When Leo and the boys at the big “F” ranch developed the Tele, they put a big slab of steel under the bridge-pickup coil. This reflected the magnetic field up and toward the strings. In the words of Seymour Duncan’s Evan Skopp, this gives it more “crack”—which, if you’re addicted to twang, is a good thing. The better news is that you can attach a plate (sometimes called an elevator plate, because of how it elevates the magnetic field toward the strings) to any single coil whose pole-piece magnets are exposed at the back.

The guitar itself is decent, both my 8-year boy and his guitar teacher like it. But the mini amplifier is a BIG JOKE, seriously - it only uses a 9V battery and so small in size and so low in volume, you can barely hear it. There is a 9V DC power plug port. However, when I plugged in a 9V DC power plug (it is not included, but I found one in my toolbox), it only gave me white noise without any sound (the 9V battery can still give out a little bit volume). Initially, I thought the guitar was broken until I tested it on my home theater, then I realized it was the problem of the useless mini amplifier. I ended up buying a Fender amplifier for my son so that he can play some loud music.

In ’71, Univox introduced what are arguably their coolest-looking amplifiers, the B Group, covered in nifty two-tone blue vinyl. Remember, this was the tail end of the heyday of Kustom, with its colored tuck-and-roll amps, and the two-tone blue with a red-and-white oval logo was boss. The lettering was the same uppercase blocks as on the outline logo. These new Univox amps were hybrids, with solidstate power supplies and lots of tubes – lots! The Univox B Group had two combo and two piggyback guitar amps, two piggyback bass amps and a piggyback PA. It is not known how these were constructed, but because previous amps had Japanese chassis put into Westbury-made cabinets, these were probably built that way also.


SOLD OUT: Here we had a 40+ year old 1972 Alvarez 5080 Acoustic guitar that was built by the master guitar builder Kuzio Yairi. He used 30 year old vintage aged tone woods when they built this guitar over 40 years ago.. that would make this wood arround 70 years old... Thats right...you can say that about a new Martin can we... not going to get tone like this from a new Martin either. This is one high class example replica of the Martin 000-28 this model is quiet rare and beautifully adorned with exotic tone woods plese refer to the pics. Just have a look at the beautiful exotic old growth Jacaranda Brazilian Rosewood back, sides, fingerboard...headstock overlay .., ebony pins with MOP and brass ring all high end classic detailed appointments... notice the real patina this guitar plays real well and has been played and it shows... in a good way to my eyes.. I love it. So will you just have a look... no visable issues, no cracks to be found, inlays, bindings, pickguard, tuners,frets.....all good..and sound is rich and has a nice sustain and is a pleasure to play... fresh from the JVG shop with a fresh bone saddle & nut & new Martin Marquis strings sweet! A must HAVE 40 YEAR OLD VINTAGE YAIRI 000-28 STYLE, Claptons favorite for good reason... SORRY THIS GUITAR HAS SOLD gr8bids@comcast.net Thank you for your interest.
Non Locking Tremolo TREMOLO FAT/SAT MONTAGGIO DEL BRACCIO DEL TREMOLO L'inserimento e la rimozione del braccio del tremolo sono operazioni estremamente semplici. Inserire il braccio nell'apposito foro sulla piastra di base del tremolo. Tirare il braccio per rimuoverlo. REGOLAZIONE DEL BRACCIO DEL TREMOLO (SAT PRO) Per regolare l'altezza del braccio, rimuovere il coperchio della molla del tremolo dal retro della chitarra e utilizzare una chiave a brugola da 3 mm per girare la vite di regolazione dell'altezza sulla parte inferiore del blocco tremolo.
FeaturesThe Gibson LogoAngled HeadstockAdjustable Truss RodNew Asymmetrical Neck Profile22-Fret Rosewood FingerboardAlloy Fret WireTrapezoid Inlays Set-Neck ConstructionPlus Maple TopChambered Mahogany BodyPickups: Gibson Burstbucker ProsTonePros Locking Tune-o-matic Bridge and Locking Stopbar TailpieceNitrocellulose FinishBody BindingCustom-Made PotentiometersLocking Neutrik JackLocking Grover TunersRevolutionary Plek Set UpNew Enlarged Neck Tenon

Trim:  Heel cap: ebony. Fingerboard: ebony bound in white celluloid with scalloped lower end; 24 frets under A and D, 21 nickel-silver frets under G and C; single abalone dots behind 5th, 7th, 9th, 10th (slightly larger), and 15th frets; double mother-of-pearl dots behind 12th fret. Nut: bone. Bridge: mahogany capped with ebony; nickel-silver-plated steel screws to adjust bridge height and pickup contact. Tuners: six nickel-plated steel, worm-gear machine tuners by Grover with convex head surfaces and decoratively cut plate outline. Endpin: black bakelite; extends through tailpiece. Pick guard: imitation tortoise shell plastic raised on wood brace affixed to top with two steel dome-headed screws. Lacquer: dark orange-brown sunburst.
Hopefully now you have a good idea of what to look for in a multi-effects pedal, and what criteria we judge one on. We made this list by going through dozens of forum threads asking for best multi-effects pedal recommendations (we ended up with an initial list of 45 different recommended pedals), and tallying up the ones mentioned the most. We then researched the top 5 by reading as many user reviews as we could find, and went out to test the top 5 ourselves. Here are the winners.
When Martin turned to jobbers rather than direct sales, more variation in cases took place. Depending on what part of the country you bought your Martin, the jobber would supply a similar range of cases - chipboard, hardshell, or deluxe hardshell, from the case manufacturer of their choice. So cases on old Martins can vary greatly. This changed in 1972 with the blue thermoplastic case which was included with the sale of all new Martins.
I say from 0 to 360 degrees because that’s the simplest way to envision the “full circle” of the phase relationship, and in reality you can’t walk further around anything than a full circle. Unless you’re a phase shifter. For these pedals, designers talk in terms of a continual shifting of the phase relationship from 0 to, in theory, infinity, depending upon how many shifting stages the circuit contains. The phase shifts by 180 degrees for each stage, so for the typical simple phaser with four stages, we’re talking from 0 to 720 degrees, with three peaks and two notches along the way. Phasers with six, eight and even ten stages have been built for use with guitar. But for many, the simple four-stage circuit is most appealing.
It’s curious to note that also tauted in the ’39 Grossman catalog was the National Res-O-Lectric Pick-up Unit, designed to be added to National and Dobro amplifying guitars. This was not sold as an accessory, but had to be factory-installed for $25. On single-cone guitars, the bridge assembly/cover was replaced with the pickup assembly, faced in gloss black Ebonoid. On tricone guitars the pickup would be built in to the silver cover. It’s not clear if these were also mid-’37 developments or if they appeared closer to the ’39 Grossman catalog publication date.
Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
Learning just a song won't get you far, there will be a point where you just won't be able to learn a song because of its difficulty. First of all you need to learn some chords, scales and study a bit of music theory. Here's one example: Lets compare a song to a poem. You can learn a poem and keep saying it, but if someone asks you the meaning of the poem, you won't be able to say anything. If you just learn how to play a song without knowing any chords, it won't be any good for you. (Btw sorry for bad English) Also if you know the essentials, learning a song will get easier and easier.
For the typical two-figure Boss pedal price, the RC-1 gives you the stereo connection, some onboard memory and a little more recording time. However you do lose the true bypass and analog dry-thru circuit that makes the TC Electronic Ditto so attractive to guitar players. Still, for acoustic rigs, I find the Boss RC-1 to be the most ideal looper pedal option and a better value than something like the Ditto. 

While all acoustic guitars share the same basic construction and design elements, there are important differences that affect their sound and playability. Each guitar shares those basic characteristics above, but now that you know how an acoustic guitar is designed and built, you will want to consider some of the variables that change how each guitar feels and plays. These variables include:


To load a SoundFont in sforzando you can just drag and drop to the desktop or click Instrument, import and navigate to your SoundFont. Another good free program for PC is MuseScore and loading a new SoundFont is done by putting the file in the default Musescore SoundFont folder then selecting View, Sythesizer, Add and Set as Default. Musescore has basic editing capabilities as well as an excellent sheet music/score viewer and editor.

This Charvel is the signature model for Guthrie Govan, widely regarded as one of the finest guitarists around. Its caramelized ash body model is also up there with the finest bolt-ons we’ve ever played. The neck is extremely tight-fitting and held in place with four screws, each recessed into the contoured heel. Like any HSH set up you have huge choice on exactly how you wire it - this is no different. While the outer positions select the full humbuckers, position two voices bridge (slug single coil only) and the middle single coil; position three gives us bridge and neck (both slug single coils); position four offers the screw single coil of the neck pickup with the middle pickup. A ‘secret’ two-way mini toggle that simulates a coil-split via an old-school passive filter (a 0.1 microfarad capacitor). In many ways this feels more like high performance rifle, not a guitar. It gives off a tuned-to-perfection vibe that’s like an instrument you’ve owned for a while, gigged, modified and tweaked. Which in reality is exactly what it is only Charvel and Guthrie Govan have done it for us. But don’t dismiss this as a virtuoso rock shredder axe. Yes, if your technique is up to it, you won’t have a problem there and using just the bridge pickup you’ll probably have all you need: big and ballsy, a hint of a cocked wah-like high end it’s certainly in the JB area. But it’s offset by a pokey PAF-like neck voice, tube-y and soupy but far from one dimensional. If that was it, we’d be smiling. But there’s plenty more... Guthrie Govan’s vision for an all round workhouse that’ll stand up to the rigours of professional touring is superbly realised in this signature. Every detail is wonderfully considered. It’s not a cheap date, but it’s an astonishing guitar: a player’s tool of the highest calibre.
Manufacturing techniques can alter the impact of the variability of other factors. A .strandberg* guitar is made from lightweight but stiff materials. The neck is reinforced with carbon fiber. Each string rests on its own bridge that does not transfer vibrations to the other strings in the same way as a conventional guitar bridge. The bridges themselves are made from light and stiff aircraft aluminium instead of brass or steel as is commonplace. Each component is tightly coupled to the next with no room to vibrate. Regardless of tonewood, your .strandberg* will sound clear, airy, organic, dynamic, and respond quickly to the plucking of strings with a great dynamic range – as a result of the construction itself. The characteristics of different woods and pickups are transferred more effectively than might otherwise be the case. Is this better? Again, it depends on what the musician is after… I’ve come across for example ES-335 players that are intimidated by the responsiveness and dynamics and who become inhibited and self conscious when picking up a .strandberg*. But for most, it’s a pleasant experience that liberates their tone.
Next we look at the features and hardware of the guitar. What brand are the pickups? Is the bridge fixed or is there a tremolo system? Is there a locking nut or anything else to help with tuning stability? Does it come with a case? We also take this opportunity to look at any special features that define the guitar – perhaps a bridge that never goes out of tune, or a control switch that makes the guitar do crazy things.
While many appreciate its bulk of features, there are a few who feel that Fender went overboard, and should've limited the voicings to just a few to ensure that sound quality is not compromised. On the other hand, there are some who felt that the extra features are nice, but they are turned off by the need to use a computer to get full access to all the controls.

And on that (low) note, I’ll wrap up. While many bass parts nowadays are probably laid down with samples and synths, by keyboard players and guitarists, what you’ll get from a real bassist is more than just his sound, it’s the magic in his fingers, and his bass-players’ sense of just what to play to perfectly complement the song—it’s certainly worth a little extra effect to take advantage of what the true masters of the low-end have to offer.


Boss's MS-3 is an ingenious pedalboard solution that gives you programmable loops for three of your own pedals and a host of built-in effects - 112 to be precise. The MS-3 can switch your amp channels, adjust external effects and integrate with MIDI-equipped pedals. Then there’s the built-in tuner, noise suppressor and global EQ. It’s as if Boss looked at everything players could want from a pedalboard controller and crammed it into one compact unit. There are 200 patch memories for saving your expertly tweaked sounds, each with four effects or pedals that can be switched in or out at will, or four presets that can be instantly recalled. The MS-3 is rammed with pristine modulations, all the essential delay and reverb types, as well as a load of Boss specials, such as the dynamic Tera Echo and sequenced tremolo Slicer. Then there’s the niche yet useful effects, such as an acoustic guitar sim, Slow Gear auto fade-in and that sitar sim you never knew you wanted. The drive tones don’t live up to standalone pedals, but for most players, we’d wager those three switchable loop slots will be used for analogue drives, with the ES-3 handling modulation, delay and reverb. A genuinely exciting pedalboard development.
The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.
: : : Does anyone know for sure where these originated. I have been told Vox (the England years) made this flat bodied plank guitar in the skiffle days of early 60's/late 50's. Mine is painted white(by hand) with a large black pick guard that curves to envelope the two chrome "toaster" pickups ,bottom of neck, and three control knobs.The strings have a moveable maple bridge(not secured) and a small chrome hardtail heel.The neck has a zero fret at top and 19 more playing frets.There are dot inlays at the 3rd,5th,seventh,ninth,12th,and 17th frets.The headstock is of natural finish light maple with a top edge cut at a sloping angle like Hofner.It has brass tuning pegs,gears and gear plates and the keys are white plastic.The beautiful short neck is true ,natural maple.Along one of the tuning gear plates is the numbers: 35515 which are etched into the wood. Four bolts without any plate hold the neck base to the plain body and a green decal above the pegs at top face of headstock reads: Shadow. The fret board is rosewoodand is laid on neck without bindings.It has six strings and sounds like a short scale Baritone guitar. It also only has one strap peg at bottom since they used to put the other end of strap on a tuning key. No other holes are seen for any former peg at other end of body(where normally found). Please send any info on this small,early,simple but awesome sounding electric skiffle guitar from England(Vox?).Thanks!!!!!

When Jimi Hendrix came on the scene in the late 1960s, he was like nothing anyone had ever seen before. His ability to use volume, feedback, wah pedals, and other sonic devices to their maximum effect was awe-inspiring. Eric ‘God’ Clapton saw Hendrix for the first time and thought he would be the end to his career. There may be more technically impressive guitar players, but it’s hard to find anyone who played with more adventure or spirit than James Marshall Hendrix.
Up for sale is an Ibanez RGA32 guitar equipped with Metal Works Brushed EMG 57/66 pickups and Sperzel locking tuners. This guitar is in great condition, has never been gigged and has been kept in my smoke free music studio. Guitar Specs: Mahogany body with quilted maple top 3-Piece maple Wizard II neck Bound rosewood fretboard with 24 jumbo frets Gibraltar Standard bridge Pearl dot inlay
Power-valve distortion can also be produced in a dedicated rackmount valve power amp. A modular rackmount setup often involves a rackmount preamp, a rackmount valve power amp, and a rackmount dummy load to attenuate the output to desired volume levels. Some effects pedals internally produce power-valve distortion, including an optional dummy load for use as a power-valve distortion pedal. Such effects units can use a preamp valve such as the 12AX7 in a power-valve circuit configuration (as in the Stephenson's Stage Hog), or use a conventional power valve, such as the EL84 (as in the H&K Crunch Master compact tabletop unit). However, because these are usually placed before the pre-amplifier in the signal chain, they contribute to the overall tone in a different way. Power amplifier distortion may damage speakers.
Two and one half steps down from Drop D. This tuning is most often used by death metal or deathcore musicians, such as Suicide Silence or Whitechapel (both use seven-string guitars and tune down the seventh string a full step). Utilized by bands like Nile, Motograter, Thrice, Filter (on the songs "Columind" and "The Missing" from The Amalgamut and "Drug Boy" and "The Trouble with Angels" from the album of the same name), Dead by April, RED, Ill Niño (on Dead New World) and occasionally Slipknot, Crowbar, Amon Amarth, Five Finger Death Punch, and Parkway Drive. Trapt uses this tuning on their songs "Hollow Man" and "Waiting".
Alternatively – and often most effectively – you can fix phase issues in the digital realm. Record your two-mic signal on two separate tracks, then zoom in on the sound waves in each of the two channels in your DAW’s editing window until they are huge and you’re seeing the full up-and-down crests and troughs of the waves. Now, drag or nudge the sound wave of the ambient mic forward (i.e., to the left of the screen) a few milliseconds at a time until the sound waves line up perfectly. Listen again, and you should hear a very different blend that is fuller, richer, and more “together.”

Just bought a Martin D-18GE beautiful sunburst from Franklin Guitar today and was absolutely blown away by the hospitality, friendly atmosphere and knowledge I was met with. I've never written a revie...w before but this place is so good it deserves praise and recognition! I would recommend anyone who wants to buy any level of guitar with all ranges of experience to go check out Franklin Guitar! From beginners to professionals, this little place has what your looking for and will no doubt be a joyful experience. Thanks Pat! See More
First introduced as a 35th Anniversary Edition Guitar in 2009, it joined Taylor’s standard line up as a Specialty Model in 2010. The Baritone model features a Grand Symphony body and a longer 27-inch scale length which enables it to be tuned from B to B while maintaining normal string tension. It comes in either 6-string or 8-string option. The 8-string models incorporates a pair of octave strings that double the 3rd and 4th (D and A) strings. Solid wood back and sides available for the Baritone model are Tropical mahogany or Indian Rosewood with rosewood binding and an abalone rosette.
Whatever budget you’re on, you will always be able to find a suitable guitar. Even in the $100 price range you can find some models that play nicely. However, in that super-budget market there is a lot of garbage, so be careful. There’s a difference between ‘affordable’ and ‘cheap’, so do your research before buying something that may offer no value.
Now that you know the general protocol to a pedal chain, remember there are no strict rules in music. Introducing alternative ways of setting up your effect signals is what starts new trends and even leads to the development of new genres. There are also indisputably more choices in pedals then ever before. Vintage classics have been reissued in mass, are sounding better then ever, and have become affordable (but I doubt you’ll see that DeArmond toaster pedal version any time soon).
I string up the guitar and tune it to standard pitch. Put the guitar in playing position and capo the first fret. I hold the 6th string down at the last fret as that is where the neck joins the body. Then I turn truss rod right (clockwise) until there is no relief hardly if any bounce at the 7th and 9th frets using the 6th string as straight edge, don't go too far just maybe a slight tiny bounce because you don't want to backbow the neck. Then I simply turn the truss rod left counterclockwise 1/4 of a turn for relief and that's it. Take capo off and set action at 12th fret with 6th string 5/64 and 1st string 3/64.

The Venue has an adjustable gain feature designed for acoustics, which is compatible with both passive and active electronic systems. This is, of course, in addition to the five-band EQ we mentioned earlier. For feedback control there's a Garret Null Notch filter and a clipping light that will tell you when you're feeding back or when you need to cut down your output. Other perks include a full chromatic tuner and a boost button that gives you a nine decibel jump, ideal for solos or instrumentals.


Through the 19th century, guitars were part of a musical ensemble. As performance spaces increased in size, stringed instruments like guitars were hard to hear over other instruments, especially horns. As a result, the traditional Spanish-style acoustic guitar—wooden with a flat top, a symmetrical hollow body, a sound hole in the center, and gut strings—began to change in size, shape, and construction. For example, in the late 1890s, Orville Gibson, founder of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company, designed a guitar with an arched (or curved) top that was stronger and louder than the earlier flat-top design.
Think "guitar god," and a particular image of Jimi Hendrix springs to mind: Hendrix kneeling, shamanlike, before his Fender Stratocaster, his hands seeming to coax flames from the instrument. Captured by photographer Jim Marshall at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, this image is burned into the collective consciousness of American rock culture in the same way that Hendrix's signature sound still echoes through the years. His defiant rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner" isn't quite a technical masterpiece -- one could almost play the melody with a single finger. What elevates the song is its sound. To get that dissonant wailing, Hendrix uses two effects: an Arbiter Fuzz Face and the Vox Wah-Wah [source: Trynka].
Pickup adjustments are also very important, and I set the height of my pickups by ear. I typically like the bass side of each pickup to be a bit lower than the treble side, so the wound strings don’t overpower the treble strings. Also, strings generate more energy and volume in the area closer to the neck, so I typically set neck pickups lower than bridge pickups.
A common acoustic body style that makes use of a very large soundboard is the dreadnought. Dreadnoughts are distinctive for their square bouts, wide waists, and 14-fret necks. The first dreadnought was developed in 1916, and it has been gaining in popularity ever since. Dreadnoughts are very popular among bluegrass guitarists due to their powerful, driving sound.
Chicago’s vintage guitar shop is located in Ravenswood just west of Lincoln Square. Rock N Roll Vintage is your one stop shop in Chicago for new guitars, vintage guitars, Chicago guitar lessons, guitar pedals, and we are currently the largest synth dealer in the Midwest. Looking for a specific guitar? Rock N Roll Vintage Guitar Shop carries Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Rickenbacker and other popular guitars and basses including boutique amps. We have one of the largest selections of effects pedals in Chicago with many hard to find boutique pedal brands.
Family Owned and Operated, Lamb's Music has been serving the musical metroplex for over 30 years. Offering warranty on almost every brand of stringed instrument, Lamb's Music has been the go-to spot for repairs and customizations for companies like Guitar Center, Gibson, Gretsch,Taylor Guitars, and Fender Musical Instruments as well as many others.  
How a guitar feels is highly subjective – after all, even guitarists come in all shapes and sizes. While the acoustics in our list are all made in such a way that most guitarists will find them comfortable and easy to play, there’s still no beating being able to try several models out so you can choose which one feels like it’s a part of your body.
So you’re thinking about building an electric guitar. Well, it’s a very rewarding experience when it’s done right, and you have the ultimate freedom to make it whatever you want. On top of that, it can be a money saving alternative to the hefty price of a good instrument, if you’re willing to invest your time. Or if you’re just planning on undertaking a fun project, it can certainly fit that bill too.
A steel-string guitar tuned to concert pitch endures a tension of about 180 pounds (800 N) on the top of the guitar from the strings[citation needed]. The X-bracing system has been shown to be an efficient technique for preventing the top of the guitar from warping under this force. The braces are generally carved, scalloped and tuned to improve resonance and integrity of the guitar top, such capability being performed by skilled artisans and not readily reproducible by machine[citation needed]. This work is an important factor in determining the timbre of the guitar and a major determinant in the observation that rarely do two guitars ever sound alike, even though they are ostensibly identical in construction.

Continuing with the rock and metal theme we’ve got going, we come to the Schecter Omen 6. At the time of this writing, the Omen 6’s price on Amazon is about $50 cheaper than you’ll find anywhere else. I hope that continues long after I publish this, because the Omen 6 is an amazing guitar and finding it under $300 is a steal (and may not last long).


Guitar pedals are perfect for this. Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, because you should never try to circuit bend anything mains-powered, they can run off 9V batteries. Secondly, their internal circuitry is usually very simple, and they already have audio I/O. Thirdly, you can get them for almost no money from eBay, and the other tools required — soldering iron, wire, switches, and so on — are also very cheap. There's an almost infinite number of sonic possibilities to be explored here, from finding new ways to process a signal (of course you don't just have to use them with guitars) to creating a machine that goes 'Eeeeeeooooowsquelch blipipipip' in a different way every time you turn it on — and who would say no to that for less than a tenner?
A common complaint with the Bullet Strat among our panelists was that the single-coil middle and neck pickups buzzed too much. This is the nature of single-coil pickups. The nice thing about the HSS Bullet Strat is that you do have one humbucker, and setting the pickup selector to combine the bridge and middle or middle and neck pickups will also cancel the buzz. Also, the use of a single-coil pickup in the neck position makes it difficult to get the mellow, jazzy tones that you’ll get from guitars that have a humbucker in the neck position, but we figure few beginners are looking for that sound.

The American Deluxe Telecaster (introduced in 1998; upgraded in 2004, 2008, and 2010) features a pair of Samarium Cobalt Noiseless pickups and the S-1 switching system. Models made prior to 2004 featured two Fender Vintage Noiseless Tele single-coils, Fender/Fishman Powerbridge piezo system and 4-bolt neck fixing. Other refinements include a bound contoured alder or ash body and an abalone dot-inlaid maple neck with rosewood or maple fingerboard, 22 medium-jumbo frets, rolled fingerboard edges, and highly detailed nut and fret work. The HH model sported an ebony fingerboard, quilted or flamed maple top and a pair of Enforcer humbuckers with S-1 switching (discontinued as of 2008). As of March 23, 2010, Fender updated the American Deluxe Telecaster with a compound radius maple neck, N3 Noiseless Tele pickups and a reconfigured S-1 switching system for wider sonic possibilities. The new model now sports staggered, locking tuning machines, which provide better break angle over the nut for increased sustain and improved tuning stability.


Hand built with the same precision as our larger guitars, just 25% smaller.  Great for travel, ideal for children struggling to get their arms around full size guitars, fantastic second guitar for the office.  Because it has a smaller box design our Travel will have a smaller sound (like any smaller guitar) but our Travel Electric with built in auto tuner allows you to plug into any amplifier or PA system giving you the same power as our full size guitars.

In the early 1950s, pioneering rock guitarist Willie Johnson of Howlin' Wolf′s band began deliberately increasing gain beyond its intended levels to produce "warm" distorted sounds.[3] Guitar Slim also experimented with distorted overtones, which can be heard in his hit electric blues song "The Things That I Used to Do" (1953).[8] Chuck Berry's 1955 classic "Maybellene" features a guitar solo with warm overtones created by his small valve amplifier.[9] Pat Hare produced heavily distorted power chords on his electric guitar for records such as James Cotton's "Cotton Crop Blues" (1954) as well as his own "I'm Gonna Murder My Baby" (1954), creating "a grittier, nastier, more ferocious electric guitar sound,"[10] accomplished by turning the volume knob on his amplifier "all the way to the right until the speaker was screaming."[11]


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One of the most important things when choosing your guitar is of course the sound - read the study on electric guitar sounds. It’s best if you’re able to try different guitars out in a music shop, and the staff there will most likely be happy to present you with different options that are good for beginners. There you will also have the chance to see how the different guitars feel to play, and have the opportunity to ask the staff if you have any questions or need any advice.
Guitar amp modeling devices and software can reproduce various guitar-specific distortion qualities that are associated with a range of popular "stomp box" pedals and amplifiers. Amp modeling devices typically use digital signal processing to recreate the sound of plugging into analogue pedals and overdriven valve amplifiers. The most sophisticated devices allow the user to customize the simulated results of using different preamp, power-tube, speaker distortion, speaker cabinet, and microphone placement combinations. For example, a guitarist using a small amp modeling pedal could simulate the sound of plugging their electric guitar into a heavy vintage valve amplifier and a stack of 8 X 10" speaker cabinets.
I had an Epi G400, MIK, I found for $175 used, in a pawn. It was decent enough enough but I found the pickups (humbuckers) a bit muddy. I subsequently picked up a Valkyrie II on closeout when they changed over to the current Valkyrie shape, for $99 + shipping. It played just as good but I was able to get one with P-90's, not available on the Epi. I preferred the P-90's and sold the Epi G400. I still have the Valkyrie:
Most modern effects use solid-state electronics or computer chips. Some effects, particularly older ones such as Leslie speakers and spring reverbs, use mechanical components or vacuum tubes. Effects are often used as stompboxes, which are typically placed on the floor and controlled with footswitches. They are also built into amplifiers, tabletop units designed for DJs and record producers, and rackmounts, and are widely used as software VSTs.
The wonders of digital delay arrived on the pedalboard in the early 1980s with what seemed massive capabilities of long delays, clean signal reproductions, and the endless fun of one, two, or up to 16 seconds of looping delay. In many cases, in the early days, reproductions weren’t really all that clean (or were cleaner than analog, but colder and harsher too), and many delays were prone to digital distortion if pushed, or poor resolution on the decay of the signal. Even so, the techno-power of the new technology stamped all over the bones of the old analog delay units, and for a time threatened to bury them entirely. 

If you’ve never listened to Chet Atkins, you should do it right now. The rockabilly player was a skilled instrumental guitar player, playing most of his songs without any backing from other musicians. For a great sample of his talent, give a listen to his version of “Mr. Sandman.” His alternating thumb rhythm and syncopated melodies are marvels of beauty and precision on the instrument.


I will not take my guitars anywhere else. You just do not get better, more professional service than at Franklin Guitar. I have played guitar for a long time and I have been in hundreds of guitar stores, and this is one of the best. You won't get the "hey don't touch that" or they "what's it going to take to get you into one of those guitars?" treatment. You get treated like a valued customer. Also a lot (most) of independent guitar stores have terrible assortments of guitars for sale, but not Franklin Guitars. They have a great variety of quality instruments. Plus, they have some really cool, unique guitars. A place like this is so rare nowadays.

Many modern processors have such great presets you'll never need to get delve any further to create your own. However, almost all units with presets allow you to easily create your own favorite presets. You can start with a factory preset, tweak the sounds to your taste, then save it in your own location to be recalled at the touch of a button while you're playing.


When Schecter was first founded in 1976, the company’s original purpose was to produce replacement parts for other guitar manufacturers. In 1979, they produced their first guitar and it all took off from there. Today, Schecter is one of the highest rated guitar brands. If you’re looking for a guitar to play metal in particular, Schecter could be the brand for you. Schecter is well-known for their brutal heavy metal sounds. They have a decent range of models, including basses. Schecter’s arguably most famous guitars are the Hellraiser series. They are usually closer to $1000, but it could be worth it for you. When played correctly, the heavy metal distortions and gains that blast out of the amp is fantastic and if you’re a bit more gentle you can even get some softer sounds out of it. The same can be said with most Schecter models, but they favour heavy metal, so if you’re not looking to play heavy metal, you might want to look elsewhere.
While Taylor Guitars is most famous for our acoustic guitars, we are also proud of our line of unique electric guitars. We have the T5, our original hollowbody hybrid that bridges both worlds like no other guitar. Check out our T5z, the smaller hybrid with a compact body that electric players will love. And be sure to try the T3, our inspired take on the semi-hollowbody guitar with a sound that comes alive with amazing pickup flavors, plus coil-splitting and tone-shaping versatility.
Semi-acoustic guitars have hollow bodies which give them a warmer and more dynamic range of sounds. They are vulnerable to unwanted feedback as the distorted sound increases the chances of feedback. That’s why we don’t see rock and metal musicians playing a semi-acoustic guitar. Many guitars have solid blocks inside for decreasing the feedback factor. Check out our list of semi-acoustic electric guitars here.
Myself, were my budget less than a thousand then I'm dropping a big name like Martin of my list entirely, and probably I'm dropping Taylor too. Seagull makes some solid wood instruments for around $700...no idea how much the electronics tack onto the price, but I'm betting a Seagull SWS guitar with electronics could be had at $900 or so with ...just the slightest of scratches or blemishes.

The actual value of the pot itself does not affect the input to output voltage ratio, but it does alter the peak frequency of the pickup. If you want a brighter sound from your pickups, use a pot with a larger total resistance. If you want a darker sound, use a smaller total resistance. In general, 250kΩ pots are used with single-coil pickups and 500kΩ pots are used with humbucking pickups.
I have a problem with the way the neck bows going down from the low to high e strings. I have a Gibson les paul with the recent change in seasons I notice it on all my guitars I can adjust it out but it will some times just do the same thing, I see this on my fender and my Acoustic guitars as well when I adjust this I have a lot of problems with tuning I know this is not exactly what we were talking about but jut a question I wanted to ask I hope I made what I am saying plain enough I am pretty new to all of this. Thank you for all the great info.
On a Gibson type (like the Les Paul, 335 or SG) there are four knobs, one set of volume and tone controls for each of two pickups. The top two are volume and tone for the neck (Rythm) pickup. The bottom two are for the bridge (Treble) pickup. In the middle switch position, both sets of controls are available. If you have a Gibson type with three pickups the control layout can vary from instrument to instrument. The Epiphone Les Paul SG with three pickups has three volumes (one for each pickup) and a single (or master) tone control just next to the output jack. The Ace Frehley Les Paul (3 pickups) layout is such where the neck (Rythm) pickup is controlled by the top pair, the bridge (Treble) pickup is controlled by the bottom pair and the middle switch position activates the bridge and middle pickups that are controlled by the bottom set (Treble) of knobs.
Explore the myriad wood combinations in the Gibson lineup and see what’s right for you. Trying to finetune your tone without regard to what your wood is kicking out in the first place can be a frustrating venture, but learn to work with the organic template of each specific model, and you’re already swimming with the tide. Be at one with the heart of the wood, tune in to the voice that resonates deep within even the unplugged electric guitar, and you will go a long way toward understanding, and crafting, your own unique tone.
While we are on the subject of cute little things, I want you to consider the idea of a small amplifier with a cute name but with the looks of Marlon Brando in his early years. Wait, no, that is incredibly freaky and not something anyone wants to imagine. I mean how would you even connect your guitar to that? What I mean is imagine an incredibly handsome amplifier. Well, now that you have, let me ruin your dreams by directing your attention at the pignose 7-10 legendary portable amplifier, which is an actually rather handsome piece of equipment. The great thing about this beautiful box is that it also has a great sound, comparable to that of its betters (read: of the more expensive models). Being very light and fun to possess, it is highly portable and loud enough to captivate audiences. A great, affordable small amplifier that does not look Marlon Brando in any way, and thank god for that.
National Reso-Phonic Guitars - World renowned for their resonator instruments. Unlike acoustic guitars, where the vibration of the wooden body creates the sound, in a resonator instrument the body acts as a speaker cabinet. When the strings are plucked, the vibration is transmitted through the saddle to the resonator. The resonator, or speaker cone, then amplifies that vibration.
The Supro line continued to grow in 1938, as can be seen in the CMI catalog. Still around was the Supro Spanish Guitar, now called the Supro Avalon Spanish Guitar, other than the name change (which is not featured on the guitar, as far I can ascertain), it is identical. Gone are the wood-bodied, frumpy-pear Supro Hawaiian Model and the Model D amplifier, although a Supro Special amplifier is mentioned (and not described) as being available for $40, the same price as the Model D. One and the same?
We also decided to test a separate group of smaller guitars with scale lengths (the distance from the string nut at the top of the neck to the bridge that supports the strings on the body) in the range of 22 inches, as compared with 24.75 to 25.5 inches for most full-size electric guitars. These models may be more comfortable for kids because their smaller hands won’t have to stretch as far, and many adults also like them because their compact size makes them easier to travel with.
I was paging through my daughter's Rolling Stone Magazine today and saw a small article with three different artists that use Harmony Guitars and they were singing their praises. I'm an old dude (or shall we say vintage)who's not familiar with all of the new bands popping up today, so I can't even tell you who these artists are. However, I did find it interesting that Rolling Stone did a spot on these guitars. I was too young to get my hands on many Harmonies when I was a kid, so I can't comment on their quality, but I know they were budget guitars and weren't considered anything special back then.
Basic distortion boxes can be built around a simple network of transistors and clipping diodes, to both boost the signal and alter the waveform. Most units, however, very roughly resemble the standard mass-production overdrives detailed above, with the heavy work done by opamps, some tone-shaping stages, and input/output buffers. The ProCo Rat set the standard for heavy distortion sounds above and beyond the capabilities of the MXR Distortion + and the Ibanez Tube Screamer, although in fact its design is surprisingly similar to the former (discussed above), with silicon diodes in place of germanium, and an added tone control.

This is such a trite discussion. There are many more choices than Fender and Gibson, and to boil it down to those two players is detrimental to the industry and by extension musicians of all skill levels. Those companies made great innovations and came out with classic models, and the industry owes them a whole lot. But to me, you get more points for continued innovation, not making a few great models then resting on laurels for the next 100 years.
Quality replacement pot from Bourns with DPDT pull switch for coil tap or other switched application.   Knurled 1/4" shaft fits most knobs.  Low torque, carbon resistive element, great replacement in many applications using passive humbucker or single-coil pickups.   Note that length of threaded part of shaft is 3/8" - measure to make sure that this is long enough for your application, especially if the pot mounts through the wooden guitar body.   (This pot will not work on Les Pauls, for example).  1 Meg Ohm, Special A2 taper preferred by guitar and bass players.  Nut and washer included.   Note: threaded bushing diameter is 3/8", like most 24mm "quarter-sized" pots.   Both pot and switch terminals are solder lugs.   Not designed for PC board insertion.
Guitar combo amplifiers were at first used with bass guitars and electric pianos, but these instruments produce a wider frequency range and need a full-range speaker system. Much more amplifier power is required to reproduce low-frequency sound, especially at high volume. Reproducing low frequencies also requires a suitable woofer or subwoofer speaker and enclosure, with bass cabinets often being larger in size than a cabinet for mid-range or high-range sounds. As well, the open-back cabinets used on many electric guitar amps, while effective for electric guitar, do not have good bass reproduction.
This brings us to the end of the list of best electric guitars in India. Yamaha Pacifica PAC012 Electric Guitar is our top pick because it is a versatile instrument that can play different types of music and it comes from a reputed brand which ensures quality and playability of the guitar. In addition, it has a premium look and feel and some great features.
Giannini guitars were (and are) made by the Tranquilo Giannini S.A. factory, Carlos Weber 124, Sao Paolo, Brazil. They are generally known for being well-made instruments featuring very fancy Brazilian hardwood veneers, as well as for the strange-shaped asymmetrical CraViola models. Probably the most famous, indeed, perhaps only famous, endorser of Giannini guitars was José Feliciano. No reference materials were available on the early Giannini guitars. A catalog from 1971 is available, with a snapshot of the line that probably goes back at least a decade, and certainly forward.
Umm, no. Jimmy Page and Hendrix have both alluded to the fact that without Robert Johnson, they would never have existed. His albums were released before the 50's and 60's. To think that most of these guitarists (and by effect the people influenced those artists as well) didn't have their hands on Robert Johnson or Mississippi John Hurt albums which they learned from is preposterous. Please stop typing.
	Ibanez Artcore AF75 Electric Guitar	Another hollow body guitar to whet your appetite! The Ibanez Artcore AF75 isn’t as “old” as the other models here but it has earned a huge following because of its affordability, quality workmanship and versatile sound. Suitable for a variety of music styles, the Ibanez AF75 Artcore is also perfect for beginners eager to get started on a moderate budget.	

I was at a friends house and he had a couple of his guitar playing buddies over. We got to talking about guitar repair and setups and such. Then one the guys said “the guy I use is the be...st ever...”, and I was all like, “yeah I’m sure the guy you use is great, but the guy I know is better”. This went on, back and forth for a few minutes, when he blurted out, “I use the Cigainero brothers...”. I said “cool, me too” See More

Fender (380) Fender Custom Shop (110) Gibson (455) Gibson Custom (314) Epiphone (256) Ibanez (881) ESP (705) Dean (389) Jackson (431) Music Man (50) Gretsch Guitars (243) Daisy Rock (36) Paul Reed Smith (273) Washburn (142) Yamaha (50) EVH (7) Schecter (589) G&L (92) Squier by Fender (97) Danelectro (8) Peavey (49) Steinberger (11) Brian May Guitars (3) B.C. Rich (156) Rickenbacker (39) Laguna (11) Godin (105) Dan Armstrong (1) Parker (45) Traveler (26) Kramer (27) Hamer (55) Michael Kelly (61) Hagstrom (81) Jay Turser (44) Disney by Washburn (1) Fernandes (78) Taylor (41) Italia (48) DiPinto (15) Axl (34) Hohner (5) Spector (7) Wilson Brothers (7) Moog (1) Valley Arts (6) Breedlove (3) Hallmark (11) Minarik (4) Hofner (18) Rogue (5) Vox (9) Kay Vintage Reissue Guitars (1) Charvel (75) Richmond by Godin (6) Sterling by Music Man (22) Aria (62) Normandy (11) Luna (9) Cort (106) Guild (20) Alvarez (5) Saga (9) Johnson Guitars (9) Mitchell (7) Conklin (22) DeArmond (13) Voyage-Air (2) Lace (5) Silvertone Guitar (13) Titanic Guitars (4) Fret King (101) Ruokangas (13) Framus (129) Collings (15) Leather Guitars (7) Vigier Guitars (38) Jarrell Guitars (23) Peerless Guitars (36) Reverend (93) Carvin (54) Benedetto (14) Maton Guitars (12) DBZ Guitars (102) Line 6 (12) Boulder Creek (3) Stagg (1) Flight (3) Cruzer (5) Behringer (1) Vintage (38) Chapman Guitars (39) Legator Guitars (139) Caparison (44) Heritage Guitars (26) Ashton (1) Strandberg (37) Kiesel (98) Aristides (5) D`Angelico Guitars (29) Wylde Audio (15) Solar Guitars (23)
Hi Teo, both amps are great for beginners. I have both personally, so I know that the Vox is great for classic British tones and some heavy Rock n Roll distortion, however, if you want a more heavy metal sound the Orange would suit that better as the overdrive is very powerful. It comes down to personal preference really so I suggest you try both out! -Lee
Chorus pedals really made their mark in the 80’s with the likes of the Boss CE-1 and CE-2, the Electro Harmonix Small Clone and the TC Electronics Stereo Chorus. I found a nice definition of chorusing on Wikipedia: “Chorus pedals mimic the effect choirs and string orchestras produce naturally by mixing sounds with slight differences in timbre and pitch. A chorus effect splits the instrument-to-amplifier audio signal, and adds a slight delay and frequency variations or “vibrato” to part of the signal while leaving the rest unaltered.” A chorus is a modulation effect but the modulation we hear is produced by delaying the wet signal a very short duration causing the doubling effect we hear. So it is actually a time based effect.
I have an old Montclair that my uncle modified. He told me that is a '52 but the info here dates it as '60-62 if I remember correctly. I just registered over at the forum, I thought you guys might get a kick out of seeing this guitar. My uncle stripped almost all the paint, there's a bit under the bottom of the neck just to show how it was. He added a hand carved bridge and custom binding on the backside. Also there are a few other unique mods. I really am interested to see what you think about this guitar. It is my main player and has been for years now, an amazing sounding punchy guitar. Hopefully I'll be able to post up some pics at the forum. Cheers! -Gabriel-

Of course, any item is only worth what a willing buyer will pay to a willing seller. iGuide?is "just a guide." Please be aware that PRICES VARY WIDELY from region to region. Current estimated values are the result of much research. And we invite anyone to help add and update data. Read the "What's A Wiki" section below for more info on how to help.


When discussing the science of tone, it’s safe to assume that we all know how electric guitars work. Pickups are electro-magnets that sense string vibrations and produce a signal that ultimately blares out of the amplifier. Of course, we all know that myriad other factors influence the sound, as well. Body shape, wood choice, string selection, pedal effects, rack effects, humidity, amount of people in the room, and the guitar player’s recent fight with his girlfriend are just some of the items that can alter a guitar tone from performance to performance.

Unfortunately, a simple pickup with a single coil of wire is just as good at picking up stray electrical energy from power supplies and other interference, so it generates a certain amount of unwanted, background noise. Some guitars solve this problem using what are known as humbucking pickups. These have two coils of wire, arranged so they capture double the signal from the moving guitar strings to produce a richer sound. Each coil is wired up so any stray "hum" it captures from nearby electrical equipment is canceled out by the other coil. Most guitars have two or more pickups, which create a variety of different effects. Typically, there's one pickup under the bridge of the guitar (where the strings are supported) and another one slightly higher up at the bottom of the "neck" (the part of the guitar that sticks out of the main body).
Which got me to thinking about the history of American guitar companies. Many famous brands of guitars which started production here in the USA now exist as a name being used by an unrelated company for importing guitars into this country. Other brands are still being made but ownership has passed to one of a few big guitar companies. It’s difficult to trace this history without a “score card”.
Unlike many of the other pedals, which are designed to create dramatic or exciting effects, these units take care of the less glamorous (but still very important) jobs in creating your tone. Sound-conditioning effects are the ones that will give the finishing touches to your sound, making the difference between “amateur garage band” and “international touring guitarist.”

In the 1980s it seemed like Washburn guitars were everywhere, and they were leaders in the hard rock and metal guitar genre. Even though they aren’t quite as prominent as they once were, they still feature some nice guitars in their lineup. From metal to jazz and anywhere in between, Washburn has you covered. With signature models for Paul Stanley and Nuno Bettencourt, they still have strong name recognition in the rock world.
The Fender Blues Junior III has quickly become an industry standard amplifier for those chasing that coveted creamy Fender Blues tone. You have 15 watts of pure tube warmth in an easily transportable package and gorgeous sounds emanating from the 3 x 12AX7 preamp tubes and 2 x EL84 Power tubes. A perfect amplifier for small gigs and practice rooms as well as those in need of a quality amp to record with.

COST – I have touched upon this topic several times maybe but I feel like I need to reiterate. Amps are usually not a cheap thing to come by, especially if you want a tube amp. BUT practice amps are good because they help beginners develop their skills without having to spend several hundred. Needless to mention, even practice amps come at various prices. For instance, Donner Electric Guitar Amplifier 10 Watt Classical Guitar AMP DEA‌-1 we talked about is twice as cheap as Roland CUBE‌-10GX 10W 1×8 Guitar Combo Amp. While price often is a good guideline to which model is better you should always keep in mind that more famous brands will have more expensive models even in the cheap sections. Apart from that, keep in mind that an amp having a lot of great features and effects does not mean it’s good.  
Almost every guitar you see on our website is available in our Chicago guitar showroom. While we carry hard-to-find, top of the line vintage guitars, Rock N Roll Vintage Guitar Shop also carries new guitars and basses from Fender (Squire), Martin, Seagull, Lakland, Hofner, Kay, Hanson, EGC, and other top brands. You can also find top of the line amps including Ampeg, Analog Outfitters, Divided By 13, Fender, Hi-Tone, Laney, Magnatone and Orange to name a few.
Along with repairing instruments, we do complete restorations. Restorations often come in the way of family heirlooms and antique finds. After acquiring these instruments, you may think of them as only keepsakes, or something to put a shelf. We want to take these old instruments and restore them to their full use. There's nothing like playing on a violin or guitar that's been in the family for generations, and we want you to experience that.
Also joining the Univox amp line in ’71 (illustrated in a ’72 flyer) was the Univox U-4100 Minimax Amplifier, already showing a different style, with dark tolex covering but still the oval logo plate on the upper left of the grille, now covered in black with vertical “dotted” lines (surrounded by a white vinyl strip). The Minimax was designed for use with bass, organ, electric piano or guitar, but really was a bass combo amp. It packed 105 watts through a 15″ Special Design speaker with 27-ounce Alnico magnet and 21/2″ voice coil, powered by 11 transistors, no tubes. The back-mounted chassis had two channels with high and low inputs, plus volume, bass and treble controls for each channel. Recommended especially for keyboards was an optional UHF-2 High Frequency Horns unit with two horns for extra bite. The flyer for this amp was still in the 1980 Unicord book, but a ’79 price list no longer mentions it, and it was probably long gone, though some may still have been in stock.
Jackson is USA based guitar company founded by Grover Jackson. The company is the manufacturer of electric guitars or electric bass guitars. These electric guitars have a pointed headstock and are a typical rock style guitar popular amongst rock and metal band members. This is the style of electric and acoustic guitar that has a sleek layout and style. Not only do they provide great style but also deliver a higher sound quality. The starting price of a Jackson electric guitar is 12,500 INR approximately.
Usually, electric guitars have six metallic strings – although there are certain variants used in specific musical styles with seven or even a dozen strings (six pairs). This kind of guitar is used in all kinds of musical styles, from jazz, to metal, pop... and of course Rock'n'Roll music. Actually, the origins of the electric guitar can be traced back to the 1930s Swing-era Jazz movement, when guitarists started experimenting with steel pickups adapted to their hollow-bodied instruments, as a way to get a louder, more substantial sound than what would be possible from a regular guitar. The first commercial electric guitars came up in the mid 1940s, and by then a solid-body was already in use – thus introducing the much familiar look that's now typically associated with electric guitars.
In a way, guitars are a lot like cars — spending more money can get you more performance through different specs and trims. The extra money usually goes into paying for better parts rather than more options; there aren’t a whole lot of places to add to a guitar (unless you want the ZZ Top spinner installed). Big bucks can get you better quality wood, a nicer finish, higher-end hardware, and fancier inlays. Some of these upgrades can alter the sound or simply make help playability. For example, the same guitar cut from poplar won’t sound as good as one cut from alder wood. Better tuners mean your axe will go out of tune less often. That said, some guitars will offer features that others don’t, such as tremolos and automatic tuning. Do your research and, as always, know what you need versus what you simply want.

Rule 1 - There is a logical order for groups of effects. Some effects remove or add certain amount of frequencies, some change the basic shape of the audio waveform, and others react to the shape and amplitude of the waveform. Those are three main types of effects that logically can't come in any other order than they were just listed, or you end up with amateur results. The reason for that becomes clear in the next rules.


We've had a thread here in the last couple months about Squires, with some pretty discerning forum members praising their quality and tone. You don't need to spend a lot of money these days for a good guitar. The one the OP bought was years ago. The fierce competition in the guitar market since the economy went bad, has forced manufacturers to up their game, and recent production is of a much higher standard.
Dude, John Mayer? unbelievable. Angus young, Gary moore I agree Eric Clapton you bet. but, it is an opinion. I think Michael Schenker is badass, and what about Steve Morse. I just saw Rush in Rio, and I forgot just how good Alex lifeson is. What about George Lynch? Tony MacAlpine. so I will let you have John Mayer, because he makes you feel something, for me, it's nausea…..Oh, and I forgot Brian May. Doyle Bramhall, I could go on.
Growing popularity of the guitar in the early 1900s, fueled by the growing popularity of folk music and country and western music, led to a demand for louder and more percussive guitars. In response, many companies began to use metal strings instead of catgut. These became known as steel-string guitars. By 1921, Martin had focused production towards this type of guitar.
The instruments have been set up at the factory. However, time, temperature, and transportation are a few of the many things that can cause a guitar to go out of "intonation". We recommend that you get your new guitar set up by a qualified luthier upon delivery. We recommend taking it to a qualified guitar tech for a set up. They will adjust the neck and bridge to take out the buzzing. We ensure that before shipment there is no evident of fret buzz before shipment and the guitar plays beautifully since our professional guitar technicians inspect each instrument by hand, then perform a full, and precision setup. All brand new guitars need proper setup after shipment to suit your personal preference that would strongly correlate to your playing style. We believe that your Local Guitar Shop can properly and safely adjust the truss rod and setup the guitar correctly for issues of fret buzz and bow neck. Truss rod adjustments are made to alter the straightness (flatness) of the neck. Truss rods often require adjusting when temperature and humidity change the amount of bow in the neck. Weather, specifically temperature and humidity, may have a dramatic impact on the way your instrument plays. All instrument woods expand and contract with seasonal actuations in temperature and humidity, and naturally, string height and playing action are affected. The neck needs a simple truss rod adjustment to correct any problems like fret buzz and bow neck which can be easily done by guitar experts. And also, you may adjust the bar of bridge. Please be advised that guitar necks are crafted from wood, and they will sometimes shift during shipping and as the temperature/humidity/elevation changes. An important part of maintaining your guitar is knowing how to adjust the truss rod. When a guitar experiences temperature and humidity swings, such as when seasons change, it can develop a slight bow in the neck that results in a guitar that plays buzzy or is suddenly much harder to fret. If this situation occurs, you can often correct the problem simply by tightening or loosening the truss rod.
Hmm… you still want to buy an electric guitar first up? Okay, but again spend extra money on a guitar that plays well, will keep its value and feels perfect in your hands. In other words, don’t focus too much on paying for extras like custom pick-ups, locking nuts and electronics you don’t need just yet. At the moment it’s all about fingers and hands, not foot-pedals.
We have taken a look at the many varieties of electric guitars available in today’s market (you can read about the types of acoustic guitars and even guitar strings as well).  With this many options, it is wise to consider the genre and tone you are searching for by researching what your favorite artists choose to craft their sound.   Your choice may be based upon visual appeal and cool factor, but make sure the instrument you choose is capable of producing the tone of the style of music you play from your heart!  It's a large selection of body styles but hopefully now you're also comfortable with all of the sounds of the various types of electric guitars.
Artwork: George Beauchamp's original "frying-pan" electric guitar design from 1934. On the right, you can see a top view of the guitar with the pickup unit shown in dark blue and the pickup coil (green) sitting underneath the six strings (shown in orange). On the left, there's an end-on, cross-section of the pickup unit (looking down from the head of the guitar toward the bridge). You can see that Beauchamp has used a pair of horseshoe magnets, with their north poles (red) and south poles (blue) aligned and the strings threading between them. The pickup sits between the magnets under the strings. From US Patent 2,089,171: Electrical Stringed Musical Instrument by George Beauchamp (filed June 2, 1934, issued August 10, 1937). Artwork courtesy of US Patent and Trademark Office.
Edit: After reading everyone's comments I've decided to let the technician give my strat a first time setup and I'll try to absorb any information I can in order to be able to do it myself one day. I realize many of you have some pretty cool guitar shops that'll do a free setup so I'll try to negotiate something. I'll be sure to record the condition of the guitar itself before the setup in case the technician chips it or scratches it. I'll also check out Dan Erlewine's books like the guitarist below suggested. Thank you all for your advice, I really do appreciate it and I hope to be as wise as you all are when it comes to guitars someday.
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For each slot requiring attention, I use a nut file at a slight downwards angle to widen the slot, making sure not to LOWER it (you should do this at a shallower angle than this photo might imply – you want to make sure that you are JUST slightly downwards compared to horizontal). Just take it really easily here, keeping an eye on the front of the slot to make sure you don’t go too far. Repeat this for whichever slots require widening.
Wampler would be considered a boutique pedal manufacturer, which means they'll tend to be a little more expensive, but also more likely to give their products more creative attention and include features like true bypass, which you don't get with Boss pedals. It's also a unique blend of delay layers and reverb tones, which can really draw you in and make you want to deviate from the cheaper reverb pedals.
Description: Body: Mahogany - Body Construction: Solid - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Attachment: Set - Neck Wood: Mahogany - Nut Width: 42mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Jumbo - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Earvana - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Hardware: Chrome, Grover Tuners - Circuit Type: Active - String Instrument Finish: Brown Sunburst
Rock music evolved from Blues, the music of the streets. Most musos’ of the 50s and 60s were poor and guitar amps made to a budget. Some but not all technical principles of amp designs were well thought out. Fender and Marshall were the dominant and most copied brands. The powerful amps had 4 output valves in parallel push-pull and gave approx 60 - 100Watts.
So, I’m 50+, I’ve never played a guitar, and I’m trying to decide on an electric guitar. I’m less concerned with the brand name, more concerned with high quality and workmanship, and last, I like the tone of the guitars played by the late Pete Ham of Badfinger (especially Baby Blue), and Joe Walsh. I know Ham played a cherry red Gibson SG standard, but I’m seeing quite a few mixed reviews on the quality control and workmanship of the current SGs. I listen to a lot of jam band music (i.e. Widespread Panic) and enjoy the rhythm guitar best. So, where to start and stay under $2000 to get a guitar that will produce the type of sound I’m looking for?
Re-amping a DI'd keyboard or bass can really liven up a sound, but if you don't have access to a nice amp or amp modeller, you can simulate the effect by sending the audio to a bus with a delay plug-in set to a short delay time and with the wet signal set to 100 percent and dry to 0 percent. Then send the bus's output to another bus with a distortion (or better still, a guitar amplifier emulator) plug-in inserted. This simulates the delay you get from miking up a speaker, and if you blend this in with the DI'd sound, it can give the recording a live feel — especially if you use a convolution reverb to add some 'room' ambience. You may also want to roll off the very low and high frequencies to help get rid of that DI'd vibe. Nicholas Rowland
In jazz big bands, popular during the 1930s and 1940s, the guitarist is considered an integral part of the rhythm section (guitar, drums and bass). They usually played a regular four strums to the bar, although an amount of harmonic improvisation is possible. Freddie Green, guitarist in the Count Basie orchestra, was a noted exponent of this style. The harmonies are often minimal; for instance, the root note is often omitted on the assumption that it will be supplied by the bassist.
Another great option if your budget for an acoustic is $500 or less is the BG 40 from Blueridge. It has a sitka spruce top with mahogany back and side. It features scalloped bracing for a clean and crisp tone. Owners describe it’s tone as loud and bassy, and compared the neck width to that of an electric. This could be a plus for those with smaller hands. This guitar also features a bone and nut saddle and East Indian rosewood fingerboard for smooth playability. Based on customer feedback, this is a great budget choice that won’t let you down.
Marr, once a member of Electronic with Bernard Sumner of New Order and Neil Tennant of Pet Shop Boys, has played on a number of records and contributed to numerous other high-profile projects, including his recent stint in Modest Mouse. This weekend, Marr returns to Denver in support of his debut solo album, The Messenger, and in advance of the show, we spoke with the charming and intelligent guitarist about how he got the sound for "How Soon Is Now?" and his signature model of the Fender Jaguar.
"Guitarists frequently ask me to recommend a gig-worthy combo that sells for less than a thousand bucks," wrote Guitar World's Chris Gill in the May 2017 issue. "The question is never quite that simple though, as players often stipulate that they need great clean tones with plenty of headroom and that work well with pedals, a solid overdrive/distortion channel that really projects on stage, and really good reverb would be nice, too. While there are a few amps on the market that meet those requirements, the new PRS Sonzera series has jumped to the top of my list of recommendations."
The Ace Frehley (KISS) signature model, released in 1997 and re-released in 2012, has three humbucking DiMarzio pick-ups, a cherry sunburst finish (AAAA), a color image of Frehley’s face in his Kiss make-up on the headstock, and mother-of-pearl lightning bolt inlays, and Ace’s simulated signature on the 12th fret. There was a limited edition, Gibson Custom Shop run of only 300 guitars that were built with DiMarzio PAF, Super Distortion, and Dual Sound pickups. The production run model was only built with DiMarzio Super Distortion pickups. This was one of Gibson’s best selling artist runs. These guitars are now valued at between $US4,000–12,000.[citation needed]The more recent 2012 “Budokan” model features mother-of-pearl block inlays (no signature at the 12th fret), a Richlite fingerboard, Grover machine heads with pearloid banjo buttons, and a grade A maple top.[44]
You’ll need to get yourself setup with an account on some of the web stores selling components such as effects pedal specialty stores listed above, and some general component stores such as Mouser and Digikey. AMZ provides a list of the components required for each project. Make sure you check carefully the component requirements such as type of capacitors. Many components may have suitable electrical values but different physical layouts, so use the datasheets for your chosen component. Measure the spaces and holes on your PCB to make sure the components will fit. Remember that you’ll also need an enclosure in which to install the finished circuit and don’t forget things such as knobs, battery holders etc.

Here’s an interesting (they’re all interesting to me!!!) guitar that shows the evolution of Matsumoku made guitars.  Even the earliest solid body electrics that came out of the Matsumoku plant were made of solid wood and displayed really good wood craftsmanship!  Lots of start up companies went to Matsumoku in the early days because the plant had proper wood drying facilities (if the wood wasn’t dried properly, the guitars often became seriously messed up during the import trip across the ocean).

Size & Weight: If the multi-effects pedal will stay in one place at all times, then perhaps size and weight is not a big deal. However, one of the biggest selling points of a unit like this is its portability. If you need to gig with it or simply take it to a friend’s house, make sure you’re fine with its dimensions. The good thing is that a manufacturer like Line 6 makes several versions of the same basic pedal. The Line 6 M13 is a great unit, but if you need it to be more compact you can opt for the M9, or smaller yet the M5.
For me, the hardest part of mixing is getting the vocals to sit properly. There are a lot of tricks you can apply that can help, but I think one of the most useful is to send the vocal to a bus and insert a compressor there, with a high ratio of around 10:1 or more. Set a low threshold, and a medium attack and release, then, in the next slot, load a distortion plug-in with a warmish sound. Use high- and low-pass filters, set to around 100Hz and 5KHz respectively, and mix a small amount back in alongside the lead vocals. You don't need to add much — it should be almost 'subliminal' — but it can really help to fit the vocal in the track. Nicholas Rowland
Today, if you shop around, you can pick up the Martin D-200 Deluxe for a mere $119,999, but if that doesn't suit your style you can always go for the Martin D-15M which we announced as the highest rated acoustic guitar between $1000 and $2000 in October 2016, or the Martin DCPA4 Rosewood which we announced as the highest rated acoustic-electric guitar in the same price range at the same time.
What equally contributes to the Entourage’s place on our list of the best acoustic-electric guitars is its nuanced and bright acoustic sound. This signature tone comes courtesy of a select pressure-test solid cedar top and wild cherry back and sides. The electronics on this model are easy to use and compact, highlighted by a pewter plate giving the entire package a stylish appearance.​
Description: Guitar Type: Bass - Bass Type: Electric Solid Body - Body: Alder - Top Wood: Maple - Flamed - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Attachment: Bolt - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Nut Width: 54mm - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 24, Medium - Inlay: Abalone - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 34" (86cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge: Mono-Rail IV - Cutaway: Double - Hardware: Black - Circuit Type: Active - Pickups: Bartolini Humbucker - EQ/Preamp: 3 Band - String Instrument Finish: Amber
A very useful way of creating space for guitars in the final mix is to use tunable high-pass and low-pass filters to remove extreme frequencies that do nothing to enhance the guitar tone, but invade the space of other instruments that do perform in those areas. Generally speaking, it’s worth losing everything below 80Hz, although it’s not unusual to set the filter a good degree higher. Shaving off some high end may also be useful to help place the guitar in a specific area of the audio spectrum. Filter at the mixing stage, as the sound of the recording will often determine the optimum filtering points.
This is a rare bird. Its a early ibanez maxitone 994. It has a huge neck but plays pretty great! It has that classic MIJ tone. I can include a new Gator case for $50 extra! The neck and frets are good! The electronics are a little dirty. Ill clean them the best i can, but i thoughtit worth mentioning. It is functioning as it should be just a little dirty!
The Ampeg Bassamp Company, founded in 1949 by Everett Hull, responded to the growing demand for electric bass equipment by producing a line of bass amplifiers. Ampeg bass amps were widely used by electric bass guitarists in the 1950s and 1960s. The first bass amplifier offered by Ampeg was an 18-watt model with a single 12" speaker and a rear ventilation port called the Super 800. In 1951, they introduced a 20-watt version with a 15-inch speaker. In 1960, they introduced the B-15 Portaflex, a flip-top 25-watt tube bass amplifier with a single 15" speaker. While the Ampeg Portaflex had a pleasing bass tone, and was used by studio bassists such as James Jamerson and Carol Kaye, it was not powerful enough to be used in a stadium or arena concert.[3]
A Customer brought this guitar into us in horrible shape. He had stored this guitar in the basement for a number of years with no issues, however in the fall of 2007 a large flood swept through our area filling his basement, and in turn his guitar, with water for almost a week. Needless to say, by the time he was able to get the guitar out it had been heavily damaged. When he brought this guitar into us it was completely covered in mud and river residue, the electroics were completely shot, and the hardware had begun to oxidize. We began by completely taking apart the guitar. We thoroughly cleaned each part of the guitar, inside and out. Once completed we were actually able to save all the original hardware from the guitar and the finish had withstood the flood. The electronics had to be completely replaced however. Staying true to the guitar we used as much era specific parts as we could find. As you can see, by the time we were done with the guitar you could hardly tell anything had happened to it!
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First of all build quality. CTS's sturdy casings, brass shafts and contact patch, solid connections are second to none, and importantly are precision made by a company who have been doing so for a long long time. Fitting a well made pot will mean you'll likely only need to do it once in that guitar, that's important I feel! There are however a lot of different variations of CTS pot, and that is why I now only swear by the 450 Series, and 'TVT' Series, both are constructed with the same components, I like consistency here! Which is why you'll only find these models of pot in my harnesses. I've seen some lower quality series' of CTS pots that have been wildly inconsistent, which I'll get to next..
Vox Amplification Ltd. has been owned by Korg since 1992. Korg revived the tube rectifier and alnico speakers for their version of the AC30 in what is considered the most faithful version of the amp produced for many years. Korg have also used the Vox name for a new range of digital modelling amps. In 2005 manufacturing was moved to Vietnam, including a yet-newer redesign of the venerable AC30, designated the AC30CC, which has now been superseded by the AC30C2. A hand-wired, heritage version, the AC30H2 (and the wooden cased AC30H2L) were also produced. The AC30CC and AC15CC were later replaced with the AC30C2 and AC15C1 which had solid state rectification and a revised chassis. In 2010 Vox released a Hand-Wired version of the AC30 and AC15 with turret board construction, valve rectification and a choice of Celestion Greenback or Alnico Blue speakers. In 2011 a Hand Wired version of the AC4 was also released. Less expensive consumer versions of the retro AC4 have been marketed in recent years as well: various sizes of AC4TV.

Here we have a well preserved vintage Hohner HW600n HW for Hohner Western Acoustic Dreadnought Martin D35 Style acoustic guitar. with a gorgeously grained THREE Piece Mahogany back and sides WoW its really a beauty. Workmanship Fit and finish quality is excellent this guitar is stunning, previously set up and is Great sounding in near mint like condition its from the late 80’s early 90’s D35 Look alike, Spruce top with Mahogany Neck and some of the absolutely highest grade Mahogany your going to see its flamed and figured and has fire and looks as if it could be Koa but listed as Mahogany at any rate this is one of the nicest models Hohner in this era truly a stunner,,, its in top structural shape as well its neck angle is excellent at 1-11/16ths at the nut its medium profile neck is very easily played and is a convertible c shape… We were impressed with her sound to with nice volume and a mature sounding tone. We think you’ll like this beautiful Vintage Hohner as well we believe this to be late 1980’s to early 90’s made in Korea and would fool any made in Japan fan for its fit and finish workmanship this is a good vintage guitar in its own right… no cracks no repairs no issues no excuses someone is going to have a smile on their face. any questions or to buy this guitar contact Joe at: JVGuitars@gmail.com .


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Chrome ES-335 diamond trapeze tailpiece. This is a short version of the standard ES-335 style tailpiece which was also used on many arched top instruments. Overall length of Tailpiece not including hinge = 3 1/8 inches. Side to Side width at bar = 3 9/32 inches. Width of string bar = 47/64 inches. String Spacing at Bar = 1 61/64 inches. Important Hinge/Mounting Specs: Mounting Area of Hinge length = 1 1/2 inches. Mounting Area of Hinge Width - 2 inches. Mounting hole location bottom center = 11/32 inch from bottom edge Two Mounting hole locations from side edges = 5/16 inches. Two mounting hole locations Apart from eachother = 1 25/64 inches. Upper side of hinge length = 1 1/8 inches. Upper side of Hinge width = 1 25/64 inches.
After a peak in the 1970s, driven by the use of several high profile players, another lull occurred in the early 1980s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray and Buddy Guy in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.[citation needed] Yngwie Malmsteen is known for playing a Stratocaster in the Neo-Classical genre.
Description: Body: Nato - Body Construction: Solid - Neck Attachment: Neck-through - Neck Wood: Maple - Neck Construction: 3 Piece - Fingerboard: Rosewood - Frets: 20 - Inlay: Dot - # of Strings: 6 - Scale Length: 25" (64cm) - Headstock: 3+3 - Bridge Construction: Rosewood - Cutaway: Single - Hardware: Chrome, 1x Volume Control, 1x Tone Control, Kluson Tuners - Pickups: Harmony - String Instrument Finish: Bronze, Black

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It seems like Taylor have been around forever, but compared to most big name acoustic guitar brands, Taylor are a relative newcomer on the scene having been founded by Bob Taylor and Kurt Listug in 1974. They started out as an acoustic guitar company and that is their primary focus to this day and are now renowned the world over for the tone and quality of their instruments..
At some point, I'm guessing near the end of the Buegeleisen & Jacobson ownership-era, a few hollow and semi-hollow body guitars were sold. They shared some of the hardware and necks of the 7-800 series guitars but had symmetrical bodies and no tilted pickup. The bodies resembled the Gibson ES-335 and ES-175T. They appeared to be equiped with humbucking pickups. I'm not following those, but I'd love to have that 175T copy. See the very end of the Varieties page for some photos.
Some acoustic guitars, regardless of the body style, feature a cutaway in the upper bout to allow players to more easily reach the higher frets on the guitar neck. Phil Keaggy, a prolific and highly celebrated American guitarist, usually uses an acoustic guitar with a cutaway. If you plan to play leads on your acoustic, or are used to playing an electric guitar, you may prefer a guitar body with a cutaway.
ESP Is simply the best brand you could ever use, from it’s awesome quality ESP too their good quality/price realtion with LTD. You can use an LTD distressed series for playing classic rock, for blues also, and the Xtone series make their work too, and from their LTD standard and deluxe series to their ESP standard and signature series for the best and widest range of metal you could ever imagine, with them you can from Black Sabbath or Ozzy Osbourne, to Metallica and Children of Bodom. (Kirk Hammett, James Hetfield, Alexi Laiho, Henkka, Michael Paget, Gus G, Tom Araya, Jeff Hanneman and almost any japanese guitar and bass player that is considered good [Seriously, without exagerations or lying] endorses ESP guitars and basses).
The Omen line is made for everyone, but perhaps leans just slightly toward the shredding crowd. This guitar features a maple bolt-on neck which features a rosewood fretboard with pearloid inlays. The inlays are a nice touch at this price, if you’re into that sort of thing. The pickups are Schecter Diamond Plus humbuckers and offer a well-balanced tone that can also be aggressive when needed. Twenty-four jumbo frets means this is good for speed.
Wiring: If you chose the optional snap together wiring, then all of our instruments come pre-wired and pre-soldered, so that you can assemble the instrument without needing to do any soldering. You simply snap a few connectors together to complete the electrical connections before you screw down the pickguard, control panel, and output jack plate. This is detailed on the guitar kit wiring and hole drilling description page. If you would prefer to not have your kit pre-wired and pre-soldered, please let us know.

The amp has the usual basic controls: Volume, Bass, and Treble, plus a Gain knob that adjusts the amount of distortion. Once you start turning some of the Champion 20’s other knobs, all sorts of additional tonal possibilities arise. The Voice knob accesses simulations of different amps: Tweed (1950s-era Fender amps heard on early R&B records such as “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” and “In the Midnight Hour”), Blackface (mid-1960s Fenders, often used by Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughan), British (reminiscent of the classic Vox amps used by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and U2), and Metal (somewhat like the sound of the Marshall amplifiers favored by rock and metal players from Jimi Hendrix to Slash). Each of these four simulations has three different variations that alter the tone a bit.
In the eighties, the Sonic Youth leader emerged as indie ­rock's premier guitar radical, mixing strange drone tunings, jamming screwdrivers or drumsticks under his strings, and blasting out feedback-swirled punk jams. Thurston Moore influenced a generation of noise­heads, from grunge rockers to shoegazers. Neil Young once said that if Sonic Youth wanted to record with him, "Hell, I'd be there."
TASTING NOTES: When you add a second speaker, tones acquire texture and detail due to the phase cancellations between speakers. Tones also get more diffuse, with rounder highs and softer focus. Note how the 4x12 Marshall configuration has a muscular low-mid thump that the Fender configurations lack. That’s due in part to the closed back of the Marshall cab.
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When you are also tracking a close mic at the same time, you might try variations of the approaches discussed in the sections above on distant-miking or ambient-miking to get a little or a lot more room sound into the brew. This often will capture the best overall sound for a range of musical styles – the close mic delivers punch and plenty of midrange grind (depending on mic choice), while the distant mic – placed from about 12″ away to several feet – adds depth, dimension, and the natural reverberation of the space. After careful consideration for both mic placements (using the “position, listen, re-position” techniques discussed above to find ideal on-the-track sound from each mic), some skill in the mixing process is also often required to make the most of any multi-mic setup. The discussion about phase alignment in the sidebar (“Correcting Phase Issues”) is often a big part of this post-tracking approach to maximizing multi-mic techniques, but also be aware that you can use whatever proportional blend of the two tracks works best, a variety of effects and dynamic treatments on each track, and whatever panning of the pair best suits your overall mix, from dead-on together to any different pan of each within the stereo field.
Yes, he wears a KFC bucket on his head and a Michael Myers mask on his face, but he's a genius. Buckethead (real name Brian Carroll) plays every style, from country to death metal. Albums like 'Monsters and Robots' and 'Population Override' are must-haves for any aspiring guitarists, and instrumentals like 'Nottingham Lace' and 'Too Many Humans' take some beating. - Floods
The ultimate rock/metal electric guitar instrument is here! Shreddage II covers the entire range of lead AND rhythm playing – every fret, every string, and tons of articulations. A powerful interface allows for easy playing and deep customization. With the included Kontakt Player and ReValver HPse, you’ll have everything you need to SHRED. Now includes Shreddage 2X update!
The SSL-10 had become the SSX-10 ($387), with humbucker/single/single pickups, pretty much the same. This came with jumbo frets, a satin-finished neck and a 14 degree backward pitch on the head. The rosewood ‘board now sported the “wave” or triangular wave inlays popular on Kramers, Charvels and Jacksons of the period. No mention is made of vibrato, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t have a tradition-style unit. Colors were now Carrera midnight blue, metallic black, purple burst, dark red, white pearl and blue pearl, all with chrome hardware.
The Ibanez Artcore AS53 is a semi hollow-body guitar created for guitar players from diverse genres as blues, country, rock and jazz. The guitar feels nice and has a compact and comfortable body. The tone is rich, warm and full. If you are looking for that fat hollow body sound, this guitar makes it possible to switch from jazz to every semi-hollow rocking style of music. A combination of quality and affordability.
Hohner Musikinstrumente GmbH & Co. KG is a German manufacturer of musical instruments, founded in 1857 by Matthias Hohner (1833–1902). Hohner is identified especially with harmonicas and accordions. The Hohner company has invented and produced many different models of instrument, particularly the modern melodica, and most of the harmonicas used by professionals. The company also makes kazoos, recorder flutes, melodicas, banjos, guitars, bass guitars, accordions, and ukuleles (under the brand name Lanikai), along with its one million harmonicas a year.
I keep coming back to this point because it’s absolutely essential: learn how to solo over chords. I don’t mean simple chord arpeggiating, even though that has its place, too. If you can follow the chord changes with smooth, soulful playing, you will never be fenced in. You can drop into any style, any band, and any situation. Most of us get stuck playing a given scale pattern for years before something shakes us up. Make this the foundation of your learning with this book.
The wah-wah pedal is one of the most identifiable of all guitar effects, yet is one of the most simple as well.  An easy way to think of it is that you have a tone knob under your foot.  It is literally just that.  A rocker foot pedal allows you to accentuate high frequencies when your toes are down.  When you put your heel down, you accentuate the bass frequencies.
The PRS McCarty 594 features a double cutaway body style. It has an African mahogany body with a figured maple 10-Top and gloss nitrocellulose finish. The neck is mahogany and is topped with a bound dark rosewood fretboard with a 10-inch radius and iconic bird inlays. The neck sports a new Pattern Vintage neck shape, which is as wide as the standard Pattern neck profile but with just a little extra thickness and a slightly asymmetric carve.
• How frets influence action: This is generally a matter of taste, technique and wear. Some players who find they are encountering resistance when they bend strings may need larger frets. If notes sound buzzy or imprecise, the culprit may be too-low frets. On the other hand, frets that are too high can prevent proper intonation. But raising a guitar’s action may be a cheaper solution to correcting the latter problem than a fret replacement.
I've had an Ovation Celebrity for over 5 years. Great action, wonderful sound with or without an amp. Stays in tune. Play anything from classical to rock. The Ovation can do it. The sound is unique, so making it your only guitar may not work if your in a band. If you're a beginner, the string tension is really low so it's easy on your fingers. It is a hollow body accoustic, but it plays like an electric. I've owned and still own several guitars. This is the one I reach for the most.
Marshall Chess assembled in his words "the hottest, most avant garde rock guys in Chicago" for the album sessions consisting of Pete Cosey (lead guitar, later with Miles Davis) Phil Upchurch and Roland Faulkner (rhythm guitar), Louis Satterfield (bass) Gene Barge (tenor sax), Charles Stepney (organs) and Morris Jennings (drums). Since Muddy wasn't as accustomed to this style, he only contributed vocals, but he still played an essential part in this recording. Electric Mud (1968) was mostly recorded in live takes with few overdubs and that off-the-cuff live feel that's captured on it makes it stronger. On the opener, "I Just Want To Make Love to You," pounding drums and Cosey firing out raw screaming guitar grabs your ear with Muddy's confident singing pushing the music along. The solo on this song is nothing short of phenomenal. The guitar starts playing some distorted melodic notes then morphs into this gigantic screeching feedback riff becoming louder and wilder then continues to morph from a tearing solo until it reaches this intense mind-bending groove that sounds on the brink of collapse. At this point, the guitar cuts out, leaving you breathless, with just drums and Muddy's voice building up back to the verse, then with an out-of-your-mind guitar and organ playing off each other to the end. The next song, "Hoochie Coochie Man," begins with an incoming guitar sound and has the opposite feel of the last track. Muddy's vocals seemingly come out of the speakers at you as alternating lines come from the left and then right, giving the listener a disorienting acid-like effect. A liquidy sounding guitar that washes over like a wave accompanies the verse and changes into an expressive wah-wah lead on the chorus. There's a great, fun cover of "Let's Spend The Night Together" which the Stones must have taken as a huge compliment, having their idol cover one of their songs. Muddy and the band turn it, around making it appear like he wrote it with a big mean sounding back melody, soulful distorted guitar lines and Muddy's commanding voice sounding the way he might have sung in a club in Chicago. "She's Alright" has a trippy beginning with bass notes fluttering up then swaying back down to open up to smash your head against the wall along with crashing cymbals matched by a dirty guitar that has real spirit to it. The song makes great use of cross-overs with a screeching guitar bouncing back and forth between speakers and then somehow transforms and ends with a pleasant distorted instrumental version of "My Girl." Original material was also written for this record like "Tom Cat" and "Herbert Harper's Free Press News," with the latter as a vaguely topical song about the sixties with lines like "world is moving much too fast" and "where ya gonna run to, where ya gonna hide" and a fuzzed out guitar that parallels the confusion and outrage of the lyrics. "The Same Thing" closes Electric Mud with a slow heavy blues feel to it and a stretched out, aching guitar on top.

Unfortunately, there is no single unified format used for Ibanez serial numbers. Ibanez guitar production is outsourced to several companies and facilities through the world and the numbering schemes are different in each region and/or factory. The information on this page is culled from several sources both on-line and off-line and represents a distillation of the available information. It applies primarily to electric guitars, but some information may also be applicable to acoustics.

Filters can also be sweeping filters controlled by a wah-wah pedal. Wah-wah pedals are a foot controlled pedal that kind of looks like a car’s gas pedal. As you press the pedal forward, the filter moves to the lower end of the the sound spectrum, leaving the mid- and high-end sounding more pronounced. As you bring the pedal back, the high end is filtered, leaving a muffled sounding guitar tone.
Free to use schematics to get started can be had from the web but remember, if you are going to use someone else’s work, either completely or as a starting point for your own design, check first to see what copyright and any other terms are associated with it. If it’s not clear, ask first. There are plenty of open source designs available to use, but schematics, like other written works are covered by copyright law so check you have permission before using them.

The good people at Cordoba, therefore, sought to make a Spanish-style guitar with the traditional sound of a Spanish guitar, but the slimmer body and slightly narrower neck of a steel-string. They also added in a Fishman-Presys module for switching the guitar from an acoustic sound to an electric (including a built-in tuner), hence the “Fusion” in the model name.

Here is one electric guitar that has all the incredible features expected from an electric guitar. In terms of vibe and clarity of sound, this guitar is a jewel to have. The Gretsch G5422TDCG Electromatic Hollow Body Electric Guitar is a snow crest white guitar which features a laminated top, including at the neck, back and sides of the instrument.

Directional mics, such as cardioids and figure-of-eights, exhibit different frequency responses off axis — broadly speaking, off-axis sounds tend to be duller, although it's a complex effect which is different for each model. Professional producers are well aware of this, and employ the effect to refine their sounds. For instance, Chuck Ainlay comments "I'll usually start with a [Shure SM57] on the amp; but not straight on axis with the middle of the speaker; it's usually off-centre, angled towards the middle of the speaker and generally just off the grille." Jay Graydon refers to a fairly similar setup: "I position the mic about one inch left of the edge of the speaker-cone centre, using a 22-degree angle, and about one inch back from the grille cloth." Andy Johns, on the other hand, has said that "the miking technique I used on electric guitars for years was two [Shure SM57s], one straight on, and one at 45 degrees. Put 'em together, and it always works."
There are literally hundreds of potential models we could show you, including a wide range from Martin themselves. But, as an example, we’ve chosen to share this rather attractive number called the Martin 00-18V. This guitar is a great demonstration of the top end of the price range, and features a host of show-stopping additions. Martin has great pedigree in the world of acoustic guitars – more on that later – and the Songwriter Deluxe is a great yardstick against which other dreadnoughts can be measured.
A direct line can be drawn from “Rumble” to “My Generation,” “Anarchy in the U.K.” and “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” The song is often credited as the origin of the power chord, but it also heralded the transformation of rock from the music of youth to the soundtrack of juvenile delinquency. Several radio stations banned “Rumble” because they thought it was too sexy, raunchy and violent. Wray even dressed like a juvenile delinquent, embellishing his greasy black pompadour with a leather jacket, jeans and shades at a time when most white rock and rollers still took fashion cues from Perry Como and Bing Crosby.
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