The first thing is to adjust height. If you have the first type, you will need a flathead screwdriver. The two posts holding the bridge have flat slotted heads showing at either end. You can turn these clockwise to lower the strings or counter-clockwise to raise them. Find the string height that suits you. For an electric guitar, it will be about 1/4" off of the neck or lower. Get the strings as low as you can for comfort, but be careful that your frets don't start buzzing or that the strings are not coming into contact with pickups or any other parts. If this happens, your strings are too low. If the bridge is the second type, you will need a very narrow Allen wrench to adjust the saddles; you will find the Allen heads on either side of the saddle top.
Heat-treated Maple is used for the AZ's neck construction. Its use increases the wood's stability, durability, water resistance and tolerance of temperature changes. After extensive prototyping and trials, we concluded that 20.5mm thickness at the 1st fret to 22.5mm at the 12th fret is the optimal neck thickness for this process. The neck is sealed with an oil finish (sealer coat) which feels similar to a comfortable well-played guitar neck.
Bottom Line: The biggest downside of the Line 6 M5 is that you can’t use more than one effect at the same time, and that it’s missing a looper function. But then again, you’re asking it to be more than what it’s trying to be. This is a Swiss Army Knife of a pedal that can morph and change shapes to whatever effect you need (we should also mention it’s true bypass when switched off). Sure, the drives/distortions are a weak area, but most effects are nearly indistinguishable from the classic pedals they are trying to emulate. We love this quote from a user:
Older 1800s Martins are a challange to date (since they don't have a serial number like 1898 and later Martins). A "New York" stamp does not immediately suggest that the Martin guitar is from the 1830s for example. To accurately date pre-1898 Martins you must be familiar design and ornamentation appointments and the changes that took place in each model throughout the 1800s. Most useful though is the stamp, but you can only use the stamp on the INSIDE of the body on it's center backstrip (visible through the soundhole) to date a guitar. And even then you can only date to a period (and not to an exact date). For example if it says on the center back strip, "C.F. Martin, New York", then the guitar is pre-1867. If it says, "C.F. Martin & Co., New York", it is between 1867 and 1897. Note 1860-1890s Martins have a date (year of manufacture) penciled on the underside of the top. Check with a mirror, looking just below the soundhole and between the braces.
This thing is awesome! For its price you can't find any other processor that can plug into your computer and easily navigate the pedals. To connect to your computer or laptop you will need a standard printer cable (I would pick up one of the amazon basic cables for cheap.) I bought a 10 foot one which is plenty to run from the pedal to my music stand. Also once you are connected to your laptop via the USBcable, all sounds from your laptop will run through your amp/headphones. That confused me the first time when my computer speakers sounded better, haha. If you are curious, It comes with a power supply.
All this is to say that you don't need to worry about getting your hands on a large amp. Small amps perform better for the overall sound of your band in most venues, and any venue big enough for you to need more volume is going to mic your amp anyway, giving you all the juice you'd need. So, as you look at the amps on our list, you can evaluate them based on their EQ options, their effects, and, frankly, their look.
First off, it has three effects loops that let you control pedals (or groups of pedals) right from the MS-3. It can also be used as a foot controller for amplifiers, which allows you to change the channel on your favorite amps and employ effects in the comfort of a single compact box. This makes the MS-3 a very versatile unit, catering to vintage amp/pedal users while adding the comfort of modern digital effects processing and preset control. Since it has its own noise suppressor and global EQ, you can tame noisy pedals and shape their tone a bit more. All of these are on top of the many built-in effects that is already built into the unit, which are Boss quality good by themselves.
In most cases, the neck will sit tightly in the neck cavity hard up against the edge of the body. But if the scale length isn’t correct from this position you may need to make minor adjustments to the neck position. If the bridge holes aren’t yet drilled, it’s better to adjust the bridge position than the neck. The saddles will also allow you approx. 10mm adjustment.

The first Hagstrom electrics actually came to the U.S. beginning about 1959, carrying the Goya name imported by New York’s Hershman (Goya acoustics were made by Levin, also in Sweden). These were the now-legendary sparkle-covered hollowbody “Les Pauls” with the modular pickup units. However, while the Goya acoustics continued on in the ’60s (eventually to be distributed by Avnet, the owners of Guild in the late ’60s), the Hagstrom electrics took on their own identity and switched to Merson. The first Hagstrom I guitars were the little vinyl-covered mini-Strats with the “swimming pool” pickup assemblies – basically two single-coil pickups mounted in a molded plastic assembly looking like its nickname, with sliding on-off switches and the Hagstrom fulcrum vibrato (which was also used on early Guild solidbodies). These were followed by similar wood-bodied Hagstrom IIs, then the quasi-SG Hagstrom IIIs in the ’60s. Hagstrom electrics continued to be imported by Merson through most of the ’60s, but by the ’70s distribution had switched to Ampeg, which was responsible for the Swedes, and several thinlines, some of which were designed by Jimmy D’Aquisto. Hagstrom hung around until the early ’80s before disappearing.


A friend lent me this banjo and I got it working and sampled it. Its a 5 string closed back banjo. The fifth string being tuned to a high "g" note (half the length of the neck). Its this string and the closed back that helps give you the bluegrass sound (the high string ringing the "g" note throughout each of the chords with syncopated fingerpicking patterns). This has a standard mapping with variations of long release (to hear the whole sample) and reverb.
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SPRAYING TECHNIQUE Spray the body holding the can 6 to 8 inches away, moving either up and down or right and left depending on how you have set the nozzel. Start spraying from 2 inches outside the body and finish the stoke the same way. Don't stop or start the spry right on the body because you will end up with an uneven build up or paint drips. It is also good to spray a light "tack" coat first and let that dry for 45 min before laying on the thicker coats. This lets the paint adhere to the body better. You can also mount the guitar body to a square wooden stick that will fit inside the neck pocket so you can hold the guitar flat while you paint the top of it. This lets the coats build up thick and even, but watch for drips on the side.
The specifications of the neck and string setup dictate the guitar's overall playability. As such, it is important to get a handle of important specs which include scale length (the length by which the string is stretched from the bridge saddle to the nut), nut width, fingerboard radius, and neck profile (shape of the back of the neck). Beginners normally want guitars to play easier, and will prefer those with shorter scale length, thin nut width and neck profile, and flatter fingerboard radius. On the other hand, experienced players will have grown accustomed to a specific neck configuration, if this is your case, you will want your new guitar to have similar specs to what you already like.
In 1956 Jennings was shown a prototype guitar amplifier made by Dick Denney, a big band guitarist and workmate from World War II. The company was renamed Jennings Musical Industries, or JMI, and in 1958 the 15-watt Vox AC15 amplifier was launched. It was popularised by The Shadows and other British rock 'n' roll musicians and became a commercial success.
Some steel-string acoustic guitars are fitted with pickups purely as an alternative to using a separate microphone. They may also be fitted with a piezoelectric pickup under the bridge, attached to the bridge mounting plate, or with a low-mass microphone (usually a condenser mic) inside the body of the guitar that converts the vibrations in the body into electronic signals. Combinations of these types of pickups may be used, with an integral mixer/preamp/graphic equalizer. Such instruments are called electric acoustic guitars. They are regarded as acoustic guitars rather than electric guitars, because the pickups do not produce a signal directly from the vibration of the strings, but rather from the vibration of the guitar top or body.
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Another factor to consider are the alloys used to make the string. Acoustic strings may be phosphor bronze or an 80/20 bronze/zinc alloy, electric strings may be pure steel or a steel/nickel alloy, and the outer winding on the thicker strings may be either round wound or flat wound, which is typically used by jazz guitarists for smooth fingering with less fretting noise. Acoustic and electric strings are both now available with special super-thin coatings to protect them from sweat and corrosion. Coated strings cost more, but generally last much longer. Find out what type of string your favorite player uses, try guitars with different types of strings at your local guitar store, then try a few different sets on your guitar to see what feels and sounds best for your playing style. Major manufacturers include Ernie Ball, Martin, GHS, D'Addario, and Elixir, among others. Make sure you have a string winder to make installing the strings go faster, and some pliers with a fine wire cutter to clip the excess string from the tuning post, a well as some guitar polish - changing strings is a good time to perform some routine maintenance. Keep a clean cloth in your case to wipe down the strings after each use, along with extra bridge pins for your acoustic guitar. Regular string changes are the best way to keep your tone crisp and clear, so grab a pack and tune 'em up!
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Washburn started in Chicago in 1883. They manufactured guitars and various other string instruments. Now they’re a division of the US Music Corp and owned by JAM Industries USA, but they continue to produce quality guitars. In the beginning, they mostly focused on banjos and mandolins. Starting in the 80s, they branched off into producing signature guitars. Now days they make a wide variety of instruments and are very beginner friendly. Washburns are made from fine-quality wood. This means they can get pricey. But the quality the solid wood offers is well worth the price increases. They’re a decent american company that make very consistent instruments. 
By far the most convenient way to DI guitar is to use a digital preamplifier that combines amp modelling, speaker modelling and effects all in one unit. More flexible still is something like a Roland VG88. This requires the guitar to be fitted with a GK2 compatible hex pickup, but in return enables the system to model pickups and guitars as well as the rest of the signal chain. All these modelling systems sound different to each other and many guitarists say they don't 'feel' the same to play as going via a real amplifier, but, in many situations, the sound you record using them is very much like the sound you hear on records. As you hear exactly the sound you're recording over the monitors while you're playing, you know just how the end result will turn out, so there's little to be said about working this way other than to rely on your ears. Nevertheless, it is worth pointing out that some of the more unlikely combinations of amplifier models and speaker cabinet models can produce unexpectedly interesting results, so don't just rely on the factory patches, most of which I've found not to do justice to the products anyway. The morphing feature used in the Digitech Genesis 3 processor is also very creative, as it allows you to combine the characteristics of two completely different amp/speaker models, sometimes with surprising results.

Different types of guitars have different sound aesthetics, e.g. different colour-spectrum characteristics (the way the sound energy is spread in the fundamental frequency and the overtones), different response, etc. These differences are due to differences in construction; for example modern classical guitars usually use a different bracing (fan-bracing) from that used in earlier guitars (they had ladder-bracing); and a different voicing was used by the luthier.


The full-size guitar in black by DirectlyCheap should therefore be on your list for consideration. Made out of linden, basswood and catalpa with a particularly ornate inlay around the sound hole, this model has a really lovely sound for the price. Just keep in mind that, like other guitar shipments, when you receive the guitar, you will have to “set up” the neck. If you need help with this, a guitar tech will assist.

Octave ('Other' category): This effect really surprised me because it tracks well, but inserting the compressor before the Octave plug-in improves the tracking even further. Distorting the post‑octave sound with the AmpSimulator gives a big distortion sound, even with only the Octave 1 level turned up. If you want more of a brontosaurus guitar, turn up Octave 2 as well. In general, I like to leave a fair amount of direct sound in the output mix. You can just as easily go in a cleaner direction by using only the Octave 1 output, and bypassing the AmpSimulator. Select the neck pickup on your guitar, pull back a bit on the tone, and you'll hear a sound that recalls jazz great Wes Montgomery.


Fuzz pedals provide guitarists, bass players and even keyboard players with a hefty amount of distortion that sounds VERY different to regular distortion sounds. Fuzz pedals make your guitar sound like its pushing your amplifier to the point of blowing up. A fuzz pedal completely changes the sound of your guitar signal into a heavy, fizzy, and extremely noisy sound that, depending on which pedal you choose, can provide a bass heavy noise, to a spitting ‘broken’ amp sound. Think Velcro being ripped apart and you’re somewhere pretty close.
The 52-week part is an excellent way to motivate you to practice. The selection of licks is great too with several genres covered well. It provides info for setting your metronome to get the beat right too. They are challenging, especially when you play them at the recommended speed. The wide selection will give you plenty of choices even if you skip a genre.
Hand built with the same precision as our larger guitars, just 25% smaller.  Great for travel, ideal for children struggling to get their arms around full size guitars, fantastic second guitar for the office.  Because it has a smaller box design our Travel will have a smaller sound (like any smaller guitar) but our Travel Electric with built in auto tuner allows you to plug into any amplifier or PA system giving you the same power as our full size guitars.

If magnetic pickups are excellent for traveling guitars, contact pickups are great for amplified acoustic performances. These can capture the sound from the soundboard as well as from the rest of the body. You can also get a guitar that comes with a blended system which combines a pickup with a microphone. A model with a built-in preamp is also becoming the norm these days.
Classical guitars by Martin are equal in craftsmenship to their steel string models. But unfortunately, their sound and feel is not what classical players seem to want. Therefore they do not have the collectability of the steel string models. I group Martin classical models to include the "NY" series and gut string models made from the 1930's and later.
Established over a century ago as a piano and reed organ builder, Yamaha has since expanded into building other musical equipment and even went on to successfully expand into other industries. But in all this success, Yamaha continues to stay true to their musical roots, producing highly rated instruments, amps and other gear. While they are not primarily a guitar amplifier builder, Yamaha's extensive reach and resources give them an almost unfair advantage over the competition, as exemplified by the success of their THR line of desktop guitar amplifiers. This line of portable amps combines Yamaha's penchant for student friendly features and modern studio functions that many guitarists appreciate, ultimately securing Yamaha a special spot on this list.
The Archtone acoustics were some of the most popular guitars ever produced by Harmony. While production totals are unavailable, we can safely say that tens of thousands of these instruments were manufactured. The Archtone had a non-cutaway body and was advertised as being constructed from hardwoods. These “hardwoods” were actually birch (grained to resemble mahogany and spruce) and maple (grained to look like rosewood) for the fretboard. The binding was actually painted on!
Like the Strat above, the Fender Telecaster shares the title of being one of the most legendary electric guitars ever produced, and owes a lot of its authentic vintage sound to its unique pickups – which are both fantastic and frustrating at times. A Tele will usually feature two single-coils: a smaller one at the neck and a larger, slanted pickup at the bridge. They both deliver a twangy sound, with the bridge offering great treble tone and the neck a little more balanced. The neck pickup’s main complaint is that it is often muffled in output – unless you find a good set such as the Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele Pickup Set, which keeps things crisp and clear.
Launch price: $1,949 / £1,639 | Body: Alder | Neck: Maple | Scale: 25.5" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 21 | Pickups: 3x Pure Vintage '65 Gray-Bottom Single-Coil Strat | Controls: Volume, neck tone, bridge/middle tone | Hardware: Pure Vintage 6-saddle Synchronized vibrato, Pure Vintage Single Line 'Fender Deluxe' tuners | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Olympic White, 3-Color Sunburst, Candy Apple Red
The headstock does not come pre-carved, which is good for those who want to personalize its shape, and bad for those who can't do wood work. All needed parts are included, along with hex wrenches for the truss rod and saddle adjustment, it even comes with some solder, so you'll just need a soldering iron and a Philips head screwdriver to complete the assembly.
If there was any doubt left in the late 1950s that the guitar – not the saxophone – was rock & roll's essential lead instrument, Duane Eddy settled the argument: See his 1958 single "Rebel Rouser," curled with country twang and rippling with tremolo. "Chet Atkins used vibrato in a selective way – Duane Eddy used it to thrash the music," says the Kinks' Dave Davies. The impact of Eddy's hits, like "Forty Miles of Bad Road" and "Peter Gunn," would soon be heard in surf music and guitarists such as Jeff Beck and George Harrison.
The Blues Junior's compact dimensions, light weight and pedal-friendly credentials have made it one of the most popular gigging combos in the world, but for 2018, Fender has updated it to the new Mark IV specification, which features various tweaks, including Celestion’s excellent A-Type loudspeaker. Controls include gain, bass treble and middle, reverb level and master volume, with a small push-button ‘Fat’ switch. In use, the Junior unleashes a stunning range of Fender tones, from spanky, sparkling cleans, to fat and smooth midrange crunch that’s spot on for blues and classic rock. The Fat switch adds a generous midrange boost and can be remote-controlled from a footswitch for greater versatility, while the improved reverb circuit is very impressive, with no noise and a smooth, warm delay that feels more integral to the overall amp tone, harking back to the best blackface reverbs of the 1960s. No matter what guitar you use, the Blues Junior flatters single coils and humbuckers alike, not to mention drive pedals with plenty of volume. The sounds are top-drawer, comparing well against many so-called boutique amps costing four times the price. Factor in the compact dimensions and light weight, and it’s easy to see why the Blues Junior remains a firm favourite.
Pickups convert the mechanical energy of a vibrating string to an electrical signal, allowing it to be amplified, processed and reproduced.[1] Pickups vary greatly in construction, size, types of materials used, as well as various electrical properties, but are generally divided into two categories – single-coil and double-coil (also known as humbucker).[2]
Sie sind so viele tolle bild listen das auf kann werden Ihre motivation und informativ zweck vonJaguar Guitar Kit design-Ideen allein sammlungen. wir hoffen sie sind alle genießen und zuletzt kann finden der beste bau aus unserer sammlung veröffentlicht hier und auch für ideal bedürfnisse für den persönlichen gebrauch. team auch liefert die bild ein TOP QUALITÄT Auflösung (HD bildauflösung) das kann sein heruntergeladen durch einfach Weg.
Distortion sound or "texture" from guitar amplifiers is further shaped or processed through the frequency response and distortion factors in the microphones (their response, placement, and multi-microphone comb filtering effects), microphone preamps, mixer channel equalization, and compression. Additionally, the basic sound produced by the guitar amplifier can be changed and shaped by adding distortion and/or equalization effect pedals before the amp's input jack, in the effects loop just before the tube power amp, or after the power tubes.
Silk strings and Steel strings are described as a mixture of classical and steel strings, and are also called “compound strings.”  They have a mellow sound and lower tension that provide the feeling of a classical guitar, while still providing the brightness of the metal of a steel stringed acoustic.  The term silk is referring to the nylon used to make classical guitar strings, which we will learn about next.
Best Answer:  first off, there are tuning knobs on the end of the neck of the guitar(the neck is the long piece protruding from the body of the guitar) they control the pitch of the strings. When you tune a guitar you want the first string(or the smallest string) to be tuned to the note e.The other strings going up should be the notes b,g,d,a,e. You only need to tune the guitar whenever it gets out of tune. The knobs on the body of the guitar are volume control for each pickup,master tone control, and master volume.The controls differ from each guitar , but they usually follow something like that.Lastly, on a Les Paul there is a switch on the upper part of the body that controls which pickup is being used.-(the pickup selector). A pickup is a magnet that collects sound from the strings and lets it be amplified through a amp.A good amp costs anywhere from 50 to 100 dollars. Good luck on your guitar.
Bobby Jo is number one on this list. Every artist has unknowingly been influenced by him. Starting in the Mississippi Delta, Johnson’s life is rife with myths, and allegory. His deal with the devil and death are full of folklore and mysticism, and it only adds to his haunting voice and groundbreaking guitar playing. His songs are just a pure expression of emotion with no bars held. He led the groundwork for early blues to be filled in and worked upon by all the artists on this list. He also worked on breaking down social barriers. A black man in the early 20th century was not exactly the best place to be. But his music was to add interest by white musicians and help the civil movements of the sixties. Politically or musically, Robert Johnson is deserving of number one on this list.
Martin's OM, or "Orchestra Model", available from 1929 to 1933, has a rare combination of features. The joining of a long-scale (25.4") neck with a small body makes it an extremely responsive and playable guitar. In many ways the OM models were the first truly modern flattop guitars. They were the first Martins to have necks with 14 frets clear of the body. The OM has a wide neck (1 3/4" as opposed to the dreadnought's 1 11/16") which appeals to fingerstyle players. The string spacing is slightly greater at the bridge than on other models too, although not as wide as a classical guitars. The neck shape of old OMs is a bit unique too, although this is variable since each neck was handmade. OMs have a wide but thin backshaped V-shape which is very comfortable. Finally, the OM's smaller body size makes the guitar easy to hold, especially in the seated position. Compared this to the D dreadnought which is larger both in body depth and width (dreadnought players seem to use straps and stand up so the guitar's size is less of a factor).
Control knobs and buttons are typically on the front of the cabinet or chassis, though in some cases, the knobs are on a recessed panel at the back of the top of the amplifier. The most basic amps only have a few knobs, which typically control volume, bass and treble. More expensive amps may have a number of knobs that control pre-amp volume (or "gain"), distortion or overdrive, volume, bass, mid and treble, and reverb. Some older amps (and their re-issued versions) have a knob that controls a vibrato or tremolo effect. The 1/4" input jack is typically mounted on the front of the amplifier. In the simplest, least expensive amplifiers, this 1/4" jack is the only jack on the amplifier.

If your instrument receives regular maintenance, then you are likely to avoid any unneeded guitar setup cost. A properly cared for guitar will be regularly cleaned, oiled, and treated gently at all times. Of course, this is not possible for all people, as their preferred style of music may negate the ability to treat a guitar gently (metal and punk are good examples). Having the guitar setup can be thought of as maintenance in itself, as it is an invariable need in environments that have inconsistent weather patterns (which would be virtually all of them). The cost of a guitar setup can be insignificant if you maintain it on a regular basis.
In 1966 Vox introduced the revolutionary but problematic GuitarOrgan, a Phantom VI guitar with internal organ electronics. The instrument's trigger mechanism required a specially-wired plectrum that completed circuit connections to each fret, resulting in a very wide and unwieldy neck. John Lennon was given one in a bid to secure an endorsement, though this never panned out. According to Up-Tight: the Velvet Underground Story, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones also tried one; when asked by the Velvets if it "worked", his answer was negative. The instrument never became popular, but it was a precursor to the modern guitar synthesizer.
So, you want a guitar that's absolutely packed with tone? One that has the vibe that it's been pulled straight out of the 1950s, but has all the playability, comfort, and stability of a brand-new instrument? Then get your hands on the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. This stylish archtop smolders with personality. And with the P90 pickup onboard at neck position, you have an unbelievable vintage/atittude tonal combination working in your favor. You'll notice right away that the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin has plenty of projection and volume, and moreso in the low/mids than traditional archtop guitars. You'll love it for that. Why does the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin sound so good? Sure, it's that P90 working with the hollowbody design that gets things going. But the primary tonewoods here are pure North American perfection, including a Canadian Wild Cherry archtop, back, and sides. The finish here is a custom polish that gives each and every Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin a satin sheen that recalls French 19th century craftsmanship. Whatever your musical style, you'll have a friend on your side in the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin. It is, plain and simple, a great guitar. Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin Archtop Guitar Features at a Glance: Finish: Cognac Burst Archtop hollowbody electric guitar Canadian Wild Cherry archtop Canadian Wild cherry back and sides Silver Leaf maple neck Contoured high-gloss black headstock Custom Polished finish Rosewood Fingerboard Adjustable Tusq Bridge by Graphtech Cream Binding 1 x Godin Kingpin P90 single-coil pickup 1 x Volume, 1 x Tone 16" fingerboard radius 24.84" scale 1.72" nut width
Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!

Three CraViolas were offered. These had a strange asymmetrical shape with a pear shape, no waist on the bass side and sharp waist (and almost cutaway taper) on the treble. Soundholes were D-shaped with fancy rosettes, with a pointed tortoise guard on the steel-stringed versions. These had slotheads with a Woody Woodpecker-like peak pointed bassward. The bridges were similar to the mustache version on the Country Western. The CRA6N Classic ($150) had a yellow spruce top and full-grained Brazilian rosewood body, no inlays or pickguard. The CRA6S Steel String ($160) was a similar steel-string with pin bridge and diamond inlays. The CRA12S 12 String ($175) was the 12-string version.
Back when they were starting, Jackson guitars were only available to the elite few, mostly heavy metal artists. After being acquired by Fender, Jackson has since expanded into the entry level realm with mass produced versions of their popular guitar designs, including the Dinky shape. The JS11 Dinky does just that, making the Jackson Dinky a beginner and student friendly instrument that more players can enjoy.
Excellent article. I have found that is a complete waste of time trying to convince guitarist of anything contrary to what they already believe about instruments. The level of passion for the “wood doesn’t matter” camp is truly astounding. We are not testing a new drug or solving cold fusion. The question is simple, does wood make a difference in the tone of an electric guitar? Intuitively, it would seem strange if it didn’t; but, there are many factors that are going to affect the sound produced from a guitar; isolating them is as difficult as creating a study that will convince anyone of an idea they already are clinging to. I think this is a pretty good experiment, better than most I have seen. In the end though, who cares?…really. If someone would like a guitar made out of a Formica counter top…go for it, locking tuners, the pickups and strings of your choice…you’ll be ready to rock. And won’t you be the clever one? As for myself, my opinion, musical instruments have character, a soul if you will. That character comes from the material it is made out of and the craftsman that made it. There is no object more alive than a musical instrument. For arguments sake, lets grant the “wood doesn’t matter” their entire argument. I’d still buy the korina instrument over the countertop. And like most stubborn asses who play guitar, you won’t convince me otherwise.
Before recording commences, make sure that all of your equipment is in good shape and not producing crackles, hums and buzzes. If you are having problems, they can often be dealt with by using noise-filtering units such as gates and expanders. These are best used before post-recording effects – compression and reverb, for example – are applied, as a compressor will emphasise noise, while a gate might chop off the natural tail of the reverb.
While we are on the subject of cute little things, I want you to consider the idea of a small amplifier with a cute name but with the looks of Marlon Brando in his early years. Wait, no, that is incredibly freaky and not something anyone wants to imagine. I mean how would you even connect your guitar to that? What I mean is imagine an incredibly handsome amplifier. Well, now that you have, let me ruin your dreams by directing your attention at the pignose 7-10 legendary portable amplifier, which is an actually rather handsome piece of equipment. The great thing about this beautiful box is that it also has a great sound, comparable to that of its betters (read: of the more expensive models). Being very light and fun to possess, it is highly portable and loud enough to captivate audiences. A great, affordable small amplifier that does not look Marlon Brando in any way, and thank god for that.
A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet. While bass amps share many features with the guitar amplifiers used for electric guitar, such as providing an amplifier with tone and volume controls and a carrying handle, they are distinct from other types of amplification systems, due to the particular challenges associated with low-frequency sound reproduction. This distinction affects the design of the loudspeakers, the size and design of the speaker cabinet and the design of the preamplifier and amplifier. Speaker cabinets for bass amps usually incorporate larger loudspeakers (e.g., 15" speakers are more common for bass than for electric guitar amps) or more speakers and larger cabinet sizes than those used for the amplification of other instruments. The loudspeakers themselves must also be sturdier to handle the higher power levels and they must be capable of reproducing very low pitches at high sound pressure levels.
That's actually a good question. There were several people working on the electric guitar at the same time... so it depends on what you're looking for, and what constitutes a real electric guitar. And to compound the issue, tape recording was also in an experimental stage, back in the 1930s when the electric guitar arose. So live recordings of early performances pretty much don't exist.
In the entry-level market, brand-name guitar companies are usually forced to make their guitars with cheaper materials. There is a simple reason for this. Most major brand-name companies have a brand owner (sometimes an American company). That company buys from a factory in China, and in Australia they will have a distributor who will sell to a retailer (your local music store). It’s pretty easy to see why they can be forced to use cheaper materials. There is a lot of price pressure to get a guitar manufactured at a low enough price for everybody to take their cut of the profit down the chain.

You can think of these pedals like modulation effects that change nothing but the timing. They split up the signal in the same way, but time-based effects don’t usually make any major changes to the copied signal. Instead, they hold it back by a certain length of time before mixing it back in. This makes a few different varieties of pedal possible:
In the ideal scenario, once set, your saddles should neither be flush down on the bridge assembly of the guitar, nor extended so high they could go no further. This saddle height relative to the bridge assembly is a reflection of the neck angle. If the saddles sit flush, the neck angle is not set back very far and vice-versa. This is where you should decide if your neck angle is in need of adjustment ( if you have a bolt-on neck). Check the measurement at the 12th fret then progress up the neck, measuring every couple of frets. The string height should continue to gradually rise, if it doesn't the neck is set back too far and has to be tilted up just a little. This is a very sensitive adjustment and the thickness of a couple sheets of paper can make a big difference. Some Fenders have a neck tilt adjustment screw that is accessed with an Allen wrench through a hole in the neck screw plate. The strings must be loosened, then the neck screws, then the tilt adjustment screw is tightened or loosened. Never do this when the neck screws are tight! If you don't have a tilt adjustment, thin shims of wood veneer are fitted in the neck pocket to adjust neck angle. Uneven frets are also a possibility. If , after having followed all the above steps, you are still getting fret buzz, you must establish that the frets are all even. But this leads us to fret dressing, which is another story altogether.

80/20 Bronze strings are a mixture of Bronze and Zinc.  They are also referred to as Bronze/Brass strings and are extremely common, much like Phosphor Bronze.  One of the main differences is this variety produces a very bright tone that enhances articulation and pick attack.   This effect can be lost very quickly depending on how much the player sweats and how often they clean their strings.  This choice can be a little more demanding on the wallet, due to having to change them more often.
The Ibanez Gio GRGM21 Mikro in Black Night proves that guitars don’t have to be super expensive to sound great. This is a fantastic cheap electric guitar that doesn’t suck, often picked up by beginner guitarists who are into metal and hard rock and those who like a shorter scale guitar. Featuring an iconic shape, a specially designed GRG neck made of maple, rosewood fretboard and 2 x Infinity R humbucker pickups that can be used separately or in unison via the 3-way pickup selector, you have a comfortable and great sounding powerhouse of a guitar at your disposal. It’s one of our favourite cheap electric guitars that sounds amazing when you throw some distortion at it! Available in different finishes here.

Fishman is the main brand that you’ll see manufacturing the electrics, but lots of the bigger guitar brands will also have their own in house products. Higher end guitars are more likely to have specialist or boutique equipment which is generally considered to be better. Gibson using LR Baggs pickups systems is one such example. You can also opt for aftermarket pickups.
Heres a few no one has brought up … very under rated or possibly not well enough known …. Jeff Beck , Steve Vai , BucketHead , Ry Cooder , Eric Johnson ,Gary Moore , Ritchie Blackmore , Andy Summers ,John Petrucci ,Vivian Campbell , Paul Gilbert , Uli John Roth ,Robert Fripp ,Akira Takasaki ,Steve Howe ,MICHAEL ANGELO BATIO ,CHRIS IMPELLITTERI ,ZAKK WYLDE , Vinnie Vincent , Stevie Stevens , and my choice for best overall would definetely be Randy Rhoads…
The 700-series models were solid-body instruments while the 800-series models were hollow bodied. This is a small enough product range to make a nice little collection and the guitars are made well enough to be used. (Many of the early Japanese guitars were cheap and simply unplayable right out of the box. I know... I had one.) However interest in them seems to be rising and thus, prices are following along.
German tonemeister and Vintage endorsee, the one and only Thomas Blug arrives in the UK for a promotional tour this weekend. Following an appearance at Northern Guitar Shows London International Guitar Show at Kempton Park Racecourse on Sunday, Thomas will perform the following in-store clinics to launch the brand new BluGuitar AMP1 Mercury Edition.
Theory - These sessions will be devoted to investigating how the fretboard works, how strings and notes relate to each other, what chords are made up of etc. A lot of theory time will be spent reading and analysing diagrams and your guitar's fretboard. This aspect is for understanding how music works on the guitar, to map out the fretboard in your mind so you can later apply the physical techniques with confidence. If you're serious about getting good on guitar, you need time devoted to theory.
Replace or upgrade your guitars volume and tone controls with the best quality pots available from CTS, Bourns, Fender, Alpha, Alps and more. From full size to mini pots, long shaft and short shaft pots, blend pots and stacked concentric pots, push/pull pots and more, we have the pot you need! Not sure which pot is right for your project? Then check out the Guitar Electronics FAQ Page for more info on pot values, pot tapers and more.
While known primarily for their acoustic and acoustic-electric guitars, Takamine produced a limited run of very high quality solid body electric guitars in the early 1980’s.[1] These are the GX100 (Gibson Explorer body style), GX200 (proprietary type body style similar to a Stratocaster, stop tailpiece bridge), GX200-T or TB, (same as GX200 only with a tremolo bridge) GZ300 (proprietary design) and GZ340 (proprietary design). The GX200 and GZ340 contain factory DiMarzio made pickups.[2]

A lot of EBay sellers have been calling the Hagstrom solid-bodies of the time Hagstrom-Kent. They are not. If it says Hagstrom on the body, it’s a Hagstrom. If it is one of the Hagstrom guitars that was sold as a Kent, it’s a ‘Kent, made by Hagstrom’. I wonder if the sellers think they can get more for a guitar by associating the Kent name with it. I don’t see how. Perhaps the fact that there are so many Kents floating around, the sellers wanted a more familiar name to hang on the Hagstrom.
Arch top body size is equivalent to the flat top 000 body size, 15" wide across the top, carved sruce top, back is not carved but is arched by bracing, rosewood back and sides, unbound elevated tortoise pickguard, style 28 type multiple bound top and back with white outer layer, zipper zigzag backstripe, trapeze tail piece, rosewood fingerboard, vertical "Martin" peghead logo, nickel plated parts, sunburst top finish.
Naturally, it all comes down to manipulating the effect to fit the occasion. There is definitely such a thing as too much reverb or not enough. However, this is the type of thing you will have to figure out on case to case basis. With that said, you would be surprised at just how often reverb is used in music these days. Some sound engineers and producers like to be subtle to a point where you won’t notice the reverb unless you are actively looking for it. Others tend to go overboard in order to express themselves.
Popularity also was a critical factor in our choices, although we generally passed over a few best-selling reissues or boutique clones in favor of the real deal. So even though the Bubba Bob Buttcrack Tube Overdrive may sound more soulful than an original Tube Screamer, if it’s little more than a copy with slightly upgraded components, it didn’t make the cut.
A Distortion pedal is a must, it really helps bring out those chords, solos and riffs and makes sure they stand out. It gives you the volume jump when you need it and changes the overall sound of your guitar, giving it power and aggression. Of course, you don’t always have to dial in the pedal for bone crushing riffs as a distortion pedal can provide a smoother sound, but at least the option is there!
The RP360 XP lets you combine different effects to craft your preferred sound by choosing from its wide variety of options including 74 effects, 32 amp models and 18 cabinet models. Each setup can be saved into one of its 99 user presets, that allow for incredible flexibility. The interface has a bit of a learning curve, but allows for deep editing.

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The technique is often executed by the little finger of the guitarist which is wrapped around the volume pot of the guitar. When the note is struck the volume is increased from zero by a rolling motion of the little finger. Alternatively, the effect is achieved with a volume pedal. It is sometimes called "violining", because the sound is similar to a bowed violin. Allan Holdsworth pioneered the technique of the pedal swelling along with a delay unit to create a thicker sound that is more associated with the cello. - winner333
Featuring a sound engine derived from the bigger, premium-priced GT-100, the GT-1 contains 99 preset and 99 user patches each built from a chain of blocks that can draw from 108 effects, including 27 amp/speaker sims and a 32-second looper. The first two footswitches scroll through patches, while the third (CTL1) footswitch is used to turn an effect, or a combination of effects, on and off in a patch, or for tap tempo. Sonically, there's some great stuff here. Many of the presets are playable straight off the bat, but the wide range of effects means that you can get really creative with your own patches. As you'd expect from Boss, the modulation effects are a highlight, as well as the delays and reverbs, particularly the Tera Echo. We've heard better pitch-shifting though... While the COSM amp sims will give you an approximation of the real thing for recording, at this price, you don't get the playability and detail of high-end modelers. Likewise, the overdrives and distortions work really well when building a patch but, used as solo effects, have less of the impact of real analogue pedals. The acoustic guitar simulator is class, though. For live use, the GT-1 doesn't have the flexibility of bigger units where you can switch individual effects, although you could get 
by in a live situation with careful sequential use of your own patches and the CTL1 button.
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Bottom Line: The Zoom G3X is everything a guitar multi-effects pedal should be, and then some. As strange as it sounds, as we researched what owners of this pedal are saying about it, it was difficult to find any outright negative comments (any negative feedback tends to be centered around the notion that digital multi-fx don’t sound as good as individual pedals, which is a hotly debated topic). You have to consider how amazingly low the G3X price tag is versus how many features it packs in. It’s not the best in the world at any one thing - the looper isn’t as good as a TC Electronic Ditto, and the delays might not match up to a Strymon - but it does a lot of things quite well, and the user interface is such a pleasure to use. The Zoom G3X will be your best friend if:
Given the price tag, you’d expect the J-200 to be of a very high quality throughout, and we’re pleased to be able to say that it is. Every millimeter of the guitar has been expertly crafted, and nothing is an afterthought. The end result is a stunningly beautiful guitar that feels very special in your hands. No wonder everyone from Elvis to Jimmy Page has used a Super Jumbo in some form throughout history.

Also, if your slide playing includes any fretting at all, FORGET IT. While it certainly raises them well away from the neck, the strings are lifted to a height that makes trying to fret them pull them off pitch well before you reach the fret... and there is NO adjusting it. I used one on a wide neck 12 string strung for six. A neck designed for the tension of 12 strings easily takes the tension of a heavy gauge set in a raised open tuning. The "Slide Guitar Extension Nut" is ideal for such an application (if you don't want to even try any fretting) but I doubt Stewey Mac's sells very many of them.


Eight-string electric guitars are rare but not unused. One is played by Charlie Hunter, which was manufactured by Novax Guitars. The largest manufacturer of eight- to 14-string instruments is Warr Guitars. Their models are used by Trey Gunn (ex King Crimson), who has his own signature line from the company. Similarly, Mårten Hagström and Fredrik Thordendal of Meshuggah used 8-string guitars made by Nevborn Guitars and now guitars by Ibanez. Munky of the nu metal band KoRn is also known to use seven-string Ibanez guitars, and it is rumored that he is planning to release a K8 eight-string guitar similar to his K7 seven-string guitar. Another Ibanez player is Tosin Abasi, lead guitarist of the progressive metal band Animals as Leaders, who uses an Ibanez RG2228 to mix bright chords with very heavy low riffs on the seventh and eighth strings. Stephen Carpenter of Deftones also switched from a seven-string to an eight-string in 2008 and released his signature STEF B-8 with ESP Guitars. In 2008, Ibanez released the Ibanez RG2228-GK, which is the first mass-produced eight-string guitar. Jethro Tull's first album uses a nine-string guitar. Bill Kelliher, guitarist for the heavy metal group Mastodon, worked with First Act on a custom mass-produced nine-string guitar.
Before I recommended it to him, I went to my local GC and played one through some headphones. I thought it sounded pretty good - and certainly outgunned my Pocket Pod for pure functionality. Is this (or something like it) the be all and and all of tone? Of course not. But this (or something like it) can provide all sorts of options for practicing while leaving your neighbor (or spouse!) in peace.
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they're both excellent guitars, and for jazz-only, and a little more money, the eastman was a little better. it had a bit more acoustic volume and sounded really killer plugged in. but, the godin is the one i ended up keeping. really, really versatile guitar. the tone knob has a wide range of usable tones. really a very articulate sounding guitar plugged in, especially with the tone a little more open. i play a lot of straight ahead jazz on it, and am very happy with the sound. i have always played it with 12 gague strings on it. again, it's not terribly loud unplugged, but the sound is great, and this is designed primarily to be used plugged in.
The guitar output jack typically provides a monaural signal. Many guitars with active electronics use a jack with an extra contact normally used for stereo. These guitars use the extra contact to break the ground connection to the on-board battery to preserve battery life when the guitar is unplugged. These guitars require a mono plug to close the internal switch and connect the battery to ground. Standard guitar cables use a high-impedance 1⁄4 inch (6.35 mm) mono plug. These have a tip and sleeve configuration referred to as a TS phone connector. The voltage is usually around 1 to 9 millivolts.
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