Size & Weight: If the multi-effects pedal will stay in one place at all times, then perhaps size and weight is not a big deal. However, one of the biggest selling points of a unit like this is its portability. If you need to gig with it or simply take it to a friend’s house, make sure you’re fine with its dimensions. The good thing is that a manufacturer like Line 6 makes several versions of the same basic pedal. The Line 6 M13 is a great unit, but if you need it to be more compact you can opt for the M9, or smaller yet the M5.

The XB-40, (short for Extreme bending-40 reeds), is unlike any other diatonic made. Released in 2003, it was specifically designed by harmonica specialist Rick Epping to simplify proficient bending of the notes. To make this possible, the XB-40 uses forty reeds as opposed to the usual twenty found in most ten-hole diatonics. With these bending capabilities, the XB-40 gives access to all the notes on the chromatic scale through bending the natural tones of each hole. This model was discontinued in 2013. Shortly before production officially ceased, Suzuki Music released a similar model the SUB-30.[28]
In the fall of 1964, it's generally accepted that hide glue was replaced with white polyvinyl acetate PVA glue (Elmer's) after the move to the new Martin build facility. (But hide glue was still used until the mid-seventies for gluing tops to the rim and in some other situations.) A notation was written in Grant Remaley's personal memos on Sept 29, 1964 indicating Martin was starting to use "cold" glue. It is generally thought the type of glue used does affect the sound of the guitar. Starting some time in the 1980s Martin started switching from white glue to yellow aliphatic resin (titebond).
Gibson has been producing the Les Paul Studio electric guitar since 1983. One of the company’s lower-priced models, the Les Paul Studio was designed to attract guitar players who wanted to have the much-admired Les Paul sound without shelling out cash for cosmetic features found in upper-tier models like the Les Paul Standard. This is why the older Les Paul Studio models did not have headstock inlays and binding on the neck and body.
This company specializes in guitars meant for heavy metal and hard rock lovers. It is the proud manufacturer of some of the most outstanding designs in the history of metal such as Warlock, Bich, Virgin, and Mockingbird. It molded and influenced hard rock and thrash revolution of the 1980s. It is a great choice if you are looking for some edgy designs for your guitar. The guitars are available in 6, 7, or 8-string models that are suitable for players of all genres. Their recent introduction was the Villain series that has incredible designs and has a body of basswood or mahogany.
HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. (JANUARY 25, 2018)—Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) today announced the all-new California Series acoustic guitars, celebrating the lifestyle and culture associated with the region and the brands Southern California roots. Energetic and independent, this family of guitars defies acoustic guitar conventions with a visible look and feel of Fender’s famous electric guitars – from the Stratocaster® headstocks and vibrant colors, to the distinctive Fender body shapes that mark players as visionary artists. Lively-sounding – California Series acoustic guitars capture the laid back, yet energetic California lifestyle – from the beach to the festival stage.

FuzzPlus2 is an update of our popular free download Fuzz+. The basis of the plug-in is a transform model of a famous vintage fuzz pedal. There are four controls: Fuzz knob: This controls, as you might imagine, exactly how much fuzz is applied to the signal. Tone knob: This controls the brightness of the distorted signal. Output knob: This is the output volume of the device, when it is active. Bypass button: This works just like the switch on a stomp box. When the blue light is lit, you're money. When it's not, the input is passed directly to the output. This can be automated for a slightly different vibe than automating the effect bypass of your host. free vst plugin.

One thing that is worth trying is combining different delays with different reverb effects. You can get some seriously beautiful sounds with a reverb and delay effect that sound good together. Some manufacturers have even gone so far as to create reverb and delay combo pedals. It is truly a perfect combination of effects, kind of like peanut butter and jelly.
Probably one of the greatest is Glenn Schwartz, formerly of the James Gang and Pacific Gas & Electric. Considered to be a "white" Jimi Hendrix, he was asked by Jimi to play at what was to be his last birthday party. Glenn played behind his back and with his teeth (now with his gums) before Jimi ever did. Now out of the limelight (and out of his mind) Glenn plays (and preaches) on Thursdays at a blue collar bar in Cleveland. ONE F*CKING INCREDIBLE PLAYER. Should be on any list.
The person who made up the Top Ten list of best guitars has it all wrong! Of all the guitar companies he lists, Carvin is the only company that still uses ebony as standard material for the fretboard. This is because most other companies refuse to take the time and expense of this type of production. The others all use rosewood because it is cheap, relatively soft and can be "slammed" together quickly by machine; an indication of how they make their guitars in general! No other company who makes guitars even comes close to using the hand selected grade of wood (start to finish) that Carvin does. Take a hint from someone who knows how great guitars made step by step; if you want a guitar made from the best materials you can get, with critical operations still done by hand, order one one from Carvin, try it for ten days, if you really don't like it just return it... No questions and no hassles... Really. If you are not the type of person who cares, or are not willing to do ...more
One of the biggest hits of all-time, this song incorporates everything that is 80’s pop and is performed in the key of F# major, in 4/4 time. Lauper originally didn’t want to sing it since the original version was written by Robert Hazard, who wrote it from the perspective of a man. Eventually, the singer released her version of the song and the rest is history. 

The Epiphone Les Paul Special II Vintage Sunburst has a mahogany body and neck which gives the guitar a nice thick sound. The quality of the tuners and pickups are okay, not superb, but good enough for any beginner. If you are into metal, rock or blues the two Epiphone humbuckers do a pretty nice job, they sound really good and give you a nice fat sound. A pretty reliable and solid guitar even for live playing.
While many players revere the original analog effects boxes and their modern reissues, the majority of effects on the market today have digital circuitry. Don't let that be a deterrent, digital effects are so advanced now that many of them can only be distinguished from analog effects by certified tone geeks. Professionals at all levels use digital effects. There are advantages to both analog and digital stomps, and either can be the right option depending on the player and the music.
I have a similar guitar to the one you bought. It was my grandmothers and I'm estimating it at over 30 years old. Very folk style. She told me she actually had the original strings from when she bought it! I believed her when i tuned the thing and the day after found that the 4th and 6th had snapped. From what i know, Decca just made guitars around that time, 60's to 70's. Mine says it has a steel reinforced neck and it is really heavy compared to others. its still in really good shape and I actually play it. I'm not planning on selling it but I know its well worth its age. It has a hand chissled Ser. # on the bridge.
Tapping, in which both hands are applied to the fretboard. Tapping may be performed either one-handed or two-handed. It is an extended technique, executed by using one hand to tap the strings against the fingerboard, thus producing legato notes. Tapping usually incorporates pull-offs or hammer-ons as well, where the fingers of the left hand play a sequence of notes in synchronization with the tapping hand.
Now, if you are an electric player who doesn’t like using any pedals, that’s perfectly fine. Just be honest about the reasons. If you just like the sound of your guitar and your amp, cool. If you just want to keep things simple, I understand. That’s your preference, and it doesn’t make you better in any way than someone else who does. If you’ve been a genuine listener of music, you’ve seen and heard players who’ve blown their audiences away on un-amplified classical guitars, and players who blow us away with lots of pedals on their boards.
The pitch shifter is one of the most versatile effects in the pitch category.  Often used with a rocker pedal like a wah-wah or volume pedal, the pitch can be swept up or down by a specified amount in a smooth glissando-like bend.  It’s typical to hear a player use a range of one or two octaves for the sweep, so the shifted pitch lands back on its original note, but in a higher or lower octave.
The Uni-Vibe was released in 1968 and became an immediate favorite of Jimi Hendrix, David Gilmour, and Robin Trower. It is actually a phase shifting effect, but what makes it groundbreaking is its use of an LFO (low frequency oscillator) to create the sweeping effect. It also uses a photocell to control the speed of the sweeping effect. That is basically a little light bulb inside the unit that will pulse at whatever speed the rate knob is set to. Also the brighter the pulse of the bulb the more dramatic the effect.

In this era, as well, Gibson began experimenting with new models such as the Les Paul Recording. This model is generally unpopular with guitarists due to its complex electronics. The Recording featured low-impedance pickups, many switches and buttons, and a highly specialized cable for impedance-matching to the amplifier. Less noticeable changes included, but were not limited to, maple fingerboards (1976), pickup cavity shielding, and the crossover of the ABR1 Tune-o-matic bridge into the modern day Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge. During the 1970s, the Les Paul body shape was incorporated into other Gibson models, including the S-1, the Sonex, the L6-S, and other models that did not follow the classic Les Paul layout.
Acurious phenomenon that ac-companies certain guitar compa-nies is an inability to translate success from one medium to another. For instance, Martin has never been able to transfer its reputation for high-quality acoustics to electric guitars. And Fender has never been able, on its own, to really succeed in marketing acoustic guitars. Instead, it purchased Guild.
Peterson, Jonathon (2002). "Tuning in thirds: A new approach to playing leads to a new kind of guitar". American Lutherie: The Quarterly Journal of the Guild of American Luthiers. 8222 South Park Avenue, Tacoma WA 98408: USA.: The Guild of American Luthiers. 72 (Winter): 36–43. ISSN 1041-7176. Archived from the original on 21 October 2011. Retrieved 9 October 2012.
Martin never actually produced Stinger catalogs, so a detailed accounting is pretty difficult. However, there were four basic Stinger body styles, a fairly conventional Strat shape, a Strat-style with an arched top, a Tele and a Fender-style bass. These came in a variety of finish and pickup configuration options. Headstocks were a kind of modified Strat-style six-in-line, with a pointed throat and slightly hooked nose, with a painted triangular Stinger logo running under the strings. All had bolt-on maple necks. Guitars had a 25.4″ scale, while the basses were 34″ers.
When I was a kid in the 60s, all of the Japanese brands (probably ALL made by Teisco) had a really bad rap and only kids ended up with them. Some were very cheaply made, with weak metal, thin chrome plating, funky finishes and thin pickups. I owned a Rodeo, which was terrible. But then, who knew much about guitars then? Nowdays, anything has character.
Like the Strat above, the Fender Telecaster shares the title of being one of the most legendary electric guitars ever produced, and owes a lot of its authentic vintage sound to its unique pickups – which are both fantastic and frustrating at times. A Tele will usually feature two single-coils: a smaller one at the neck and a larger, slanted pickup at the bridge. They both deliver a twangy sound, with the bridge offering great treble tone and the neck a little more balanced. The neck pickup’s main complaint is that it is often muffled in output – unless you find a good set such as the Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele Pickup Set, which keeps things crisp and clear.
The 2019 Gibson Les Paul Standard sports a mahogany back with an artisan-grade AAA figured maple top and a mahogany neck with Ultra-Modern weight relief. This chambering technique is provides a solid core through the center of the guitar, retaining the classic Les Paul sound and making the guitar less prone to feedback. The Ultra Modern weight-relieved body also makes playing long sets a breeze. The neck has an asymmetrical Slim Taper neck profile for increased playability and comfort.
Guitar amplifier modeling: Amplifier modeling is a digital effect that replicates the sound of various amplifiers, most often vintage analog "tube" amps and famous brands of speaker cabinets (e.g., the Ampeg SVT 8x10" bass cabinet). Sophisticated modeling effects can simulate different types of speaker cabinets (e.g., the sound of an 8x10" cabinet) and miking techniques. A rotary speaker simulator mimics the doppler and chorus effect sound of a vintage Leslie speaker system by replicating its volume and pitch modulations, overdrive capacity and phase shifts.[95]
Nylon strings are essential for any classical instrument, and if you are planning to play classical music or Latin styles such as flamenco, a nylon string guitar is the way to go. Steel strings are more appropriate for rock, pop, blues, and pretty much everything else that doesn’t fall under the classic umbrella. You can check out our article on the best classical guitars for beginners.

Here we have a well aged Vintage Washburn D12/br from 1989 its a D-18 type with a cedar top and man does this cedar top sound great…it was surprisingly sound and deep for a late 80s it has a mature balanced tone…I like it with its pretty good bass response and all. Its structurally great no cracks and no playability issues what so ever its neck and alignment integrity is also excellent as the action is good and the guitar is as a result easy to play. Cosmetically this guitar has been around the block its no sissy its stood the test of time and its previous owner and still all in all with all its obvious nicks and scratches and various doinks man it looks pretty darn vintage COOL and I loved it I thought you might like it too just take a good look for yourself if your the type that likes a well warn in vintage guitar and you don't really mind that it has some extra character and soul this just may be a guitar you might appreciate….. its own beauty from life playing and enjoying the music experience this guitar has been well loved and played yet it is no where near warn out it has years of life left in her she just wants to really sing for someone and in my assessment she’s ready to be enjoyed for another 30 years or more! Very cool vintage Washburn Dreadnought guitar. Its neck is straight and has the proper relief its Tuners are real good sealed gears and doing an excellent job to this day, This one has the medium slim taper neck with the Diamond volute like the old Martin style…nice touch Washburn. Mahogany Back and sides and neck with rosewood fingerboard its neck width is 1-11/16ths at the nut. This a a well built good player folks if you don’t mind it not being exactly mint cosmetically its actually beautiful in its own vintage appeal. Any questions or to make the purchase you can contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com.
The string is not the only thing that vibrates. The guitar itself vibrates, and how it vibrates depends on the tone wood. The pickups are attached to the guitar and therefore they go along for the ride. In other words they vibrate under the strings which adds to the disruption of the magnetic field. So the environment the pick ups are placed in affects the tone. A good example is Neil Young's Old Blackie, which has an aluminum pick guard on it which gives it a unique.
Ash is a common body material in solid body guitars. It is harder than mahogany and very resonant. This gives the guitar ringing sustain and bright tone with a well-defined mid-range. A light colored wood with attractive grain figuring, it is often given a transparent finish. Swamp ash is a particularly appealing, detailed wood used on higher-end guitars.

I think Washburn is one of the best out there, From their A series, to HM to x series they all rock. I've had a a-10 since 1980 and it plays great! I have also got the reissues still great quality over the years. The only issue I've seen is Washburn's commitment to catch/keep some artist. Either they can't keep um or they don't want to. Can't see it being the later. Its very difficult to try one of their pieces out as their are very few stores that even stock them. In the 80's early 90s they were everywhere, now?
Typically do not use any effects, but have an EQ, Sustain, and Room echo sim in my effects chain with Ampkit on my iPad that I use pretty much 100% of the time, but my goal is clean ,clean, clean. I'm still just a beginner so I am holding off do effects until I at least learn how to play. I play more Jazz then anything else. I even play metal clean so I can hear my technique.
An EQ pedal has been designed to allow you to tune certain parameters of your sound such as the bass, middle and treble frequencies. They are predominantly used by more experienced guitarists who want to add or take away specific bands of sound. These are great for guitarists who want to really boost the treble, bring out the bass or just ensure their guitar signal sounds as flat as possible. The MXR M109S Six band EQ Pedal is one of our favourites.
Every single pickup on this Godin XTSA is awesome in its own right, but the best part of it all is dialing ina combination of the two. By virtue of its quality, it gives plenty of power, possessing a wonderful sounding high end cutting through, which makes it possible for you to hear it over the keyboard and the bass. With this electric guitar, you can get a beautiful acoustic sound and a really fat and great sound as well.
Accompanying the Tempo guitar was the Merson Tempo Guitar-Amp. This was a tube amp with two instrument and one microphone input, heavy-duty 8″ Alnico 5 speaker, volume and tone controls, and a pilot light. The cabinet was covered in two-tone leatherette. The picture is in black-and-white, but the look is remarkably like Premier amps of the time, so a tan and brown color would not be a bad guess. The speaker baffle featured a classical guitar design (!) with “Tempo” written in little circles on the bridge! Substitute a lyre for the classical guitar and you’d swear this was a Premier, made by Manhattan neighbor Multivox, so that might, indeed, be the story there.

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