Dont buy too cheap. The cheaper the guitar, the harder to play and the less quality the sound. You want a rewarding feel and sound or you will get discouraged. Buy a better guitar used than a new one cheap. Are you going to learn chords or fingerpicking ? Some guitars are better sounding for one than the other. Some like Taylors are versatile and provide good sound for both. Be smart. Good luck.
Basic distortion boxes can be built around a simple network of transistors and clipping diodes, to both boost the signal and alter the waveform. Most units, however, very roughly resemble the standard mass-production overdrives detailed above, with the heavy work done by opamps, some tone-shaping stages, and input/output buffers. The ProCo Rat set the standard for heavy distortion sounds above and beyond the capabilities of the MXR Distortion + and the Ibanez Tube Screamer, although in fact its design is surprisingly similar to the former (discussed above), with silicon diodes in place of germanium, and an added tone control.
If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.
The GuitarTricks instructors are working professional guitarist and great teachers. With more than 45 instructors you have plenty of choice to find the ones you like best. There is a structured, best practice, teaching approach to every lesson, song and the entire curriculum which beats the hap-hazard approach of picking free lessons on YouTube. I also like that the I can learn not just what something does but WHY it does it and how to apply it to other parts.
ESP LTDs are a ripoff. All the money goes into the finish and nothing else. Cheap hardware and poor electronics. All of the LTDs I've ever owned couldn't stay in tune worth a damn, have noisy, pop-y switches and crappy pots. I have the Viper 400, and it's an overrated turd. Luckily I got it for a steal. Thing can't stay in tune AT ALL. I will be replacing the alleged Grover tuners with real Grover lockers. That still doesn't solve the issues with the soft finish and ultra-noisy electronics. Plus it has a humpy neck, a cracking neck joint (like all of my LTD set-necks) and the frets were likely leveled by a monkey considering the quality.
The guitar itself features a resonant and solid American Alder body, maple neck and 2 x single-coil pickups with 1 x humbucker installed with a coil tap function for tonal variety. The guitar is comfortable to play and sounds great especially when you throw some distortion at it through an amplifier. The guitar is budget friendly and ideal for beginners and home recording enthusiasts thanks to its high build quality and comfortable playing experience.
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There’s another wrinkle: vintage-style pickup magnets can weaken over time, resulting in a softer, smoother tone. Some pickups are designed to mimic this ageing process. Say you were looking for a vintage P.A.F.-style humbucker: You could choose between one of our models that that sounds like a pickup straight off the late-’50s production line (the Seth Lover humbucker), and another that mimics a similar pickup as it would sound and look today after decades of wear and tear (the Antiquity humbucker).
Straight away, we have to talk about how good this guitar sounds. Lots of low-end and mid-range acoustics tend to do one tonal area well, but the Martin DRS2 does an awesome job all round. It’s got deep, booming lows, while the highs remain nice and crisp. And of course, all of this is available acoustically or electrically in the dreadnought cutaway acousticelectric guitar.
When two sine waves with frequencies A and B are ring-modulated, the output will also contain the frequencies A+B and B-A. If frequency B is not a multiple of A, these additional frequencies are inharmonic; e.g. ring-modulating sine waves at 1000Hz and 1250Hz will add the frequency 2250Hz, which is neither a multiple of 1000Hz, nor of 1250Hz. When more complex sounds are ring-modulated, sums and differences of all the harmonic frequencies are added.
Sometimes, the research we do - such as this hunt for the best multi effect pedal - opens up our world to a piece of gear we did not previously know about, and yet completely blows us out of the water. Such is the case with the Line 6 M5 Stompbox Modeler. This is the second item from Line 6 that made it into our top 5 list (the other one being the high-end POD HD500X). The Line 6 M5 is different than the other multi-effect pedals on our list, as it’s the only one that can only model one effect at a time, and also does not do amplifier modeling. With the other pedals on our list, you could replace your entire pedalboard by having multiple effects active at the same time. The M5 is far more simplistic, only letting you use one at a time. You might be asking yourself why we love it so much - well, it’s not for everyone, but there’s a lot of beauty in its simplicity. Read on to see if this is the right pedal for you.
The 1960s were the Golden Age for guitars in America. The folk music boom was followed closely by the British Invasion and the demand for guitars skyrocketed as young people by the millions started making their own music. The Silvertone Amp-In-Case model 1457 was the entry point for thousands of them. Some of the most sought-after Silvertones are from this era … more

After a certain point of decreasing the price on the amplifier systems you are offering to the buyers, you get a return in the shape of an increasing size of the amplifiers themselves. Which is not really that much of a problem, especially when the Fender speaking you are talking about look vintage and sounds like it could be from the future. The Fender Mini Tonemaster Battery Powered Electric guitar amp is a little on the big side among smaller amps, in terms of size and in terms of sound. While it might be a little tiring to carry with you, the sound you are going to produce for the price of almost nothing is going to feel worth it, every second of the song.


Even now i make people custom guitars and have made a few for people in MO/IL a total of 23 made and they all love them and say they are the best guitars theyve played cause i work side by side to shape the guitars necks and bodys to fit most comfortably with them but i charge $2500-3000 for a guitar which is still cheaper than the big name guitar places

Five string guitars are common in Brazil, where they are known as guitarra baiana and are typically tuned in 5ths. Schecter Guitar Research produced a production model 5 string guitar called the Celloblaster in 1998.[43] A five-string tuning may be necessary in a pinch when a string breaks on a standard six-string (usually the high E) and no replacement is immediately available.

Charles Kaman put a team of employees to work on inventing a new guitar in 1964.[2][7] For the project, Charlie chose a small team of aerospace engineers and technicians, several of whom were woodworking hobbyists as well. One of these was Charles McDonough, who created the Ovation Adamas model.[8]Kaman founded Ovation Instruments, and in 1965 its engineers and luthiers(guitar makers) worked to improve acoustic guitars by changing their conventional materials. The R&D team spent months building and testing prototype instruments. Their first prototype had a conventional“dreadnought” body, with parallel front and back perpendicular to the sides. The innovation was the use of a thinner, synthetic back, because of its foreseen acoustic properties. Unfortunately, the seam joining the sides to the thin back was prone to breakage. To avoid the problem of a structurally unstable seam, the engineers proposed a synthetic back with a parabolic shape. By mid-1966, they realized that the parabolic shape produced a desirable tone with greater volume than the conventional dreadnought.[9]


Ibanez JEM77WDP Electric Guitar With the Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar, you can get a little piece of the legendary guitarist. This model is also commonly referred to as the JEM Woody because of its distinctive poplar burl veneer pickguard and matching headstock. Part of the company’s Premium line, the JEM77WDP electric guitar also features two cutaways and Steve Vai’s signature monkey grip.
The fretted instrument market is in many ways an excellent leading edge indicator of world economic conditions as a whole. China is not only rapidly advancing in the fretted instrument market but in all areas of manufacturing. Furniture factories in North Carolina are closing due to competition with imported Chinese products of equal quality for far less money. Numerous other industries are moving offshore. As you have all noticed the price of gasoline has risen dramatically in recent months. It should be noted that China now consumes approximately an equal amount of petroleum to Japan. This was certainly not the case five years ago. If OPEC and other producers pump the same amount of oil as they used to, but China emerges as a new player consuming this much fuel, it should come as no surprise that prices will go up. China now is a major importer of fuel, wood and agricultural products. Commodity prices in general are rapidly rising. China is not only becoming a world leader in manufacturing but it is becoming one of the world's leading consumers of all sorts of raw materials and commodities. While the per capita income in China and the per capita consumption of fuel is much lower than in the USA, their population is well over a billion people. At the rate they are going it will not be long before they consume fully as much fuel and other raw material as we do and have an economy which could rival the annual GNP of the USA. Not only are they an economic and manufacturing powerhouse, but they have a huge army. As their manufacturing capability increases not only quantitatively but qualitatively they become more and more of a super power. While the USA may have won the cold war with Russia, at the rate things are going as much as American consumers may benefit from inexpensive but high quality-guitars, furniture and other products from China, we may find ourselves in the uncomfortable position of no longer being the only world super power.

The Continental and other Vox organs such as the Jaguar, the Continental II, Super Continental, and the Continental 300 share characteristic visual features including orange and black vinyl coverings, stands made of chromed steel tubing, and reversed black and white keys. The English wood key single manual Continental (V301J) is increasingly collectable, although the wood key American-built (V301H) and plastic key Italian-built models (V301E, V301E/2 and V302E) also command premium prices. Jennings sold production rights for the Vox Continental organ to an Italian subsidiary of Thomas Organ in 1967. Under the new production agreement, the Continental was gradually and subtly altered in quality and sound, and reliability became questionable. For example, Ray Manzarek of The Doors had been using a Vox since 1966, but could no longer trust it during performances because of the problems in quality after 1967, and thus was forced to look elsewhere for an organ. He settled on the Gibson Kalamazoo, because it had a flat top like the Vox Continental, so it could accommodate the physical requirements of the Fender Rhodes Piano Bass, which was the bass instrument for The Doors in concert.


With over 100 effects, there's really no shortage of virtual stompboxes to play with, while the unit's complex signal routing capabilities allow for a wide variety of effects combination. Add to this Helix' acclaimed amp modeling features, which lets you mix and match 62 amp, 37 cabs and 16 mics. If that's not enough, you can also make adjustments to the amp models to better personalize your sound. To match its complexity, Line 6 designed the interface to be simple yet intuitive, courtesy of its color LCD display and colored LED rings.


Gibson carefully adjusts the action and the string height before shipping the Epiphone Dot. Don't make adjustments unless you've got clear problems, particularly with string buzzing. Exercise extreme caution when adjusting the truss rod. Overtightening can damage the neck of your guitar. If you're not sure what you're doing, do not attempt to make these adjustments; have your guitar set up by a qualified professional luthier.
6. Bugera V5 Infinium 5-watt 1x8 ($199.99): This little amp delivers pure all-tube tone at a fraction of the size of its larger counterparts. Bugera has utilized the Infinium Tube Life Multiplier technology to make sure your tubes stay healthy over the lifetime of the amp. If you want to get into the world of tube amplifiers but don’t care about a lot of bells and whistles, this little amp is a great option.

Simple and great idea! Ordered it from StewMac and received it in the mail two days later. Mounted it on my Taylor acoustic instantly and played for hours! Haven't put it on an electric yet but have every bit of confidence that it'll work like a charm there as well! Very handy piece to have in your studio....quickly turn any guitar into a slide-playing machine!


Description: Natural Model. Guitar Type: Acoustic - Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Spruce - Back: Mahogany - Sides: Mahogany - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 26" (66cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Bracing: X-Type - Soundhole: Round (Traditional) - Rosette: Pearloid - Hardware: Chrome, Diecast, Classical Tuners - String Instrument Finish: High Gloss Natural

Aside from tuning issues, new bass strings, especially roundwounds, can be very bright, and this may result in a lot of finger noise and fret buzz. If they’re changed a day or two before the session, and the bass is played a bit to break them in, there may be less likelihood of problematic noise. In fact, while many players think of them as old-school, flatwounds can sometimes be the best choice, when a fat deep bass sound is called for—it’s worth a thought.
Official Vintage Guitar Price Guide: This print guide, published by Vintage Guitar and Bass, is an annual guide that is re-published with updated information each year. The webpage above is handy because it shows links for all guides that have been published in one place and will continue adding links for future years. The link shown for each guide will take you to a store online where you can purchase the guide. It is known for being extremely thorough, and its latest edition, the 2017 guide, has appraisals for 2,000 brands of guitars, basses, amps, effects, mandolins, steels, lap steels, ukuleles and banjos.
Family Owned and Operated, Lamb's Music has been serving the musical metroplex for over 30 years. Offering warranty on almost every brand of stringed instrument, Lamb's Music has been the go-to spot for repairs and customizations for companies like Guitar Center, Gibson, Gretsch,Taylor Guitars, and Fender Musical Instruments as well as many others.  
The effect also took Nashville by storm in the 70’s as well and was a favorite of Waylon Jennings’ music and others. What the effect does is mix the guitars signal with a slightly delayed reproduction of the signal. This delay shifts the waveform a few milliseconds thus producing the out of phase sound. It then uses a LFO (low frequency oscillator) to control the sweeping effect of the phaser. This pedal is key to the classic VH guitar sound!
There’s still a lot of confusion over Japanese- and Korean-built guitars from this era in regards to trademarks, who built them, when they were offered, and the connection between them all. However, many of these guitars are high quality and you should always pay close attention when encountering an unknown trademark. If a guitar was produced at one of the aforementioned factories, it could very well be a treasure, just like your Lotus.
Electric instruments have a big role to play in the world of music, but there's a catch: they need amplification to do it! For that matter, even acoustic instruments need to be boosted when they're playing big venues. And while an amp alone can handle those tasks, many of the sounds in modern music (the signature distortion of rock and metal, for instance) rely heavily on effects units to shape the basic tone into something even better. If you're new to your instrument, then consider this selection of amplifiers and effects the doorway to your future sound - and your instrument will be the key that opens it up, once you've got your hands on your brand new hardware!

A tung oil-finished rock maple neck, and a slightly more curved fretboard radius of 13.75 inches are the other small modifications to the ‘speed’ features on the MD200. However, it has a thinner bolt-on neck as compared to the MD400’s wider mahogany set neck. That said, both neck profiles remain a shallow “C” shape, and the guitars’ dramatically beveled cutaways give you ample room to reach the high notes.
Automatic Track Creation & Loop Recording: A new layer (track) is created each time you start recording and each time a Riff loops. Stack layers on top of each other (bass, guitar, vocals) to create a Riff. Use looping to create multiple tracks, do multiple takes, etc. Each layer has controls for mixing and effects. (4 tracks with T4, 24 tracks with Standard)
The significance of Les Paul’s contributions to his Gibson guitar design remains controversial. The book “50 Years of the Gibson Les Paul” limits Paul’s contributions to two: advice on the trapeze tailpiece, and a preference for color (stating that Paul preferred gold as “it looks expensive”, and a second choice of black because “it makes your fingers appear to move faster on the box”, and “looks classy―like a tuxedo”).[11]

Categories: Guitar manufacturing companies of the United StatesGuitar amplifier manufacturersManufacturing companies based in ChicagoManufacturing companies established in 1890Companies disestablished in 19681890 establishments in Illinois1968 disestablishments in IllinoisDefunct companies based in IllinoisMusical instrument manufacturing companies of the United States


The D-18E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. D-18Es are the rarest of these early Martin electrics, lasting only from the ’58 prototypes through 1959. These began with prototype #163746. Around 858 of these were produced.
omg guitar playing isnt just about speed and technically skill. its about style and uniqueness of sound, as shown by tom morello and jack white. most of those metal guitarist, with quite a few exceptions ill admit (tony iommi, john petrucci, randy rhoads & van halen, and joe satriani & steve vai), sound EXACTLY THE SAME. i think you need to expand YOUR musical taste.
The Squier Deluxe Stratocaster by Fender is another excellent electronic guitar for newbies. The body is made up of basswood which is a soft, light wood with some of the best mid and upper frequency production. A maple neck and fretboard further assists the mid and high range frequency sound. Its C-shaped neck guarantees the best comfort. This guitar features three single coil pickups. One is assigned for master volume control, one tone control for the neck pickup and one tone control for medium pickup. The five-way switch lets you combine these three pickups and produce the widest range of sounds ever!

Apollo, Aquarius, Arbiter, Atlas, Audition, Avar, Ayar, Barth, Beltone, Black Jack, Cameo, CBS, Cipher, Concert, Cougar, Crown, Daimaru, Decca, Diasonic, Domino, Duke, Emperador, Heit Deluxe, Holiday, Ibanez, Imperial, Inter-Mark Cipher, Jedson, Kay, Kent, Kimberly, Kingsley, Kingston, Keefy, Lindell, Marquis, May Queen, Minister, Noble, Prestige, Randall, Recco, Regina, Rexina, Sakai, Satellite, Schaffer, Sekova, Silvertone, Sorrento, Sterling, Swinger, Tele Star, Top Twenty, Victoria, Winston
The SG retains a similar dual-humbucker configuration as the Les Paul Standard but it truly has a life and style all its own. Due in part to its aggressive style, impressive mid-range bite and thunderous output, the SG has become synonymous with rock ’n’ roll. The Gibson SG is one of only a handful of models that has never been out of production since its introduction in the early ’60s.
To start off, the GIO GRX70 features a basswood body with quilted art grain top that makes it look more expensive than it actually is. But it's not just about the looks because for the price, you are getting Ibanez level playability, which is consistently comfortable and easy to play. Following conventional Super Strat specs, it has a 25.5" scale maple neck, topped by a 22 fret rosewood fingerboard wit a nut width of 1.65". Three Powersound pickups in HSH configuration are tasked to give this guitar its versatile rock and shred friendly tone, without breaking the bank.
Organ tones are sounded in one of three ways; in 'normal' mode, by pressing any string onto a fret; in 'percussion' mode, by fretting any string and touching the included brass plectrum (connected to a short wire plugged into a socket on the scratchplate) onto any metal part of the guitar; or by pressing one of the six 'open string' buttons. There is an option to silence the lowest two strings, and the organ section, as a whole, can also be switched off. There is a four-position octave selector, a six-position effect selector, a four-way selector for the percussion and a flute selector.
To fulfill the diverse requirement of our esteemed clients, we are engaged in offering them a wide range of Electric Spanish Guitar. This offered range of Electric Spanish Guitar is available with us in various shapes and size and can also be modified as per our clients requirement. Our clients highly appreciate our offered Electric Spanish Guitar for its
While many electric guitar amp cabs have "open back" designs (actually partially open back, as part of the back is usually enclosed in panels), open back cabinets are rarely seen in bass amp cabs, except in the smallest, least expensive practice bass amps. The reason that open back designs are not used with bass amp cabs is that open back designs make it hard to reproduce low-frequency sounds, which are crucial for bass cabinets. On electric guitar amp cabs, the reduction of some very low-frequency sounds may be desirable, as it makes the cabinet less "boomy"; however, for a bass cabinet, this loss of bass frequencies is generally seen as undesirable.
It’s hard to definitively name the best guitar books. Everyone is working with a different skill set, and you’ve all built up your skills in a different way. However, all of the books below provide enough information to help you improve some aspect of your playing. They may help some of you more than others, but they all have enough helpful tips in them to justify their purchase. Our team read these and many more, and these were the titles we found most inspiring. It turns out we aren't alone in loving these books, since these books get great reviews all around, but these were the ones we found most enlightening. The fact that we were excited to practice and couldn't wait to pick up these books to learn more is ultimately the reason they made this list. We think these books will provide or build a solid foundation for anyone looking to learn the guitar in an efficient way.
FU was non-stop work & fun at the 2014 NAMM Show in Anaheim California! It was great to be back in the southern California sun with 85 degrees while freezing snow and blizzards were happening back east! The fun started with an opening night party with Eddie Van Halen and the launch of several new EVH Guitar models. The rest is just a blur but here are some out-takes to enjoy, For more behind the scenes photos check out our Facebook page!
I knew what it is that I need to do. The friend who worked on it with me said when we were finished, "Oh right, it sounds like all your records all put together." I guess that got the job down. Without getting too technical about it or elitist, it kind of does the job of a Gretsch, sonically, and a Rickenbacker, sonically, but I play it like a Fender. It's kind of handy, really. I used to it pretty much exclusively during my time with Modest Mouse. And totally exclusively during my time with the Cribs. I've used it nearly entirely on the new solo record.
There are different types of delay – digital, analogue and tape. Analogue and tape delays behave similarly. As each echo repeats, the sounds slightly distort which can be pleasing particularly for electric guitar. If you want cleaner repeats, go digital. Tip; if you are using it for acoustic, try the pedal set on a high number of repeats before you buy and check the sound quality. Some cheaper digital units can sound ‘grainy’ after a few repeats with an acoustic.

Paint chips and cracked binding: Common on older instruments. Over time these openings will collect sweat, polish, and dirt, causing discoloration, lifting of the edges, and further deterioration. It is best to clean these spots w/ naptha (lighter fluid)or alchohol, remove any loose edges around the chips before cleaning (they will be holding polish and grime preventing the glue from working), then seal the chips and cracks with thin superglue. Super glue can be heated in the microwave for a few seconds (plastic bottles) to make it flow better. Drop Filling is a technique for filling chips with paint. This is covered at the ReRanch site.
This book emphasizes tabs with the accompanying music notation. It’s not a long book and one that a beginner will likely outgrow at some point. However, it provides a good introduction to get you playing songs you’ll recognize fast. It does a fine job of explaining everything the newbie needs to know including how to position yourself. Build those good habits early!
Another point to remember about ’65 Teisco Del Rey guitars. While, in reality, Japanese Teiscos were never too particular about consistency in headstock design, they at least tended to show consistency in the catalogs. The American Teisco Del Reys were even more varied, and the ’65 Teisco Del Rey catalog shows a mix of the Bizarro square Strat head (the most predominant), the new ’64 hooked design, and the older elongated Strat design. This is probably explained by the vicissitudes of stockpiles and shipping to the new American market. In any case, it makes it a bit harder to date these instruments.

Loose frets are especially problematic in certain old guitars, but are generally very easy to fix. You'll be amazed at the difference you can make with just a few tools, a bit of knowledge, and a little time. Fixing loose frets can eliminate fret buzz, remove sharp fret ends, and greatly improve the tone of any guitar. If your luthier bill will be greater than the value of your guitar, definitely time to have a go yourself!
This is a fantastic tool for acoustic solos artists, worship leaders, session players or an acoustic rig that lacks a lot of control or a preamp source. Moreover, the Venue provides the additional functionality of tuning, feedback control, an effects loop and a built in DI box. Its price is usually on the higher end, though you can check used pricing which often dips significantly below retail. However, buying a preamp, tuner, noise gate and DI box separately would run you a lot more than what the Venue costs.
There's no denying the popularity of the Stratocaster, thanks to it being the weapon of choice for a long list of iconic players that include Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck to name a few. The American Professional Stratocaster is the latest iteration of this classic, carrying over much of the look and feel of the original, but more reliable and road worthy.
During World War II, instrument manufacturing at Gibson slowed due to shortages of wood and metal, and Gibson began manufacturing wood and metal parts for the military. Between 1942-1945, Gibson employed women to manufacture guitars. "Women produced nearly 25,000 guitars during World War II yet Gibson denied ever building instruments over this period," according to a 2013 history of the company. Gibson folklore has also claimed its guitars were made by "seasoned craftsmen" who were "too old for war."[13][14]
Here we have the very highly respected ... Alvarez Yairi dy91 ... This very unique and beautiful guitar is in AMAZING CONDITION and is based on the RARE exotic Hawaiian Koa tone wood and is one of more ornate & fancy D-45 Martin Drednaught Acoustic the Martin retails for well over $7,500 and this guitar offered here at JVGuitars is the Alvarez Yairi answer and is quite a HIGH END JAPANESE HAND CRAFTED GUITAR by one of the greatest Luthiers in Japan.... Reserve your Rare & Exotic Koa Yairi DY91 Today...this baby is in excellent vintage condition... This is THE DY91 to own... any questions please email me gr8bids@comcast.net All the best! General specs:About the DY91: These High End Yairi acoustic guitars are Handcrafted for outstanding projection, this example offers enhanced bass response and an articulate high-end register performance. As with this one many are Sculpted from some of the most precious rare sought-after tone woods from all over the world. This example is Hawaiian WoW! Here are the Specs: Handmade in Japan Saddle & Nut: Bone Neck Joint: Hand Fit Dovetail Finish: Gloss Body Style: D-45 Style Slope Shoulder Dreadnought Back & Sides: AAAA Figured Koa Top: Solid German Spruce Neck: Premium grade Mahogany Fingerboard: Bound Ebony Scale: 25 3/8" (645mm) Width at Nut: 1 11/16" Fingerboard Inlay: Large Diamond Bridge: Ebony-Inlaid Body Binding: Ivory & Abalone Soundhole Rosette: Abalone Head Overlay: Figured Koa Pickguard: Black Tuning Machines: Original Yairi Gold Die Cast Finish:Gloss Natural Electronics: None Original Semi-hard shell case: Case candy Included .

The HSS pickup configuration with a five-way switch keeps things versatile and beginner-friendly. Two single-coils and an overwound bridge humbucker provide a good mix of glassy Strat-like and fat Les Paul-esque tones that are capable of straight-up rock, funk and blues. They’re good as far as in-house pickups go, but don’t expect tonal authenticity at this price point.
The name Epiphone stands above all for very good, less expensive alternatives to the unfortunately always quite expensive Gibson guitars. Gibson tries to offer good alternatives to their Gibson branded Instruments through its subsidiary Epiphone. Les Paul, SG, Explorer and other models. Todays Epiphone program includes electrical, half- and full-resonance guitars, basses, acoustic and electro-acoustic instruments, banjos and mandolins. Epiphone stands on the one hand for innovative ideas in guitar manufacturing and on the other for successful replicas of instrument classics that are affordable for everyone.
Pre-1929: All size 1 and larger guitars, from any year, have 6" long pyramid bridges. All size 2 or 2 1/2 Martins have 5 3/4" to 5 7/8" long pyramid bridges. Most pyramid bridges before 1900 are roughly 7/8" wide, and most after 1900 are 1" wide. The average length of the wings on most pyramid bridges is roughly 1 3/8" During the 1880's and 1890's, however, there is more variation, as much as from 1 1/4" to 1 1/2" On the earlier 7/8" wide bridges, the wings have a very long, narrow, elegant appearance, with a gentle curve to the inside angles of the pyramids, that looks nothing at all like the harsh angles found on many copies. There is no difference between the dimensions of ivory and ebony bridges from the same period.
One of  the most widely used guitars in jazz, the ES-175 is a semi-acoustic, hollow-bodied archtop that comes equipped with two humbucking pickups. The ES-175’s deep body produces the thick, dark sound beloved of jazz guitarists and the thin neck allows for fast chording and soloing. The bridge pickup is capable of producing a less jazzy, thinner sound, and ES-175s can be used in blues and rock.

Beavis Audio Research – started in 2005 as a hobbyist site to share information on DIY guitar electronics. From the initial few pages of questionable designs, it has grown to a popular place for DIY freaks to visit and learn. Along the way, beavis has evolved into a small company. They strive to advance the DIY ethic and provide resources, tools, kits and products to the worldwide community of gearhounds.
The Effect:Chorus is one of the most recognized pedal effects, dating back from the beginning of the 70’s, and later on popularized in the 80’s, it was the most used effect on guitar pedals back then, and no guitarists dared to step foot on stage without the classic Boss CH-1 Stereo Super Chorus Pedal or MXR Micro-Chorus, to name a few. Originally, Chorus pedals came in Analog form, however today the market is mixed with both Analog and Digital pedals, with the difference between the two being that Analog modifies the signal directly, while Digital takes the original analog sound coming from your guitar, converts and modifies it into digital form, before finally converting it back to analog form prior to its release.
The BOSS ME-80 multi effects pedal is an excellent entry point into effects as it contains just about every type of effect you can think of. The ME-80 allows you to chain eight effect groups together in one patch with 36 preset patches allowing you to seamlessly switch from rock to funk to jazz at the push of a footswitch. There are also 36 user patches so you can create your own tone.
While electric guitar manufacturers like this are often more expensive, they do provide a level of customization that isn’t available with several mainline models. Most companies of this size can have a casual email or phone conversation with you, take a few notes about how you want your guitar setup (probably jotting it all down with pen and paper) and then making a guitar to your exact specifications.
Very good working condition, this guitar is completely playable and in great condition. All electronics function properly without any issue. This guitar contains very minor cosmetic scuffs throughout, typical wear from a used guitar, nothing at all significant, please see pictures. The body, neck and headstock are all straight and contain zero cracks, bends, or bows. This guitar will come exactly as shown with soft gig bag.
In general, this measurement is taken by measuring the distance between the bottom of the string and the top of the 6th fret while holding the string down at the 12th fret and the first fret. This is where the capo comes in handy - put it on the first fret so your hand is free to take the measurement. Using a feeler gauge of the desired height, in this example, 0.010, hold the low E string down at the 12th fret (with the capo on the first fret), and measure the distance between the top of the 6th fret and the bottom of the low E string. If the distance is greater than the desired relief, then you need to turn the truss rod clockwise (towards your right) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. If the distance is less than the desired amount, then you need to turn the truss rod counter-clockwise (towards your left) as you're looking down the headstock towards the body of the guitar. The basic rule is:
Signature Guitar was a Canadian Guitar company, which providing good quality guitars for more than 30 years. They produce high quality electric guitars, beautifully crafted and basses. Their guitars are especially made for Indian weather. The company is situated in Aurora, Ontario, Canada. They are regarded as one of the reputed Indian Guitar brand. The price range starts from 4,999/- onwards (approx).
When you have a setup that you like, you can easily save it as a track preset — or, better still, create multiple track presets for different types of sounds. Cubase can even make a fine host for live performance, should you decide to trade your rack of effects for a svelte laptop that patches directly into the PA system, as you can switch instantly between racks. (I'll cover how to do this at the end of the article.)
Just SOLD OUT sorry.... Another FRESH Release from the JVG Vintage Vault: Hey Mandolin lovers here we are proud to present a wonderful vintage 40 year old beautiful sounding and is absolutely gorgeous !!! She has chop too well preserved and well taken care of this is the more rare of the Japanese mando's you do see a lot more Aria's & Alvarez but less Ibanez lawsuit version of the famously popular Gibson F5 mando. Excellent workmanship and it's the solid spruce carved example she's in very good - excellent vintage condition with just a few blemishes and yet nothing to detract from its undeniable beauty. This beauty comes with its original hard shell case it's rectangular black tolex with brilliant plugs marigold lining, open its cas and wow she's really striking .... This Iis a rare one folks a must for the ibanez mando fan... Contact Joe: jvguitars@gmail.com.
Distortion was not an effect originally intended by amplifier manufacturers, but could often easily be achieved by "overdriving" the power supply in early tube amplifiers. In the 1950s, guitarists began deliberately increasing gain beyond its intended levels to achieve "warm" distorted sounds.[29] Among the first musicians to experiment with distortion were Willie Johnson of Howlin' Wolf,[29] Goree Carter,[30] Joe Hill Louis,[31][32] Ike Turner,[33] Guitar Slim,[34] and Chuck Berry.[35]
learning how to play songs on guitar is not necessarily the same as learning how to play guitar. If your just repeating something without understanding it, your not learning. If you are one of the very few who can instinctively play, learn songs and teach yourself simply by doing- then it doesn't really matter- many (of the few) really successful musicians have done it this way. In most cases, a beginner should do both- learn the chords and the theory pertaining to the songs you want to play, so you can more easily connect the learning to the playing. One thing is for sure, you're not going to be able play very many songs without first knowing at least your 7 basic major and minor chords and some basic rhythm patterns. All the other primary chords (7 / 9 / 11 and 13's) are all built off these 7 basic major and minor triad structures. it's all up to you as to how much effort and time and how far you want to go with it- in any case good luck and have fun with it
Choosing guitar strings is like choosing lenses and frames for your glasses.  There is a right strength of lens for you and when you switch frames it may take some adjusting to get used to.  This analogy is referring to the bridge height, nuts, and truss rod tension.  Do take your time to experiment but once you settle it's best to keep using the same gauges so you can dodge the lengthy set-up process from happening again.

Tags: Adrian Belew, All Time, Arto Lindsay, bert jansch, bob mould, built to spill, Carcass, Carrie Brownstein, chic, dave navarro, David Bowie, death, dillinger escape plan, earth, Eugene Chadbourne, Fred, Fred Frith, fugazi, james blackshaw, Janes Addiction, Jerry Harrison, John McLaughlin, Johnny Thunders, Josh Homme, Joy Division, Keiji Haino, King Sunny Ade, living colour, Lydia Lunch, Marc Ribot, marnie stern, Mayhem, MC5, Meat Puppets, Mick Ronson, Morbid Angel, morrissey, Napalm Death, Nels Cline, New Order, nile rodgers, Orthrelm/Krallice, Pantera, Patti Smith Group, pavement, pearl jam, PS I Love You, rage against the machine, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Rhys Chatham, Robbie Basho, Rufus, screaming females, Shuggie Otis, Sightings, Skrillex, sleater-kinney, Slint, Smashing Pumpkins, Soundgarden, st vincent, stephen malkmus, Syd Barrett, The Birthday Party, The Breeders, the Jesus Lizard, The Magic Band, the slits, Throwing Muses, Tinariwen, Wayne Kramer, wild flag, Wino, Wipers, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Yo La Tengo
Solid-body guitars are made with solid sheets of tonewoods that make up the soundboard, back, and sides. Solid tonewoods tend to dry out and age better with time further evolving your music signature as the guitar ages. One such gorgeous solid-body guitar is the Seagull Artist Mosaic Acoustic Guitar that we have done a full review on. You could also see what the Yamaha A3R A-Series Acoustic Electric Guitar sports for a solid-wood body!
O WOW!...I love...Fallout 4 is a great game like the rest of the fallout series but if your a fan of the series u will be kinda of down that the choices u make don't affect the outcome of the game because they made more of a story they wanted to tell but don't lose hope still a good game and they might make a sequel to new Vegas and there just might be a Multiplayer for new Vegas 2....The world is so large and the gameplay non linear (which is good and bad), I find if I walk away from the game for a while, I have to spend a lot of time figuring out where I was and where I stashed things when I come back to it later.
mid-1939 Popscicle bracing on D body sizes. See the above picture for what the popsicle or T-6 or upper transverse graft brace is. The popsicle brace was added to the underside of the top of the guitar, below the fingerboard. The brace was added to help prevent top cracks alongside the fingerboard. Since the first D body size was made in about 1934, problems obviously came about and Martin added the brace by 1939. The brace does not appear in pre-1939 Martin D-sizes, but transitioned in around 1939, and is present in all 1940 and later D models. Without the popsicle brace, the top is attached only by the strength of the spruce fibers and a 1/2" x 2" glue area where the top overlays the soundhole #1 brace. With the popsicle brace there is an additional 1" x 2" glue surface directly under the fingerboard. Unfortunately the popsicle brace can deaden the sound of the upper bout area of the soundboard, and the popsicle brace doesn't always prevent the top from cracking along the fingerboard either. As people search for why the old Martins sound so good, they examine every aspect of them and the popsicle brace usually enters the conversation. Here's some data on popsicle braces:
Richard Thompson has been one of rock's most dazzling stylists since his days with Fairport Convention, a British folk-rock band that veered into English traditional music. Shooting out life-affirming riffs amid lyrics that made you want to jump off a bridge, he combined a rock flatpick attack with speedy fingerpicking. His electric-guitar solos, rooted less in blues than in Celtic music, can be breathtaking, but his acoustic picking is just as killer; no one knows how many tears have been shed by players trying to nail "1952 Vincent Black Lightning."
I have found, like others, that I'm very comfortable with a 9.5" radius Modern C neck. I prefer it if the neck is on the chunkier side of Modern C, but I'm OK with most of 'em. Wider string spacing is helpful too, but would probably be a detriment to someone with shorter fingers. I rarely play fast (OK, I can't really play fast) so a flatter thinner "shredder" neck holds no advantages for me.
For his work on Supernatural, Glenn Kolotkin turned to elaborate multi-miking as a way of managing Carlos Santana's complicated setup. "I used multiple microphones on Carlos' guitars: Electrovoice RE20s close, Neumann U47s further away, an SM56, U87s. He was playing through an assortment of amplifiers at the same time, and by using multiple microphones I was able to get just the right blend."
The "Chrome Edition" harmonica is also based upon the MS reed plates. Featuring a crystal glass comb and specially engraved chrome-plated anniversary cover plates. The bottom cover plate has the serial numbers from 1 to 1857. It is also packaged with an anniversary booklet. The "Standard Edition" model features a clear acrylic comb and the top cover plate is specially engraved.
Just so you know, if you’re not a big fan of black electric guitars, Davisson has rolled out several colors like blue, vintage sunburst, red and pink for you to choose from. My choice was classic black, though! Now, my first impression of the 39” guitar as I unpacked it, was of sheer wonder. I mean, it was really tough to visualize the sturdy construction in terms of the menial cost. Of course there are letdowns, such as the body that is made of basswood instead of maple (that is used in premium guitars), which gives you sort of a mediocre feel. Even the material used for crafting the chrome bridge, humbucker pickup, pickguard and strings, is pretty average. But if you look at the overall feel, design and ergonomics, this model definitely deserves a round of applause!

I have a very unique Lyle guitar. It is apparently a 1972 but on the headstock it has the pearl from Gibson and it says Gibson on it as well on the headstock. It has the tail trapeze and the adjustable saddle. I recently had it set up and there is absolutely no fret buzz, it looks like it just came off the wall, stellar condition. My tech was stunned at the body condition and even the frets were like a new guitar? This is the only guitar I have seen that is definately a Lyle but it has Gibson, correctly done on the front of the headstock? I went in to the acoustic section and played a Gibson new hummingbird next to mine and it sounded cheap! I was stunned. I have no idea what this is worth but is like the perfect guitar. No dents, nicks, scratches, just and old guitar that has been babied, no warping anywhere, I think this will play another 30 years easy. If anyone knows about a Lyle with a Gibson logo and Gibson written on the headstock, please let me know


Semi-acoustic guitars have hollow bodies which give them a warmer and more dynamic range of sounds. They are vulnerable to unwanted feedback as the distorted sound increases the chances of feedback. That’s why we don’t see rock and metal musicians playing a semi-acoustic guitar. Many guitars have solid blocks inside for decreasing the feedback factor. Check out our list of semi-acoustic electric guitars here.
The middle S (Position 3) by itself also works very well for chord strumming, and it also responds very well if slapping is something you like to do (A single coil in the middle is literally the textbook choice: Single coils typically have more bite and will bring life to the pops, and it's position will ensure the slaps aren't too boomy (like a neck pickup would be) or too tinny/nasally (like a bridge pickup would be)).
This is one of several Squier models available that offer a pretty good product for a reasonably low price. The pickups and hardware are sometimes suspect, and the workmanship varies from instrument to instrument, but for the price, these are a very good beginner guitar choice. Squier Fat Strats are similar in appearance to the much more expensive Fender Stratocasters, so the look of the instrument is appealing. 
So essentially if you are looking for a thicker, higher output sound a humbucker will be a better fit for you. If however, you prefer a brighter, twangier tone a single coil will be best. If in doubt consider the guitar tones and styles of music you prefer e.g. Fender or Gibson and go with a similar style of guitar kit or even better grab yourself one of each.
A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.
My favorite guitar effect is Tremolo with a touch of echo. This works well on songs with slower melodic guitar leads and slower rhythms. Tremolo is an effect that has a speed adjustment and amplitude adjustment. The speed needs to be adjusted to the song tempo. This was popular for many songs written in the 1950’s. If you are a guitar shredder you will not be happy with this effect. I have a Boss Guitar Pedal and Line 6 Pod XT and use this effect from the pedal. I am not crazy about software generated effects as there is not enough space on stage for all the equipment and adding a MacBook and keeping it from getting knocked around would be too difficult. After recording I have used Garage Band and this software is easy to use. I probably have four or five software packages and they are too overwhelming at times. I have given up trying to figure out how to use the software with my expensive Presonus 24 track digital AI Board. It is almost impossible to use these recording software packages without having expensive school training.

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Jazz guitars are big bodied, often semi-acoustic, and designed to coax out some wonderfully rich, warm tones. Historically, jazz was played on acoustic guitars. However, in the days before amplification, the guitar often became lost in the mix of the big band sound. Until, that was, the introduction of arch top acoustics. Containing a magnetic pickup, arch tops ushered in a new era of guitar manufacturing. This meant that players could be heard in the way they wanted.
Hohner Musikinstrumente GmbH & Co. KG is a German manufacturer of musical instruments, founded in 1857 by Matthias Hohner (1833–1902). Hohner is identified especially with harmonicas and accordions. The Hohner company has invented and produced many different models of instrument, particularly the modern melodica, and most of the harmonicas used by professionals. The company also makes kazoos, recorder flutes, melodicas, banjos, guitars, bass guitars, accordions, and ukuleles (under the brand name Lanikai), along with its one million harmonicas a year.
@NeilMeyer I used to believe that as well until I started noticing songs that used the flatted 7th degree chord instead. It's generally easier to play those major chords for a beginner than diminished chords. Since the answer is provided for beginning students, I presented the easier approach. Notice the chart also leaves out some major keys which feature more difficult to play chords. Keeping it simple for newbies. Tim referenced this (music.stackexchange.com/q/29817/16897) – Rockin Cowboy Jan 18 '16 at 17:26
CALIFORNIA CLASSIC models feature superb playability, distinctive looks and an unmistakable Fender vibe. The fully-painted solid Sitka spruce top and natural solid mahogany back and sides, as well as a matching painted 6-in-line headstock and koa binding and rosette, give them an elegant two-toned aesthetic that was made for the stage. California Special and California Classic acoustic guitars are equipped with a Fender- and Fishman-designed PM preamp specifically tuned to complement the unique shape and voice of each instrument—complete with tuner, frequency and phase controls.
I’ve never played a gig without an amp, but I am prepared to… Instead of spending a ton of money on AXE FX (which a good amp can be a small fraction of the cost of AXE FX, especially if you still need to buy monitors, power amp, etc…), I keep a Line6 Sonic Port in my bag I can use with my iPod, iPad, or iPhone. Cheaper than AXE-FX. I do use the Line6 Sonic Port into my iPad for recording tracks for different projects. A lot less than AXE-FX and easier to use. Another option.
Distortion became more popular from the mid-1960s, when The Kinks guitarist Dave Davies produced distortion effects by connecting the already distorted output of one amplifier into the input of another. Later, most guitar amps were provided with preamplifier distortion controls, and "fuzz boxes" and other effects units were engineered to safely and reliably produce these sounds. In the 2000s, overdrive and distortion has become an integral part of many styles of electric guitar playing, ranging from blues rock to heavy metal and hardcore punk.
The Ibanez DT-250 is a perfect guitar for shredding. The basswood is light so you can run all over the stage, jump off your stack, and still have energy to dive-bomb. Even do the splits. Notice that was a “you can.” These were outfitted with a pair of blade-pole V5 humbuckers, produced toward the end of Japanese-made pickups, before Ibanez started working with DiMarzio. They are smokin’ hot! This guitar almost leaps out of your hand when you plug it in. The Japanese improvements on the locking vibrato were also impressive, and this combines the precision of a Floyd Rose with the feather touch of a Kahler.

Note: For additional information and history on Ibanez guitars, please check Wikipedia. For a great overall resource for Ibanez guitar questions, check out the Ibanez Collectors World website. The ICW is a gathering of Ibanez collectors who relish in the challenge of not just collecting Ibanez guitars, but of identifying old models, dating guitars by serial numbers, and generally watching the vintage guitar marketplace to understand how interest in Ibanez guitars is evolving.

I like...So fun...I am a big fan of the call of duty games - this one is a step above my son loves it and I do to but he is a lot better at it than I am - it is a challange for someone new to playstation...Well first starters died about ten times just beginning in campaign and yea even though I have it on regular mode it still is a challenge for me signs of I'm getting to old for this lol but there snippers on story mode when you concentrate it slows down all the enemies but give it a shot your self I like it
Here we have a well made in Japan kinda rare to see these vintage Fender Japanese acoustics now days... interesting well built and is still beauty ..its all mahogany body & neck are very well constructed , offering good cross braced body ala D-18/28 seems to be awfully similar?..to my vintage Yamaha FG180 or 200 Nippon Gakki.....that is to say pretty darn nice!.. almost the same guitar but for the Fender's more stylistic headstock top shape that differs from the vintage Yamaha... this was clearly built for Fender as there import in those days Japan offered more competitive pricing to us manufactures to produce there line...this offering is really quite a nice guitar in its own right... so now its nicely aged well over the years..nice ring tone to it now, its very good overall condition, but sometime in its past history it received a doink to the binding on the back side lower bout a binding touch up repair has been done ...to the back lower bout and is about a foot long area -replaced ..its on the back bottom like I said so its really out of sight and is out of mind the remainder of bindings are otherwise 100% very nice beautiful actually nice looking tortious style..the rest the body has a few nicks or scars not to bad looking though a real vintage Vibe to it with no major cracks or warpage the bridge & top are tight and flat so its a very sound playing instrument, 1 changed tuner. The minor abraiions had been lacquer filled to preserve the original finish integrity ..we just built up low spots with matching lacquer to level off to prevent further degradation pealing or chipping those areas have been french polished built up and then excess has been removed elsewhere leaving only the low spots filled then we polished to gloss and well it looks ... pretty darn GOOD now.. she's preserved & fully ready for another 30 years of play... this example has a NICE NECK and she plays great....Worth preserving?...I think so See pics please... This guitar has no abrasions wood cracks or issues at all just a vintage guitar thats surprisingly such a fine player...action is good not too high at all and it still has room to lower the saddle or nut even more you so the neck set is very good for many years no worries..its a nice sounding & playing 25 years old vintage Japanese guitar...and is overall a nice looking vintage example..stays in tune nicely and is a joy to play... nice vintage Japanese guitar this guitar is JVG Rated: 8.5/10 very good used guitar as described ...still after 25 years it looks & plays good. Interested in this beauty let me know..Thanks for looking, Joe JVGuitars@gmail.com Pics soon to come stay tuned!.
the product took a while to arrive which i was ok with they let u know ahead of time….however the only instructions is a poorly photocopied over view of the board and a few details of other items…nowhere is the wiring schematic… they give you a foot long one color wire not the 3 color connected wire they show here on amazon… kinda bummed on unfinished instructions…. disappointed with the single color wire i mean the foot switch has 9 openings where are the instructions for that? actually while writing this review i down graded it to a 1 star… i was getting more upset with the lack of instructions….

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I like it especially as a studio companion for lead guitar players who have session clients that need melodies to come out perfectly on recorded tracks. Having a neck that's so thin makes it easier to play and get right the first time which will reduce the number of takes. Though the live performer will benefit as well, considering that improve playability has universal benefits.
Unlike the other brands so far, Martin focuses more on the acoustic side of the world of guitars. They offer both acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars. The quality in the wood of a Martin strongly depends on the model you purchase. Their higher-priced guitars feature extremely high-quality wood, but even the lower end models are made of a decent material. Surprisingly, you can even find their lower-end models sporting Rosewood necks. Rosewood is known as one of the best materials to use for guitar necks. When it comes to resonators, on the other hand, Martin has that one in the bag. Most of the top-quality resonators in other high-end guitars are actually made by Martin. That, alone, should be proof enough of the quality of Martin’s resonators. Overall, Martins are excellent quality and are great for honing finger-picking skills. They are known for a warm, sustained tone and a very bright sound.
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Yet another acoustic steel guitar for the right handed guitarists. It has 6 strings and mostly comes in tobacco sunburst without a case. The perfect design makes it suitable for use by beginner guitarists. The sides and the back are made of meranti, with a spruce top. It is quite cost effective, with prices ranging from around INR 8,500 depending on available offers. More about Yamaha F310 TBS can be found on the following website link.

It’s easy to remove your pickup or pickguard and slide some foam rubber behind the unit. Start with soft foam first, and then increase the density to find the difference you like. Conveniently, the gray foam used in aftermarket pickup packaging makes great damping material: It’s soft enough that you can double it up (see Fig. 1 and 2) to create more pressure on the pickup’s back plate, too. This is a relatively no-frills mod that requires minimal materials and tools.


The Fretted Synth website has mysteriously disappeared (the likes of Native Instruments not happy that they’re giving away so much goodness for free??), so we’re linking to the Rekkerd page that still seems to host the plugins. FreeAmp3 really shouldn’t be free: it features masses of sound-shaping potential and the user interface looks great. If you just want one (free) VST guitar plugin, get this.
Roger Fritz is a professional luthier who makes guitars and basses for musicians like George Harrison and Randy Jackson. Roger is also a bass player who fell in love with the old Kay 1950's bass after having a friend recommend he play one. Roger, who had worked for Gibson in Nashville on their Bluegrass instruments, created his own company, Fritz Brothers Guitars in Alabama is making custom hand-made instruments for professional players worldwide. Roger was so enamored with the sound of the Kay (K162V) Pro Bass that he developed a clone and made them available for sale under the Fritz name. Roger Fritz was the missing link that was needed to make the project a reality: a Luthier that had a love for the instruments to be produced. Roger joined our team in early 2007 to help create and develop all the parts and features that made the Kay products different from all the rest. Most of the parts and molds were no longer available so everything had to be created from scratch. The pickguards, the knobs, the hand wound pickups, the tailpiece, and even the baseball bat style toggle switch cover all had to be manufactured using original parts as templates for the new reissued versions. Finding the parts was difficult and surprisingly expensive since we needed to search stores, eBay and contact collectors to find perfect originals to reproduce. The going price for a good vintage Jazz Special Bass today is $7,000. But after finding the parts and vintage instruments from avid collectors like Gary Walko, Vintage Kay historians like Michael Wright and Jay Scott, and dozens of avid fans, the project was able to take form.
Two-handed tapping was the hoariest of heavy-metal clichés until Marnie Stern reclaimed the concept on behalf of indie-prog bedroom shredders everywhere. No one would ever confuse Stern’s chops with Eddie Van Halen’s, but that’s kind of the point: If Stern’s shredding exudes the agreeably skewed internal logic of the self-taught, it also allows her to utilize the two-handed technique far more creatively than the pseudo-classical chest-puffing that usually comes with Dokken territory.
Around ’77 or so (since the new shape was similar to the Magnum basses), with sales embarrassingly bad, Ovation took some Deacon bodies and added new contours, carving a dip into the top curve and adding angles. It didn’t help. The Breadwinner was officially axed in ’79, with the Breadwinner loosing its head in ’80, although the market had long passed them by.
It is easy to make the mistake that the tone control set-up in an electric guitar is a simple single stage Resistor / Capacitor filter, where the two components are in series, the other side of the capacitor goes to ground, the signal is applied to the other end of the resistor and the output is measured across the capacitor. If that were so then your first calculation is roughly correct, while in a practical situation in the second, the capacitor would be fed from the impedance of the signal source. Lets say this is a test generator with an impedance of 600 ohms – the -3dB cut off would be around 12kHz. This is not the case for the typical electric guitar.
The new AC15 'Twin' retains the all-important dual-EL84, cathode-biased output section of its forebear, but otherwise it's very different. A quick scan across the top panel reveals two inputs for independent access to either normal or top boost channels. One benefit of the bigger, 2x12 enclosure is that it provides ample room for a full-length reverb tank, housed in the bottom. There's also an in-built tremolo effect, with controls for depth and speed. But the whole point of this amp is the pair of 25-watt Celestion G12M Greenback speakers. They are the speaker of rock in so many cases and while purists might hope for Celestion Blues, they would add a good £300 at least to the price; and he increased power handling of two Greenbacks on the end of just 15 watts is quite a tantalising prospect. It's fair to say that even with the master volume set-up, the magic doesn't really start happening until the amp's lungs are at least half way open, but happily, that's not far from perfect for many of today's pub and bar gigs - it may even be too much for some. The AC15 'Twin' does sound magnificent when clean, but listen carefully to those amps or this and it's rarely completely undistorted. That harmonically rich drive that was never supposed to be there is the key characteristic that latter day, non-master volume AC users find hardest to replicate.
Bull necked and heavily tattooed, Mike Ness is not the kind of guy you’d want to mess with. The Southern California guitarist, singer and songwriter has known good times and bad, punching his way out of a serious drug addiction in the mid Eighties. He has funneled these experiences into some of the most hard-hitting, plain-dealing rock songs to come out of the SoCal punk milieu. Ness launched Social Distortion in 1978.
Every ZZ Top tour is a treat for guitar geeks, as Gibbons uses the occasions to unveil a six-string surprise. (Last year it was an elusive Gibson Moderne.) But what really makes Gibbons cool is a certain undefinable quality called “vibe.” Anyone who has ever met Billy and gotten to know him—however briefly—has an outrageous story to tell about the encounter.

New too was “the popular Supro” Baton Guitar, sold with a matching Baton amp as the Supro Baton Guitar Outfit No. 200. This was basically the same shape as the old Avalon, but a short-scale (21″) student version now finished in a grained walnut finish. The silkscreened fingerboard sported diamond inlays. The Supro logo plate was on the slightly flared head. This had the new exposed-staggered-pole pickup with a rectangular handrest bolted on over the pickup, all mounted in the middle of a large square plate. The strings attached to a pyramidal tailpiece. Controls now included bakelite volume and tone knobs on either side of the end of the fingerboard. The back was covered in no-slip suede. It came with a natty alligator soft case. Based on the use of the description “popular,” which Supro almost always used to describe previously available models, the transition from the Avalon to the Baton may indeed have begun in 1940.

In Vietnam, electric guitars are often used as an instrument in cải lương music (traditional southern Vietnamese folk opera), sometimes as a substitute for certain traditional stringed instruments like the Đàn nguyệt (two-stringed lute) when they are not available. Electric guitars used in cải lương are played in finger vibrato (string bending), with no amplifiers or sound effects.
Living Colour’s Vernon Reid agrees but also speaks to a larger shift. He remembers being inspired when he heard Santana on the radio. “There was a culture of guitar playing, and music was central,” adds Reid, 58. “A record would come out and you would hear about that record, and you would make the journey. There was a certain investment in time and resources.”
At the higher end of the market, you will definitely want to consider theGibson Memphis ES Les Paul Studio. A stunning marriage of the ES hollowbody and Les Paul solidbody shapes, this is a model that combines playability, power, sustain and tonal warmth to perfection. Equipped with ’57 Classic and Super ’57 Classic pickups and boasting solid construction throughout, the ES-Les Paul Studio is perfect for anything and everything you could imagine. Each model is supplied with a Gibson Memphis hardshell case to get you out and about in style.
When two or more speakers are used in the same cabinet, or when two cabinets are used together, the speakers can be wired in parallel or in series, or in a combination of the two (e.g., two 2x10" cabinets, with the two speakers wired in series, can be connected together in parallel). Whether speakers are wired in parallel or in series affects the impedance of the system. Two 8 ohm speakers wired in parallel have 4 ohm impedance. Guitarists who connect multiple cabinets to an amplifier must consider the amp's minimum impedance. Parallel vs. series also affects tone and sound. Speakers wired in parallel slightly dampen[s] and restrain[s] them, giving what some describe as "tighter response" and "smoother breakup". Some describe speakers wired in series (usually no more than two) as sounding "...looser, giving a slightly more raw, open and edgy sound."[26]
I see a bunch of people all over social network sites and youtube videos responding with things like "who needs it, just give me a guitar and a tube amp" whenever news about a pedal of some kind comes up. What's so wrong with pedals? For some reason there's a stigma against them that "bad players use pedals to mask how bad they are" when most people use them to get sounds out of their guitar that you normally can't without them. I don't understand why so many people opt for the "guitar right into an amp" sound when there's so much more available.
Not everyone has the luxury of drum booths and separate rooms, but isolation boxes are great for isolating guitars during a rhythm track recording. They are also ideal for home recording, allowing a good  volume level without disturbing neighbours. Isolation boxes are commercially available, but can be expensive; try making your own from wood and foam.

So I was all, "oh no...I want this one." So I did leave with it, and without even asking they sold it to me at less than the price on the thing because it was the demo and had a tiny belt buckle type scuff or two on the back. I think I actually wound up saving a few hundred dollars. I don't know if they figured a percentage of the total should be knocked off, or what.
Perhaps the most popular choice though is a paper in oil capacitor. I have tried so many brands and options, and truth be told, it's very hard to notice a substantial difference and you can, unnecessarily spend a lot of money on premium ones. I received so many requests for a PIO equipped harness, so in an effort to try and whittle my findings down to a good value, tight tolerance and good sounding paper in oil capacitor, I've settled with one made by WD Music USA which are superb. Compared to other PIO caps on the market, they're a reasonable price and importantly are tight tolerance meaning the key details about how it will react with a tone pot, is accurately presented. Again, no real right or wrong here, if your budget allows you to go crazy on capacitor choices, no one can tell you not too. But truthfully, just pay attention to the tolerances, as that will tell you the most about how it will 'sound'. 
Nothing compares to a Martin. The craftsmanship and attention to detail is impeccable, and the sound: the sound. The sound is like heaven. If you're used to an electric, a Taylor may feel more comfortable, but nothing compares to the timbre of a Martin acoustic. In the right hands, the bass and treble are perfectly actuated. None of that "tinny" Taylor quality which - while useful in certain applications and seems "easier to play" - cannot hold a candle to the the deep, rich, nuanced tone of a Martin acoustic. Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Woody Guthrie, Eric Clapton... Need I say more? I own a D-35, and I wouldn't be caught dead without a Martin guitar in my arsenal. Complete, unequivocal perfection.
I love reading interviews with engineers and producers, but the more of them I read, the more I come up against the basic problem that my brain is like a sieve. I'm forever thinking to myself "I really must remember that technique", but unless I dash off and use it right away the knowledge just skips out of my ear and heads for the hills, probably glad to be free. And even if I vaguely remember reading a fascinating passage about de-essing nose-flutes, I'm damned if I can recall where I read it or who recommended it.

You can use compression not only to keep levels under control but also to increase sustain. Sometimes a guitar part will work better in a track if the sustain is created using a little less overdrive augmented by compression rather than relying on overdrive alone. Even a heavily overdriven guitar sound can be made to appear more powerful if compressed, as its average energy level is increased further, though any noise will also be rendered more obvious. Clean guitar parts can also benefit enormously from compression, as it creates a more dense, even sound and can emphasise the picking attack of the notes when a longer attack time is set. Using a faster release time, so as to cause audible level pumping, can make for exciting rock guitar sounds, but some compressors pump more gracefully than others — Dbx models are quite popular in this respect.

When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.

In terms of tone, a smaller dreadnought body will be slightly lacking in projecting the low-end frequencies. That doesn't matter here thanks to being an acoustic electric. With that said, the trebles and mids give away its origin, tone-wise. Play a few chords and you'll immediately hear that classic 'Taylor sound' even from a lower mid-range guitar like this one.
When talking about 1920s Martin guitars, you hear people say this a lot (especially if they are trying to sell you a guitar!) Unfortunately there is no definative way to tell if a 1920s Martin is capable of handling steel strings. The term, "braced for steel strings", though is inaccurate. A better way to put it would be, "built for steel strings". For a 1920s Martin to be built for steel strings there were several small changes - the top, braces and bridge plate are all slightly thicker. Can you see this inside the guitar? For the most part, no, unless you really know what you are looking for (frankly I can't tell). So how do you know if a 1920s Martin is built for steel?
I’m Björgvin Benediktsson. I’m a musician, audio engineer and best-selling author. I help musicians and producers make a greater impact with their music by teaching them how to produce and engineer themselves. I’ve taught thousands of up and coming home studio producers such as yourself how to make an impact with their music through Audio Issues since 2011.
What's funny is that guitars with cheap pickups very often sound better direct than guitars with "good pickups". I have an Epiphone Special I with ( presumably GFS ) P90-style pickups and that thing sounds great direct. It's also fine with a band thru an amp if the band doesn't play too loud - if the band's too loud the low mid buildup means you gotta EQ a lotta bass out and it loses it's girth.
3,000 to 8,000 Hz - Brilliance and Presence: This is the range that can add shimmer or allow a guitar to cut through a mix when boosted. It can also be where you make cuts to keep a guitar from conflicting with a vocal. If making boosts in this range, keep an eye (ear?) out for noise, as any noise present from distortion/effects pedals will very quickly be accentuated as well
The question is now - do you need the entire bundle? When it comes to the presets, the guitars are all very unique, but because of the mass amount of tone-shaping available once you start twisting and manipulating away there becomes less and less of a distinction — the bundle being over a third less than individually purchasing them doesn’t help the decision making factor at all.   
Enter exhibit A: A late 60’s KENT short scale variation on the very popular (then and now) “Beatle” violin shaped bass. As you can see from the photos, this isn’t your average violin bass. While many, from the classic Hofner that Paul McCartney turned a few kids on to, to the Teisco and Black Jack Japanese models, didn’t stray far from the violin shape, this Kent takes a few attractive and stylish liberties with the standard template.
The solution is pretty simple actually. When setting your intonation it should look like two sets of steps. You should never need to move the saddles all the way forward or turn them around. If you want to adjust something do it in a way that allows you to keep this configuration. You do that and you'll never have to worry about tuning issues period, let alone a g-string.
King V has got to be one of Jackson’s most iconic guitar families. The one we are looking at here is a but underpowered compared to the original King V, however it also comes at a much lower price. The whole package is well made and quality control is top notch. It takes some time to get used to the Flying V body shape, but once you do you’ll refuse to go back. Aside from looking good, this thing also brings a mighty sound.
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The beauty of an affordable small amp is that it can be high quality without the sacrifice of anything. I mean yeah some people say that the low tones disappear a little when the amplifier gets small, but don’t listen to them too much. Unless your low tones are being drowned out by some loud person screaming into the microphone so hard that the system starts screeching, even the smallest of amps can produce a respectable low tone. The small amplifiers are there to be portable and easy to have, so that you never have to deal with a back hurting (unless your instrument is heavy) or your arms being tired from anything other than playing the guitar too much. Which is why the Blackstar Fly 3 Battery Powered Guitar Amplifier is a great piece of equipment to have in your artillery. Portable, small and powerful in sound, what else could anyone ever want?
Description: Body: Basswood (Tilia, Linden, Lime) - Neck Wood: Maple & Wenge - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: Jumbo - Inlay: White Dot - # of Strings: 7 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 4+4 - Bridge: Gibraltar Standard II-8 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, 3-Way Switch - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 808 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Cobalt Blue Metallic, Galaxy Black - Made In: Japan
After a peak in the 1970s, driven by the use of several high profile players, another lull occurred in the early 1980s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray and Buddy Guy in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.[citation needed] Yngwie Malmsteen is known for playing a Stratocaster in the Neo-Classical genre.

Some distortion effects provide an "overdrive" effect. Either by using a vacuum tube, or by using simulated tube modeling techniques, the top of the wave form is compressed, thus giving a smoother distorted signal than regular distortion effects. When an overdrive effect is used at a high setting, the sound's waveform can become clipped, which imparts a gritty or "dirty" tone, which sounds like a tube amplifier "driven" to its limit. Used in conjunction with an amplifier, especially a tube amplifier, driven to the point of mild tonal breakup, short of what would be generally considered distortion or overdrive, these pedals can produce extremely thick distortion sounds much like those used by Carlos Santana or Eddie Van Halen. Today there is a huge variety of overdrive pedals, and some of them are:


Straight away meeting the essential criteria and tonal platform for a good small solid state combo amp for practicing at low volumes with a pocket friendly price tag is Orange Crush 20RT. This dual channel 20 watt guitar amplifier that also comes in a 35 watt version is the upgraded model of the well received Orange Crush 20 for having a built-in spring reverb effect and a chromatic tuner which are the kind of features great for daily use.
I'll second the neck comment, conditionally. My first guitar was a hand-me-down Monterey archtop acoustic that had been my uncle's, and it have a sharp V neck. Out of nostalgia I bought another Monterey on eBay and its cross section feels like a tomato can lying in my hand. After a refret it plays smoother and easier than anything that fat has a right to. The original frets..., not quite.
Blue Book Publications: Blue Book Publications publishes a number of print guides for musical instruments, and it also maintains a subscription-based website. The website is divided into electric guitars, acoustic guitars, and guitar amplifiers in addition to other instruments. Unlike Used Price, you will have to register for a paid membership with this site to get the information you need to self-appraise your guitar. You can access the prices online or purchase print editions to be mailed to you.
But the guitar store? They always remember me and treat me like a guest even if I'm not there to buy shit. Everyone there is a genuinely good dude. They're all honest too, which can be hard to find in this industry. I took my guitar in for a check up and they told me doing anything to it would be unnecessary. They could have easily charged me $80 for a set up and taken my guitar.
Looks like a good guitar. I honestly think that for 90% of the hobbyist players out there, after buying better pickups, the difference between the sound of a Squier and a real Fender is negligible. I could be wrong I guess, but my ear doesn't really pick up enough of a difference to justify the money for a more expensive guitar. The quality of the guitar plays a big part for me. For instance, when I first got my guitar, the frets weren't smooth. Bends sucked because the note had lost it's sound by the time it was bent all the way up. Finally through playing and polishing, they flattened. Now they play really nice. I'm sure that on a new Gibson, that wouldnt happen. Oh well. About the Tele headstock that you didn't like, what don't you like about it? Do you like the gibson style 3 tuners to a side configuration?(like an acoustic?)
Fender has a long history of building amplifiers, so much so that many of the amps we see today still mimic the look and aesthetics of the amps that they built many decades ago. You could also say that many of the amps we have today can trace their roots to the classic Fender amp design. Also impressive is the long list of Fender amplifier users which include Eric Clapton, Jerry Garcia, Brian Setzer, Neil Young, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Eddie Van Halen and many more. For a company with a long legacy and a massive line up of amplifiers, maintaining high rating across the board is quite the feat, but then again, this is to be expected from the company that helped shape the electric guitar sound that we know today. These days, Fender is well represented in the entire amplifier market, from entry level models with amp modeling, to premium modern reproductions of their iconic tube amps.
John Scofield (b 1951) is an American jazz guitarist and composer, who has played and collaborated with Miles Davis, Joe Henderson, Charles Mingus, Joey DeFrancesco, Herbie Hancock, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell, Pat Martino, Mavis Staples, Phil Lesh, Billy Cobham, Medeski Martin & Wood, George Duke, Jaco Pastorius, John Mayer, and many other artists. Scofield had played a 1981 Ibanez AS-200 as his main guitar for over 20 years.[26]
• Now let's add some slap-back room delay. In the seventh insert (which, incidentally, comes post‑fader in Cubase, as does insert eight), go to Delay/StereoDelay. In the left channel, try setting Delay to 1/16T, Feedback to 6.5, Lo to 50, Hi to 15000, Pan to ‑100, and Mix to 20, and enable Sync, Lo Filter, and Hi Filter. Use the same values for the right channel, but with Delay at 1/16, Feedback at 7.3, and Pan at 100.

Maton was founded in 1946 as the Maton Musical Instruments Company by Bill May and his brother Reg. Reg was a wood machinist, and Bill a jazz musician, woodwork teacher andluthier who had for some years operated a custom guitar building and repair business under the name Maton Stringed Instruments and Repairs. The name “Maton” came from the words “May Tone” and is pronounced May Tonne.
The Dobro All-Electric featured a pickup purchased from the fellow who’d invented it in ’32, Arthur J. Stimson of Seattle, Washington (it was not invented by Dobro’s Vic Smith, as has been reported elsewhere). This was, as far as we know, the first modern electric guitar pickup, with the magnet under the pickup, rather than over the strings, as on Electro/Rickenbacker instruments (or the presumed “transducer” on the ’28 Stromberg-Voisinet). Stimson’s pickup had a large horseshoe pickup in the body with two coils, one for bass and one for treble strings, each with its own bar polepiece. A 1/4″ jack outlet sat on the top down near the standard stamped National trapeze tailpiece, next to a single volume control.
The Aston Sedona is an ES-335 inspired design that truly lives up to the standard. With solid maple construction, 23-3/4″ scale length, bound fretboard, body, and F-holes, 22 fret rosewood fretboard, classic toggle, tone, and volume controls, tune-o-matic style bridge, stop tailpiece, and smooth, strong humbucking pickups, this guitar can hold it’s own with the classic designs and shine!

In our so-called modern configuration, the tone cap is attached to the pickup before the volume pot. This presents the volume control with a totally different signal, resulting in a more colored sound as you reduce the volume. This can be useful if you like to turn up the guitar to cut through more. For me, the downside is the way it makes the tone control a bit of a hair-trigger affair. If you’re the type who avoids the tone control, this won’t be a factor for you.
Very large cabinets, such as 8x10" cabinets, may have both wheels and a long "towel bar"-style handle to facilitate moving the equipment. Some 8x10" cabinets have handles on the top and bottom to facilitate two-person carrying of the cab. Some combo amplifiers have wheels and a retractable carry handle, to enable bassists to walk while pulling their bass amp; this can enable bassists to walk onstage with their bass and amp or walk to a venue with their gear.
In 1958, Gibson introduced the ES-335 as part of its Electric Spanish line of guitars, and it was the world’s first commercially released semi-hollow guitar. Featuring a solid center block in an otherwise hollow thinline body, the then-radical design effectively combined the round, airy tone of a traditional archtop with the sustain and feedback-fighting benefits of a solidbody. Its groundbreaking design is one of the most imitated around.
There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings. For a six-string guitar in standard tuning, it may be necessary to drop or omit one or more tones from the chord; this is typically the root or fifth. The layout of notes on the fretboard in standard tuning often forces guitarists to permute the tonal order of notes in a chord.
I took it into a local shop to have it looked at, turns out the neck was warped, leading to problem #2 above. I ended up returning it and ordering the same model from a different retailer; although the new guitar didn’t have the same neck problems I ended up having to replace the bridge with a Mastery Bridge (see issue #1, above, the Mastery Bridge cost me another $200 or so, including labor for installation).
In 1928, the Stromberg-Voisinet firm was the first company to sell an electric stringed instrument and amplifier package. However, musicians found that the amps had an "unsatisfactory tone and volume, [and] dependability problems", so the product did not sell well. Even though the Stromberg-Voisinet amp did not sell well, it still launched a new idea: a portable electric instrument amp with a speaker, all in an easily transported wooden cabinet. In 1929, Vega Electrics launched a portable banjo amplifier. In 1932, Electro String Instruments and amplifier (this is not the same company as Stromberg Electro Instruments) introduced a guitar amp with "high output" and a "string driven magnetic pickup". Electro set out the standard template for combo amps: a wooden cabinet with the electronic amplifier mounted inside, and a convenient carrying handle to facilitate transporting the cabinet to rehearsals and shows. 1n 1933, Vivi-Tone amp set-ups were used for live performances and radio shows. In 1934, Rickenbacker launched a similar combo amp which added the feature of metal corner protectors, which keep the corners in good condition during transportation.[1]
The Venue DI is essentially an amplifier without a speaker cab. If you go straight into a mixer or PA system this unit lets you customize your acoustic's tone in every way imaginable. While it's particularly ideal for someone who doesn't have an existing preamp in their acoustic rig, it outperforms most preamps that come standard in an acoustic guitar or even in an acoustic amp.

The Gallien-Krueger 800RB was a solid state bass amplifier head introduced in 1983 that was liked by bassists for its loud, clean sound and durable construction. It introduced the concept of bi-amplification, as it sent 300 watts of low register sound to the bass speakers and 100 watts to the tweeter.[6] The GK used a tube preamp simulator circuit called "boost". GK 800RB users include Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea and Guns and Roses' Duff McKagan.[6]
Now that we covered the basic features, let’s talk about what really counts: the built-in effects, amp models, and usability. For better or for worse, people tend to compare multi-effects units with the experience and sound you get from owning a pedalboard full of individual pedals. Well, great news: the consensus is that the Zoom G3X feels a lot like using individual stompboxes; more so than any other multi-effects unit on the market. Zoom really nailed it when it comes to making an intuitive interface. If you look at the layout, you’ll notice 3 “stompbox-style” sections side by side, each with a little display and on/off footswitch. These are meant to feel like 3 guitar pedals next to each other. They’re technically 3 slots which can each hold an effect or an amp model. The Zoom has 6 slots total (you can scroll left and right to access them), and all 6 can be used at once. You’ve got LOTS of choices to shape your tone: 94 effects and 22 amp and cabinet models. Any type of effect you can dream up, the Zoom G3X has you covered. Tremolo, vibrato, compressors, filters, overdrives are all available, and many of the effects simulate popular pedals like the Tube Screamer, EHX Big Muff, Pro Co RAT, Boss DS-1, and the list goes on and on. Same goes for the amp modeling - you can emulate a Marshall, Fender, Orange, Vox, etc. and pair up different amp models with various cabinet models. You can make your effect chain in whatever order you want, which is great for the beginner who is figuring out pedal order for the first time, and the veteran who wants to experiment with unique pedal combos. From a user review:

Most players dream of having comfortable, smooth action on a guitar. With the PLEK, the most optimal string action possible for any instrument can be realized. This gives the individual musician an instrument that plays exactly the way he has dreamed of. Optimal playability on a guitar makes it sounds better with notes that ring true and clean. There is no fret buzz under normal playing conditions and the intonation problems that occur because of high string action, are eliminated. You can hear and feel the difference.
Search out any discussion about tone and tonewoods on the internet and you will quickly find a wide variation of opinions among players and builders alike. However, the majority will almost always list "tonewoods" and/or specific species of Spruce and Cedar as the key to getting the desired tone from a guitar. Indeed, many beginning builders agonize over wood choice combinations as they relate to tone, with more experienced craftspeople offering suggestions that seem to assure the correct … [Read More...]
This is another really nice 12" 16 ohm guitar speaker from 1973, and is a matched pair with the one listed earlier, it has its original Pulsonic H1777 cone, and is in excellent condition, there it also has a tiny repair on the edge of the cone but this doesn't affect the sound in any way.Cash on collection preferred but carriage can be arrange if required.
Gibson’s drive to recapture the magic of the original “Patent Applied For” humbucker pickups of the 1950s culminated with the introduction of the Burstbucker line in the early 1990s. In 2002, Gibson followed up this innovative accomplishment with yet another breakthrough in pickup design—the Burstbucker Pro, designed specifically for the new Les Paul Standards. The Burstbucker Pro features an Alnico V magnet (instead of the Alnico II), which offers slightly higher output and allows preamps to be driven a little harder to achieve a more natural break-up. Like all Burstbuckers, the Burstbucker Pro has asymmetrical coils—true to the original PAFs—which supply a more open sound. The Burstbucker Pro Neck is wound slightly less than the original PAFs, while the Burstbucker Pro Bridge is slightly overwound for increased output. The Burstbucker Pro pickups are also wax potted to allow loud volume pressures with minimal feedback.
For punchy tones and a clear, high tone, you might want to consider the EMG JH James Hetfield Humbucker Set. Designed specifically for Metallica's front man, this set features both a neck and bridge pickup that can be used together or separately. If screaming highs and bluesy lows are what you're after, the Seymour Duncan SH-1 1959 Model Electric Guitar Pickup is a solid choice. Its enameled wire, nickel plated studs and balanced coil windings produce great sustain, making this neck pickup a great addition to your Gibson or Les Paul. For an electric guitar pickup that offers great range for different genres, a Gibson '57 Classic Plus Pickup can help you make your musical mark. This bridge pickup delivers a slightly higher output without sacrificing the rich, vintage tone of your instrument. The Seymour Duncan SH-PG1 Pearly Gates Pickup is another great choice if you want some kick combined with a well-rounded sound. Your choice for an electric guitar pickup really comes down to personal preference and what kind of sound you're looking for. Whether you're jamming in the garage, recording live in the studio or taking centre stage every night, you're sure to find the electric guitar pickup that best suits your needs.
The downside of boosting the volume of an acoustic guitar this way is the fact that every microphone adds a color of its own to the end result, not to mention the preamplifier and any compression and equalization applied. In other words, not only do you have to position the microphone correctly, but you also need to be very careful when choosing which mic to use.
If they're properly stretched it's usually not a big problem. Usually you can just push down on the new strings around the bridge and the nut and retune a few times to get the slack out, or do the push down/pull up technique to stretch them. I find that most players have more tuning issues from holding down the strings too hard or inadvertently slightly bending them with their fretting hand.
The best way to use this type of book is to just take 15 minutes a day to work through a page or two at a time. You don’t have to find something that requires a lot of study or dedication on your part at this point. Your first priority should be finding a book that gets you thinking about theory as well as helping you develop coordination in both your fretting and strumming hand.
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At 10.8 pounds and 11.4 by 12 by 6.7 inches, the Crush 12 is one of the smallest amps we tested, so it’s easily portable and stashable—although with just 12 watts and a 6-inch speaker, it’s the least powerful of our top picks. It has a ¼-inch headphone jack but no line input, so you can’t connect a smartphone for play-along sessions. While our sample came in the company’s iconic orange color, it’s also available in black—although as Wirecutter editor-at-large Geoffrey Morrison put it, “Buying an Orange amp in black is like buying a sports car with an automatic transmission.”
Since guitar players are automatically cool, that means cool guitar players are the coolest of the cool. In this issue, we exalt this elite class of cold—the players who even we would sell our wives and first born just to have some of their mojo rub off on us. Some of them are pioneers who paved a bold, daring path to define new styles of cool, while others are simply the kind of guitarists we want to be when we never grow up (which is part of being cool).
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