Ibanez is one of the first Japanese musical instrument companies to gain a significant foothold in import guitar sales in the United States and Europe, as well as the first brand of guitars to mass-produce the seven-string guitar and eight-string guitar. The company has an impressive lineup of products ranging from instruments to pedals and accessories.
The Teisco J-1 was a natural maple-topped guitar with a single pickup near the adjustable wooden bridge, a large affair with a metal cover with six slots parallel to the strings and two round bulbs on either side, very space-age! The stop tail was probably rounded, allowing strings to pass through the body, and was covered with a square metal plate. A small pickguard sat between the pickup and the neck. A volume and tone control sat on another little piece of plastic down on the lower treble bout. Knobs were white plastic knurled with a silver ring around the top.
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The Epiphone G-400 features a mahogany body and neck and a rosewood fingerboard. It has Alnico Classic PRO™ pickups with coil-splitting on both pickups via a push/pull control on the pickups’ volume controls which gives you a lot of tonal variety. If you want to nail it like Angus Young, Eric Clapton in his Cream days or Tony Iommi from Black Sabbath, the PRO gives you the sound of a true SG without the vintage price tag.
Hybrid picking is a technique that makes use of both the pick and the remaining pick hand fingers. On the surface, it’s more versatile than playing with just with a pick. Digging deeper, you’ll learn hybrid picking has the same, yet different mojo than fingerpicking as well. At the end of the day, this technique is a very powerful one that will enable you to play things that would be otherwise impossible. Be it oddly accented phrases to wide interval licks to more intricate chordal ideas, hybrid picking opens up in credible options.
From Clean to Modern, chose from 8 amp settings, four modulation effects and four delay/reverb effects, with tap tempo. Its Hi-Fi sound can be sculpted by a three-band EQ, giving it a lovely spacious sound distribution; and special off-stage circuit gives it excellent overdrive qualities even at low, discreet volumes. Finally, its sleek designer looks will fit into any living space, especially with its soft tube glow.
AMAZING. Awesome place. Will NEVER go anywhere else for guitar work again. I am sitting in the parking lot of this place writing this on my phone, THAT'S how good of an experience I had. I wanted the action lowered on two acoustics and a strap button put on. I called 6 different places around town, each one quoting me prices ranging from $50-$60 for the setup (action adjustment) and another $10 for the strap button. I called Franklin Guitar and Repair and was quoted at $25-$30 for the setup and $5 for the strap button. What a steal! So I took both guitars. He looked at one and said all it needed was minor adjustments, which he did right then and there for free. The other, he kept overnight to adjust and add the button. I picked it up today. $15 TOTAL. What a wonderful person, awesome shop, honest, quality people. And for a steal. Cannot recommend enough!
Anyone who wants a guitar that can handle both the expected twang and bluesy yield of a traditional Tele, along with the hard rock and punch of humbucking pickups will find a rather ideal companion in this guitar. I like it for studio guitarists in particular since it gets you a professional brand along with a wide range of tone capability that can help you be more accommodating to clients.
Tonewood (basswood, mahogany, alder...) doesn't matter in an electric guitar unless you're getting ancient pickups for it. Older pickups used to act more like microphones and picked up sound resonating from the guitar body as well as from the strings. Modern technology has fixed that so the sound comes purely from the strings. Most guitar companies that market their guitars for tonewood are guitar brands that have been around since the times of these ancient pickups and based their marketing off of it. Most of them still haven't changed it. I recently read a scientific breakdown (experiment, analysis and all) that thoroughly proved the tonewood debate pointless once and for all. Every variable was accounted for-only tonewood was changed. So, don't worry about the basswood; it could be made from the least acoustic material on earth, and the pickups would give you the same sound as they would have on a different guitar material. I've spent months researching this in depth. (I play, too.)

Drummers have their cowbells and double bass pedals, vocalists have their harmonisers and auto tune. We guitarists, however, are the luckiest: we get effects pedals. Ranging from subtle slap-back echoes to wild and crazy ring modulators; from simple boost pedals to drive your amp a little harder to insane distortion stomp boxes, we can have it all.


Other artists, such as George Benson, John Lennon, and the world renowned B.B. King would use the instrument to its fullest capability to produce a clean, bright, woody tone reminiscent of fully hollow guitars, while being able to provide the volume levels to perform in much larger concert halls without the inherent issues known with fully hollow body guitars.
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And on that (low) note, I’ll wrap up. While many bass parts nowadays are probably laid down with samples and synths, by keyboard players and guitarists, what you’ll get from a real bassist is more than just his sound, it’s the magic in his fingers, and his bass-players’ sense of just what to play to perfectly complement the song—it’s certainly worth a little extra effect to take advantage of what the true masters of the low-end have to offer.

I purchased this about 8 months ago (it is my first acoustic guitar) so I could learn to play again, I'm a singer by trait, but wanted to pick up a guitar again after a very long break. I did not want to spend a lot of money, but I didn't want junk either, while at the same time I wanted something that would translate well into performing live too. I did my research, and personally, it came down to this or the Yamaha APX-500 (But I really want the Mrk 1 not 2), so I settled for this.

The Ibanez JEM77WDP Steve Vai Signature guitar features a rosewood top on a mahogany body. The maple and walnut neck with a slim Wizard neck profile is topped with a 24-fret rosewood fingerboard with jumbo frets and Tree of Life vine inlays. This model also has a striking wooden pickguard and matching headstock, as well as wooden control knobs, earning it the nickname “Woody.”

In 1957, president Sydney Katz introduced the Gold “K” line of archtop and solid body electric guitars[14] to compete with major manufacturers like Fender, Gibson, and Gretsch. The gold “K” Line featured the Jazz Special, Artist, Pro, Upbeat,[18] Jazz II, and Jazz Special Bass. Gold “K” guitars used the same hardware as top manufacturers. However, there were truss rod and neck issues.[citation needed]
Cutting the RATE and DEPTH knobs too high will cause the effect to sound thick and chaotic. This is more so an attribute of the chorus effect in general and not a knock on the pedal itself. With that in mind, we would advise taking Roland's "formal" settings suggestions (pictured below) with a grain of salt, as long as you're using the CH-1 with an acoustic guitar. In most cases, we found that the pedal performed best on the lower settings, particularly with the RATE and E.LEVEL knobs cut before 12 o'clock.

Designed in collaboration with the legendary Guns N' Roses guitarist, this limited-edition Slash Firebird won't last long. After all, as Slash himself says, "Who doesn't want a Firebird?" Limited to a production run of just 900, worldwide, this version of the iconic guitar combines tradition, like the reissue Kluson banjo-style tuners, with some of Slash's signature touches like the Seymour Duncan Slash signature Alnico II pickups and flame maple top. Great for rock and blues, don't miss your chance to snap one of these up. Case sold separately.
Most Gibson guitars feature two humbucking pickups, giving them a very full, clean sound. They are very simple in design, and easy to use with a focus on quality. Maintenance is also easy with Gibsons. Their bridge style places the strings closer together than the likes of Fender or Ibanez guitars, making them slightly different to play. While there is slightly less room for error in finger placement, the strings’ proximity makes them a better fit for small hands and for instrumentalists who need to rapidly navigate the fretboard.

With $500 in your pocket, buying a good amp becomes a lot easier. In fact, it’s probably as expensive as most casual guitarists would ever need to go. This category includes a big choice of both amp heads and combos, solid-state and tube amps. While they make great practice amps, they are all worthy of small to medium-sized gigs and studio recording. For example, you can find the excellent Peavey ValveKing II. This little amp head offers the same beastly tone as the iconic full-size 6505, with 20 watts of power and solid controls.


That day, I learned about the array of amazing things you could do with effects pedals. Sure, guitar is about your hands, but you also have to play with your feet. You have to know when a song needs more distortion, and when a song needs a jangly chorus with reverb. Without effects pedals, you’re painting with only primary colors, you’re singing in only a major key, movie-acting with one emotion. Guitar pedals open up a world for you in music. Of course wonderful music has been made in the time before such magical machines existed, and great music will continue to be made without them as well. They’re just tools after all. But what glorious tools they can be.
An incredible acoustic baby right handed guitar, natural in color without a case. It has a solid wood and Nato fret board that constitutes of 19 frets. It also has an awesome mid range boost, has adjustable truss rods, is light in weight, and is easy to operate, making it suitable for an entry level guitarist. The prices are relatively fair, ranging from INR 9,990. You can get more details on the product by clicking on the following link:
TC Electronic's Hall of Fame reverb pedal is stacked with features and is easily our top recommendation from this list. The first perk is a mode selector that gives you a total of ten different reverb types, in addition to the TonePrint option. TonePrint is TC Electronic's signature feature that allows you to program tones into your pedal designed by artists and popular musicians.
My dad has an old Norma classical 6 string from the 70s.I've been told it was a cheap brand and not especially remarkable,but his is still holding up and still sounds good.It had to have a neck repair many years ago,but still plays well.I'm not sure what the tone woods are.The neck,back and sides are dark,like mahogany,the top is very orange and kind of ugly.
Finally moving over to the flipside, there is a certain issue with the amplifier which I’m not quite able to understand. Don’t get me wrong, it is a very good 10 Amp Amplifier from Hollinger, but somehow you get this buzzing noise when you set it in full volume. At a lower volume however, it sounds just fine. Even the distortion button works well, and helps you work up some pretty cool effects. All other accessories work fine, and aid your growth as a fresh learner.

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Ibanez produces a number of signature series, but none of them even come close to Steve Vai’s JEM guitars. JEM7V is by far one of the most intriguing electric guitars Ibanez has to offer, and in general. It’s performance is legendary, just like the man who designed it. I’ve had a chance to play it once and it completely blew my mind. The thing was built to be an extension of your body, plain and simple.

Finally, we come to our time-based (and space-based) effects group. This includes reverb and delay. Both are forms of the same effect with reverb being a much faster version of delay. All they do is take the input and "smear it out" while reducing the volume over time. Not only does this create an extremely complicated signal that other effects won't react to well, but the variances in volumes these create would further confuse the previous pedals.
Nice 60's, Japanese Hollow-Body. Really cool, "Barney Kessel" style hollow body / Arch top, double cutaway Electric Guitar by Univox. 2-Pick-up. Fabulous Sunburst finish. Bound, Rosewood fingerboard. "Trapeze" tailpiece. Separate Volume and Tone for each pickup and adjustable truss rod. White "Mother-of-Toilet seat" headstock overlay. Finish and wood in great shape. Plays and sounds great. Missing Logo, Pick guard and whammy bar. Not many finish chips. Very shiny. Some chips on plastic pick-up bezel (see photos). Really cool "Emerald" cap on pick-up selector switch. Frets in great shape with minor, normal wear. We have completely done a "Pro" set up on the guitar, including cleaning all the electronics, Re-soldered the output jack, tightening and lubing the machines, oiling the fingerboard, adjusting the neck and action for great playability (clearance at the 9th fret = .012 when fretted at the first and the body), adjusting / checking the intonation (adjusted perfectly!),  and cleaning and polishing. Plays and sounds great. We also installed a new set of .011 "Flat-wound" strings. Dilapidated, but functional gig bag included.
Pyle Pro’s PEGKT15SB package is the next step up. This guitar has more of a vintage feel thanks to its sunburst finish. Like the Silvertone above, it features 3 single coil pickups, two tone knobs, a tremolo bridge system, and a full-scale neck complete with a 22nd fret. Also included in the package is a Pyle Pro gig bag, a small 10-watt amp with cable, 3 guitar picks, a strap, and extra strings.
There are several aspects that make the acoustic guitar different from the electric one. The most notable difference is the fact that the acoustic types do not need a source of electricity or rather they do not have to be plugged in for them to be heard. They are relatively large and are built with a hollow chamber for the magnification of the guitar’s resonance thus giving out sound that originates from the plucked strings. It also has a bridge that is essential for the transmission of vibration of the strings to the body. They are self contained, needing minimal preparation to play. In other words, they are the guitars to be bought by all those looking for simplicity.

This is like an echo where the sound you play repeats either once or multiple times depending on how you set the pedal. At low repeat settings this fills up the sound which is useful if there aren’t many other musicians. With lots of repeats it sounds rhythmic and huge. This effect relies heavily on the speed of the repeats keeping time with the song tempo. With practice it’s easy to set correctly but get it wrong and it can sound like your chords are running away from you.


A guitarist’s or bassist’s effects chain can largely determine the uniqueness of that player’s tone. Perhaps the most common effects pedal is a distortion or overdrive pedal, which either provides a distorting effect or overdrives the guitar’s signal into the amplifier—a tone that is highly popular in many genres of music. Other popular effects pedals include a wah-wah pedal (designed for sweeping a guitar’s tone control), fuzz, delay, flanger, phaser, reverb, chorus, compression, looping and boost. Many guitarists also use an EQ pedal to further shape and customize their sound. With all the brands and effects available at Guitar Center, your effects pedal options are virtually endless.
Now you might be thinking that if you already have amp controls these aren’t worth getting – you’d be wrong. Put every control high up and you have a very effective volume boost for solos at the press of a footswitch. Change the settings around and you can access an entirely different tone immediately, simply because of a shift in EQ. For instance, you could go from a bass-heavy tone for one part of a song to a louder, more trebly tone for another part. The possibilities with EQ pedals are vast, especially if you like to change the character of your tone mid-song.

Reverb is a more subtle form of delay that replicates the natural echo effect of various spaces, such as small, medium, or large rooms or concert halls. Many amplifiers have built-in reverb effects, but a lot of guitar players like having a separate reverb pedal for an increased range of programmable options. Some modern reverb stompboxes emulate the sound of vintage reverb devices that used reverberating springs or plates to achieve their effects. Reverb is great tool to add color to a very clean tone, but can quickly make a heavily distorted tone sound muddy.
I love squire guitars because they are cheap and affordable. I love the fact that I now have a stratocaster so if you think that they suck think again. I can play under the bridge and scar tissue etc on my squire stratocaster honestly for those that can't afford a fender this is the best thing that has ever happened to me because I can now play an electric guitar which is not only good but it is brilliant
I purchased this about 8 months ago (it is my first acoustic guitar) so I could learn to play again, I'm a singer by trait, but wanted to pick up a guitar again after a very long break. I did not want to spend a lot of money, but I didn't want junk either, while at the same time I wanted something that would translate well into performing live too. I did my research, and personally, it came down to this or the Yamaha APX-500 (But I really want the Mrk 1 not 2), so I settled for this.

Adjusting saddle height couldn’t be easier on a Les Paul. Since the bridge can only be adjusted at each end, there is no need to adjust each saddle individually. Firstly check and, if necessary, adjust the low (thick) E string height. Do this by adjusting the height of the bridge at the thick E string end. This is done by rotating the thumbwheel anti-clockwise (counter-clockwise) to raise the bridge or clockwise to lower it. You might be able to do this with just your fingers, but chances are you will need to use pliers. Be careful if you use a tool as it is easy to slip and damage the finish on your guitar. Alternatively you can slacken all of the strings and use your fingers, although this is a very time-consuming process. Finger method


Use of audio feedback to enhance sustain and change timbre. Feedback has become a striking characteristic of rock music, as electric guitar players such as Jeff Beck, Pete Townshend and Jimi Hendrix deliberately induced feedback by holding their guitars close to the amplifier. Lou Reed created his 1975 album Metal Machine Music entirely from loops of feedback played at various speeds. A good example of feedback can be heard on Jimi Hendrix's performance of "Can You See Me?" at the Monterey Pop Festival. The entire guitar solo was created using amplifier feedback.[26]

Late 1938: Scalloped "X" bracing with "rear shifted bracing", where position of the "X" moved further than one inch from soundhole (exact measurement varies, for example: a 1941 D-18 has 1 7/8" distance). So the X-braces were moved about 7/8" further down. And the tone bars were angled more parallel with the length of the guitar and further apart. These late-1938 to late-1944 guitars had deeper scalloped braces than the 1938 and prior forward or advanced braced guitars. This gives the late 1938 to late 1944 Martin guitars improved bass response (don't let anyone tell you that war-time Martins are not as good as pre-1939 Martins!)
For you, the 15W should be fine for a long time to come. It runs about $215.00 retail but I suspect, like me, you can make an offer on one for less than $200. Many dealers put these up on Reverb or Ebay as “open box” or make an offer. Mine was marked open box but was clearly brand new when I got it. I think I paid $189 for my 15W. By far this series was the best value I have ever seen in an amp. I’ve owned several Fender, Vox, Sundown (smaller 5W) and no name amps. This AV series is super nice.

Ovation acoustic-electric guitars are unique, innovative and, for some players, almost addictive! Once you’ve played an Ovation, no other guitar may do. They have a different look and feel than most other acoustic guitars due to their design, which incorporates a wood top with a rounded, synthetic bowl shape instead of the traditional back and sides.
Ideally, a steel string acoustic guitar or an electric guitar would be the best for you if you want to learn to play blues and classic rock. Classical guitar because of its nylon strings and its warm tone is best played by fingers. If you need help in what kind of guitar to buy, check out our article on different kinds of guitars available for beginners, this might help:
Rule 3 - Experimentation occurs within these groups of effects. While these three major groupings need to follow a strict order, the effects within those groups can be toyed with to invent new sounds. For instance, you can apply a reverb to your echo delay or apply an echo to your reverb. But that general group of time-based effects needs to come at the end of your effects chain, regardless.

The original guitar recording preamp was almost certainly the Scholtz Rockman, but within a few years we had several sophisticated competitors (from Sansamp, Groove Tubes and Mesa Boogie) using both solid-state analogue and tube circuitry. These all include speaker emulation of some kind, though usually offer few or no effects. On the whole they are easy to use and some produce excellent results, though they have less tonal flexibility than digital systems designed to model the characteristics of a range of specific commercial amplifier and speaker combinations.


Launch price: £849/€850/$999 | Type: Amp modeller/multi-effects pedal | Effects: 116 | Connections: Input jack, main output (L/MONO, R) jacks, SEND1 jack, RETURN1 jack, SEND2 jack, RETURN2 jack: 1/4-inch phone type - Sub output (L, R) connectors: XLR type - Phones jack: Stereo 1/4-inch phone type - CTL4, 5/EXP2 jack, CTL6, 7/EXP3 jack, AMP CTL1, 2 jack: 1/4-inch TRS phone type - USB port: USB B type - DC IN jack - MIDI (IN, OUT) connectors | Power: AC adaptor
There is no such thing as a best amplifier. It's all about what kind of music you want to play and what sort of sounds are in your head trying to get out. Different amplifiers have different characteristics. Some have amazing cleans, some are known for their heavy distortions, some take pedals very well, some are built trying to be a "jack of all trades."  Only way to know what amp is best for you is to plug in and try them out. Try to "A-B" them,  trying one amplifier and then plugging into another immediately after with the same settings, playing the same thing. It will give you a good idea about how their characteristics differ. If you have favorite pedal effects that you  know that you're going to want to use, make sure you try those two.  Petals can sound quite different going into various amplifiers.
10. Behringer Ultracoustic ACX450 45-watt ($229.99): Not to leave our acoustic-centric players out of the list entirely, the Behringer Ultracoustic not only looks amazing, but it has a ton of features to keep you inspired and sounding great. Two channels are utilized so while you plug your acoustic into channel one, channel two allows you to input a microphone or another source. The FBQ Feedback Indicators allow you to control the feedback coming out of your amp by monitoring the LEDs on the graphic EQ. Need your own guitar effects? The ACX450 allows for 16 different presets on each channel, including delay and reverb. A great bargain for those looking to take their acoustic playing to the next level!
In 1960, Gibson experienced a decline in electric guitar sales due to their high prices and strong competition from Fender’s comparable but much lighter double-cutaway design, the Stratocaster. In response, Gibson modified the Les Paul line. This 1961 issue Les Paul guitar was thinner and much lighter than the earlier models, with two sharply pointed cutaways and a vibrato system. However, the redesign was done without Les Paul’s knowledge. Although pleased with the sound, he asked Gibson to remove his name from the instrument until they fixed a design issue with the neck.[18] This separation occurred in 1960, but Gibson had a surplus stock of “Les Paul” logos and truss rod covers, and so continued to use the Les Paul name until 1963. At that point, the SG guitar’s name was finally changed to “SG“, which stood simply for Solid Guitar. In addition to the SG line, Gibson continued to issue the less expensive Jrs and Specials (and the Melody Makers) with the newer body style. These, together with the Firebird, were the standard Gibson solid-body models until the reintroduction of the Les Paul Standard Goldtop and the Les Paul Custom guitars to the market in 1968.
Most of Peter, Paul and Mary’s work had splendid fingerstyle guitar work. My favorite is “Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”. Paul Stookey also had some fine acoustic work going solo with stuff like “Sebastian” and “The Wedding Song”. “The Wedding Song” was supposedly “must learn” stuff for aspiring acoustic players in the 70’s (so they could play at their friends’ weddings).
Another popular method for keeping that signal strength is by way of a booster pedal which pretty much gives your signal a dose of added voltage in order to avoid degradation. Booster pedals become increasingly necessary when working with a signal chain involving a good number of pedals in order to keep that signal strong by the time it hits the amp, but depending on whether you just want to boost the overall signal strength or the strength of a certain effect, placement becomes important.
Besides insulting Taylor Swift in a way even Katy Perry would bristle at (“Nobody would confuse the pop star’s chops with Bonnie Raitt’s. But she does play a guitar.”), Edgers manages to make it through an entire history of the electric-guitar industry as it stands without quoting more than one female guitar player — the Runaways’s guitarist Lita Ford. Any person who has actually interrogated the music landscape deeper than, say, an Eric Clapton record would recognize that the electric guitar isn’t dying. The throngs of women who play electric guitar just don’t get exalted or celebrated in the same way as aging men. But there are legions of women playing guitar — maybe Edgers just hasn’t been paying attention.

Then there's the issue of valves. Serious guitar players invariably prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to any form of solid-state circuitry, but the technical reasons are not as obvious as you might imagine. We all know that valves distort nicely when driven hard, but the use of output transformers also affects the sound. Then there's the choice of Class-A or Class-B (sometimes referred to as AB) power stages — Class-A stages clip asymmetrically whereas Class-B power stages tend to clip symmetrically. Even the make of valve has an effect, as do technical issues such as the choice of triode or pentode output valves, or even the types of capacitor used in the circuit. Because there are so many variables, not including the most important one (playing technique), the electric guitar is capable of a vast tonal range.
The Effie was also joined by the Coily U1825 guitar and U1835 bass. These were essentially the same except the Coily guitar had a Bigsby-style vibrato, roller bridge with flip-up mute, and a pair of chrome-covered screw-and-staple humbuckers, typical of early-’70s Arias. The Coily bass had similar four-pole screw-and-staple pickups and a fancy trapeze tail with a diamond design on it. These were available in orange sunburst, red and jade green. The guitar cost $122.50, the bass $135.
For players that want to start off purely in the world of metal playing, this Schecter bundle should be right up their alley. The guitar itself has a lovely midnight satin black finish, with ready access to its 24 frets thanks to a generous cutaway. The dual humbucker pickups will put out plenty of power as well, allowing for more extreme styles of music to be played with ease. This particular set skips the accessories in favor of a mere amp, gig bag, and instrument cable, but the quality of the main instrument makes up for the omission of picks and the like.
AmpliTube's effects are as noteworthy as its amp modeling capabilities. The current version comes with up to 51 effects - modeled after rare vintage gear like Ibanez Tube Screamer, Arbiter FuzzFace, MXR Phase100, MXR Dynacomp, Electro Harmonix Memory Man and many more. What sets AmpliTube apart from the competition though is its very intuitive interface. No parameter is more than two clicks away, and its realistic looking graphics are extremely easy to operate - even allowing for drag and drop operations. If you want a quick setup software, AmpliTube is your best bet. Price: usually about $200 - Check out Amazon.com for the latest price and reviews
In high school wood shop class, while other kids were building bookshelves that tilted, coffee tables that bowed, and paddles to smack each other with, Crisler was building a guitar. He later attended the Roberto-Venn school of Luthiery in Arizona and became a guitar researcher at Schecter Guitar Research and continued to enhance his knowledge of the guitar. Later, working for places like Guitar Center and Mars Music, which has since closed its doors, Crisler learned the ins and outs of the guitar, how to quick fix problems, and create solutions for unfixable problems. In the '80s, when Van Halen was touring in support of their album 1984, he had the opportunity to go back stage and repair Eddie Van Halen's guitar. "I thought I was so cool," he says. But he'd finally obtain the right to call himself a "guitar master."
Ibanez is the most important Japanese guitar brand, and this new book tells the story of the electric guitars the company has made since the late 50s. The story tracks the fortunes of Ibanez from its early years as a copier of prime American models to later success as a creator of impressive original designs. The big break came in the late '80s with the launch of Steve Vai's JEM models and the related RG design, which have ensured Ibanez's popularity among metal and extreme rock players. Players include George Benson, Phil Collen, Allan Holdsworth, Pat Metheny, John Petrucci, Lee Ritenour, Joe Satriani, John Scofield, Mick Thompson, and more, many of whom are featured or interviewed for this book. With a gallery of full-color pictures of famous guitars and players, a reference section detailing production years and specifications, and a section covering how to interpret serial numbers. 160 pp.
The actual value of the pot itself does not affect the input to output voltage ratio, but it does alter the peak frequency of the pickup. If you want a brighter sound from your pickups, use a pot with a larger total resistance. If you want a darker sound, use a smaller total resistance. In general, 250kΩ pots are used with single-coil pickups and 500kΩ pots are used with humbucking pickups.
Being by nature rather sceptical, I have to admit to initially dismissing many of the recording methods in this article as 'studio snake oil', and because there was usually too little time during my own sessions to experiment with new ideas, I'd usually end up with an SM57 glued to the speaker grille by default. Taking the time out to trial the above techniques in the studio showed me quite how much I had been missing — not only much better raw recordings, but also tremendous extra flexibility at mixdown. But don't take it from me — listen to the audio examples for yourself and make up your own mind. If they don't expand your recording horizons, I'll eat my SM57...
The effect of amplifier coloration can be emulated using a parametric EQ, where you'll probably find you need to add some upper mid-range boost to get the same brightness as from an amp. Note that, if you're using a software amp modelling plug-in, you'll still get the best results if you feed your guitar via a high-impedance DI box — plugging it straight into a soundcard's line input is likely to result in a drop in level and may even affect the sustain and high end of the guitar sound due to the pickups being loaded by the impedance of the input circuitry. This does not apply to active pickup systems which, in effect, function as a combination of pickup and DI box.

Benefits of this system are fairly obvious. You get to choose which source to use based on the venue you are playing at. Let's say the stage you are about to perform on has a number of large monitors pointed directly at you. In that case, you'd definitely want to stick with a piezoelectric pickup. On the other hand, if there are no monitors around, you can use both or only the microphone. Alternatively you can mike your acoustic guitar with external mics, which is great in isolated situations such as a recording studio.


Similar to the previous model we mentioned, Squier by Fender Bullet Strat represents the Stratocaster beginner family. It’s a guitar full of tradeoffs, but you are rarely going to find a model more capable in this price range. I’ve played a lot of these, and even have one which I use strictly for practicing at home. I like it, even though it’s somewhat limited.
If there is one body shape out there that everyone will recognize, it is this one. In terms of finish, Fender chose a lacquer clear coat to show off the natural wood instead of their usual choice, and it looks pretty awesome (of course there's a 3 tone sunburst and olympic white too). Made of ash, this particular Strat offers a U-shaped maple neck with a maple fretboard that is bolted onto the body. In terms of pickups, we have a set of three single coils belonging to their vintage line. These come with Alnico magnets, giving you that classic tone we all love so much. The hardware follows the canon as well. Here we have Fender's well known synchronized tremolo bridge paired with a set of F tuners on the headstock.
Compressors are available as footpedal controls and can be used as an effect on electric guitar signals, for example. They can be used to obtain greater sustain for a string by setting the gain high and allowing the compressor to keep the output signal at a more-or-less constant level until the natural sustain of the string drops the signal below a certain threshold.

This is an amazing 6 stringed electric guitar from Ibanez that is right handed and comes in a beautiful white color. The body is made from basswood  and kneck of rosewood. It is perfect for anyone to be his/her first guitar regardless of the music. Prices range from around INR 12,124  depending on the prevalent market factors such as whether there are offers or discounts available. You can find more details regarding this model by clicking on the link below:
The 6260 will keep the high-gain crowd happy. The V22 will satisfy anyone looking for a tube combo for rock, blues or country music. The 1960 will meet the needs of players looking for a British-type overdrive, and the 333 will nail those scooped out metal tones you might be looking for. Bugera is definitely worth checking out for players on a budget, or guitarists just looking to build their collection of classic sounds.
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In the 1920s, the earliest combo amplifiers did not have any tone controls. Tone controls on early guitar amplifiers were very simple and provided a great deal of treble boost, but the limited controls, the loudspeakers used, and the low power of the amplifiers (typically 15 watts or less prior to the mid-1950s) gave poor high treble and bass output. This made these early amplifier/speaker systems a poor way for upright bass players to amplify the sound of their instruments.
Mike Hedges also uses this idea a great deal, and explains how it really comes into its own at the mix. "You've got two or three tracks of guitar: one clean, one medium — say, half-driven — and then one really driven. As the song progresses, you might use the nice clean track during the verse, as you're coming to the bridge you fade in the heavier guitar sound, then back it off a bit, into the chorus with everything full on, then back to the next verse and drop it all out. It's all done on one guitar track, so it doesn't sound like you've done 10 guitar overdubs. It has a different quality, it sounds like a live performance, but you've got real dynamics in the sounds. It's a very effective technique."
Leo Fender's work is timeless. This is easily deduced by simply looking at the popularity of both Stratocasters and Telecasters. With that said, Strats are arguably the favorite between the two. A top of the line American-made Stratocaster still costs a bit more than what our budget here is, however, there is an alternative. Fender's plant in Mexico builds great Stratocasters that aren't really behind their American counterparts. You essentially get a near identical performance at a more affordable price due to the stigma. The Fender Classic Series '70s Stratocaster is one such guitar.
It’s big, it’s brawny and it’s bold—the Reverend Jetstream HB represents a ton of value for its price tag. Although it excels in rafter-shaking rock ’n’ roll tones, this offset guitar has a few nifty tricks that make it more versatile. Add to that quality construction and components, and you’re left with one of the best electric guitars under $1,000.

Did I say WoW....your going to love this one...Here we have a VERY rare GREAT FIND and premium example at that this over 35 year old vintage mandolin has absolutely beautiful flamed AAA Fiddle grade Maple to both the back chevron 2 piece & sides .... this piece is simply gorgeous and has an aged & wonderfully grained figured Sitka spruce top this a VERY High Quality. This is a Japanese made Artist grade Mandolin from the prime Japanese Law-suit era ... the very talented Luthiers built this example... this one was made in the mid 1970's at the famous Ibanez factory in Japan this example is cleverly labeled with a beautiful mother of pearl logo then unheard of " CARLO ROBELLI "... This is a Gibson exact REPLICA of the " F Style " MANDOLIN this M-700 M700 ACOUSTIC Mandolin in excellent vintage condition WoW! its so nice dare I say Near Mint...its over 30 years old and has that aged and mellowed tone and has emerged as a great sounding professional quality constructed PRO level beauty that is available for a fraction of what the very same vintage Ibanez or Aria m-700 Logo'ed Mandolin will cost... ( same factory built those to ) same luthiers same materials... as seen with the great original golden plush lined hard shell case.. all & all one of the best sounding & playing mando's available under $1600.00 vintage F style and beautifully flamed & figured Maple ..looks like old school nitrocellulose lacquer but no visible checking cracks but just one short 3" finish check on back and is almost impossible to see... a few buckle mars on back but so faint not threw finish and again almost impossible to see... guard is also in top shape not all scratched up..this baby is in under the bed for 30 years condition it looks more like its one year old condition wise as it is actually 30+ years old...as you can tell the finish has that aged patina and warm appearance of a vintage Mando.. here is a great one w/ its original hard shell case ..WoW! Its being cleaned up now and is looking as new... the guard's glue just came loose so it will get cleaned prepped & re-glued and ready for another 30 years. I will also be restring her with a new set D'Addario strings we have in stock and set her up... she will ring like a sweet bell and be ready to record with or tour. Copy & paste this link to view many new pics of this beautiful Vintage Japanese crafted Mandolin... https://picasaweb.google.com/gr8bids/70sCarloRobelliFMandolin?authkey=Gv1sRgCNbp6p6_1cicsQE#slideshow/5588480984817011186.


While a little on the pricey side, their products are seen as particularly powerful and reliable overall. The H&K Trilogy is well appreciated for its versatility, allowed by the high level of German technology and engineering involved in its construction.  It has easy MIDI control and three channels, a clean, crutch, and lead, all with boost options that give a lot of freedom to musicians who are into experimenting.

To create a fairly live, in-your-face sound, a short reverb or ambience program with a fairly bright character is ideal. A hint of slapback echo or a little pre-delay before the first reflection can enhance the sense of power and intimacy, as when a guitar is played in a small club. More generous reverb can be combined with repeat echo effects to create a lush, spacious sound, but you need to leave space in the instrumentation and arrangements for these sounds to work, otherwise they just sound confused and messy. Feeding the effects send through a chorus or flanger before the reverb gives a nicely complex twist to the sound without being too obvious.


Scott Walker began tinkering with electronics at an early age. In his early teens he began playing guitar and experimenting with pickups. In the Spring of 2001 he attended the Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery.  Following graduation he accepted a job with luthier Richard Hoover, of Santa Cruz Guitar Company. At Santa Cruz Guitar Company his specialty became hand-carving necks, and he also began to take on other responsibilities, including the position of shop foreman. At this time he began developing an electric guitar for the ‘21st century.’ After meeting musician Barry Sless, he began to develop an instrument that had the broadest tonal range available. After five years of R&D he began offering his guitars to the public. During his pursuit to develop an electronic package to incorporate into these instruments, he began working with electronic wizards Peter Miller and John Cutler. This collaboration resulted in the current design now found on all ‘Walker Guitars.’  For more information please visit:  www.scottwalkerguitars.com
The best acoustic electric guitars solve the inconveniences of playing a traditional acoustic in a very preferable way. No longer do we need to play a guitar size and shape we don't enjoy in order to project more volume. We don't have to strum and pick harder. We don't need the nuisance of setting up and staying positioned behind a mic to be heard through the loud speakers. Today we look at how this is achieved and share our top recommendations for every budget...
First Act is a very peculiar guitar company. They have guitars that sell at Toys R Us that will literally fall apart in your hands. They sell pedals that are a complete joke, leaving you with the impression that they must be a bad, bad joke. Then something strange happened, I did a little research and found some info that was stunning. First Act has a couple of guitar lines that are some of the finest guitars I have ever seen, heard, or even read about. They have guitars that go for $3000 plus and are better guitars than any person commenting on this board will ever have the opportunity of even being in the same room with (including myself) Who would have thought?! Go figure.

When two or more speakers are used in the same cabinet, or when two cabinets are used together, the speakers can be wired in parallel or in series, or in a combination of the two (e.g., two 2x10" cabinets, with the two speakers wired in series, can be connected together in parallel). Whether speakers are wired in parallel or in series affects the impedance of the system. Two 8 ohm speakers wired in parallel have 4 ohm impedance. Guitarists who connect multiple cabinets to an amplifier must consider the amp's minimum impedance. Parallel vs. series also affects tone and sound. Speakers wired in parallel slightly dampen[s] and restrain[s] them, giving what some describe as "tighter response" and "smoother breakup". Some describe speakers wired in series (usually no more than two) as sounding "...looser, giving a slightly more raw, open and edgy sound."[26]

Rickenbacker basses have a distinctive tone. The 4001 bass has neck-through construction for more solid sustain due to more rigidity. The sustain at the bottom end is particularly striking, and by routing the two outputs from the stereo “Rick-O-Sound” output, the brighter bridge pick up through a guitar rig and the bassier neck pickup through a bass setup, a particularly distinctive bass sound is produced. The 3000 series made from the mid-1970s to mid-1980s were cheaper instruments with bolt-on 21 fret necks. There was also a set neck4000 version in 1975 and 76 (neck set like a Gibson Les Paul) which had a 20-fret neck, dot inlays, no binding (similar to the 4001S) but only a single bridge position mono pickup. (more info needed)
Want to write blazing leads and screaming solos? Crank the pitch bend up, use one of four vibrato modes, and shred to your heart's content. Need some ultra-chunky rhythm chugs? S2 features both single-note and powerchord palm mutes with up to 5 layers and 8 variations each, offering superior realism and maximum options. While it excels at rock & metal playing (both lead and rhythm alike), it is also well-suited for many other genres thanks to its clean tone and huge range.
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One app I can recommend for playing these SoundFonts on smartphones or tablets is bs-16i from bismark.  Large SoundFount files like Nice-Keys-* listed at the top of this page have been tested and run perfectly on newer iPads with 3gb of Ram or more. For iPads with 2gb (Air2) it is best to limit the SoundFont size to around 600mb. For older devices try SoundFonts around 300mb.
The cool thing about this setup is the EQ bypass feature. In other words, you can completely nullify any effects of the EQ and tap into the raw tone of the guitar. That works great for those who want that authentic tone or to let the mix engineer handle the rest. Overall, this Takamine is rock solid in all aspects. It is a great alternative for anyone who's looking to extract the most out of their money who wants to try something other than a Martin.
Now, in the days of solid state signal processing, outboard units are available to produce a facsimile of the old tube-type distortion. Some units actually incorporate a vacuum tube and do it the old way. Other electronics packages simulate the effect. The "tube-type" distortion is preferrable to many over the kind of distortion produced by solid-state amplifiers because the tubes just gradually rounded over the peaks as they went into distortion, whereas the solid state devices just chop off the tops of the peaks cleanly at the supply voltage point, producing a harsh distortion. One type of distortion device, employed as a distortion pedal, was called a "fuzz box".
The style of music you prefer will greatly dictate the type of guitar you want, so it is safest to stick to the guns (or axes) of your heroes. This way you can get a good and inspiring instrument even when you don't have thorough knowledge of guitar types. For experienced players, you owe it to yourself to understand the pros and cons of different guitar types better, before making big investments. But even then, your preferred style, and the recommendations of experts and professional guitar players that play them will be invaluable.

Based both in Japan and the USA, this Japanese manufacturer produces guitars under different brand names: "ESP Standard," "ESP Custom Shop," "LTD Guitars and Basses," "Navigator," "Edwards Guitar and Basses," and "Grass Roots." Hisatake Shibuya opened his "Electric Sound Product" store in 1975 where he used to sell guitar spare parts. He then started to build his own parts and became a Kramer and Schecter subcontractor. His first signature guitar went to George Lynch (the Kamikaze), while the powerful Gibson Explorer copy designed for metal heads and adopted by a certain James Hetfield (Metallica) became almost as popular as its owner in the late 1980's and early 1990's.
Looking at the front (or top rather) panel of the Boss ME-80 is where it gets interesting. Don’t let the sheer number of knobs intimidate you. Shaping your tone with the ME-80 is a very tactile experience, just like you would if you had a pedalboard full of pedals. The ME-80 is made for the guitarist that doesn’t necessarily want to lug around (or spend money on) a large pedal collection, but still loves the feeling of turning knobs and instantly hearing results. The interface is actually pretty easy to understand. Every major section is surrounded by a white border, and to design a sound (a.k.a. patch) you just move through the sections and set the effects to your heart’s content. We should mention that the Boss ME-80 has 59 different effects and nine guitar preamps which you can use. The first section labeled PREAMP is where you set your amplifier model, and should feel familiar if you’ve ever messed with a guitar amp. Next you have an EQ section, REVERB, COMP, OD/DS, MOD, and DELAY. You can look at the front panel for yourself in a closeup photo to see the various effects available within each of these groupings. The 8 black footswitches along the bottom are what you use to switch effects on and off, as well as move through banks and presets. They’re not your traditional stompbox footswitch, but they feel pretty nice. As is the norm with the larger multi-effects floor units, the ME-80 incorporates an expression pedal, which is assignable to different effects via the knob next to it. Very easy to use, very intuitive.
The Fender Mustang I V2 Guitar Amplifier Combo also features USB connectivity allowing you to hook it up to your computer or DAW software for easy recording. If you don’t already have a DAW, you can utilise the free downloads of Fender FUSE and Ableton Live software suites to create your own music and take advantage of all the great features within the amplifier when recording. An intuitive, easy to use control panel allows you to see and change your sounds and footswitch connectivity (sold separately) ensures you can have complete control without the need for a pedalboard. A fantastic amplifier for beginners and players of all levels.
“Most guitarists learn from records,” says Dr. Andre Millard, a professor at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, editor of The Electric Guitar: A History of an American Icon. “That’s how you learn to play. We learn from the classic records. And those classic records have that classic tone, which is ’58 to ’63.” And quite frequently, Millard points out, the studio had as much an impact on those recordings as anything else. He uses the Rolling Stone’s debut, England’s Newest Hit Makers which was released on London Records in 1964, as an example.
1946 to present: Sitka spruce (darker than Adirondack). The change to Sitka happened on the larger "D" models first (in very early 1946). It took Martin a little while to use up all the smaller pieces of older Adirondack red spruce, hence the change to Sitka happend slower on the smaller body models. This is also the reason multiple piece Adi red spruce tops are sometimes seen on 0,00,000 bodies in 1946.

The specs for this stripped-back Singlecut are identical to PRS's gloss Standards; the difference is in the paint - or, rather, the lack of it. Instead of that faster S2 gloss, here we have a nitrocellulose satin finish that doesn't bother with grain filler - you can easily see the body wood's grain and feel it on the neck - for a thinner finish, which will wear and age the harder you play it. Plus, thin finishes don't choke any vibrations or resonance. Along with the dot-only fingerboard inlays, this Satin Singlecut looks very workmanlike, but the build and parts still deliver the goods. The body is one-piece mahogany, the neck three-piece. The bridge is the USA Stoptail, the locking tuners, like the pickups, made in Korea to PRS specs. The pattern regular neck is a nice mainstream handful, and setup and intonation are, as ever, top-drawer. Mahogany guitars can be dark-sounding and here, yes, there's a throaty midrange focus, but a clean-edged ring and resonance that provides clarity and punch, much like the pickups that nail an almost P-90-ish sizzle and classic-rock poke. The four-control layout means there's plenty of adjustment, and the coil-splits on the tone controls add authentic single-coil cut. Clean, low, medium or high-gain, this one's a banker: the most rock-out, resonant blue-collar PRS we've ever played, and that's why it's one of the best electric guitars, especially at this price point.
Back in the control room, audition each mic, preferably as the guitarist plays along with the other instruments. Listen carefully to how each microphone sounds on its own and, more importantly, to how it works in the mix. Usually, one microphone will come up a winner on the first pass. Don't stop there, however. Instead, leave the "winning" microphone where it is and experiment with the placement of the other two mics. Time-and mic selection-permitting, you may also wish to do a second round of testing with other microphones.
Excellent explanation! One thing that no one has touched on, yet is the physics of the high frequency components (mentioned above). When you clamp a string at both ends and pluck it it will have a fundamental frequency of waving back and forth based on a) it's length b) it's thickness and c) how tightly it's stretched. All wavering strings, though will have additional waverings. These are referred to as overtones. The first overtone will be a doubling of the frequency and the next a trippleing and so forth. Each of these overtone frequencies contribute to the rich, complex sound of the instrument. Here's a good explanation with pictures. Note the location of the frequency nodes in relation to the placement of the pickups.
Certain features make Vintage® guitars a “bigger bang for the buck.” Subtle changes to traditional guitar designs have been made so they perform much better. For instance, on the spring block, the holes are staggered in a way that allows the strings to leave the block and pass over the saddles at a consistent angle that helps keep those strings in tune. Trev also developed tuning keys called EZ-LOK™ that work like a locking tuner, but actually don’t require any mechanical manufacturing. There’s nothing to unwind when you’re slacking the strings using the vibrato, and they always come back to pitch. The same goes for our pickups. Trev doesn’t have a high-dollar pickup range to protect, so he can produce pickups that will sound as good as any company can wind anywhere in the world.
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Like many engineers, I learned the basics of recording guitars by doing live sound and occasional session work. But my "higher education" began when I was hired by a blues/R&B-oriented mail-order record company, and I "had" to listen all day long to recordings from the '40s, '50s, and '60s. No matter how primitive or poor the recording quality on those old discs, I was constantly amazed by the array of exciting sounds produced by electric guitar. Later, when I started recording blues sessions in my own studio, I learned firsthand about the key elements that contributed to the great tones that I'd heard on those classic recordings.
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this is literally the worst piece of cow dung in the industry. I wouldn't even call it a guitar, it's so poorly made. Management, especially the CEO, don't care a bit about quality, the only thing that matters is their unrealistically high production numbers. the production processes are so archaic they are amateur, and they have the audacity to call it the worlds finest guitar. all of this stems from the CEO and his manic psychotic neurotic management style (he has to sign off on EVERYTHING: new hires, transfers within the company, promotions, raises, budgets, any funding for new parts or machines.
Launch price: $4,149 / £2,999 | Body: 3-piece maple/poplar/maple with figured maple top | Neck: Mahogany | Scale: 24.75" | Fingerboard: Rosewood | Frets: 22 | Pickups: 2x MHS Alnico II humbuckers | Controls: 2x volume, 2x tone, 3-way selector switch | Hardware: ABR-1 bridge with titanium inserts and stopbar tailpiece | Left-handed: Yes | Finish: Sunburst
I have made over a hundred solid body electric guitars by hand. I can use the same pickup in a plexiglas, or a wood body, utilizing a wood neck, plugged directly into a tube amp, and they do sound different. There is no way anyone can deny me my personal experience on this. I think whats going on here is the new 3D printer body's that are being pushed for their capability of unusual designs. Nothing wrong there, as i have some of my own designs i am going to try as well. I have a contact that makes aluminum guitars, and they also produce a different sound.
If you've NEVER heard of EZMix for effects, Impact Soundworks Shreddage 2 IBZ or Prominy V-Metal for guitar, or Alchemist Studios Texas Grind for bass, or Impact Soundworks Shreddage Drums for drums, then I would say you're right, (Amplitube 4 is out right now, by the way). You need Kontakt 5.5 for all of this to work though, so if you have this already you need to upgrade.

Compared to building something from scratch, the kits listed here are relatively easy to work with. Still, there are some that require more patience and experience, like those with set-necks and hollow bodies. On the flipside, there are kits that make life easier for you with their no-soldering required electronics and bolt-on necks. It is recommended that beginners go for easier builds, but with so much information available in the internet age, it should not hinder you from getting what you really want - just make sure to be patient and do your homework.
Almost criminally underappreciated, Irish blues rock guitar player Rory Gallagher was arguably the top guitar player of the 1970s. Capable of playing slide guitar as well as anyone that ever existed, he also excelled at blues improvisation. One of his best songs is “Tore Down,” a hard driving blues rock song with a truly tasty guitar riff and inspired soloing. Hopefully, with time, Gallagher will start to get a little more recognition.
The electric guitars have to be plugged in for sound to be produced. A cable and an amplifier are a must for them to produce sound. They are largely dependent on some electronic pickups, having between one and three pickups on their bodies, for them to produce this sound. They are relatively much lighter and have lighter gauge strings when compared with their acoustic counterparts. It is therefore a better option for the small statured or small-handed players. Getting comfortable to hold a guitar or fret the notes is quite physically challenging when working with the acoustic guitars than with the electric types.

For years, Schecter has provided a nice counterpoint to the various Les Paul and Strat look-a-likes on the market (many of which are very good) at an affordable pricepoint. As my local guitar shop owner once said, for the money, they might make the best all around guitar south of $1,000. You can spend more than that, but the point is, they don’t skimp downrange.

“It was just a different world,” Ford says. “There was ‘Don Kirshner’s Rock Concert,’ Ed Sullivan, Dick Clark, and they would have one band on and you would wait all week to see who that band was going to be. And you could talk about it all week long with your friends — ‘Saturday night, Deep Purple’s going to be on, what are they going to play?’ — and then everybody’s around the TV like you’re watching a football game.”
This product was not working and parts were defect. I don't know how some people made it works. The instruction was terrible and seller's wires description photos are more worse. I did not expect much for this little toy. Just piece of the junk. I was tried to return, but the seller said that I had to pay return shipping and he gave me a fake return shipping address.
The Duo-Sonic is a short-scale student model that has become highly prized for its excellent playability and tone, making it one of the best electric guitars for beginner guitarists with cash to spare. This updated model - with its slab alder body, flawless in sparkly Surf Green - features the classic offset Fender waist that gives the series its name. The three-ply white/black/white scratchplate also plays host to a chrome-tipped three-position pickup selector switch and knurled (aka easy-grip) volume and tone knobs servicing two pickups, a neck single coil plus a bridge humbucker. The latter is also coil-splittable via the push/pull tone knob. We've encountered guitars at more than twice the price that don't play anywhere near as well as this thing does. Oh, and it doesn't matter what size your hands are. If we had to use a song to describe the tonal range of the bridge pickup, we'll have Smells Like Teen Spirit, please. A clean setting here echoes the clattering rhythm voice of the song's intro while a fuzz box unleashes a racket not unlike the heavy sound Kurt craved. If it sounds like we're typecasting this guitar then rest assured the Duo-Sonic is versatile enough to handle country picking, surf, indie, classic rock, whatever. Plus, the neck pickup warms things up perfectly for clean or dirty blues lead or jazz chords.
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Talk about sweet... gorgeous exotic Hawaiian woods.... The Beautiful curly Koa wood is so rare it is only found in the beautiful Hawaiian Islands...This example is well over 30+ years old and has mellowed to perfection...Very Clean Original condition WoW!....See the pics This one sounds amazing...talk about fun...I got into the Uke after seeing the Beatles anthology interview footage with George Harrison on Maui at his home had several Ukulele's at his home when company came over usually other pro buddies they would all have one to Jam on....so great footage of George etc....and we go to Maui every year now for the last 7 or so..you see the gorgeous Koa Wood everywhere you go almost...but The Curly stuff like this Uke is Very Expensive, This Uke's neck is arrow straight and is also highly curly & figured.... This one is the REAL DEAL folks and it don't get much better...Made in Hawaii in the 60's...in very good-excellent original condition so light finish checking only adds to the wonderful vintage feel of this great player...no disappointments .
I'm looking for a similar guitar. My first electric in 1969, purchased used for $50.I lost it sometime in the 70's, but still have a picture of it. It was a sunburst finish cutaway violin shaped body with Bigsby type tailpiece and a tunable bridge with a flip up mute bar. The headstock is similar to a Gibson but the neck was thinner.I can't remember how it played or sounded.I'm just looking to replace it for nostalgic reasons. I also recently purchased a Kent Les Paul copy I found on e bay while searching for kenr guitars.I have seen the framed ads but I have yet to find that model.
StepFilter ('Filter' category): I'm a huge fan of Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn processor. When I play with groups like Air Liquide, it's the only gear I take other than the guitar, and of course a MIDI cable to sync it from the band's MIDI master clock. You can get many of the same effects from Cubase's StepFilter.The StepFilter offers synchronised filter effects that recall Roger Linn's AdrenaLinn signal processor. StepFilter is basically a tempo‑sync'ed dual step‑sequencer, each with 16 steps, and there's a total of eight patterns. One sequencer controls filter cutoff and the other resonance. The filter response morphs from low‑pass to high‑pass, with a stop along the way for band‑pass. You can also copy a pattern, paste it into a different pattern, and create variations. All of these parameters, including pattern selection, can be used with VST host automation control. If you're into electronic guitar effects, you really should check this out — but also try the Tranceformer ('Modulation' category) and Chopper ('Other' category), which are similar, although Chopper works on amplitude, and Tranceformer syncs a ring modulator's carrier frequency to the project tempo'
A lot of folks really like Squier guitars. In most cases, I'm not one of them. Fender’s economy guitars (Squiers) are cheap, coming in under $400 (often $200 or less), which can be an attractive option for a first-time buyer. However the price difference between a Squier Strat and a real deal Fender Strat isn’t big enough to make up for the quality hit you take when you buy a Squier.
And you should still be able to take it to a certified Martin repair person. There may be some issue given how long you have had the instrument, however, if there is no evidence of the problem existing when the guitar was new. But it is worth checking out. Martin has changed policy in recent years regarding what voids the warranty and what does not. But if things are as you say, they should have taken care of the issue a long time ago. And they may still be willing to under your warranty. If not, you may be able to find someone who really knows what they are doing to fix the issue – which may require a neck reset, but would be worth it in my opinion. Good luck!

On top of that, the Champion 20 offers built-in effects, including reverb, chorus, flanging, delay, auto wah, vibrato, and tremolo. All of these effects can be chosen using a single knob, with an additional FX Level knob to control the mix of the unprocessed sound with the effect. These effects can’t match the flexibility and adjustability of separate effects pedals—for example, with the exceptions of reverb+delay and reverb+chorus, effects can’t be combined—but they can at the very least give beginners an idea of how these effects work. Many guitarists may find the Champion 20’s built-in effects to be all they need.
I didn’t want to spend much money (I’m a cheap bastard…part of me thinks I could never truly love a 59 Bassman unless I scored it at a yard sale for a hundred bucks. Now, tone matters more than money to me, but I tend to love the tone of crappy amps just as much as high enders, so I’d feel like a stooge dropping that kind of money on an amp. Especially since I play them and would ruin the collectable value of anything by gigging with it).
Yamaha continues to rank highly in the entry to mid-tier guitar market, thanks to their student friendly instruments. I for one took classical guitar lessons with a Yamaha classical that still plays and sound great up to this day. As expected, they have an entry in this affordable price range category, in the form of the 3/4 size JR1, which is essentially a smaller version of Yamaha's popular FG acoustic guitar.

The design of this guitar probably makes it stand out from the “crowd.” This is another awesome six string acoustic guitar from the brand Juarez available in sunburst and black . It is designed for the right handed and mostly comes in Sunburst color without a bag. The body is made from blackwood with the top laminated with Linden Wood. The entire structure has a natural gloss finish, with the fret board having up to 18 frets. The hardware structure has a chrome finish. Prices are quite fair, ranging from INR 2,790. Find more details below.
Negative feedback controls the accuracy of the output stage's reaction to the signal coming from the preamp stage, and reduces distortion at the point where it's fed back into the signal chain. Too much negative feedback causes a sluggish amp response with insufficient attack, while too little negative feedback produces an exaggerated and harsh upper midrange response with an overly aggressive pick-attack sound. The Presence control is thus a useful contributor to the overall tone production of the amp.
Popular music typically uses the electric guitar in two roles: as a rhythm guitar to provide the basic chord progression and rhythm, and a lead guitar that plays melody lines, melodic instrumental fill passages, and solos. In some bands with two guitarists, both may play in tandem, and trade off rhythm and lead roles. In bands with a single guitarist, the guitarist may switch between these roles, playing chords to accompany the singer's lyrics, and a solo.
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