We make our Tone Bars / Ferrule Blocks (tone slugs) out of 360 brass and use them on most all of our string through custom guitars. You will notice an enhancement in sustain and beauty.  The ones sold here are not polished. Go to shawwoodshop.com to purchase slugs that are polished. Please ask any questions you might have about the Slug. I offer quantity discounts.

The guitar’s ‘shoulders’ – where the body meets the neck joint – will usually be slightly more sloped than you’d see in a classic dreadnought acoustic, while the base of the body will also be narrower than larger sized guitars. All of which makes for a more comfortable and less physically intrusive playing experience. Another obvious benefit of this is the portability of parlour guitars. Their relatively smaller form factor means they lend themselves well to being slung in a case and carted off to gigs with less hassle than, for example, a jumbo-sized acoustic.
In the late 1950s, Guitarist Link Wray began intentionally manipulating his amplifiers' vacuum tubes to create a "noisy" and "dirty" sound for his solos after a similarly accidental discovery. Wray also poked holes in his speaker cones with pencils to further distort his tone, used electronic echo chambers (then usually employed by singers), the recent powerful and "fat" Gibson humbucker pickups, and controlled "feedback" (Larsen effect). The resultant sound can be heard on his highly influential 1958 instrumental, "Rumble" and Rawhide.[17]
SOLD OUT : A real find this one is... not your average vintage Takamine you will soon see its also in amazing original superior condition .. this premium example was hand built by the finest Japanese Luthiers at Takamine Gakki. This prime example is the finest Exotic Brazilian Rosewood we have had in yet and we have had some duzies for sure this true Law Suit era Takamine F375S acoustic guitars we have ever had! wow.. and exact copy of the Genius original Martin design of the D-28 exotic....WoW.. the frets look almost new, Martin bone nut and saddle the "s" stands for solid construction and the Solid Sitka Spruce top is super nice amber with age now over the past 37 years and taken care of this California native guitar exhibits its premium exotic woods very proudly just have a look all round everywhere you look...from the amazing Brazilian rosewood sides & the back is A Gorgeous 3-piece back with intricate inlay work to the premium solid mahogany neck..fit & finish is simply put gorgeous. The neck is nice & straight with a perfect Martin like medium V profile 1-11/16ths @ the nut - the action is very good 3-16th @ 12th fret you can adjust either way to taiste no problem and with the bone nut and saddle this guitar has wonderful tone right up there with the Martin or Yairi this guitar is AAA professional grade vintage and is in 100% condition it is not new or mint with minimal dings its condition is JVG Rated as 9.5 / 10 - excellent vintage = beautiful and exotic... please see the pictures for the cosmetics..these Takamine are built as good or better than the Martin it copies the back is quad braced and the reinforced crossbracing of the top should make this finely built instrument last several lifetimes.. Your looking at the best of the best in Japanese vintage exotic & solid construction in astoundingly nice condition...you simply must play and hear this guitar we love it and so will you.. I can't amagain a cleaner example of this vintage you will not be sorry... exotic Brazilian Rosewood tone woods are the best of the best. No need to spend $3000 or even $5000 or more for such an exotic vintage 40 + year old Martin d28....Find it here Email: gr8bids@comcast.net ..
Here, the brighter/lower-value cap is engaged when the pot’s all the way up. As you roll it back, the larger cap is introduced, producing greater capacitance and a deeper treble cut. When you arrange caps in parallel, their total capacitance is the sum of their values. For example, I tried a .0047µF cap and a .047µF, so the minimum value is .0047µF (a very modest cut) and the maximum is approximately .052µF (a very dark tone).
A selection of makers within the high-end, hand-built crowd of today do offer variations on the opamp-based template discussed above. Blackstone Appliances bases its Mosfet Overdrive on a discrete transistorized circuit centered around, yes, mosfets, and Klon’s Centaur pedal uses… well, who the hell knows? They cover the entire circuit board in epoxy goop to keep the cloners at bay, but this expensive overdrive certainly sounds different. Other popular boutique overdrives are found in the Barber Electronics LTD pedal, the Crowther Audio Hot Cake, and the Fulltone OCD.
I own some 13 or so, high end American, Canadian and/or Japanese 6 strings 7 basses and a full studip of gear and if my opinion means FA then I can't help but not mention my Washburn Custom Shop WV548! It has Parker guitars (famous for the FLY) patented composite glass carbon fiber fretboard, EMG active PU's (81, 85) and a real Floyd with the Buzz Feiten system and it is bar none, the fastest, smoothest, and by far the nicest playing (and sounding for that matter) guitar I own or have played in my some 30 odd years plus, playing electrics.
Martin is a famous America-based company known for is a variety of impressive electric and acoustic guitars. Their guitars are predominantly manufactured in Pennsylvania and Nazareth. The history of Martin guitars dates back to 1833. From then on, Martin has managed to maintain classiness and quality in their guitars to satiate the thirst of pro players in America.
This final trick is pretty cool for live use because these effects are very efficient, which means that you can have several tracks of 'racks' without straining your CPU. Go to the Mixer tab at File/Preferences/Project, and check 'Enable Solo on Selected Track'. Solo a track, and now all you need to do to call up a new sound is select a track, and the Solo will 'move' to that track. The change from one sound to another is instantaneous. Now it's time to amaze your audience!    
Jimmie Vaughan: based on Jimmie’s own ’57 Stratocaster, the Jimmie Vaughan Tex-Mex Strat reflects his deep roots, traditional style, and preferred Strat features. Noteable for it’s alder body, 3 Fender Tex-Mex single-coil pickups, an extra-hot bridge pickup, a special tinted maple 1957-type V-shaped neck with maple fretboard and medium-jumbo frets, vintage machine heads, original Fender synchronized tremolo, and custom tone control wiring. Tone, tone and more tone.
When I first plugged it in, it made a sound like it was "fretting out" if you put a bar at the twelfth fret position. That's a pretty good feat, given that the guitar has no frets. It turned out that someone had cranked up the pole pieces for extra gain, but had cranked them so far that the strings made contact with them when the guitar was played. A quick tweak right in the store with a jeweler's screwdriver sorted them out and revealed the lovely vintage sound of this little beastie. Supro developed a neat strings-through pickup system with staggered pole pieces that this guitar features.

As the name implies, a pickup selector is a toggle switch that controls which pickups are being used. Since most electric guitars have at least two pickups, a pickup selector is a crucial piece of the overall tone of your guitar. Pickup placement will create different tones; thus, switching between the bridge and neck pickups will allow you to change the tone of your guitar. With multiple pickups, there are many pickup selection combinations.
“To extend valve life, turn your amp off after a gig and let it sit for a few minutes before moving it. And vice versa: as soon as you’ve got a power cable to your amp turn the juice on and let it warm up for as long as you can. Tone-wise, you can notice the difference between an amp that’s been turned on for only five minutes and an amp that’s been sitting there [switched on] for 45 minutes.”
ZPS (ZERO POINT SYSTEM) OF ZR TREMOLO Hauptfeder Anschlag Tremoloblock Anschlagstab Bei richtig gestimmter Gitarre stellen Sie die Hauptfeder ein, um sicherzustellen, dass Anschlagstab den Tremoloblock und Anschlag berührt. Wenn der Anschlagstab nicht den Tremoloblock und Anschlag berührt, stellen Sie die Hauptfeder- Einstellschraube ein, bis Kontakt hergestellt ist.

Minnesota Public Television has a wonderful program called Minnesota Original (www.mnoriginal.org)which features artists, artisans and musicians in Minnesota. Recently they did a feature on me and Tim Sparks.  I am very excited and honored.   I hope you will tune in , or at least look at the segment on their web site.  http://www.mnoriginal.org/episode/316-charlie-hoffman-christina-habibi-the-cactus-blossoms/charlie-hoffman/
The Boss GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor is by far the best multi-effects pedal that the team at Boss have ever come up with. This is jam-packed with the entire back catalogue of Boss stomp box effects as well as tones from the coveted "500" series Delay, Modulation and Reverb multi FX pedals. So, you have over 116 types of effects to create music with – making it a no-brainer for Boss fans in general and those who need a huge array of expertly crafted FX.
The FX8 lets you configure up to eight effects per preset, from a list of impressive effects that are modeled from classic to modern stompboxes. It also offers a more traditional work flow via Fractal Audio's "Scenes" mode, which lets you assign effects to footswitches, turning the unit into a virtual stompbox pedalboard. And since it utilizes the same algorithm as their premium processors, you can be sure that each effect model has the same sound quality. Fractal Audio is also known for their boutique like attention to detail and build quality, which is prevalent in the FX8's design. Most notably its footswitches which are designed to have no-mechanical contacts, meaning no noise and improved reliability.
Here’s the thing about acoustic guitars: those that use solid wood command a higher price than those that use laminates for their soundboard. Acoustic guitars that have a solid top are more sturdy and sound better as the wood matures. This is why solid wood models are usually more expensive, and also why they come highly recommended if you want to make a really good investment.
Well, I’m glad you asked. Don’t be fooled by the price and the size of this thing, as it’s a veritable Pandora’s box of effects waiting to be unleashed upon the world. You have over 75 onboard effects to choose from including distortion, compression, modulation, delay and reverb modelled on some of the biggest hitters in the industry, like the Boss DS-1, Metal Zone, Fuzz Face, Big Muff, Pro Co rat and many, many more. The team at Zoom have also thrown in a simulator to allow your guitar to sound like an acoustic.
In late 2013, it was announced that Absara Audio of Port Jefferson Station, New York, had purchased the rights to the Supro trademark from noted electronic engineer Bruce Zinky.[7] Zinky himself had used the Supro name for a series of amps beginning in 2005 from his company, Zinky Electronics. Absara announced in January 2014 that a series of new Supro amps would debut at the Winter 2014 NAMM Show in Anaheim, California.[8] The new Supro amps are cosmetically reminiscent of their progenitors from the 1960s.
A mysterious and unstoppable force threatens the galaxy, the Master Chief is missing and his loyalty questioned. Experience the most dramatic Halo story to date in a 4-player cooperative epic that spans three worlds. Challenge friends and rivals in new multiplayer modes: Warzone, massive 24-player battles, and Arena, pure 4-vs-4 competitive combat.* *Online multiplayer features require Xbox Live Gold membership (sold separately).
To me the easiest way to learn to play songs on the guitar is to learn a few basic chords. You can even start with power chords. It may be helpful to set a goal of learning the I - IV and V chord of a particular key and then learning to transition between those three. In the key of C that would be I = C IV = F and V = G. Once you learn the basic I - IV and V chords and develop the ability to transition between them, you will know how to play all the chords required to play literally thousands of songs.
The first burst of interest in Explorer-style guitars in the 1970s, led by players such as Rick Derringer and Sammy Hagar, was followed by a hiatus at the end of the decade when guitarists followed an Alembic-style lead. However, natural-finished neck-through guitars with sophisticated electronics didn’t cut it with the heavy metal bands that became more popular in the early 1980s with the New Wave of British Heavy Metal and the subsequent American response, chiefly out of Los Angeles. Poofy hair and skin-tight spandex begged for guitars with in-your-face style. The radical Explorer shape was perfect for making the right kind of personal stage statement. Manufacturers jumped on the bandwagon. Baby Deans, Ibanez, Aria, Cort… Even Gibson offered Explorers in cool custom graphics.
JHS distributes them and they get really over the top cheesy reviews in the free magazine "gear" which is really just a JHS catalogue. Their endorsers include lists of "has beens" and "up and coming next big things". Trev Wilkinson no doubt has some good designs but gets more credit than he deserves for some of these copies. I've seen a few in the shops, and they range from not bad looking to absoloubtly terrible. I think they're very inconsistant, some I've picked up had very sharp fret ends. 

What is an Essex? Also who compiled this list? It definitely wasn't guitar professionals. Every guitar maker has top line and then entry level guitars. Top line for those that can play and entry for the beginner who 9 out of 10 stop playing and they don't care that a $60 to $200 mistake lays in the closet for years. Yamaha makes 100's of styles and a lot are great guitars and some stink. It goes with the territory in a very competitive market. This should have been better defined and broken down by cost levels. Because this could have even been titled "The 10 Best Guitar List"
Some guitars incorporate a “blend” of both magnetic and piezo pickups, and others may have one of these options with an internal mic. All nylon string guitars with the option of pickups will always have piezo pickups and/or a built-in mic because there’s no way to sense vibrations from nylon – a non-magnetic material. But, many acoustic electric guitars have steel strings, so what options can you expect with these?
Although most acoustic guitars have steel strings, classical and flamenco guitars use nylon strings. Nylon strings produce a mellower, softer sound. It is a common misconception that a new guitar player should start with nylon strings because they are easier on fingers or easier to play. Nylon strings and steel strings are not interchangeable on the same guitar, so it’s not a matter of progressing from one kind of string to another with experience. What should really drive your decision is what kind of music you want to play.

Players perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the company was taken over by CBS in 1965. As a result, the late-1960s Stratocasters with the large “CBS” headstock and (from the mid 1970s) the 3-bolt necked models (instead of the conventional 4 bolts) with the “Bullet” truss-rod and the MicroTilt adjustment system fell out of fashion. However, many blues-influenced artists of the late 1960s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar’s popularity. Also, so-called ‘pre-CBS’ Stratocasters are, accordingly, quite sought-after and expensive due to the perceived difference in quality even compared with contemporary post-CBS models. In recent times, some Stratocasters manufactured from 1954 to 1958 have sold for more than US$175,000.
Continuing the example of making comparisons of specifications, there are Guilds in this price range that come with all solid woods, a rosewood fretboard, and with built-in tuners. Also, Epiphone Masterbuilt has solid wood acoustics, even some with cedar tops which are highly sought after by finger style players, plus they have a rosewood fretboard, a built-in tuner, two pickups and deluxe tuning machines. Moreover, both of the above guitars sell for less than the Taylor 200 series model you listed. So which is better?

As musicians, we have a staggering amount of information available to us that can help us hone our craft. The hard part is deciding which resources are valuable and which resources aren’t. We’ve all ordered a book off of Amazon that we thought was going to take our playing to the next level only to find out that we could have gotten just as much out of a five minute Google search. Well, not all books are created equal, and you’ve probably not been looking at the right ones.
The Univibe effect was produced to also mimic the sound of the Leslie rotary speaker, but in a slightly different way from the new digital pedals previously mentioned.  They often combine slight amounts of all modulation type effects at the same time to approximate the rotary sound, but became a unique sound of its own.  Some pedals allow some individual tweaking of each modulator, but most typically allow the user to adjust the speed of the Univibe effect.
The kind and quality of woods and other materials, as well as features such as onboard electronics, also figure in the price of a guitar. With a well-built guitar that is made using quality materials, you can be sure to have a sturdy instrument that will last for years, as opposed to a low-end product that you may need to replace because the neck snapped.
Oh, did you say you like lots of switches and pickups and knobbies?  Hell, welcome to our club!  Yes, the Norma 421-4 was the proverbial “king” of the catalog from 1968 to around 1970.  Similar guitars were sold in Japan at this same time, mostly carrying the brand name Liberty.This model was sold alongside a 12 string (EG412-2T) with a tremolo(!!!!!), a bass (EG467-2B), and a two pickup version (EG450-2).  Reading the catalog from 1968 is a real trip!  Here’s the description of the 412-4:
A multi-FX unit is a single effects device that can perform several guitar effects simultaneously. Such devices generally use digital processing to simulate many of the above-mentioned effects without the need to carry several single-purpose units. In addition to the classic effects, most have amplifier/speaker simulations not found in analog units. This allows a guitarist to play directly into a recording device while simulating an amplifier and speaker of his choice.
Sorry This guitar has SOLD OUT! Here is a wonderfully crafted in Japan 000-18 type acoustic guitar by the great Takamine in the prime time of the lawsuit copys made with Pride in Japan long gone these have been discontinued decades ago over the copyrights to this Headstock design and also the logo looks identical to the Old 50s early 60s Martin from a few feet away looks exactly the same, that said this example is like owning a fairly new Vintage it has aged near 40 years yet is still near mint condition w/ nice OHSC.
Early valve amplifiers used unregulated power supplies. This was due to the high cost associated with high-quality high-voltage power supplies. The typical anode (plate) supply was simply a rectifier, an inductor and a capacitor. When the valve amplifier was operated at high volume, the power supply voltage would dip, reducing power output and causing signal attenuation and compression. This dipping effect is known as "sag", and is sought-after by some electric guitarists.[46] Sag only occurs in class-AB amplifiers. This is because, technically, sag results from more current being drawn from the power supply, causing a greater voltage drop over the rectifier valve. In a class-A amplifier, current draw is constant, so sag does not occur.
Hi Timothy, sorry it took a while for me to respond. Yes, from your first statement it sounds like you’ve correctly understood the operation of ‘normal’ guitar pickup selector switches (i.e. standard 3 and 5 position), the wiper contacts overlap as they move across each other. Unfortunately I’ve never seen anything that matches your 4 pick-up idea, if I were you I’d start looking at the 5-position mega switches which have lots of possibilities but can get pretty complicated. Good luck!

Dick Dale is a prominent Stratocaster player, who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 1960s, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin–guitarist for the Shadows, a band that originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was Hank Marvin’s sound that many musicians, including the Beatles, initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster.[citation needed] However, in 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon acquired Stratocasters and used them for Help!, Rubber Soul and later recording sessions; the double unison guitar solo on “Nowhere Man” is played by Harrison and Lennon on their new Stratocasters.[10][11][12][13]
With the ME-80, Boss has made a unit that’s slightly different than a traditional multi-fx unit. Instead of trying to simplify the interface and make it sparse and clean, it’s immediately evident that there are a LOT of knobs on the front of this unit. The ME-80 is trying to mimic the feel of having a pedalboard full of pedals at your fingertips. This is good, because us guitar players love pedals for exactly that reason - you can just look down at them, twist some knobs, and your tone changes. Instant gratification! Not many guitarists we know like to scroll through endless menus and read text on a tiny screen, much less have to read the user manual cover to cover to understand how to work our gear. We want to twist a knob or two, and we want to play!
Gretsch aggressiveness in the entry level market is at an all time high, churning out a wide selection of affordable alternatives to many of their premium guitar models. Continuing this theme is the Gretsch G5426 Jet Club, which is essentially a more affordable stop-tail piece version of the Electromatic Pro Jet Bigsby above. It features the same chambered body and high quality looks but with a basic humbucker and without a Bigsby.

Electri6ity is frequently compared to Musiclab’s real electric guitar line as they came out around the same time, and while Musiclab delivers better quality in most aspects, you only have one guitar per VST - where Electri6ity has eight. However,  while Electri6ity will give you twice as many guitars for the price, Musiclab continues to update their Real line, now blowing Electri6ity out of the water.
Modern electric guitars most commonly have two or three magnetic pickups. Identical pickups produce different tones depending on location between the neck and bridge. Bridge pickups produce a bright or trebly timbre, and neck pickups are warmer[when defined as?] or more bassy. The type of pickup also affects tone. Dual-coil pickups sound warm, thick, perhaps even muddy[citation needed]; single-coil pickups sound clear, bright, perhaps even biting[citation needed].

In 1967, McCartney gave his 4001 a psychedelic paint job, as seen in the promo film for Hello Goodbye, and in the Magical Mystery Tour film.[7] A year or so later the finish was sanded off; a second over-zealous sanding in the early 1970s removed the “points” of the bass’ cutaways. McCartney predominantly used the Rickenbacker bass during his time with Wings, until the late 1970s.

Hollow: Although a bit more rare than the previous two, it may be exactly what you’re looking for if it fits your style. Hollow body electric guitars sound a lot like acoustic guitars, giving us that brighter sound but having trouble with higher volumes since feedback is likely to occur (especially in medium to higher volumes). It has a round and full tone with great bass response, giving jazz players a big grin when they hear it.
The Marshall CODE412 - 4x12 Speaker Cabinet is a powerful monster designed as a companion to your CODE 100 head. A classic angled cabinet that is packed with four 12” speakers, each with a 30-watt output. This extremely affordable 4x12 amplifier cab is perfect for those in need of a high-quality option for their set up, whether you have a CODE or not. A single input makes it easy to plug and play and the 24kg weight ensures you won’t break your back carrying it to practice. It’s also Marshall’s most affordable friendly speaker cabinet, making it a great choice for those on a budget.
(Book). Backbeat's successful Handbook format applied to the world's most popular instrument. The Electric Guitar Handbook is the latest entry in Backbeat's best-selling handbook series, combining a two-part book and an audio CD in a practical lay-flat binding for ease of reference when playing. Part one of the book examines how different types of electric guitars are made, and why varying construction methods influence the way guitars sound. It also looks at the role of various pieces of guitar hardware, including pick-ups, tremolo set-ups, and bridges. Part two is a comprehensive, user-friendly course in playing the electric guitar, from the basics of posture and hand positioning to music and tab reading and advanced performance. Newly written exercises presented in the book and also on the accompanying CD take the learner through each step in the process, covering styles including rock, country, blues, soul/funk, indie/alternative, and metal. Author Rod Fogg also offers practical advice on everything from simple scales to complex chords, alongside short features introducing key performers and styles.

Particularly if you want to get into recording and production, this Blackstar model is ideal. With six distinct “voices” from Clean Warm to OD2, as well as 12 stereo effects, there is a huge range of tones and options to play with. Together with the patented ISF control it allows for a nuanced choice of timbres, allowing you to immerse into exactly the sound you are after in gloriously deep Super Wide Stereo.

There is no such thing as a best amplifier. It's all about what kind of music you want to play and what sort of sounds are in your head trying to get out. Different amplifiers have different characteristics. Some have amazing cleans, some are known for their heavy distortions, some take pedals very well, some are built trying to be a "jack of all trades."  Only way to know what amp is best for you is to plug in and try them out. Try to "A-B" them,  trying one amplifier and then plugging into another immediately after with the same settings, playing the same thing. It will give you a good idea about how their characteristics differ. If you have favorite pedal effects that you  know that you're going to want to use, make sure you try those two.  Petals can sound quite different going into various amplifiers.
There are a couple of important things to look out for when buying an acoustic guitar for the first time, one of which being plastic hardware – especially if it’s used on the bridge or the tuning pegs. Unless you are paying less than a hundred dollars for the instrument, there’s no reason why a good beginner guitar should have a plastic bridge or saddles, which aren’t particularly durable and do nothing for the instrument’s tone or sustain.
The diagram on the left shows you the fretboard on the guitar, with the thickest string on the left, and the E high string on the right. The numbers over the frets tell you where to press the string. At the top of the chart, you see an X or a 0 in near the strings. The X tells you to mute the string (not play it at all), the 0 tells you to play it open, without pressing any frets. So, in order to play the A chord as shown in the diagram, you should:
Paul Reed Smith is a relative newcomer having been born just 2 years after the Stratocaster was created, and founding PRS Guitars in 1985, but in that relatively short period of time PRS have made a huge impact on the guitar world, have been used by the likes of Carlos Santana, Ted Nugent, Dave Navarro. and Mark Tremonti, are now the 3rd biggest electric guitar manufacturer in the USA, and have earned their place among the best electric guitar brands.
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The Hummingbird Pro is a distinctive square shoulder dreadnought acoustic electric. This lack of cutaway does have some playability disadvantage, but what it does mean is that the tonal quality is absolutely amazing throughout the entire range. Whatever sound you want to get out of the Hummingbird, you can, and the excellent L.R. Baggs Element pickup does a great job of translating that to an electrical signal.

The Indiana Thin Body Acoustics give you all the sonic punch you need but in a more compact body size. Starting with a spruce top that's matched to mahogany back and sides, the I-TB2 Series were created for acoustic players that find that a traditional dreadnought body size is a bit too bulky. Having a tighter profile gives these guitars and almost electric guitar feel and they're perfect for the stage or studio. Great action and playability right out of the box! An on-board 3 band EQ gives you total control at the touch of a button and all players love the extended cutaway for upper fret access. Sealed diecast tuners, nickel silver frets, gold hardware, high gloss finish and 10 Year Warranty make the Indiana Thin Body Acoustic series a great alternative for any player.

For more balanced tone and increased sound quality, the Agile AL-3010 comes with two tone and two volume controls, plus three-way pickup switch.The guitar comes with professionally installed strings sitting tight on an ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets and solid abalone trapezoid inlays. This gorgeous guitar is highly recommended for the beginner and even the professional alike.
The Truetone Rock Star has a classic 1960s Fender Jaguar - inspired body with a cherry & black sunburst finish and swank natural wood grain finish neck. The headstock has an odd, but killer-looking shape, an elaborately cut pick guard and what might be the world's coolest pickup; a chrome-cased body with a shimmery red marblized pickup cover. The guitar is 100% original with no replacement parts. We  rescued this one a while back and it was rusty and did not work when first tested. We meticulously detailed and cleaned it and removed the rust. We also re-soldered a few wires inside, and this fab Japanese guitar was ready to rock again. It sold and was shipped France, and the Rock Star is pretty rare, but there are lots of cool retro Truetone / Silvertone Japanese Guitars for sale below! Scroll Down for more from our collection!
In order to achieve supreme neck grip comfort, the fretboard edge is finished with a smooth curve that extends from the border between the fretboard and the neck, and then to the surface of the fretboard. The detailed neck shape is precisely carved using a ball mill for ultimate consistency. The width measurements of the fretboard are at 42mm at the nut and 56.4mm at the last fret. These dimensions allow for an easy grip in the lower register, and a more modern feel in the higher register.
The volume knob can act as a boost which can take your guitar from clean sounds for rhythm playing to dirty overdrive tones for soloing. When playing a song keep your volume knob at 6 or 7 when playing chords or verse parts and when it’s time to deliver a rockin’ solo roll up the volume to 10 and you will not only hear a boost of gain (overdrive) but also a volume lift over any other instruments in the song.
Launch price: $1,949 / £1,639 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 21 | Pickups: 3x Pure Vintage '65 Gray-Bottom Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge/middle tone | Hardware: Pure Vintage 6-saddle Synchronized vibrato, Pure Vintage Single Line 'Fender Deluxe' tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Olympic White, 3-Color Sunburst, Candy Apple Red
Description: Body: Mahogany - Top Wood: Maple - Quilted - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 5 Piece - Fingerboard: Maple - Frets: 24 - Inlay: None - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 27" (69cm) - Headstock: 7 In-Line, Reverse - Bridge: Floyd Rose Style Locking Tremolo - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: EMG 707 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Tribal Purple, Black flame, Tribal Green, Blue Quilt, Satin Natural, Blue Flame

Japanese classical guitarist Shiro Arai founded the Arai Co. in the 1950s as an international importing company, which expanded to manufacturing in the 1960s adopting the "Aria" brand name. The explosion in popularity of the electric guitar in the 1960s led them to begin manufacturing and distributing several different brands, Lyle being one of them. Arai attended the NAMM trade show and saw many of the American guitar designs that had attained popularity in the U.S. This greatly influenced Arai to produce similar models.


Of all the guitars in the world, this ends up as number 42!?! OK, amateurs, time to tell the truth, these guitars are the best, simply flawless and amazing. Don't talk about your Yamahas or your Ibanez or even Fender for that case! Those are just decent guitars. You will fall in love with the John Petrucci models; they have clobbered, I mean nearly humiliated Gibson. Try these, then think again.
If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.

The stompswitches take a couple stomps to cut on. There also some tape residue around the led lights where someone covered them. But its not a huge issue for reverb considering that the way I play, I always have a little reverb on to add texture and presence to my tone. Also, if you have a pedal switch looper that you can run all your pedals through it can stay always on that way too. But I'm going set the bidding price lower just because they don't work 100% properly and the tape residue. Other than the issue with the stompswitches the effect works great. Just clarify, you have to stomp on the switch 2 or 3 times and it cuts on.
Semi-hollow designs are similar to hollow-body guitars, but typically feature a thinner body with a central wooden block inside. This helps to control feedback while giving the instrument some of the same tonal characteristics as a hollow-body. This type of guitar has been used successfully in just about every genre of music, with the exception of extreme metal.
Shop Hourly Rate is $60.00 per hour. Since each guitar is unique, prices quoted are estimates and may be adjusted based on actual time involved. A final price will be submitted prior to actual work and price may need to be adjusted in the case of repairs that get more involved as the work progresses. (Please see the article on the 1975 Gibson Hummingbird for a good example of this.)
The envelope filter is also known as an auto-wah.  It functions sonically like a wah-wah pedal but uses the strength of the signal to control the sweep of the frequency.  Typically, control knobs allows the player to set the amount of wah to interact with picking, so that the guitarist can dynamically control the effect without using a rocker to engage the filtering.
The fuzz pedal is one of the earliest stomp boxes on the market. A very simple circuit the fuzz box altered the guitar’s signal by transforming it into a square wave. The first widely available fuzz was the Maestro Fuzz Tone by Gibson. The Fuzz Tone pedal was released in 1962 and didn’t really catch on until Keith Richards used one on the opening riff of “Satisfaction” and the floodgates opened. Another definitive fuzz pedal of the late 1960’s was the Sola Sound Tone Bender made famous by Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page.
If you haven't tried a higher end Yairi then you have missed it. These are great hand crafted guitars with a very good neck and great sound. They are branded Alverez in the US but be sure it is one of the Yairi made. There are not lots of them made due the the complete hand crafted design. You don't find them in the music stores much but they should be there. I have owned one for many years and have yet to pick up any other guitar that can match it in my opinion
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Volume pots don’t attenuate all frequencies consistently. Treble gets attenuated faster which results in treble loss when volume is rolled down. Treble bleed circuits (or bright caps) are there to compensate for treble loss and make guitar sound at lower volume as close as possible to sound with volume maxed. There are several different treble bleed circuits used or recommended by guitar/pickup manufacturers. What’s common between them is that they are installed across guitar volume pot (input and output lug).

There is clearly a great deal that the guitarist can do for the sound by changing guitars, strings and amps, but from the perspective of the recording engineer it's also important to think about how the guitar cab is interacting with the room it's in. For example, Roy Thomas Baker mentions that he sometimes sets up the same guitar cab in different rooms because of the effect on the sound. Even if you're restricted to one room, a number of producers suggest trying out different positions of the amp in the room. Tony Visconti: "It's not so much that you're miking a guitar — you're miking a guitar in a room. I had a cellist in here recently, and I moved her until I got a good sound. Once I put her in one particular corner, her cello just sang — the room just filled up with the low end, and the sound exploded! A person who hasn't had years of experience might not have thought of doing that, but I could tell there was something lacking when she was in the centre of the room. That's mic technique. It's not so much the instrument; the room is very much part of the sound."

At that time European craftsmen operated under the guild system. The guitar (in its modern form) was a relatively new instrument, and most guitar makers were members of the Cabinet Makers’ Guild. The Violin Makers’ Guild claimed exclusive rights to manufacture musical instruments. The Violin Makers’ Guild filed appeals on three occasions – the first in 1806 – to prevent cabinet makers from producing guitars. Johann Martin is mentioned in a surviving submission dated 1832.
Thats a major bend of opinions! It all boils down to..the style of music that you play and what you expect out of the guitar! Is playing only a hobby or are you trying to make a living bangin that Ax? The price of a guitar is not as important as the ability of the person strumming the strings! If your abilitys suck,and you have a expensive guitar..You Still Suck..No matter how good the guitar may be! I have owned cheep and expensive guitars of all different brand names..some very good..some very bad..bottom line is..if Your happy with the AX,thats all that matters! Screw the Name or the Price!!
I know that you are used to seeing things like “the number 1, the number 2” etc. When it comes to stomp boxes I believe that I do not have to be that strict. If I am recommending 8 different pedals to you, then there is no 1st and 8th position. All of the pedals that we will review are worth checking out. If it is bad, we will just skip it. Never forget that you can combine your pedal with a good guitar amp with some built-in effects. Also if you do not see a specific model or brand, it does not necessarily mean it is bad, the market is just huge and very competitive, updating will take time!
Rule 1 – There are no rules. The sound you’re after might not be made by what we could call the appropriate or logical signal path, but that’s not always the issue. The issue is this: what does it sound like? If it makes the sound you’re after, then it’s right…although, you may have to do something about the noise. Traditional pedal board arrangements were designed for certain reasons, and keeping the noise down is one biggie. Following the principles of how sound is made in physical space is another (see Rule 4 coming up). But the final choice is yours. As a very wise man said: if it works, don’t fix it.
The best place to start is with a small tube amp. This kind of amp is far less forgiving, leaving you nowhere to hide. It sounds counter-intuitive, I know. You’re looking for the best choice and here I am telling you one that will make things more difficult. But think of it as tough love – forcing you to confront your technique and learn the right way to play a chord or scale progression.
Is there any particular reason you're opposed to Kontakt libraries? All of the plugins you mentioned are sample-based themselves, with the notable weakness that you would not be able to change the mapping, grouping, programming (etc), unlike with Kontakt. As someone who uses a lot of virtual instruments, I'd say it's always preferable to have a sample-based instrument in an open sampler plugin since you can see what's going on under the hood and change things like envelopes as needed.
Indeed, a little bit of bow is OK. In fact that's what we're doing when we make sure there's a gap of approximately 0.012” at the 8th fret. But as mentioned in the article, this is personal choice; some people prefer a bigger gap here, some like less, but 0.012” is usually a good starting point. As for buzzing, some people are OK with a little bit. Mostly as long as it isn't heard through the amp, a little bit is acceptable. Again, it's all down to personal choice.

An electric guitar can last many lifetimes; however, they have a variety of electrical parts and connections that, over time, can wear out. When that happens, you need to know how to fix or replace those electronics. The following are the parts that are most likely to wear out or break and need replacing. You can perform any of these fixes yourself without doing damage to the electric guitar — even if you screw up.
Some resonator guitars possess metal bodies and these are called steel guitars. This can lead to some confusion with the Hawaiian guitar of the same name. They are two distinct instruments. The Hawaiian steel guitar takes its name from the steel bar used to create the glissandi and the Resonator steel guitar refers to the material used for the construction of the body.
By the late 1950s, the Les Paul was considered “staid and old-fashioned” as well as too heavy and expensive, no longer competitive with the Stratocaster, and by 1961 Gibson stopped producing the traditional Les Paul in favor of a lighter redesign called the SG. The mid-1960s, however, brought a resurgence of interest in the Les Paul, a development credited to one man and one album: Eric Clapton, using a Les Paul plugged into a Marshall Bluesbreaker amplifier as recorded on Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton (the “Beano” album, 1966),[13] set the standard for tone for a new generation of guitar players in blues and rock and roll (see Keith Richards’ contribution to the Les Paul legend below in the section ‘Renewed interest in the Les Paul models’ below). [14][15] Clapton was initially followed by American guitarist Michael Bloomfield and British guitarist Peter Green, and the subsequent rise in the instrument’s popularity was such that by the late 1960s Gibson reintroduced an updated Les Paul and a variety of other instruments “in its mold”, including a bass guitar.

The Thunderhead guitars would be offered until June of ’72, with several model designation changes along the way. In ’70, the K-1360 became the K-1213, and in May of the following year changed again to the K-1233. At the same time, the vibrato-equipped models also changed, the K-1460 becoming the K-1214 and then the K-1234. The Tornado lasted until the end in January, ’73, but also went through the model number changes along with the Thunderheads, the K-1160 becoming the K-1211 and then the K-1231. The vibrato Tornados went from K-1260 to K-1212 and then K-1232.
You can simulate any sound of three pickup guitar with two pickup guitar and vice versa, the only problem is getting it with proper wiring or customizing it. Even they will not sound the same may be close enough for your application or even better. And don't forget about potentiometers problem. The 250K potentiometer will cut some frequencies from humbuckers while 500K make singles brighter than they are by default. It may be not a problem or critical to choosing favorite tone :D

Fawned over by hard rock-loving guitarists the world over, Marshall is one of the few amplification brands that really needs no introduction. And if you’re looking for aggressive, overdriven rock – this amp is one of the best beginner’s options. What makes this one really special, however, is the sheer number of sound-shaping options it gives you – thanks to its ability to model a whopping 14 MST preamps, 4 MST power amps, and 8 MST speaker cabinets. That’s 448 possible combinations, if you’re keeping score. You can even connect it to your computer via USB or use it as a Bluetooth speaker. If versatility is your top concern (it probably should be), look no further.
Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!
Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)

Learning how to play guitar on an acoustic style guitar brings about the benefit of forcing you to learn better habits at the beginning rather than unlearning them later, which is exponentially harder to do, because they're a bit more unforgiving about hiding your errors, especially because you won't be hiding behind a string of distortion and reverb pedals.
Ostentatious Delays: If you're making very rhythmic music of any kind, it makes sense to use tempo-sync'd delays, to avoid undermining the main pulse. However, simple tempo-sync'ed delays tend to be masked by the main rhythmic stresses, so they sink into the background of the mix unless mixed very high in level, which makes it difficult to create ostentatious delay effects in rhythmic music without swamping your mix. One solution to this problem, very common in trance music, is to set a delay to a three-16th-note duration, which means that although the delay repeats never step outside the 16th-note grid, they'll often miss the main beats and therefore remain clearly audible. Mike Senior
I bought my amp at my local music store. When I walked in, I told the sales person that I got my El Dorado and I wanted to buy an amp. I asked him if he would mind playing my guitar through the amps in my price range. He readily agreed because he is the person who found Big Lou Guitars on the internet after I tried every brand of electric guitar in the store and believed I needed a big nut guitar because my hands needed an action with more space between the frets and strings. He told me to bring it in when I got it because he wanted to try it. He plugged it in and went up, down, and across the fretboard playing riffs and chords. When he finished, he said “great action, I’m surprised – and the price!”

To preserve the clarity of the tone, it is most common to put compression, wah and overdrive pedals at the start of the chain; modulation (chorus, flanger, phase shifter) in the middle; and time-based units (delay/echo, reverb) at the end. When using many effects, unwanted noise and hum can be introduced into the sound. Some performers use a noise gate pedal at the end of a chain to reduce unwanted noise and hum introduced by overdrive units or vintage gear.[12]
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*When the item leaves our warehouse, they are generally shipped to EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service and it would usually take 7 – 10 days to United States. We ship our products from Mainland China where our manufacturing factory is located. We will inform you once your order has been shipped and we will be providing you with the tracking number so you can conveniently monitor the shipments progress on EMS Worldwide Express Mail Service website or SF Express and USPS and Parcel Force website.
Two full steps down from normal tuning. Used by bands such as Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss, Sleep, Spiritual Beggars, In Flames (until Clayman), The Black Dahlia Murder, Asking Alexandria on Reckless and Relentless, Bring Me The Horizon, Architects, First Signs of Frost, Dismember, Dethklok, Immolation, High on Fire, Cold, Dream Theater, Arch Enemy (since the Angela Gossow era), Entombed, Amaranthe, Nails, Cataract, and The Smashing Pumpkins.
The guitar, however, appears to be in better shape than the guitar maker. While in the past decade, sales of the electric guitar have fallen from 1.5 million to 1 million, according to the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) a total of 2.6 million guitars, including both acoustic and electric guitars, were sold in the U.S. last year, 300,000 more than in 2009.
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I've had an Ovation Celebrity for over 5 years. Great action, wonderful sound with or without an amp. Stays in tune. Play anything from classical to rock. The Ovation can do it. The sound is unique, so making it your only guitar may not work if your in a band. If you're a beginner, the string tension is really low so it's easy on your fingers. It is a hollow body accoustic, but it plays like an electric. I've owned and still own several guitars. This is the one I reach for the most.
While the number of effects may not be as many compared to recent releases, others don't have the same deep control and sound quality that the GT-100 provides. Speaking of control, instead of merely choosing your preferred amp, this processor lets you custom build your virtual amp and cabinet, an interesting feature that allows for even more freedom in crafting your own tones. Another feature that users are fond of is the ability to assign effects into its many footswitches, making the unit behave much like a regular pedalboard. Other notable features include polyphonic tuning and USB recording.
For metal there are few better performers than this menacing guitar from Schecter; the signature model of Avenged Sevenfolds lead guitarist Synyster Gates. From the pinstripe double-cutaway mahogany body emerges a hugely-playable thin C-shaped mahogany set neck with ebony fretboard, 24 extra-jumbo frets, and Schecters Ultra-Access construction to allow unhindered access to the highest of frets.
Just like in a conventional guitar, an electric guitar also has 6 strings with tuning knobs and frets. However, unlike the hollow body and cavity of an acoustic guitar, a solid body usually forms the lower part of an electric guitar. The long neck of the electric guitar consists of magnetic pickups, parts which produce the magnetic field and which are located just below the metal strings. The magnetic pickups are connected to the amplifier with an internal electrical circuit. The long neck of an electric guitar also consists of knobs for adjusting the elasticity of metal strings.
A variation on Drop E, A with the G flattened one half step to F♯; this tuning is identical to 6-string Drop A, with two E strings added: one above, and one below. Like Drop E, A; this tuning allows easy fingering on the E since it is a standard fourth interval below the A. It also provides three high strings a fourth apart instead of the usual two. The tuning is used by Infant Annihilator on their album The Elysian Grandeval Galèriarch. A 7-string variation of the tuning without the high E (E-A-E-A-D-F♯-B) was used on their previous album The Palpable Leprosy of Pollution and is used by Enterprise Earth/Delusions of Grandeur guitarist Gabe Mangold.
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“If Gibson offers two pickups, let’s have three!”  This simple statement by Leo began a revolution in sound for electric guitarists by offering 3 single coil pickups instead of the usual 2 humbucking pickups that Gibson offered players.  These lower output pickups provided a thinner sound, but with more tonal variants.  Players could now have clear chunky rhythm tones alongside cutting trebly lead tones, while the inclusion of the middle pickup gave players access to the “spongy quack” distinctive of the Stratocaster’s “in between” positions.
This is a product of Colorado USA, every detail of this guitar was hand painted with waterproof organic non led based paint. It is brand new fully functional acoustic guitar. Become the center of attention on your party with this beautifull vibrant instrument. Perfect for a present (Christmas, Valentine, or b-day) for your loved one, family or a friend. Come in to the magic world of music with this beautifull hand painted acoustic guitar. Fill the positive energy of Marcy's artistic story through your song.  The artist Marcy Snow all the way from Colorfull Colorado presents you this unique hand painted acoustic guitar .
The compressions, delays, and modulation effects are super solid, and unless your friends or audience are ultimate tone nerds, nobody will be questioning the quality of those. One particularly cool delay effect that owners of the ME-80 say is a big deal is the TERA ECHO, which if purchased by itself would cost you around $150. The amp modeling is decent quality, perhaps slightly better than what you get on a Zoom multi-effect, but not quite as nice as a Line 6.
Daron Malakian (b. 1975) is the lead guitarist for System of a Down. During the System of a Down era, Daron played IC200's and IC300's on stage. During the Toxicity era, Malakian played a variation of the Ibanez Iceman ICX, with custom artwork designed by his father, then a special edition "DMM1" was released by Ibanez. The DMM1 featured more artwork by Malakian's father, Vartan Malakian (b. 1947). After using Gibson guitars for 5 years, Daron switched back to Ibanez and began using an Iceman again.
Primarily, reverb pedals tend to give you a lot more variety and control over the effect than you'll have with an amplifier. In fact, most amps that have reverb will have a single reverb knob that you turn up for more of the effect, or down for less. This can work if you use reverb sparingly, but if you're into the effect and like to use it a lot, that's not enough control to really get the most out of your reverberated tone.
I have no idea what the set measurement is for the Authentics, and if it is any different than other guitars. Probably not. But guitars settle during their initial acclimation period and the exact bow of the neck and arch of the top can change. Actually it is almost certain to change some. There have been reports of all sorts of Martins with action reaching up near or over the maximum height within spec. But the same holds rue from brand of guitar that uses organic materials like solid wood.
An instant classic, and an easy guitar song that offers a simple, repeated section of just a handful of dyads, or two-note chords. It is one of the most recognizable guitar riffs of all time and it’s great for beginners to learn. The entire section is played with just two notes per chord, and it’s a progression that keeps your fretting hand in just a single section of the neck. Once you learn this riff, it’ll be tough to stop, since it sounds so good, and it’s easy to play. 

Some of the energy is not translated to string movement because it is lost. Where? To the body. Dependant on hardware and body composition, certain amounts of frequencies are absorbed by the body and therefore lost to be seen by the pickups. Body resonance is the OPPOSITE of what most people think. Those prevalent frequencies you hear ringing out of the wood are now unavailable to be transferred to the pickups. Remember, we can't create energy, only move it around. If a guitar is prominent in specific frequencies, it is only because other frequencies have been "removed" to make them stand out.

This is my new, energetic positive corporate music track with confident bright mood, which contains happy optimistic piano and synth solo, driving electric guitars, drums and live bass. This track can be used as a motivational musical background for business websites, computer games, tv or radio jingles, advertising and commercial youtube video, etc. Enjoy!

There have been a series of the Boss RV pedals, some of which have included delay as part of the package. The RV-6 doesn't brand as a reverb/delay pedal, but it does have a "+Delay" mode that incorporates it into the reverb's decay trail. While it doesn't quite meet the same decorated feature list as the HOF (no true bypass, no analog signal, less modes) the RV-6 does add an expression pedal option, which gives you some added flexibility that might be more helpful in performance situations.
By the way, if you like older Japanese guitars, you must obtain a copy of Mr. Noguchi’s book, ’60s Bizarre Guitars (Guitar Magazine Mooks, Rittor Music). It is lusciously printed in color and, while the text is in Japanese, model names and dates are in English, so it is an invaluable reference tool, as well as a fun coffee table book. Some of the following information on specific guitars comes from this source, as well as catalogs and other research materials kindly provided by dedicated guitar fans in both the U.S. and Japan. It’s virtually impossible to reconstruct a comprehensive chronology, but we will attempt to document some broad-brush details and periods of what guitars we can, and with luck you’ll be able to search out and identify your favorite Teiscos with much greater authority. Your corrections and additions are most welcome!
If you have your heart set on a Stratocaster, but can’t justify shelling-out $600 or more for the USA-made Standard Strats, the Squier Standard Stratocaster is a great place to start. Unlike the even cheaper Strats that are included with Fender’s “starter packs,” this guitar is a definite step-up in quality and features a more modern take on their traditional bridge. I personally prefer this bridge style over Fender’s traditional/vintage 6-screw bridges.
@Danny – As an EQ is used to filter and tweak the tone of the signal passing through it, this can be placed anywhere in the chain. For example, if you want to tweak the overall sound before the amplifier, place the EQ at the end of the signal chain. If you want to adjust the tone of your guitar before it hits your effects pedals, place the EQ at the front of your signal chain. It just depends on what you are planning on doing with the EQ and where in the signal chain it sounds best to you.
Acoustic necks are usually listed as 12- or 14-fret necks. This number refers to the number of frets above the guitar body, not the total number of frets. On a 12-fret neck, the 13th and 14th frets will be on the body, and, thus, harder to reach than on a 14-fret neck, where they are extended beyond the guitar body. If you have small hands, look for an acoustic guitar with a smaller diameter neck.
The display borrows a lot of its design cues from Guitar Hero—which is probably a good thing, since so many players are already familiar with that system. Like GH, Rocksmith has vertical columns to show you which frets to hold, and the notes move toward you until they reach a line that represents the moment you're supposed to play them. However, GH's display didn't need to move since there were only five buttons. Because it has to span the entirety of an actual guitar neck, Rocksmith's display floats up and down. If you're playing primarily notes between the fourth and seventh frets, for example, it will show you just those frets on the screen, then slide up to the 10th or 11th when it's time for you to play those.
The sounds of the electric guitar made it to outer space. In 1977, both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were launched into space with remnants of international life and culture onboard. On each vessel was a gold-plated phonograph record with 115 sounds and images curated by a team led by astronomer Carl Sagan. Along with selections that included the likes of Bach and Beethoven, Sagan decided to throw in – however controversial it was at the time – Johnny B Goode by Chuck Berry, an American rock’n’roll anthem defined by its rollicking electric guitar lick.
MusicPCB.com – offers PCB projects to build guitar and bass effects, and synth modules. All PCBs are professionally manufactured, and include soldermask, a silkscreened component legend, and plated through holes and pads. They are designed to be easy to build, provide simple and clean wiring, to work well with your other pedals, modules, and instruments, and most of all to sound great and provide sounds and features not available in commercial designs. Each PCB comes with a PDF document with wiring diagram, schematic, build notes, and large modding sections with details on how to perform a variety of mods to tailor the design to your needs/taste.

If you love the Telecaster look and sound, then here’s a great entry level Tele for beginners. In fact, “entry level” really doesn’t do this Telecaster justice. I’ve considered buying this exact model for myself–for times when I need to record some true single coil tones. If country twang is your thing, this is the guitar to get started with. But the Telecaster isn’t a one-trick pony. Plenty of rock (and even metal) players have used Telecasters over the years. Swap that bridge pickup with a single coil-sized humbucker and you’ve got a guitar that can do rock and metal with the best of ’em.


Dimebag Darrell first discovered this guitar master while he was working in a club in Colleen, Texas. King was 17 and Darrell was 15. "They played and blew me away," King says. So he asked if the aspiring guitar legend needed help breaking down his guitar. It was the beginning of a working friendship that lasted until Dime's untimely death in 2004. Learning from another guitar master, Walt Treichler of Rotting Corpse, is what put this guy at the top of the extended family's list for repair answers. He also studied with Floyd Rose at a guitar show, learning everything there is to know about the Floyd Rose tremolo. "There's nothing better than the original thing Floyd came up with," he says. King is the kind of guitar doctor who makes house calls; but he's not accepting any new clients unless you're part of his extended family of musicians. "If I know 'em, and they need work on their guitar, I'll help 'em out."


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I've owned and played Martin, Ovations, Fender, and Gretsch acoustics but none has thrilled me more than the Breedlove Concert Pursuit with cedar top. The tone is definitely different - so balanced and the midrange really shines. Absolute joy to play despite this is not their top line. Not so much a strumming guitar - shines when finger picked. Last but not least, the tone when plugged in is so deep and warm it astounded me. Far better than the others I've had.
Scale Length – Scale length of a guitar refers to the length of the strings and it is measured from the nut to the bridge. Guitars with longer scale length have tighter string tension with a brighter tone and well-defined low end. Guitars with shorter scale length have less string tension which allows easier bending of the strings and it offers warmer tones.
The problem of the recent Gibson bashing is well-founded. There were quality issues over the last maybe 15 years. The thing is that a Gibson is still a dream for a lot of people. They get better and giving themselves a present after putting money away. Then, after several years, maybe decades of anticipation they get crappy quality for several thousand dollars. The brand is alive, they can bounce back, but the managment...instead of the elevator, they should take the japanese business shortcut. As soon as the quality and passion is back, people will love to buy one. Hope they'll get back on track before 2020. - MountainGoat
The Fender Stratocaster born in the early 1950's in Southern California, and more precisely in Fullerton, near Los Angeles, hometown of the Fender(tm) Musical Instrument Co. Since it's official debut in early 1954, the Fender Stratocaster(tm) has proved to be possibly the most successful electric guitar ever manufactured. Quite a legend in it's own right! The Strat(tm) - as it is affectionately known has to be acknowledged as one of the major landmarks in the history of the guitar. It enjoys a popularity undiminished by time and changing fashions and remains quite clearly a firm favourite among many generations of players, no matter what their style of music....... Fender Stratocaster 'Tex Mex' Jimmie Vaughan signature model - $999
Rickenbacker is another famous American brand created in 1931 to build Hawaiian guitars, called "Frying pans" due to their typical shape. The brand incorporated guitars to its catalog a bit later. The models created by Roger Rossmeisl (Combo 4000 guitar, 4000 bass), a former Gibson collaborator and future Fender man in the 1950's, enjoyed a lot of success and became the brand's most typical designs. The 360, 370, 620, 660, and 4003 models can be connected to a Rick-O-Sound unit (a box with two mono outs) via a stereo 1/4" jack, which allows the two or three pickups to feed different amps. Most instruments have a dual truss rod and a varnished rosewood fretboard. Their distinctive jangle and chime emphasizes high frequencies, giving pretty good results with clean sounds. The Beatles, and especially John Lennon, often played Rickenbacker guitars at the dawn of their careers. Tom Petty, The Jam and R.E.M. are also Rickebacker users.
The Yamaha's top is constructed of Sitka spruce, a “strong yet elastic” wood that helps the player articulate tone and dynamics. The neck is made of Nato wood, and the back and fretboard are both made of rosewood. One of the best things about the Yamaha's neck and body is the way the two are joined together: via a hand-fitted, dovetail neck joint that uses no metal hardware. This neck-to-body cohesion is ideal for tone as well as the overall stability and durability of the physical instrument.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.
Launch price: $1,427 / £999 | Body: Mahogany with maple cap | Neck: 3-piece mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Ebony | Frets: 24 | Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB humbucker, Seymour Duncan Jazz humbucker (EMG 81/60 reviewed) | Controls: 2x volume, tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: EverTune bridge, Grover tuners | Left-handed: Yes (without EverTune) | Finish: See Thru Black, Dark Brown Sunburst

Overdrive distortion is the most well known of all distortions. Although there aren't many electronic differences between a distortion an overdrive, the main audible one is that a distortion does exactly as the name suggests; distorts and clips the signal no matter what volume is going through it, the amount of distortion usually remains relatively the same. This is where an overdrive differs. Most overdrives are built to emulate the sound of a tube amp overdriving and therefore give the player control of the clipping through dynamics. This simply means that the effect gives a clean sound for quieter volumes and a more clipped or distorted sound for louder volumes.
With Dave Matthews playing an electric guitar in place of his usual acoustic, the band delivered a performance of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)”, the lead single from Come Tomorrow, their record-breaking seventh-straight album to debut at #1 on the Billboard charts dating back to 1998’s Before These Crowded Streets. You can watch Dave Matthews Band’s performance on Ellen below:
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Description: Body: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Body Construction: Semi-Hollow (Chambered) - Top Wood: Maple & Poplar & Maple - Neck Attachment: Glued - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 1 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Binding: Cream - Frets: 22 - Inlay: Pearloid block - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 24.75" (63cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: ABR-1 - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: 2x Volume Control, 2x Tone Control, Grover Tuners - Pickups: Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 - Pickup Configuration: H-H - String Instrument Finish: Faded Cherry - String Instrument Accessories: Hardshell Case, Certificate of Authenticity - Made In: America
The humbuckers were smaller than typical, with metal covers and two rows of exposed adjustable polepieces. The pickups and three-way were mounted on a small black/white pickguard, with knobs on the body. Two jacks for mono or stereo output were mounted on the side of the lower bout. The two-octave unbound rosewood fingerboard had dot inlays. Early Preachers had “Preacher” engraved on the lower pickguard and a bridge/tailpiece assembly was similar to that on the Breadwinner/Deacon, with more metal and less plastic. Other versions are seen without the engraving and all-metal bridge/tailpieces, indicating the model evolved. Though no information is currently available on when the transition occurred, based on evidence from later UKs, it happened late, possibly around 1980.
I started playing & kinda grew up then (although my wife would dispute the 'grew up' part). We used to play mostly 9s or 10s. It depended on the quality of the neck on the guitar we could afford. A good guitar neck/fret job would let you go to the lighter 9s. You couldn't get all the great pedals then, so sustain was often achieved with some feedback, which is a product of TURNING UP the volume. Lighter strings seemed to feedback more easily. Lighter strings don't last as long as heavier ones, so unless you love re-stringing, 10s are a good compromise. I think Billy Gibbons still plays 8s, but he has a guitar tech that probably changes them for every show.
While all acoustic guitars share the same basic construction and design elements, there are important differences that affect their sound and playability. Each guitar shares those basic characteristics above, but now that you know how an acoustic guitar is designed and built, you will want to consider some of the variables that change how each guitar feels and plays. These variables include:
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“Tone that emulates the human voice is always more accessible,” Waara continues. “Otherwise, purely electronic music would have taken over, and we wouldn’t be making guitars anymore. There are some absolutes in human DNA about wanting to feel connection and that’s probably a fuller frequency tone, that’s tone that is more reminiscent of the human voice. Or, for instance, a violin or organic instruments that have been around for hundreds of years. When we talk about guitars having an organic quality, it’s because that’s rooted in what human beings know. Which is air moving, wood vibrating, people speaking.”

Open the case and you will find over 689MB of rich guitar tones ranging from 70 to 130BPM. These sensational loops are neatly arranged into 3 categories comprising of 50+ Ballad Hooks, 50+ Steady Riffs and 50+ Upbeat Jams, all applicable to a vast range of genres! From the clean, delay-drenched chime of Ballad Hook 'Serene' to the upbeat overdrive of Steady Riff 'Perpetual' and the crunchy swagger of Upbeat Jam 'Loose', STUDIO GUITARS redefines quality guitar samples and delivers them in stunning 24-bit high definition.
Those of you familiar with Van William’s former bands Waters and Port O’Brien, will have suspicions about what to expect from the songwriter’s debut solo material: boisterous, vibrant hooks that are easy to swallow but gut you on their way back out.  His latest incarnation represents a bounce back after a period of personal tumult. Two parts power pop bombast, to one part Americana, William’s maturation as a songwriter and guitarist seems to have hit a new high water mark.
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Sie sind so viele tolle bild listen das auf kann werden Ihre motivation und informativ zweck vonJaguar Guitar Kit design-Ideen allein sammlungen. wir hoffen sie sind alle genießen und zuletzt kann finden der beste bau aus unserer sammlung veröffentlicht hier und auch für ideal bedürfnisse für den persönlichen gebrauch. team auch liefert die bild ein TOP QUALITÄT Auflösung (HD bildauflösung) das kann sein heruntergeladen durch einfach Weg.
The body and neck are also slimmer than other Spanish guitar models, as well, so if you’re used to a steel-string, but gearing up to try a classical guitar, the Kremona Sofia is one to put on your list to try. The strings are Royal Classic Sonata strings, made in Spain, so add this to the guitar body’s manufacturing origins, and you will have a sound that is worthy of a professional, but affordable for just about everyone.

Martin actually got into the electric guitar business in the late ’50s when it started slapping DeArmond pickups onto some of its acoustic guitars yielding the D-18E, D-28E and OO-18E. These pickups were the DeArmond humbuckers with chrome sides and a black center in a trapezoidal hole, large pole pieces along one side and smaller poles along the other. Prototypes of the D-18E began in 1958 and in 1959 production began on it plus the D-28E and OO-18E.

Our Parlor size guitars are approximately 25% smaller than our full size guitars but what really makes them special is they have a 2 inch shorter neck design. This means children and small adults (under 5 ft tall) don’t have to reach as far holding certain chords making playability even easier. Most of our customers buying our Parlor guitars are coming from little Martins and Taylors.  They say the Easy Play Parlor has 30-50% easier playability and sound is slightly richer and deeper.  Shipped from our workshop in Lincoln, Nebraska.  100% money back guarantee, lifetime warranty.
The Effect: Wah pedals are primarily based on inductors, and later on Fasel inductors – serving as integral parts which play a big role in the outcome of the sound itself. They work on a basic principle, by adjusting a wah pedal’s footswitch your sound frequency’s behavior is modified, resulting in a “wah wah” tone – for further clarification take a listen to “Voodoo Child” by Jimi Hendrix. Naturally, effects may vary slightly or greatly depending on the model in question. Some of the most popular modern wah pedals are Dunlop’s numerous Cry Baby iterations and Vox’ marvelous classic enhanced remakes. The thing that sets wah pedals apart from other types in a unique way, is the fact that they rarely feature any controls, it’s just the footswitch and a dynamic range of impressive funky tones at your disposal.

The President was produced by Hofner in Bubenreuth, Germany, specifically for Selmer, who distributed the brand in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and other commonwealth nations. The President was a hollow body electric acoustic, available as a full body or thinline, and with blonde or brunette finish. It was a great playing guitar that sold fairly well in the second half of the 1950s, throughout the 1960s, and into the very early 1970s. The example shown here is a full-body depth guitar in blonde - and as a 1965 guitar, one of the last to feature the rounded Venetian cutaway. From late 1965 until 1972, the President sported a sharp Florentine cut. Naturally, such an electric acoustic suggests jazz and blues, but many of the original British Hofner President players were part of the rock 'n roll, skiffle and beat scenes of the late 50s and early 60s.


Visit “mom and pop shops,” big-name musical instrument retailers, Craigslist, eBay & Amazon to compare the reviews and prices of various models. The ability to make an educated decision based on the feel, sound quality and playability is important. Consider renting a guitar for the first month of lessons. A good teacher will serve as a guide throughout the buying process and will teach you to play well enough to “test drive” your options.
The full-size electric guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul SL, Ibanez GRGA120 Gio, Indio 66 Classic, Indio Retro DLX Quilted Maple, Jackson JS11 Dinky, Squier by Fender Affinity Series Jazzmaster, Squier by Fender HSS Bullet Strat, and Yamaha Pacifica PAC012. The short-scale guitars we tested are the Epiphone Les Paul Express, Ibanez GRGM21 Mikro, Jackson Dinky Minion JS1X, Jackson Rhoads Minion JS1X, and Squier by Fender Mini Strat.

This is another budget guitar that is routinely praised for the excellent value for money it provides. Many reviewers point to its playability as its strongest point, which is not surprising given that this guitar is from Ibanez. There were even several people who wrote in their reviews that they liked the GRX20Z so much that they had bought it more than once.
The C-series archtops were long scale until mid-1934, same as the 000 models. Sometimes a C model is converted from an archtop to a 000 style flat top. A conversion of a short scale C-2 (mid-1934 and later) won't exactly be a 000 either. The neck must be shortened to get the shallower angle required for a flat top. This amounts to about 1/3 of a fret, so the guitar ends up having a 13 2/3 fret neck. This puts the bridge position a little lower on the top, closer to the OM bridge position (but not exactly the same). The other feature on the C models that is different from a 000 is the back arch and the back braces. The archtops have more arch in the back and taller #3 and #4 back braces. Note the 1939 and later C-2 models have no abalone, the neck inlays are pearloid.
Leo Fender's work is timeless. This is easily deduced by simply looking at the popularity of both Stratocasters and Telecasters. With that said, Strats are arguably the favorite between the two. A top of the line American-made Stratocaster still costs a bit more than what our budget here is, however, there is an alternative. Fender's plant in Mexico builds great Stratocasters that aren't really behind their American counterparts. You essentially get a near identical performance at a more affordable price due to the stigma. The Fender Classic Series '70s Stratocaster is one such guitar.
In 1958, Gibson made a radical design change to their Junior and TV models: with the design change came cosmetic changes to these guitars that would later take on enormous importance. To accommodate player requests for more access to the top frets than the previous designs allowed, Gibson revamped both these electric guitar models with a new double-cutaway body shape. In addition, the Junior’s fresh look was enhanced with a new cherry red finish, while the re-shaped TV adopted a new, rather yellow-tinged finish for its new design.
"The Choice of Professional and Student Musicians Everywhere" This eight page catalogue was included as an insert in the 1963 annual "school music" issue of Downbeat magazine (September 1963). As well as keyboards and pedal steels, this catalog contains seven guitars, three basses and ten amplifiers - from student guitars such as the Musicmaster and Duotone to professional models like the new Jaguar.
In the ideal scenario, once set, your saddles should neither be flush down on the bridge assembly of the guitar, nor extended so high they could go no further. This saddle height relative to the bridge assembly is a reflection of the neck angle. If the saddles sit flush, the neck angle is not set back very far and vice-versa. This is where you should decide if your neck angle is in need of adjustment ( if you have a bolt-on neck). Check the measurement at the 12th fret then progress up the neck, measuring every couple of frets. The string height should continue to gradually rise, if it doesn't the neck is set back too far and has to be tilted up just a little. This is a very sensitive adjustment and the thickness of a couple sheets of paper can make a big difference. Some Fenders have a neck tilt adjustment screw that is accessed with an Allen wrench through a hole in the neck screw plate. The strings must be loosened, then the neck screws, then the tilt adjustment screw is tightened or loosened. Never do this when the neck screws are tight! If you don't have a tilt adjustment, thin shims of wood veneer are fitted in the neck pocket to adjust neck angle. Uneven frets are also a possibility. If , after having followed all the above steps, you are still getting fret buzz, you must establish that the frets are all even. But this leads us to fret dressing, which is another story altogether.
The Taylor Guitars factory tour takes guests through the steps of acoustic guitar construction. From wood selection to final assembly, guests will experience each process as a guitar evolves from raw wood into a finished instrument. You will also have an opportunity to visit the TaylorWare store. Here you will find everything for the Taylor fan, from apparel to gift items to replacement guitar parts. The tour lasts approximately one hour and 15 minutes and departs from the main building at 1980 Gillespie Way in El Cajon, California.
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