustments that affect the the ease with which the strings can be fretted, and is often referred to as the guitar's "action."
As of 2012 Taylor Guitars has more than 700 employees. The company maintains two factories: One in El Cajon, California and the other, 40 miles away in Tecate, Mexico where the entry-level guitars of the Taylor line (the Baby, Big Baby, GS mini, and 100-200 series) are made along with the Taylor guitar cases. In early 2011, the company opened a distribution warehouse in the Netherlands. Also that same year, the company, along with Madinter Trade, S.L., partnered to purchase the Crelicam ebony mill in Cameroon. [6]
Reverb sits at the other end of the tonal kaleidoscope, serving usually to add warmth and depth to a clean tone. Practically speaking, reverb simulates the sound of your guitar being played in a larger physical space. Imagine shouting at the top of your voice in a cloakroom. Then imagine doing the same thing in a church and you’re somewhere near there. Ok, that’s an extreme example, but approximating the sound as it reverberates around is quite a seductive thing when applied to a guitar. There are plenty of good examples of it being used to add a bit of life to an otherwise sterile clean tone.

The Professionals, just like the Standards before them, are designed to appeal to a wide range of players with a wide range of styles. These are not for vintage obsessives. Most of the changes are relatively subtle: a new 'modern deep C' neck shape; new narrow/tall frets; and the Teles revert back to three (compensated) brass saddles over the previous six Strat-style saddles. Both single coils here use Alnico 5 rods on the bass side and Alnico 2 on the trebles and we have a treble bleed RC network on the volume. A basic trio of sounds shouts 'contemporary Tele' from the biting harmonically rich honk of the flat- pole bridge, through the wider, less quacky pickup mix, to the less hard-hitting but not soft neck voice. It's like someone has EQ'd the sound to balance and maximise its Tele-ness. There's a very lively ringing resonance, too: all the planets seem to align, the maple neck/alder body perhaps pulling down a little edgy spike, while those brass saddles - not to mention the through-body stringing and the more classically voiced pickups - combine to create what seems like a modern Tele in spec but one that has plenty of classic, vintage reference.The colour/wood choices are wide and the subtle improvements to the build - on an already very well proven chassis - make a noticeable change, not least the new neck shape and the taller fretwire. Yes, we've played thicker, beefier-sounding Teles, and thinner, brighter ones, too, but as a foundation tone, which also includes a very smart and practical, lightweight moulded case, it all becomes a bit of a no-brainer.
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple & Wenge - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Gibraltar Standard II-8 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 808 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Cobalt Blue Metallic, Galaxy Black - Made In: Japan

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For my tastes, position 1 on a clean tone can be a bit too boomy. Even if one backs the volume a bit to take the edge off, it doesn't quite suit acoustic-style strumming. Position 2 is perfect for these sorts of things, though. I'd always use it for the small high chords you often find in funk and reggae. Position 2 is also a nice way thinning a distorted tone without it cleaning up too much, like Position 1 with the volume dialled down does. If you have your rig set so Position 1 screams, Position 2 will sing.
Even by the mid 1970s costs to manufacture instruments in Japan were rapidly rising. Labor was still cheaper than in the USA (it isn't anymore), but real estate, raw material, fuel, transportation costs and virtually all other manufacturing costs were fully as much if not more in Japan as in the USA. The Japanese were able to compete in the international market due not only to low labor costs at that time but also due to highly efficient manufacturing techniques and the fact that their low-cost workers were skilled and highly motivated.
My guitar is in excellent condition and is all mostly original. The tuners are replicas of the original Klusons, and it came with non-original wooden legs. The legs were originally `sold separately, so it’s possible that the original owner opted for cheaper off-brand legs instead. I prefer to use a table-type keyboard stand anyway, mainly because it frees up more space for my feet underneath. This is my primary gigging steel; it’s reliable and versatile, and it usually turns a few heads as well due to its unique appearance. Aside from a broken name badge, it’s in excellent condition; it came with the cleanest original Valco case I’ve ever seen. There is some slight deterioration of the chrome plating, but otherwise there is little wear to be found. I previously owned a Supro Console Eight, and liked it so much that I traded it for the double-neck version. The Console Sixteen is a rare bird because it was produced only briefly; it first appeared in the 1958 Supro catalog and last appeared in 1959.
At the higher end of the market, you will definitely want to consider theGibson Memphis ES Les Paul Studio. A stunning marriage of the ES hollowbody and Les Paul solidbody shapes, this is a model that combines playability, power, sustain and tonal warmth to perfection. Equipped with ’57 Classic and Super ’57 Classic pickups and boasting solid construction throughout, the ES-Les Paul Studio is perfect for anything and everything you could imagine. Each model is supplied with a Gibson Memphis hardshell case to get you out and about in style.
Flanger – a time-based effect likened to the sound of an aeroplane taking off and landing. The “whooshing”effect is created by feeding the output of the guitar tone back in on itself with a very short delay (usually less than 20 milliseconds) causing comb filtering (boosts and cuts along the frequency range). The delay time is then varied which causes the comb filter to move up and down the frequency range.
Shure SM57.Sennheiser MD421.For a rock sound, many (though not all!) engineers will use a dynamic mic placed close to the speaker (sometimes on its own, sometimes in combination with other mics) like this Electrovoice RE20.Why such a strong preference? These days, force of habit has got to be part of the answer, but there is also a lot about the microphone's frequency response which suits guitar recording. For a start, the sub-200Hz response roll-off reduces low-end cabinet 'thumps', which might otherwise conflict with the kick drum and bass in the mix. This also compensates for proximity boost when the mic is used very close to the speaker cone. However, there's also a slight 'suckout' at 300-500Hz, an area where muddiness can easily occur, and a broad 2-12kHz presence peak, which adds bite and helps the guitars cut through the rest of the track.
Byrd recommended Kaman show his guitar to folk singer Josh White, who was performing in town at the time. Kaman promptly did so, and for White, it was love at first strum. He enthusiastically agreed to have an Ovation guitar made to his specs, and became the first Ovation endorser, in ’66 and brought his entire family to Connecticut to pick up his first guitar, playing the first Ovation concert with his new guitar. Byrd did eventually get a classical guitar from Ovation, and performed with it for many years.

So you've decided to purchase a new axe? Well you've definitely come to the right place. Todays line of intermediate electric guitars are so superbly crafted right down to the smallest component, you don't have to worry about sacrificing quality for a reasonably priced instrument. In fact, this catalog is exploding with intermediate electric guitars for every taste and style. Like any expert guitarist will tell you, the learning process speeds up considerably when you have a guitar that's an ideal balance of comfort, playability and tone. Thankfully, popular guitar companies like Ibanez, Epiphone, Jackson and countless others are passionate about giving everyone the opportunity to play an electric guitar that's meticulously constructed. You'll even find intermediate electric guitars that are endorsed by professional artists, including Dave Mustaine, Brian May and John Petrucci. Since its earliest beginnings, the classic sound and feel of a Strat has found its way in the hands of icons, and the Fender Deluxe Player's Stratocaster will be sure to continue that legacy. Consisting of a noiseless pickups, gold hardware and loaded with advanced electronics, this Strat plays effortless, and the push-button pickup switch provides you with seven pickup combinations for a wide range of tones. This section also features plenty of intermediate hollow-body guitar choices, such as the Gretsch Guitars G5420T Electromatic. This eye-catching single-cutaway contains a Bigsby tremolo and Filter'Tron pickups to give you a lethal combination of vintage twang and vigorous punch. Searching for a brand new electric guitar is an exhilarating experience, and with so many stunning options to choose from on today's market, there has never been a better time than now to get your hands on an instrument that perfectly represents your own personality. Whether you're a '60s garage turkey or a technically-skilled metal shredder, you can bet that you'll find what you're looking for.
Popular condensers: when it comes to condenser mics for guitar-cab miking, the AKG C414 (in its various flavours — the C414 B-ULS is pictured above left) and the Neumann U87 (centre) are both popular choices. Some producers also frequently look to the U87's predecessors, the U47 valve (pictured) and FET models, and the U67.The characteristics that producers most often seem to be looking for in these mics are their extended frequency response, especially at the low end, and the slightly softer, more diffuse sound imparted by the large diaphragm. These mics also tend to boost the 5-15kHz region, but this boost is rapidly lost as you move off-axis (it is inherently difficult to design a large-diaphragm capsule with an even off-axis frequency response).
Maybe you'd rather check out the legendary "Marshall Sound" in all its glory? If so, flip the switch on the Marshall DSL40C 40W All-Tube 1x12 Guitar Combo Amp. This all-tube powerhouse is great for gigging guitarists, thanks in part to its fantastic projection and its Pentode/Triode switch that allows the performer to drop the power down from 40W to 20W on the fly for even more versatility. When only the best will do, nobody delivers like Marshall.
It was shortly after the debut of the first Supros that National Dobro entered a period of major transition. By 1935, at least, the company had decided to abandon the sunny beaches of L.A. for the freezing winters of Chicago, then the principal home of America’s instrument makers, and not coincidentally, America’s giant mass merchandisers Montgomery Ward and Sears. Both Wards and Sears had been offering National and Dobro resonator guitars since the late ’20s. Being in Chicago had the obvious advantages of proximity to the resources surrounding the business and being next door to the world’s two largest retailers of the day. The move to the Midwest began early 1936 and took almost a year and a half. Throughout most of ’36, the majority of production continued in L.A.
Scott Knickelbine began writing professionally in 1977. He is the author of 34 books and his work has appeared in hundreds of publications, including "The New York Times," "The Milwaukee Sentinel," "Architecture" and "Video Times." He has written in the fields of education, health, electronics, architecture and construction. Knickelbine received a Bachelor of Arts cum laude in journalism from the University of Minnesota.
 An enduringly popular effect, with all sorts of uses for vocals, drums, guitars and synths, is genuine reverse reverb. This is where a reverb tail appears to increase in volume ahead of the sound that gives rise to it — a completely unnatural sound and something that's impossible to create in real time. It's easy enough to do in a DAW application though. First, find the section of audio you want to treat and reverse it. In the DAW I use, Digital Performer, there's an offline plug-in for this. Now apply conventional reverb to this 'backwards' audio — either by playing it through a reverb plug-in and recording it to another track, or by rendering it using an offline process (if your DAW offers this). In either case make sure you allow enough additional time at the end of the audio to capture the full, final reverb tail. In the screen grab I've done this by allowing 1500 milliseconds of post-roll processing.

One of the earliest studio effects created by taking advantage the distance between the record and playback heads on tape recorders, delay duplicates the original signal and repeats it after the original sound is played. This can be repeated over and over for an echo effect, or be a single repeat that produces the slap-back sound popular in rockabilly. The time between repetitions can be very short, measured in milliseconds. Or it can be longer and more dramatic. Delays can also add a rhythmic element to your playing. There are many different kinds of delay effects available, and most offer a number of different types in the same unit.
Lists like these come down to personal taste, but since you like Ryan Adams you should give Uncle Tupelo’s album March 16–20, 1992 a listen. After Uncle Tupelo pretty much defined the modern alt-country genre with the electric guitar driven albums “No Depression” and “Still Feel Gone” they released one of the best acoustic albums you will ever hear.
After I published that blog post, a number of beginners wrote to tell me they had a higher budget and would actually like me to recommend some better beginner guitars than those you typically find in starter packs. When I dug deeper, most told me they had a max budget of about $300 for the guitar alone, and weren’t interested in all-in-one starter packs. They wanted a really great (but affordable) guitar and wanted to shop for amps and accessories separately. I further confirmed this with a little informal poll on Twitter:
The truth is that you can play any genre of music with just about any type of electric guitar. Many blues players run Gibson Les Pauls with beefy humbuckers, while Iron Maiden completely broke the stereotype that you can't play metal with a Stratocaster.  Guitar effects pedals really changed the game too. However, some guitars do actually deal better with certain music genres.
If the microphonic problem is not due to the cover, or is with a singlecoil pickup you have two options. First is to wax pot the pickup. The second is to pot the pickup in something else. Laquer was once commonly used, but it can cause a problem with some types of insulation (disolving it) and prevents future repair (other than full rewind). I have found a great alternative to both. It is vinyl sanding sealer. (I'm using Sherwin williams wood classics interior sanding sealer) This stuff penetrates deeply, dries solidly, and allows for repairs same as wax does. It requires no special equipment or care. Just submerge the pickup wait till bubbles stop appearing, pull it out and set it on a paper towel to dry. Once the excess has run off (a minute or so) wipe off the top and bottom of the pickup with a rag and allow it to finish drying. In it's intended use it dries fully in an hour. I leave them overnight.
Flanger – a time-based effect likened to the sound of an aeroplane taking off and landing. The “whooshing”effect is created by feeding the output of the guitar tone back in on itself with a very short delay (usually less than 20 milliseconds) causing comb filtering (boosts and cuts along the frequency range). The delay time is then varied which causes the comb filter to move up and down the frequency range.
It was also during this time that Perry Bechtel, a well-known banjo player and guitar teacher from Cable Piano in Atlanta, requested that Martin build a guitar with a 15-fret neck-to-body join[citation needed]. Most guitars of the day, with the exception of Gibson’s L-5 archtop jazz guitars, had necks joined at the 12th fret, half the scale length of the string. In keeping with Bechtel’s request, Martin modified the shape of their 12-fret 000-size instrument, lowering the waist and giving the upper bout more acute curves to cause the neck joint to fall at the 14th fret rather than the 12th. Fourteen-fret guitars were designed to be played with a pick and replace banjos in jazz orchestras. Thus, Martin named its first 14-fret, 000-shape guitar the Orchestra Model (OM). Martin applied this term to all 14-fret instruments in its catalogs by the mid- to late-1930s.

Several years later, Gibson issued its third Jimmy Page Signature guitar, this one based closely on Jimmy Page’s #2. Issued in a production run of 325 guitars, the guitar more accurately reproduced Page’s heavily modified No. 2 than the original Signature model of the 1990s, and featured the 4 push-pull pots, the two mini-switches under the pick guard, accurate tuners and sound-accurate pickups (the same pickups that were used in the 2005 Jimmy Page No. 1 Signature), as well as an accurate neck profile. As in the original Signature model of the 1990s, pulling up the neck or bridge volume pots switched the respective pickups’ coils from series to parallel, and pulling up the tone pots switched the respective pickups from humbucking to single coil. The two push-button DPDT switches mounted beneath the pickguard provide universal switching functions, regardless of the positions of the push-pull pots. With the switch mounted toward the bridge-end of the pickguard in the out position, the bridge pickup’s phase is reversed. With the switch mounted toward the neck-end of the pickguard in the out position, both pickups are wired in series and out of phase. With both switches out, both pickups are in series and in phase. The Jimmy Page “Number Two” Les Paul is finished with a sunburst finish to replicate the appearance of the original guitar. 325 of these guitars were made, with the initial 25 being autographed by Jimmy Page and priced at US$25,000 when new.


In some small to mid-size venues, such as bars and nightclubs, the PA system may not have the capacity to provide the bass sound for the venue, and the PA system may be used mainly for vocals. Bass players in bands that play at a variety of venues, including these types of small to mid-size venues, may need to be able to provide the bass sound for the venue, and so they will require a large combo amp or bass stack with this capability.
A. Most electric guitars have several control knobs on the body. The amount of knobs and what they do can vary, so it's worth experimenting, but we'll go over the most common configuration. The majority of electric guitars have three control knobs and one switch. One control knob is for volume and the other two are for tone, with one controlling the neck pickup, and the other controlling the bridge pickup. The switch is to change between using the neck or bridge pickup.
Anyway, as the Strat-style guitars have three pickups, the selector switch works like this: all the way to the left (relative to the Jimi pic) would limit the guitar’s output to the sound of the neck pickup. One position to the right will blend the neck pickup with the middle pickup. Put the switch in the middle, and you’ll get just the sound of the middle pickup, as you may have guessed. The next position will blend the middle and bridge pickups, and all the way to the right, it’s all bridge pickup.
The Thunderbird IV was first introduced in 1963 and instantly became one of rock's most recognizable bass guitar designs. For almost five decades, the Thunderbird has powered artists as varied as Nikki Sixx, The Who, Kings of Leon, Cheap Trick, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Steely Dan and The Silversun Pickups. Turn on your radio and you'll hear a Thunderbird bass. Now, Epiphone takes all the vintage mojo of the original Thunderbird IV and sends it flying into the future with Gibson TB Plus humbuckers with ceramic magnets and all the 'Bird's original styling and features intact.
Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.
In 1992, two more models were added, the single-cutaway BC-40 and the 5-string B-540. Although widely admired[who?] for their high quality and lovely appointments, they proved to have limited appeal due to their $2000-plus list prices. By 1997, all four of these initial basses were dropped in favor of the B-1, a lower-priced ABG with laminated mahogany sides as part of Martin’s 1 series of guitars. The BM, an even less expensive model in Martin’s now discontinued Road series soon followed; it had laminated mahogany sides with a solid mahogany back. Also around this time electronics became standard on Martin basses. The most recent additions are the BC-15, a single-cutaway version with a mahogany top, the BC-16GTE, also a single-cutaway with solid Genuine mahogany back and sides with a gloss top, and the 00C-16GTAE, which is a slimmer thin-line version of the previously mentioned model. As a special edition, Martin offered the Alternative X Bass with jet black High Pressure Laminate back and sides and a Graffiti-patterned Aluminum finish top. This bass was very similar in build to the other guitars in Martin’s X series. There have been two Limited Edition Martin acoustic bass models. The first, the SWB Sting Signature Model, was released in 1999 and was made with woods certified by the Rainforest Alliance’s SmartWood program[citation needed]. The SWB’s top is made with book matched solid Sitka spruce reclaimed from pulp logs, the back, sides and neck are solid certified cherry, and the fingerboard is certified katalox. Sting’s signature is inlaid between the 18th and 19th frets, and a label inside the body states that a portion of the sale price is donated to the Rainforest Foundation International[citation needed]. The second and more recent Limited Edition is the B-28KV Klaus Voormann Signature model released in 2008 for the German market. It has a Sitka spruce top with Solid East Indian Rosewood back and sides and a black Ebony fingerboard. The headstock features a unique art design by Klaus as a circular inlay making each bass a one-of-a-kind. In addition to these U.S.-made instruments, Martin also markets Sigma ABGs made in Korea.
It is a standard dreadnought with 26 frets. There are no electronics, no cutaway, and no fancy upgrades. It has a book matched sitka spruce top, rosewood fingerboard, adjustable rosewood bridge, cream colored plastic binding, rosewood back and sides, and a black inlaid headstock. The neck is not one piece and is made from presumably African mahogany. It has closed gold tone tuners, black beveled pick guard and some plain black line art for a rosette. This guitar is void of polyurethane and has a lacquer finish, so much the better.
Position 4 (inner coils, parallel connection): This is similar to position two just inverted. Pole 1 connects bridge pickup coil tap to the output through pole 2. Pole 3 grounds neck pickup coil tap and pole 4 connects neck pickup hot lead to the output. That leaves us with bridge pickup coil from ground to coil tap and neck pickup coil from coil tap to hot lead. Again, they are paralleled.
Some acoustic guitars, regardless of the body style, feature a cutaway in the upper bout to allow players to more easily reach the higher frets on the guitar neck. Phil Keaggy, a prolific and highly celebrated American guitarist, usually uses an acoustic guitar with a cutaway. If you plan to play leads on your acoustic, or are used to playing an electric guitar, you may prefer a guitar body with a cutaway.
Matsumoku is one of the Japanese manufacturers that did not survive long after the heyday of the 1970s guitar market despite having a long tradition of quality stringed instrument craftsmanship. Matsumoku produced guitars for major manufacturers Greco, Guyatone and Yamaha. Matsumoku made Arai, Aria, Aria Pro II and Aria Diamond badges, with Aria being their primary badge for a majority of this time frame. Badged guitars known to have been made by Matsumoku include Apollo, Arita, Barclay, Burny, Capri, Columbus, Conrad, Cortez (electrics only), Country, Cutler, Dia, Domino, Electra, Epiphone, Granada, Hi Lo, Howard, Ibanez, Lindberg, Lyle, Luxor, Maxitone (this guitar differs from Tama's Maxitone badge), Mayfair, Memphis, Montclair, Pan, Pearl (electrics only), Raven, Stewart, Tempo, Univox ,Vantage, Ventura, Vision, Volhox, Washburn (in 1979 and 1980), Westbury, Westminster and Westone. Possible Matsumoku badges include: Bruno, Crestwood, Conqueror, Eros, Mako, Memphis, Orlando and Toledo.
The Salamander Grand made by Alexander Holm (details above) who sampled his Yamaha C5 Grand and is quite well known for having a great sound. Most sf2/sfz versions seem to be lacking the proper dynamics, have latency problems or have been oversimplified. This sf2 version has addressed these issues yet retains its essential character including optional resonance but removes other non-essential sounds such as pedal noises.
For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.
This is a right handed 2018 Gibson Custom Shop Explorer, Extra/Elbow Cut, with a heavy aged relicing, Natural Finish, Gold plated Nickel hardware. This model is patterned after the 1958 Explorer owned by Eric Clapton. It is brand new with OHSC, COA, and all paperwork/tags. The weight is light at only 7 lbs, 12 oz. This is only one of a limited run of 5 in the Natural Finish. I also have the same guitar in Cherry finish, one of only 5 in the Cherry finish.
If you are using the bs-16i or similar app try changing the Rx. Channel for say the first 8 channels all to 1. You will then have 8 easily accessible sounds to play at the touch of the Solo/Mute button. You can then mix for instance piano and pads together. Alternatively you could leave the channels 1 to 16 and use channel select to choose your favorite sounds.  To play two sounds together just put them on the same channel. This is handy for pianos where you can add the level of resonance you prefer. When layering sounds with piano choose the non resonance piano versions (available in all the SoundFonts) to avoid lack of polyphony problems.
I remember choosing a floating tremolo equipped electric guitar as my first ever purchase, and I ended up being so frustrated at how hard it is to keep the guitar in tune and how complex string replacements were. To make the long story short, I felt relief when I traded it up for a simpler Fender Strat. These days, floating tremolos have gotten better and easier to setup, but I'd still recommend a guitar with basic stop tail piece or tremolo bridge for beginners - just so you can focus on learning the instrument and worrying about string setup when you have more experience.
What if you don’t have a music shop nearby and need to order a guitar online? Our recommendation is that when you have read through our list of the best guitars, select a few that you’re interested in, and look them up on YouTube. There you can watch (and listen to!) great reviews where you can hear the guitar be played and get someone else’s opinion on it. Try listening to the different guitars directly after each other so you can determine which one sounds the best.
Martin opened its “Custom Shop” division in 1979.[7] Martin built its 500,000th guitar in 1990, and in 2004 they built their millionth guitar. This guitar is entirely hand-crafted and features more than 40 inlaid rubies and diamonds. It is worth an estimated $1,000,000.[8] As of 2007, Martin employs 600 people. Thirteen workers are devoted to quality assurance[citation needed]. In October, 2009, Martin purchased at auction a D-28 that was played by Elvis Presley in his last concert for $106,200.[9]
One special effect I used quite a lot in analogue studios, but which is surprisingly tricky to implement in a lot of software sequencers, is where you feed the left and right outputs of an auto-pan effect to two different effects processors. With this setup, the outputs of the two effects can then be mixed together to create a variety of different modulation-style treatments. This patch always worked well in a send-return loop with a pair of phasers, especially if you also EQ'd the two returns wildly differently. The same setup used as an insert could do great things with distortion and ring-modulation processors, and if you were feeling really adventurous, you could fiddle with the panning rate in real time while mixing down. Mike Senior
Smaller players, musicians who travel frequently, and parents shopping for children, may also want to consider travel and mini-acoustic guitars. These guitars were designed for the comfort of smaller players, and for convenience when traveling, but many guitar manufacturers have invested significant time and resources into creating smaller-scale acoustic guitars that don't compromise quality or sound.
As his Tuareg brethren continue their separatist insurgency in northern Mali, the leader of Tinariwen again can lay claim to being one of the world’s few literal rebel rockers. Ibrahim gets credit for inventing the modern Tuareg electric guitar style adopted by Etran Finatawa, Bombino, and other Saharan musicians. He generates this gritty, grungy, churning sound by hammering open strings on his Fender axe in a laid-back desert boogie reminiscent of his late northern Mali peer Ali Farka Touré.
One of the earliest tremolo devices goes back several hundred years and can be found on 16th century Italian and German pipe organs. Like modern day samplers, these early organs had several auxiliary stops including drums, birdcalls, drones, bells, and a tremulant — a mechanism that opens and closes a diaphragm to vary the air pressure of the pipes. As the pressure varied, so did the amplitude, allowing for both vibrato and tremolo.
On paper it looks fantastic for the money, but having Google'd it I found some people were less than happy with the fit & finish. But I value the opinions of my fellow MLP'ers a bit more than those found on some other forums so I'd like to hear what you all think. Aside from the electronics, which I'd replace, how is the quality of this instrument? Is it as good as the singlecut models?
I have owned a Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier for 5 years now and couldn't be happier! Granted, the amp took a long time to dial in my perfect tone, but it was a good way to familiarize yourself with the amp. If you want cleans, crunch, distortion, and a wall of gain that is big enough to destory small islands than this is the perfect amp. Not to mention, the customer service is out of this world! About a month after purchasing the amp Mesa Boogie called to make sure everything was okay and I was enjoying the amp. They also ask you to take a questionnaire on how the sales person performed. Great company, Best amps.
Matt Heafy, of Trivium is working on a signature 6 string and 7 string Les Paul with Epiphone. Heafy has said that ‘(I) chose Epiphone, because I have to work my way up, from an Epiphone, Gibson USA, then a Gibson Custom. The thing is if it was a Gibson Custom, the kids would be paying $6000 for it, and they can’t afford that. I want it to be affordable but something I will use on stage”[citation needed]
The double cutaway body and its higher fret access made the SG become the perfect axe for the slide guitarist.  Duane Allman of the Allman Brother’s Band is one of the most highly revered slide guitarists of all time, and he chose the SG as his weapon of choice.  Allman was even known to pass the fret board entirely and create notes in a high range that were not previously capable of being played with normal slide technique.
Distortion and overdrive: Distortion and overdrive units re-shape or "clip" an audio signal's wave form so that it has flattened peaks, creating "warm" sounds by adding harmonics or "gritty" sounds by adding inharmonic overtones. In tube amplifiers, distortion is created by compressing the instrument's out-going electrical signal in vacuum tubes or "valves".[52][53] Distortion pedals produce perfectly flattened peaks or "hard" clipping. Overdrive pedals produce "soft” tube-like distortion by compressing the sine wave without completely flattening it. Much like tube amps, overdrive units produce "clean" sounds at quieter volumes and distorted "warm" sounds at louder volumes. Distortion and overdrive pedals may either be transistor-based or digital.[54][55] While distortion pedals are most associated with electric guitar, they are also used with bass guitar (fuzz bass), Hammond organ and electric piano.
With so many guitar manufacturers hot rodding the Stratocaster, it is refreshing to see brands like ESP going after the other popular guitar shape, resulting in the "Super LP" guitar like the ESPT LTD EC-1000FM. This souped up version of the classic single cutaway body combines traditional looks with modern tones and playability, resulting in a fast playing axe that's easy on the eyes, and not too edgy.

Includes 9+ hours of in-depth training on all aspects of guitar. There are many variables that can impact the tone and quality of a guitar recording — from setup, string gauge, amps and pickups, to processing, effects and miking. Mark breaks it all down so you can confidently create awesome guitar tone and take your mixes, productions, performances and recordings to the next level.


Finally, the Univox 1085 PA Amplifier System ($1,035) was another piggyback with 10 tubes, 105 watts, four channels, eight inputs, external echo or equalizer connection, four volumes plus master volume, bass, middle, treble, presence, reverb with footswitch, and a cabinet with four 15″ Univox speakers with 20-ounce Alnico magnets and 2″ voice coils. It also had 12 high-frequency horns with crossover networks, usually used with two cabinets.
The Squier Deluxe Stratocaster by Fender is another excellent electronic guitar for newbies. The body is made up of basswood which is a soft, light wood with some of the best mid and upper frequency production. A maple neck and fretboard further assists the mid and high range frequency sound. Its C-shaped neck guarantees the best comfort. This guitar features three single coil pickups. One is assigned for master volume control, one tone control for the neck pickup and one tone control for medium pickup. The five-way switch lets you combine these three pickups and produce the widest range of sounds ever!
by pedalhaven  @airbag3333  has a seriously stacked board! Don't forget to DM/Tag us to submit your photos! ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️ ▪️  #pedalhaven   #pedalboard   #guitarpedals   #knowyourtone   #ambienttones   #pedalboards   #pedalnerds   #pedalporn   #guitar   #gearporn   #gearnerds   #pedalboardpeople   #shoegaze   #geartalk   #guitarsdaily   #gottone   #tonefordays   #guitargear   #reverb   #gearpost   #boardshot 
What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
An EQ pedal has been designed to allow you to tune certain parameters of your sound such as the bass, middle and treble frequencies. They are predominantly used by more experienced guitarists who want to add or take away specific bands of sound. These are great for guitarists who want to really boost the treble, bring out the bass or just ensure their guitar signal sounds as flat as possible. The MXR M109S Six band EQ Pedal is one of our favourites.
In the Popular Mechanics lab, we played the Xbox 360 version of Rocksmith 2014 with a pair of Epiphone guitars: The Les Paul Junior that comes with the game bundle, and a $1000 Les Paul Custom that the company sent us for testing, and which, sadly, we have to send back. The thing that sets Rocksmith apart from other rhythm games is the "Hercules" adapter. It's a cable that plugs into the output jack of any guitar or bass and connects it to your console via the USB port. You use the ordinary console controller to navigate menus.

We specialise in 1960s and 1970s parts and literature, relating to American and European guitars and basses. Specifically Gibson, Guild and Vox. The parts for sale on this site are sorted by brand and type, or you can search for keywords in the box above. We have a lot of parts unlisted on this site - if you do not see the part you need, please ask.


A neat recording solution for when you want the sound of a speaker running flat out, but without being thrown out of your flat by your neighbours!A practical method endorsed by those engineers who don't like to leave their comfortable chairs too often is to combine the above techniques by using two close mics, one on-axis and one off-axis, plus one distant mic a few feet from the cabinet. If the close mics have very different characteristics, for example a capacitor mic on-axis and a dynamic mic off-axis, you'll get an even greater choice of tonality, as you can vary the mic balance being recorded. Switching the phase of individual mics can often yield interesting combinations and, if you really don't want to leave that chair, you can also delay the ambience to increase its effective distance when it is combined with the other mics. Each millisecond of delay is roughly equivalent to 12 inches of added distance.
But when combined with those Dean humbuckers, this thing full-on rocks! It’s full of gain, fuzz, buzz, but still articulate enough thanks to the strong middle frequencies, reeling in that Dime sound to cut any mix and in style. Additionally, the price is lower than many of the models on the rundown, making this puppy a safe choice for cheap good guitars.
Tempo guitars and amps offered in 1971 included three nylon-stringed guitars, three steel-stringed guitars, and two solidstate amplifiers. These were pretty low-end beginner guitars probably imported from Japan, though the heads have a Harmony look to them. The N-5 Folk Guitar ($31.90) was standard-sized with spruce top and mahogany body (presumably laminates), slothead, tie bridge, no markers. The GM-62 Steel String Guitar ($29) was also standard size, “light” top and “dark” back with dots, moveable bridge with saddle and stamped metal tailpiece. The GM-300 Convertible Guitar Outfit ($33.90) was a spruce and mahogany slothead with dots and a glued/bolted bridge which could be used for either nylon or steel strings. It came with nylons and an extra set of steel strings. Harmony made guitars like this for Sears in the early ’60s. The N-48 Nylon String Guitar Outfit ($82.50) was a grand concert classical with amber spruce top, maple body, marquetry strip on the slothead and gold hardware, hardshell case included. The N-40 Nylon String Guitar ($45) was grand concert-sized with amber spruce top and “dark brown” body. The F-34 Steel String Guitar was also grand concert-sized with spruce top, “dark brown” body, belly pin bridge, block inlays, and engraved hummingbird pickguard.
3.  This one is not so much a customer fix as customer negligence.  A crack in the top of an acoustic that is not addressed right away.  Dirt and grime are allowed into the crack and oxidizes the surfaces so that what could have been fixed with a diamond patch on the inside has now become a fix that includes taking away the rotten wood and inserting a splint.  It can be very difficult to match the new wood with the old, and you better make sure the customer knows that his or her guitar will not look brand new.
BOO TO AMAZON FOR CARRYING A MISREPRESENTED PRODUCT. Due to the description I thought we could use this for lessons. It is NOT an instrument it is a toy. It doesn't stay tuned for even a 1/2 hour lesson and the teacher won't allow him to use it for fear that it will hurt his ability to hear when a real guitar is out of tune in the future. I tried to return but they didn't respond for weeks and told me it was too late after they finally responded. The guitar has barely been used at all and won't be used since it is clearly doing more harm than good for a young musician! AMAZON you should drop this product, it is NOT what is presents itself to be!!!
.From its G logo cattle brand on top, to the fence rail pickguard graphic, the Chet Atkins Gretsch cowboy'd up big time with cactus, cattle, rifle and arrow inlays inscribed right into the mother of pearl. This 6120W  Reissue combines many of the most desirable features of this longtime favorite. Twin Filter-Tron pickups offer lively, hum-free performance, with master volume and tone controls for ease of operation. See pics,pricing and info here

James Burton, another famous Twin user, put it best: “If you can plug your guitar into an amp and make it sound good, that’s what it’s all about. The amp I really enjoy playing, especially when I’m traveling, is the Fender ’65 Twin Reverb. It’s got everything you need for live playing and it has great tone. That amp just works for me and it’s real trustworthy. When I travel on the road, I do use a little digital delay and maybe a little chorus, but I just like the sound of the guitar and playing something that I think people will appreciate and understand.”


15 years ago a friend brought his in Miami i think. The guitar sounds amazing and the care for making it was awesome. The guitar have a cristal like sound and shines particulary well. Today i've acquire it from him by a fair trade: i purchased a new Falcon guitar, wich is the best brand here in Peru, and trade it for his Palmer. Is the best trade i've done. Not sure for him ;) My friend paid $100 for it 15 years ago and the model is PF20. Hope this information was helpfull
Frank Zappa was a lot of things. A writer of hilariously satirical lyrics. A composer of technically brilliant music. And a player of some of the most innovative and inventive guitar heard to date. His lightning fast fretting hand gave rise to some truly remarkable guitar improvisation. One of his best performances can be heard on the song, “Watermelon in Easter Hay.” “Muffin Man” is another great example of his titanic ability.
I can't have them above Guild. Their usa made stuff and vintage acoustics are gems no doubt, but they set 7 or 8th for me. I just wish they still made American made acoustics. Like guild they are a hallmark name in the acoustic guitar world. Unlike guild they aren't being made in america. Guild and their supporters really lucked out with the Cordoba purchase. They're bringing Guild back where they belong. On top. Now if someone would do the same for Washburn. I really thought the usa made stuff would get back to greatness with that solo deluxe warren haynes model, but they stopped American made guitars all together which is a shame.

There sure are a lot of electric guitar options to choose from in this day and age. Thankfully, your choice doesn't have to be a difficult one to make thanks to world-leading guitar companies like Epiphone. In fact, Epiphone specializes in a wide range of electric guitar value packages, assembled specifically to help budding enthusiasts begin their musical journey on the right foot. If learning how to play the guitar is something you've always wanted to try but were never sure where to start, consider this section your launching pad.
It’s interesting to note that luthier Steve Klein introduced a guitar that got a lot of press in the early ’80s with a body virtually identical to the Ovation Breadwinner. According to Charles’ son (and future president of Kaman Corporation), Bill Kaman, Jr., Ovation considered “pointing this out” (i.e., legal action), but given its bad track record with solidbodies, figured it wasn’t worth the effort.
Fractal Audio is a relatively small company that competes directly with the world's biggest amp modeling and effects manufacturers. They built their reputation on the quality of their premium priced guitar processor called AxeFX, but has since expanded into relatively more affordable territory with the AX8 and FX8. Of the two, the FX8 gets our pick because of its incredible balance of quality, complexity and practicality. It is also fits this list better because it is a true multi-effects "only" unit, so there's no amp modeling feature to get hung up on.
I've been an on/off guitar player for at least 15 years now. Never really good, but steadily improving. My hardest thing is consistent motivation. I go through spurts where I study theory and practice like crazy and then, suddenly I just stop. I got this both because I was exceited about it's teaching potential (lessions were $20/30 min when I was a kid, got this for $25) and it has got me playing again and is a lot of fun.
Thinking out loud... what defines electronics then? I've always assumed that the pickups, caps, pots, etc. inside an electric guitar constituted an electronic system. The "guitar's electronics" facilitate a deliberate flow of electrons through a circuit with semi-conductors, etc. Heck, with coils and magnets (and sometimes battery packs), they also provide the electricity that's conducted through the system.
For the hobbyist guitarist this is a great 'bang for the buck' investment. It has practice tools for the beginner but solid tones for the advanced guitarist. For home use, maybe even a garage band it's perfectly adequate. If I were a more serious musician doing gigs with high end audio going to the audience, I'd be investing more than a hundred bucks in my stage rig.
Choosing an electric guitar can be a difficult feat, especially if you have never played electric guitar before. There are so many brands of electric guitars and so many things you need to consider while making your choice. Among the things you need to consider are shape, musical preference, and price. In addition, you need to take a look at the best electric guitar brands to help you choose the highest quality guitars out there that will fit your preference and give you the best playing experience. This is why we have put together a list to give you a look at said brands.
Flanger – Before digital recording was the standard, a common trick used by artists was to touch one of a tape recorder’s reels to slow it down, then let it go so it would catch up with the main track. The result was a sound that could be subtly thicker or downright unrecognizable, and it’s the effect that flangers are designed to reproduce. You can hear Jimmy Page’s use of a flanger on Nobody’s Fault But Mine and Kashmir, by Led Zeppelin.
Acoustic guitar body sizes and styles differ between manufacturers. The C.F. Martin Company has been at the forefront of setting trends in body styles and sizes, and many companies have followed suit with their standards as a solid foundation,and altering their designs to creat custom sizes and styles. The following describes some of the common acoustic guitar body sizes and styles, and shares a little bit about the sound and tone profiles.   These profiles do not follow Martins standards to a tee, but do exhibit some of the most commonly used acoustic guitar body sizes and styles used, many having been influenced by the Martin Guitar Company.
The customer then tells me that it was the second brand new preamp that they failed to get working. The first one they couldn’t get working and blamed it on a defective preamp. Could have been, who knows? So the guy orders another new preamp and they still couldn’t get it working after 2 weeks. Sadly, they charged him anyway and he left with a bass that still was not working. So he brings it to me after being recommended by some of my very kind customers.
Eddie's Guitars represents the finest in boutique amplification. We have the largest selection of quality amplifiers available today. We focus on keeping up with the industry's most current builders. Stocking guitar amp brands like Fender, Marshall, Mesa Boogie, and Orange, providing completely original designs or modern reproductions of your favorite classic amps, we truly have something for everybody.

I’m not a Fender amp guy at all. I know, a lot of people swear by them, and they do sound great, and are a standard in the indie world. They tend to have less options and features that a beginner might want to play around with, and to get those options you end up spending more money than you might be comfortable with. You also don’t get much horsepower for the cash compared to some of the other lower priced options. To me, a cheap Fender sounds like…a cheap Fender. Blues guys sure do love those Mustangs though.

First of all build quality. CTS's sturdy casings, brass shafts and contact patch, solid connections are second to none, and importantly are precision made by a company who have been doing so for a long long time. Fitting a well made pot will mean you'll likely only need to do it once in that guitar, that's important I feel! There are however a lot of different variations of CTS pot, and that is why I now only swear by the 450 Series, and 'TVT' Series, both are constructed with the same components, I like consistency here! Which is why you'll only find these models of pot in my harnesses. I've seen some lower quality series' of CTS pots that have been wildly inconsistent, which I'll get to next..


Chorus: Since this is still a repeating effect that has a tempo component, the chorus of a song tends to be a tough fit.Verse: The lower intensity and high emotion of most verses in Christian worship leaves room for some tremolo effect, depending on what the guitar is doing.Bridge: Short solos during the bridge are an ideal place for the tremolo effect, particularly if it hasn’t been used in other parts of the song.
The ultimate in superb workmanship, total versatility. This deluxe 4 pickup electric will be played with pride by the most experienced performer.  Four simulated split pickups make possible virtually unlimited sound combinations. Powerful magnetic pickups are height adjustable. Ultra fast steel reinforced neck. Head and Rosewood fingerboard bound in White. .22 Nickel Silver frets (plus zero fret), 8 “N” shaped pearl position markers, 4 volume controls, 3 position rotary tone control (high-medium-low), Rhythm-Solo-Switch, 4 slide pickup switches.  Advanced type tremolo arm.  Chrome adjustable roller-type bridge.  Highly polished yellow-to-red-to-black sunburst finish.  Size 41″x14″.
The Truetone Rock Star has a classic 1960s Fender Jaguar - inspired body with a cherry & black sunburst finish and swank natural wood grain finish neck. The headstock has an odd, but killer-looking shape, an elaborately cut pick guard and what might be the world's coolest pickup; a chrome-cased body with a shimmery red marblized pickup cover. The guitar is 100% original with no replacement parts. We  rescued this one a while back and it was rusty and did not work when first tested. We meticulously detailed and cleaned it and removed the rust. We also re-soldered a few wires inside, and this fab Japanese guitar was ready to rock again. It sold and was shipped France, and the Rock Star is pretty rare, but there are lots of cool retro Truetone / Silvertone Japanese Guitars for sale below! Scroll Down for more from our collection!
It’s 1951, a dark, rainy night on the backstreets of Memphis, Tennessee. Ike Turner and His Kings Of Rhythm are packing the gear into the station wagon, getting ready to head off to the studio to record a track for producer Sam Phillips, a track that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame will one day honor as the first rock and roll song of all time, ‘Rocket 88.’ (Although, distinctly unfairly, the song will be credited to singer Jackie Brenston and the imaginary band ‘His Delta Cats.’) “The amp—a Fender Bassman—was in the trunk of the car and it fell out, right on the road,” Ike Turner told Guitar Magazine’s Rick Batey in 1998, “and it was raining, so the amp got wet. When we got to the studio and plugged it in one of the tubes went ‘pop.’ We didn’t have no more tubes—so that’s where the fuzz came from.’
AGE CAN’T HINDER YOU – Working off of muscle memory and visual assistance, ChordBuddy is designed for players of every age. In fact, ChordBuddy is well-suited for those looking to play guitar with arthritis, offering a pain-free method of playing your favorite song. Utilizing ChordBuddy also allows you to learn the guitar on your own, eliminating the need for long guitar lessons with an instructor, which can result in prolonged joint pain.

Spruce has historically been the wood of choice for acoustic flat-top guitar soundboards. However, Luthiers and other large guitar manufacturers very often choose more economical and readily available woods rather than top-quality spruce. Redwoods and cedar, for instance, are often used in soundboards by American guitar-makers to great effect. In some cases, two different woods are used together to give the guitar a distinctive appearance and tone.


Lutherie has been my life's work since the beginning. After graduating from Roberto-Venn School of Lutherie in 1992, I set up my first shop in a rental garage, and began designing, building, repairing, and restoring fretted stringed instruments. Aided and abetted by 13 years of employment as a staff guitar repairman at Seattle's Trading Musician, I gained an extensive knowledge of the inner and outer workings of a vast array of instruments.
By 1961, at least, the makeover was complete. The old mini Les Paul, the J-1, was changed to become a sunburst double-cutaway solidbody. These had widely flaring equal cutaways, a single rectangular neck pickup, a large pickguard which covered most of the treble side, a wooden adjustable bridge, covered tailpiece, volume and tone. The bolt-on neck now had a more Gibson-style open-book head shape (with round logo sticker). The fingerboard had the old large dots with two small octave markers. The J-1, in a number of forms, would survive at least through 1966, if not longer. It is presumed that the J-2 was still around and that it had also become a double-cutaway; it most certainly was still in the catalog, as a double-cut, in ’62.
Rosewood » The diminishing supply of Brazilian Rosewood has led to Indian Rosewood replacing it in most markets. While the two look different, the tonal quality is virtually the same. One of the most popular and traditional woods used on acoustic guitars, rosewood has been prized for its rich, complex overtones that remain distinct even during bass-heavy passages. It's cutting attack and ringing tones make for highly articulate sound and plenty of projection. Rosewood is also a popular choice for fingerboards and bridges.
The neck, which extends from the guitar body, includes the fretboard and headstock on which the tuners are mounted. It contains a metal truss rod that prevents neck bowing and twisting, and can be adjusted to help the guitar maintain consistent pitch. The fretboard is usually made from a thin layer of rosewood or ebony, although some models, usually with maple necks, have a fretboard made of the same wood as the neck. Most fretboards have position dots or other markers inlaid in the fretboard. Some models have markers on the upper edge of the fretboard offering the player easy visibility.
TASTING NOTES: The dynamic mics have the sharpest, edgiest tones. The condensers have a neutral, full-frequency sound. The ribbons have rounded highs and warm lows. Remember, though, that the prettiest sound isn’t always the best choice. Many engineers swear by the relatively harsh Shure SM-57, and not just because you can buy one for less than $100. Its tough, even brittle, edge can shine in aggressive rock mixes.

There is no right or wrong answer when choosing a guitar. Choose whichever guitar suits your style. If you are inspired by electric guitar players, you may want to follow suit. If unplugged acoustic sounds tend to be what you enjoy most, then the acoustic guitar is the right choice for you. If you’re still not sure, make a list of ten bands or artists whose styles you’d like to emulate. If the list is predominantly electric, go electric. If it’s acoustic, then go acoustic.
In our testing, the Fender Champion 20 was the only amp that offered a wide variety of amplifier sounds and special effects while also keeping them all easy to access. Beginners can get a great sound easily and experiment with different effects without having to invest in separate effects pedals. Experienced players can get most of the sounds they want with nothing more than a guitar, an amp, and a cable.
Sturdily constructed with a solid basswood body, bolted maple neck and rosewood fretboard, this black electric guitar has an attractive glossy finish. The list of add-ons include a high quality Hollinger BC-08 practice Amplifier (10 Amp), string-winder cable, strap, gig bag and pitch-pipe picks. The intonation as well as playability of the Davison full size electric guitar has been enhanced owing to its single, high quality humbucker pickup, chrome bridge system and diecast tuners. Last but not the least, the practice amp is suitably equipped with a headphones jack for noise-free practice sessions, as well as an overdrive mode for cool distortions!
Here we have a matching quad of late sixties Goodman speakers with green labels 25 Watts each @ 12 ohms Very rare in that EACH driver is fully functional, the cones are nice and stiff, no cone rub or any tears, just a killer set of vintage speakers. These came out of a wem cab and were also stock in laney cabinets(think sabbath tone, wem, Burman and Selmer gear Wem used odd impedances, these read 10.01 ohms on my multimeter so is treat them as 8ohms if they are wired up in a cab series parallel. Postage in the U.K. is £32 and they will be sent out in two separate parcels, you will have to arrange your own courier if your not U.K. based you can also collect in person! Any questions just ask

The Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar features a rosewood top on a mahogany body. The maple and walnut neck with a slim Wizard neck profile is topped with a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with jumbo frets and Tree of Life vine inlays. This model also has a striking wooden pickguard and matching headstock, as well as wooden control knobs, earning it the nickname “Woody.”
The only guitars that I have been able to find pictures of that have the little curly thingie on the headstocks have been Kents, Kawais and some kind of no-name guitar that looks like the factory took a red Kent 820 and sprayed black around the edges to create a “redburst” finish. The example above appears to has started as a regular sunburst finish with more red and black added. The neck, headstock, pickups, and body are identical to the Kent 820 except the name ‘Kent’ doesn’t appear on the guitar anywhere. Note that the hardware on it is the same as on the 820 shown. That bridge and tailpiece configuration is a little unusual for Kent 820s. (the 820 there is mine) The bridge and tailpiece on the Kent 823 is the more common configuration.

The book provides examples of simple mathematical models for the complete signal chain consisting of the electric guitar and related accessories. Several do-it-yourself books have been written with the emphasis only on building a pre-specified circuit according to step-by-step instructions. This book takes one step further and brings up the designer perspective on guitar electronics. The importance of mathematics as a tool for design and analysis is emphasised throughout the text. Often in similar publications the use of mathematics is avoided as much as possible, but the fact is that mathematics provides ways to analyse circuits before spending time and money on random prototype builds. For more information on the contents of the book, check out the table of contents and the Google Books preview
Sometimes people forget that the greatest musician is not the one who can plays faster. I play guitar and I admire who plays fast, but i admire more the ones who can make beatiful music, even if it's simple. Frusciante is one of the few guys who can do so (beside Hendrix). And Frusciante could play all of Jimi's songs when he was 12 years old, and I guess he still can. So for those who compare them to Steve Vai, you should listen to music and not watch to the speed of their fingers.

One day I went over to hang out with a friend on Long Island’s prestigious, luxurious north shore. He was also an amateur, aspiring, guitarist, and perhaps slightly more advanced than me – after all, he wrote a solo, even if it didn’t belong to a song yet. But he was very excited when I arrived and wanted to show me something cool in the family room. When I stepped inside, what did I see strewn about the floor but a whole bunch of effects pedals surrounding his electric guitar like a battalion about to march on and conquer a fierce enemy.
Finally, have you ever heard a definitive answer to the question “how long does it take to learn guitar?” Us neither! Learning your first chords can take a few hours, but the instrument can take a lifetime to master. But that’s the joy of playing guitar – you never stop learning. It’s down to you to practise and progress, because practise makes perfect!
The best is a personal idea. Clapton & VanHalen can make a Walmart Special sound good. Paul Reed Smith made a guitar out of plywood purchased at HomeDepot and it didn't sound bad. IMHO Gibsons are too heavy, Fenders are like broom handles, Suhrs are Fender copies, BC Richs sound like muddy water, and Jacksons are just plain ugly. But if you like 'em, that's fine with the rest of us. I do laugh at people who shell out major $$$ for an axe and they still suck at playing. Dream on.
I see a bunch of people all over social network sites and youtube videos responding with things like "who needs it, just give me a guitar and a tube amp" whenever news about a pedal of some kind comes up. What's so wrong with pedals? For some reason there's a stigma against them that "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" when most people use them to get sounds out of their guitar that you normally can't without them. I don't understand why so many people opt for the "guitar right into an amp" sound when there's so much more available.
In 1969 MCA closed the Danelectro plant. This was blamed on MCA's shift to selling instruments to individual guitar stores instead of jobbers (such as Sears). At this time, Dan Armstrong bought most of the remaining parts, and continued manufacturing Danelectros through Ampeg. These instruments had single cutaway bodies with one humbucking pickup (not lipstick tube pickups), and no brand name on the peghead. Apparently Ampeg was having problems with the production of the see-thru Dan Armstrong guitars. In the interium, Armstrong sold the remaining Danelectros through Ampeg until the Dan Armstrong guitars were fully available.
The taper of a potentiometer indicates how the output to input voltage ratio will change with respect to the shaft rotation. The two taper curves below are examples of the two most common guitar pot tapers as they would be seen on a manufacturer data sheet. The rotational travel refers to turning the potentiometer shaft clockwise from 0° to 300° as in the previous visual representation drawing.
Flat tops from 1945 to 1969 are considered good quality and have good sound, although they are not as collectible as the 1920's to 1944 steel string models. This is largely due to the change in bracing and materials Martin started using in 1945. Rosewood models of Brazilian rosewood are most collectible from this era. This is because Brazilian rosewood was basically unavailable since 1970 due to export problems. Because of this, these models are considered more collectible.
Boost pedals increase the strength of your signal going in to your amplifier. This means you don’t have to use distortion to get that volume jump when you want to make the chorus or lead line jump out. A boost pedal increases the signal without adding distortion, and can be used to fatten up your sound, ‘pushing’ your amplifier harder and louder, just without the grit that a distortion pedal will add.
The offset body style includes three main instruments: the Jaguar, the Mustang, and the Jazzmaster. While there are definite differences between them, offset guitars all generally have a “jangly” sound. When we say jangly, we mean bright and clear with a subtle mid and low-end response. These guitars are also well suited to rhythm work depending on their tone knobs are adjusted.
When this guitar came in the headstock was completely broken off.  Being a 12 string I knew that it would need some extra reinforcement to stay structuraly sound.  I glued the headstock in place and then started to cut away wood from the truss rod to the edge of the neck running from the 5th fret to the A string tuner.  It took hours of cleaning up gluing surfaces and precisely fitting the graft before I could glue it in place.  I then repeated that step on the other side of the neck.  With this repair the only original wood remaing around the break is directly over the truss rods making the finished product basically as strong as a new neck.  Once the neck was refinished you cant even see the original break and only if you look very closely can you see the edges of the grafts.  When the owners of the guitar came to pick it up they thought I had made a whole new neck.  Needless to say they were very excited.  -Evan

Visit “mom and pop shops,” big-name musical instrument retailers, Craigslist, eBay & Amazon to compare the reviews and prices of various models. The ability to make an educated decision based on the feel, sound quality and playability is important. Consider renting a guitar for the first month of lessons. A good teacher will serve as a guide throughout the buying process and will teach you to play well enough to “test drive” your options.
Much of a B3's magic comes from good mic placement and the player (the right drawbar settings are game changers). EQ should be applied sparingly and mainly as a corrective measure. Usually it's good to look to anything clashing with the bass (80 to 180 Hz), and if it's feeling a little "chubby" in the middle and either can't get out of its own way or doesn't play nice with other mid-heavy instruments or guitars, look to make cuts somewhere between 300 to 500 Hz.
Ate you guys just starting, or just bored? Curious is all, its seems that the ?s and statements alike are from beginners, which all of us started out with, there are many pro sites that will give you better advice. Advice at least boogie gave good support. Another thing is always wipe your strings down Everytime you finish playing. The slinky's are easy to play but rust very quickly and lose tone. GHS has a decent set of steings, but it's like anything else you get what you pay for. Come on guys ur talking about strings that are $4.
Arch top body 16" wide across the top, carved spruce top, back not carved by arched by braces, rosewood back and sides, f-holes, style 45 backstripe, bound ebony fingerboard, 2 white/black/while lines inlaid down length of fingerboard at the edges, abalone hexagonal fingerboard inlays on 8 frets (a few make with pearloid), vertical "Martin" pearl peghead logo, gold plated parts, sunburst top finish.
I have been a musician for many years now. I have played in everything from metal bands to acoustic coffee house sets to worship/praise bands. I feel that with these many years of playing I have earned a sharp ear, no pun intended. By that I mean that I have developed an ear not only to hear pitches, tones, and notes, but I can also hear good and bad timbre. I feel that Taylor guitars simply produce the best timbre of any acoustic guitar I have played. Naturally, all of my acoustics are Taylor! With that, thanks to Bob Taylor for doing it best and doing it right the first time!

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Another negative I found was that this book focuses more on traditional music notation, and places guitar tablature into the background. As a guitar teacher, I believe that tabs are the next best thing to sliced bread, since it makes learning soooo much easier for beginner guitarists. And since learning the guitar is hard, anything that makes it simpler is more than welcome. On the other hand, if you want to learn to read standard music notation, this will be the way to go for you.
What’s more, musicians will (or at least modern musicians have the opportunity to) learn about their niche area through metadata analysis and find out what makes the fans tick, so that they can pick up on this connection between music maker and listener. As such, how can you really be sure that the person playing the drums, strumming on the guitar or singing the song on your favourite album is actually feeling the music in the magical way we’d like to think they are?
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